La Salle County IL Biographies
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HIB-HIT

Eleazar Hibbard

Eleazar Hibbard, who married a daughter of Reuben Reed, made a claim on S. 32, T. 33, R. 4, where B. B. Reynolds now lives. He also separated from his wife, and the Hibbard family moved to Sand Prairie, near Hennepin. All the Hibbard men separated from their wives, and all the Hibbard women from their husbands, it is claimed from the influence of the brother from St. Louis; in the words of Darius Reed, "they were always in commotion and trouble, casting up mire and dirt, and never found rest but in the grave." All the Hibbards but one died soon after they left the county.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 257 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Hibbard

Henry Hibbard made a claim on S. 5, T. 33, R. 4, and sold to Disner, and he to McKernans in 1831, and they sold to Ebersol in 1834.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 257 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William Hickling

William Hickling came from England to Ottawa in 1834; married Adeline, daughter of Dr. David Walker; for about twenty years was a partner of George E.Walker, under the firm name of Walker & Hickling, a popular house, which probably sold more goods to the old settlers than any other firm. Mrs. Hickling died in 1848 ; Mr. Hickling now lives in Chicago with his second wife.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 230 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


William A. Hickok

("Wild Bill" James B. Hickok's Father)

Wm. A. Hickok, from Grand Isle Co., Vt., to Union Grove, Putnam Co., in 1833 ; June 16,1834, to Bailey's Point with Rev. N. Gould and Isaac Fredenburgh, then to Granville and Troy Grove in Nov., 1836 ; was Deacon of the Presbyterian Church; opened the first store kept at Homer ; a worthy man. He died May 5, 1852; his widow resides with her daughter at Homer, much respected, aged 74. Had three sons : Lorenzo B., who is Supervisor of Troy Grove ; Hiram, married Martha Edwards, and holds the office of Justice of the Peace at Troy Grove;

James B., born and raised at Troy Grove became notorious on the western frontier and earned the sobriquet of "Wild Bill" ; a man of superior physical form, over six feet tall, lithe and active, he was more than a match for the roughs he met on the debatable ground between civilized and savage life, and is said to have often killed his man ; at one time he is said to have killed four in sixty seconds- they were on his track seeking his life. He served with Jim Lane in the Kansas troubles. He was elected Constable while a minor in Kansas; was for two years U. S. Marshall at Abilene, and was regarded as a very efficient and reliable officer. He was killed at Deadwood, Dakota, Aug. 2, 1876. While playing cards his assailant came silently behind him and shot him through the head. His murderer was tried by a mob jury and acquitted, but subsequently arrested under forms of law, convicted and hung.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 408-409 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Stephen G. Hicks

Stephen G. Hicks settled on S. 30, T. 33, R. 5, opposite Marseilles.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 450 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Hiram Higby

Hiram Higby, from New Hartford, Ct., and wife, Frances M. Tamer, from Middlesex County, Ct., in 1836. Mr. Higby was the first Supervisor of the town of Utica. He died in 1864. Mrs. Higby died in 1854. Their children were: Arthur, deceased; William, deceased; Frances, the widow of Charles Powers; Thomas Frederick, served in the 53d Regiment Illinois Volunteers, and died soon after his return ; Helen M., married C. M. Buel; H. W., is a druggist in Utica ; Julia, is deceased.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 358 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Higgins

John Higgins, from Detroit, to Chicago, in the spring of 1836, and to La Salle, November 1st. same year. Is now in the grocery trade, which he has followed since he came to La Salle. Married the widow O'Conner, daughter of William Burns-has a second wife.[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 380 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Higgins

John Higgins, a native of Prince Edward's Island, and from Putnam County here ; made an improvement on Section 8 in 1855, and has occupied it with his family since 1856.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Allen, 477 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hill

John Hill, and wife, from Plainfield, Connecticut, in 1840, now at Troy Grove.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Waltham, Page 465 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


George D. Hiltabrand

Though comparatively a young man, George D. Hiltabrand has already evinced that he possess exceptional business and financial ability, and during the six years of his residence in Tonica, LaSalle County, he has been an untiring worker in the interests of the place - a fact thoroughly appreciated by its citizens. The standing of a town or community in the public opinion is a matter that should be of great concern to every inhabitant of the place, for true patriotism, like charity, should begin, though not end, at home.

The grandfathers of our subject were numbered among the early pioneers of Illinois, and his relatives have borne an important part in the development of its resources.

George Hiltabrand, his paternal grandfather, was a native of North Carolina, and lived in Tennessee prior to his removal to Magnolia township, Putnam County, Illinois in 1827. His farm was located at a place known as Ox Bow, and there he resided until his death, which event occurred when he was nearly three-score and ten years of age. During the Black Hawk war he enlisted and served as a sergeant of his company.

Jeremiah Hartenbower, the maternal grandfather, was born in Germany, came to America in the '20s, and about 1830 located in Putnam County, Illinois, taking up some government land. Later he settled in Hennepin Township and in 1876 he departed this life at his home in the village of the same name. He had nine or more children and George Hiltabrand had eleven children, and their descendants are numerous and influential, both in this and in other states of the Union.

Benjamin F. Hiltabrand, father of George D., was born in Putnam County, where he was a successful farmer and stock-raiser for many years after arriving at manhood. In 1882 he came to LaSalle County, and during the next thirteen years he dwelt about a mile and a half west of the village of Lostant. He owns six tracts of eighty acres each in that locality, another farm of one hundred and twenty acres in that district and about five hundred and seventy acres in Iowa, besides twenty acres in Putnam County. Since 1895 he has lived retired in Bloomington, Illinois. For some time he was the supervisor of Magnolia Township, Putnam County; and in Hope Township, this county, he served in the same capacity. Politically he is a Democrat, and religiously both he and his estimable wife are members of the Baptist church. In her girlhood she bore the name of Minerva Hartenbower, and like her husband, she was born in Putnam County. They had six children, four of whom survive, namely: George D., Norman J., Vera L., and Benjamin Franklin.

The birth of George D. Hiltabrand occurred on the parental homestead near Magnolia, Putnam County, September 10, 1872. At ten years of age he came to this county, and, after finishing his district and village school education, he took a commercial course at the Dixon (Illinois) Business College and for about a year pursued his studies in the Northern Illinois Normal School in the same town. Then, returning to his father's old homestead, he continued the agricultural labors which have engrossed his time and attention, to a great extent, from his childhood. He is now engaged in the stock business, in partnership with his brother, Norman J., and they cultivate a farm of three hundred and twenty acres.

In 1893 our subject became assistant cashier of the Tonica Exchange Bank, and two years later he entered into partnership with John E. Hartenbower and Austin Hiltabrand, and for a year they were the proprietors of this now well-known and successful banking institution. In 1896 Mr. Hiltabrand retired and the firm has since consisted of J. E. Hartenbower and George D. Hiltabrand. The latter owns considerable real estate and is interested in its sale and in the insurance business and other enterprises.
In the multiplicity of his private business affairs, Mr. Hiltabrand does not neglect his duties as a citizen, and at present he is serving as president of the board of trustees of Tonica. He is independent in politics, using his franchise for the nominees and principles which he deems worthy of support regardless of party lines. Socially he belongs to Tonica Lodge, No. 364, F. & A. M. (Free and Accepted Masons), of which he is the present master; of Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M.; Tonica Lodge No. 298 I. O. O. F.; and of Kaiser Camp, Modern Woodmen of America.

On the 12th of December, 1894, Mr. Hiltabrand married Miss Lizzie, a daughter of Abraham and Sarah (Dixon) Phillips, and they have one child, Wendall K. Abraham Phillips is a native of Manchester, England, while his wife was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He came to this state about 1840 and was preceded here by his wife, who came west with her parents in 1838. Her mother dying when the little Sarah was but four years old, the latter was reared by a Mrs. Miriam Graves, who lived to the remarkable age of one hundred years. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Phillips were James and Nancy Dixon, and her maternal grandparents were John and Mary Woolsoncroft. James Dixon, a native of England, located in the neighborhood of Magnolia, Illinois, about 1845 and he lived to be well along in years, while his wife was almost a century old at the time of her death. John Woolsoncroft, also a native of England, did not come to America until he was past the prime of life, and his last years were spent in Putnam County, Illinois, where he died at an advanced age.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]


William W. Hiltabrand

Seventy years ago the father and numerous relatives of William W. Hiltabrand came to the frontier of Illinois and thus from pioneer days the name has been indissolubly connected with the early history of the state. The family has been noted for all the sterling qualities and public spirit which goes toward the making of valued citizens.

The paternal grandfather of our subject, Conrad Hiltabrand, was a native of Pennsylvania and was of German descent. At an early day he removed to North Carolina and his last years were spent in Tennessee, where he died at an advanced age. His widow, Jane Brown Hiltabrand, came to Illinois and departed this life in Putnam County about 1860. They were the parents of ten children, most of whom followed agricultural pursuits, to which calling they had been reared.

The maternal grandfather of our subject was Harwell Hailey, of Scotch-Irish extraction. He was the father of thirteen children.

The parents of William W. are Isaac and Elizabeth (Hailey) Hiltabrand, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father came to this state in 1829 and took up a quarter section of government land in Putnam County. Later he became quite wealthy for that day, and owned a section of land, some being within the boundaries of this county. He continued to dwell in Putnam County until his death, in 1877, when he was nearly seventy years of age. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk War and never failed in the discharge of his public duties. His wife died in 1871, when fifty-two years of age. Both were members of the Baptist church and loved and honored by everyone who knew them. Eight sons and one daughter of their fourteen children are yet living, namely: William W., our subject; Gilbert, Andrew and James of Hope Township, LaSalle County; Allen of Henry, Illinois, Austin of Tonica; Douglas, on the old homestead in Putnam County, Edward in Magnolia, same county, and Amanda, the wife of Eliphlet Ketchum, of Henry, Illinois.

Born in Putnam County, February 2, 1839, William W. Hiltabrand was early initiated into the routine of farm life, and received such knowledge as he could gain in the common schools. As he approached manhood he managed the old homestead on shares, for his father, for four years, and then bought eighty acres in LaSalle County. To this tract, situated in Hope Township, he subsequently added adjoining land from time to time, and invested in other property until he is now the owner of eleven or twelve hundred acres, altogether. Seven tracts of eighty acres each are located in Hope Township; and another, the one on which he now makes his home, is in Tonica; while one quarter section is in Iowa and two quarter sections are in Nebraska. That he possesses business ability is evident from the above mentioned facts, and that his success has been mainly due to his own efforts, his success in life is well worthy of admiration. Honesty and industry are the only secrets of his prosperity.

In 1863 Mr. Hiltabrand married Miss Sabina Kreider, who died just ten years subsequently. She was a daughter of the well-known citizens, Samuel and Catherine (Reed) Kreider and was a consistent member of the Baptist church. Three children were born to our subject and his first wife, namely: Sabina Katie, Marion F. and John Willard. The latter died at the age of twenty-three years. Sabina K. is the wife of H. A. Barr and resides near Lostant. She is the mother of seven children, named as follows: Elsie, Verna, Mina, Florence and Forest (twins), Ralph and Hazel. Marion F. married Miss Ida Stillwell and their home is in Hope Township. They have five children - Wilma, Berle, Laura, Lelah and Charles. In 1874 our subject wedded Miss Melissa Ferry, and their two children, Burton and Jane Elizabeth, are at home - the former still a student in the local school, and the latter a teacher in district schools. Mr. and Mrs. Hiltabrand are active members of the Methodist church. Following out his strong temperance principles, he favors the Prohibition Party with his ballot. For a number of years he served as a road commissioner and school director. All public enterprises calculated to benefit the people have received his earnest co-operation.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]




John Hise

John Hise, from Pennsylvania, to Ottawa, in 1839. He married Lucy S, Cotton ; he was connected with the Free Trader as editor and publisher, and followed farming for several years, and is now living in Chicago. He was Supervisor and member of the Legislature from both LaSalle and Cook Counties.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 254 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Daniel F. Hitt

Col. Daniel F. Hitt, from Champaign County, Ohio, in 1830 ; came as one of the corps of engineers locating the Illinois and Michigan Canal; lived with his brother-in-law, Martin Reynolds, of Deer Park. He served through the Black Hawk war ; a surveyor and engineer; he was for several years County Surveyor of La Salle County; was Lieut.-Col. of the 53rd Illinois Reg't Volunteers in the war of the rebellion. He married Phoebe Smith, of Maryland, and has lived mostly in Ottawa; has four children : Andrew Jackson resides in Athens, Ohio; H. Houghton lives in Ottawa; Eleanor at home; Rector Cass in Chillicothe, Ohio-all single.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 230-231 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 HOB-HOG

John R. Hobbs

John R. Hobbs, came from New York, in 1835; settled on S. 26. Daruria, died; Alfred, married, and lives in Serena. [Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 440-441 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John V. A. Hoes

John V. A. Hoes, from Kinderhook, N. Y., in 1836, a lawyer by profession, practiced at the bar for several years, but has devoted his time mostly to financial affairs and real estate; he was Judge of Probate from October, 1837, to August, 1843. He married Fanny Reynolds, of McHenry County. His children are: Ella A., widow of M. B. Peak, of Green Bay, and Edward, now banking in Lake City, Colorado.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 231 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hoffman

John Hoffman, from Tioga Co., Pa., in 1838; married Mary Ann Mann; kept a hotel, and did a warehouse and commission business in company with C. C. Charles, and afterward with John L. Coates ; has been Supervisor, and Chairman of the Board; is now farming in Mendota. Has eight children : Asa, married Frances Raymond, of Ottawa ; Phebe Adeline, married O. Beardsley, she is now dead ; Maria L., married L. L. Stoddard, of Englewood : John B., married Mary Thomas, and lives in Mendota; Julietta C., married Charles Wolf, of St. Louis; Maria R., Charles C., and Andrew J., at home.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 366 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Abel Hogaboom

Abel Hogaboom, brother of John and Richard, came from the same place, and settled on S. 6, T. 32, R. 3. He married Charlotte Jones, and after her death, he married the widow Horn, daughter of Jacob Gruber; is now living in Nebraska, and has seven children, one son, Frank, living on the old homestead. Mary, married to Robert Crane, in South Ottawa; Hannah, Eliza, Susan, and Luella at the old home; Abbey and Lucy with their parents.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 258-259 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hogaboom

John Hogaboom married Miss Hopkins, and came from Ulster County, New York, here, in the fall of 1830; settled on S.33, T.33, R.3. After his wife died he married widow Brooks ; had fourteen children. Of those living, Adelia married Nathan T. Carr, lives in Brookfield, and has seven children; Emily married Morgan Marion, in Iowa; Mary married Frank Ocean, and lives in Iowa; George and Loring live on the old farm; Edgar married Miss Wade, and lives in Ottawa; Charlotte married a Mr. Robins, and lives in Nebraska; Frances married Henry Gilbert, and lives in Iroquois County.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 258 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Richard Hogaboom

Richard Hogaboom, brother of the above (John Hogaboom), from the same place (Ulster County, New York), in 1830, married Phebe Farnsworth, and settled on S. 32; removed to Green Bay, in 1837, and now lives in Nebraska. Has four children: Eliza, married D. C. Mills, and lives in Farm Ridge ; Cornelia, married Joseph D. Lewis ; Harriet, married a Mr. Robinson, both in Nebraska; William, lives with his parents.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 258 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Richard Hogaboom Sr.

Richard Hogaboom and wife, Hannah, parents of the foregoing brothers (Richard, Abel, John), came from Ulster County, New York, in 1830. He died in 1845, aged 83; his widow died in 1857, aged 84.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 259 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

HOL

Zophar Holcomb

Zophar Holcomb, and wife, Lucy Goddard, from Maine, with Gillett, in 1833. Had five children: Harlan, married Miranda Brook ; Warren, died; Flora, married Asahel Baldwin, her second husband was a Mr. Button, she is now in Iowa ; Sophia, married Mr. Axtel, they live in Kansas; Harriet, is deceased.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 406 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Solomon Holden

Solomon Holden, from Plattsburg, N. YM came to Buffalo; a brick maker by trade; was sometime in the employ of the noted builder and contractor, and finally forger, Rathbun. He came to Illinois and settled in Munsontown in 1836 ; his wife was Susan Allen, sister to Esquire Ethan Allen, of Freedom; he removed to Ottawa in 1839, and died there, leaving four daughters : Sarah, married John Batcheller: Cornelia, married William Wiley ; Mary Elizabeth, married Stephen Jennings, of Ottawa ; Salome, married Henry King.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 401-402 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Holderman

John Holderman, and wife, Hannah Young, came from Richland Co., Ohio, in the spring of 1831; the first settler in the town ; he settled on S. 27. He died about 1842. He had five children : Jacob, married Rachel Gannet, of Streator ; Allen, is now living in Streator ; Sarah, married Elisha Naramoor; Martha, married Barney O'Neill; Eliza, married George Tillsbury.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 442 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Asa Holdridge

Asa Holdridge, from New York in June, 1833, and settled on S. 25, T. 32, R. 1, near Bailey's Point; he married Polly Warren ; was a successful farmer, and died in 1866, leaving five children: Lafayette, married Hannah Simmons, and lives in Livingston County ; W. H. H., married Mary Swift, live in Eden; Volney, married Lizzie Simmons, and lives in Ancona ; Clarinda, married D. Willey ; Arminda, married Capt. L. Howe, and lived near Tonica.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 350-351 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Edward Holland

Edward Holland came from Clermont County, Ohio, in 1840 ; his wife was Eva Hess. He died in 1846, leaving eleven children. His widow married Henry Gorbet, who had fifteen children.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 358 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hollinger

John Hollinger, from Champaign County, Ohio, in 1833; settled on Section 4, T. 32, R. 2; died Jan. 4th, 1836. His widow married Thomas J. Potter in 1838, and died September 3d, 1840. The Hollinger children are: John D., who married, and lives at Granville, Putnam County; Martin H., married, and lives in Page County, Iowa; Maria H. is dead; Harry C., married, a physician at Salt Lake City; Wm. S., married, living in De Witt County, Iowa; Elizabeth, deceased; Caroline S., wife of James Holman, of Deer Park; Mary A. Barbary, married, and moved to Iowa, both herself and husband were killed by lightning.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 327 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Madison E. Hollister

Madison E. Hollister, from Cayuga County, New York, came to Illinois in 1834, and settled permanently in Ottawa, with his wife, Delia A. Tichener, in 1836. His youth was spent on a farm. He had a taste for military life, and held a Colonel's commission in the New York Militia. But his life has been mostly devoted to the profession of law. He was Postmaster at Ottawa under Van Buren's administration, resigning after the election of Harrison. He was Justice of the Peace for two terms, and Presidential Elector in 1848, voting for Lewis Cass, but left the Democratic party in 1854, and has since acted with the Republican party. In 1855 he was elected Judge of the Ninth Judicial Circuit for a term of six years, was re-elected in 1861, and resigned in 1866 to accept the office of Consul at Buenos Ayres. Was recalled in 1869, and returned to the practice of law in Ottawa, with Messrs. Glover and Cook. In 1871 accepted the appointment of Associate Justice of the Territory of Idaho. A short time before the term expired, he received the appointment of Chief Justice of the Territory, which position he still holds. Judge Hollister has only one living child, Edward, who is unmarried, and lives with his parents.

Judge Hollister has furnished some reminiscences of the early times in Ottawa, from which one or two extracts are inserted, showing the state of society and public feeling at that time. "The Democracy of the early time, and particularly during the construction of the canal, were of a peculiar type, and during seasons of political strife, were apt to become somewhat fiery and fierce. It happened that while I held the office of Justice of the Peace, a convention of the party was held in the court house, and the struggle became intensely bitter between the friends of the several candidates, for at that time a Democratic nomination was equivalent to an election. Charles Hayward, a bold, uncompromising, but honest partisan, was the champion on one side, and Simon P. Shope, a hot headed, passionate man, took sides against him. After exhausting their arguments they came to blows. I was an earnest sympathizer with Hayward, while others of the poorer, if not the baser sort, were equally zealous for Shope, and the partisans of each, as many as could, were mounted on a table and vociferously cheering on their champions. When it came to blows, however, I thought it time to magnify my office, and accordingly ordered the belligerents to keep the peace. No sooner had I done this, than I was dealt a blow on the back of the neck by some one behind me, when I found myself, on the floor, some feet from the table, a conquered and meek official, and convinced that a Democratic convention was not a proper field in which to exercise official authority.

"When I was holding the office of Postmaster, it was considered as rank treason to the party, to harbor or countenance in any way, an abolitionist. As was well known in those days, my house was understood to be a minister's tavern. I always opened my doors to men of the cloth. It happened that the Rev. Mr. Cross, a noted abolition lecturer, put up at my house one night, which fact became known through the town, a crime not to be tolerated in a Democratic official. A meeting was called at the old Mansion House, and I was invited to attend; a series of questions had been prepared which I was required to answer, but the chairman, Ward B. Burnett, finding they very seriously interfered with the rights of hospitality, very adroitly managed to give them the go-by, and the meeting adjourned. The next morning I met Dodge, who had represented us in the Legislature, and who had taken an active part in the proceedings, when I quietly told him that had they attempted, as they had proposed, to eject Mr. Cross from my house by force, they would have had to settle a little preliminary matter with me before they reached my guest. He apologized, and the matter dropped."

Of his personal habits, Judge Hollister says: "I have not used tobacco in any form, or indulged in strong drink for more than forty years, and was never addicted to the latter. In 1839, myself and wife became members of the Congregational Church and still retain our connection with it. I believe there are but three of the original members remaining, viz., Deacon H. W. Gridley, myself and wife."

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 240-242 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


George W. Holly

George W. Holly came from Salisbury, Ct., in 1837; his wife was Miss Church, daughter of Judge Church, of same place ; he was editor of the Ninawa Gazette, published by Ford & Holly, the first newspaper in Peru ; a genial man and good writer. In 1839 he removed to Niagara Falls. Mr. Holly was educated at West Point, but left there on account of partial deafness.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 364 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

HOR-HOX

James Horner
Mary Evangeline (Horner) Axline
Daniel Axline, one of the leading farmers of precinct N., Seward county, Nebraska, was born on the 22nd of June, 1856, in Putnam County, Illinois and is a son of Aaron and Ann (Street) Axline and a grandson of Jacob and Tracy Street. At an early day his father located in Putnam County, Illinois, and from there removed to Marshall County, that state, where he purchased four eighty-acre tracts of land and engaged in farming until within three years of his death, which occurred in the autumn of 1884, when in his seventy-fourth year. In his family were seven children, namely: John W., Kate, Theodore, Clara A., Mary E., Clarence A. and Daniel, all of whom are married and have homes of their own. The boyhood and youth of Daniel Axline were passed on his father's farm, where he remained until his marriage on the 22d of February 1877, Miss Mary Evangeline Horner becoming his wife. She was born in La Salle County, Illinois and they had been acquainted for about six years.

Her father, James Horner, was a native of the north of Ireland, and when a lad of eight years was brought to the new world by his parents, John and Jane (Spears) Horner, who settled in Illinois about twenty-four miles north of Chicago, which at that time was only a small village on a wet prairie. There James Horner grew to manhood and married Miss Almira Angeline Day, who was born near Rome, Oneida County, New York. He was one of a family of nine children, six sons and three daughters, in order of their birth being as follows: Mary, James, William, David, John, Amos, Loftus, Eliza and Laura Jane. Mr. and Mrs. Horner removed to La Salle County Illinois, where Mrs. Axline was born, June 10, 1853, and attended the common schools, completing her education, however, in the high school of the city of Wenona, Illinois. She is the third in order of birth in a family of eight children, the others being as follows: Josephine, Thomas, Ida F., Delbert J., Grant W., Eddie D. and Ira S. With the exception of Grant W., who makes his home with Mr. and Mrs. Axline, all are married and have good homes of their own.

For nine years after his marriage Mr. Axline engaged in agricultural pursuits upon one of his father's farms in Illinois, and then loading his effects into cars started for Seward County, Nebraska. Here, they located on a farm on section 25, precinct N, belonging to Mrs. Axline's father, and to its cultivation and improvement he had devoted his energies with marked success. Five children have come to brighten the home, namely: James H., Ida L., Laura I., Ernest R. and Oral D., who are still under the parental roof and are able assistants of their parents in the work of the house and fields. Mr. and Mrs. Axline take an active interest in every enterprise calculated to advance the moral, educational and material welfare of the community, and are recognized as valued and useful citizens of sterling worth and strict integrity.
[Source: Memorial and Biographical Record and Illustrated Compendium of Biography of Butler, Polk, Seward, York and Fillmore Counties, Nebraska, Geo. A. Ogle & Co. 1890]


John Hosford

John H. Hosford, and wife, Margaret Myers, came from Orange County, Vermont, to Ohio, in 1833, and from Ohio here in 1837. His family came in the spring of 1838, and settled on S. 23; removed to Ottawa in 1875. Has six children : Fear R., married Robert Rowe, on the old farm ; Mary, married Hugh McCIure ; Arabella, married W. G. Brown ; Sarah P., married Frank Condon ; Josephine C., married George Lamb; Charles, married Sarah S. Brandon.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 398-399 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jeremiah Hough

Jeremiah Hough came from Oswego, N. Y., in 1839. Died in 1845. Had five sons.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 428 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Yerk Hoveland

Yerk Hoveland came from Norway to New York in 1825, and to Illinois in 1834; died at Ottawa in 1870.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Miller, Page 459 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


G. W. Howe

G. W. Howe, from New York in 1834 ; settled on N. E. ¼ S. 33, T. 34, R. 4 ; went to Rock Run, Will County, in 1840, and died there.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 281 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Allen H. Howland

Dr. Allen H. Howland, and wife, Katharine Reed, from Saratoga, New York, 1833, a prominent physician in Ottawa for nearly a third of a century ; he died in 1866, his wife died in 1864, leaving two children : Henry, who married Miss Clark, and lives near Ottawa, and Elizabeth, who married Dr. Morrison, and lives in Michigan.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 232-233 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hoxie

John Hoxie, from Williamstown, Berkshire Co.. Mass., came in 1836. and settled on Sec. 25, where he still resides. He married Elizabeth Beem. His children are: Henrietta, Fremont, Lincoln, and Fanny. Henry was killed at the battle of Mission Ridge.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 438 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John D. Hoxsey

John D. Hoxsey was born in Williamstown, Massachusetts, August 3, 1812, and came to Illinois about 1840, settling in Serena, and became one of her prosperous and progressive citizens. He was a fine business man and became, in general standing, one of the first men in the place. He died February 23, 1881. His wife was by maiden name Elizabeth Beem. Their children were: Henry, who died in the army during the civil war period; Frances E., deceased; Henrietta, born April 10, 1849, the wife of Fridthgof Arntzen; Fremont; Lincoln; Fannie E., the wife of Ed. S. Jacobs. Mrs. Hoxsey died October 27, 1886..
[Biographical and Genealogical Record of LaSalle County, Volume I, Chicago, The Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Page 372 - Contributed by N. Piper]

HUB-HYA

John Hubbard

John Hubbard, and wife, from Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., settled on Sec. 14, in 1835. An industrious, worthy man; an excellent teacher of sacred music. He lived several years with an adopted daughter who married the Hon. M. B. Castle, of Sandwich, but returned to his farm a few years before his death in 1875.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 398 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Mr. Hudson

Mr. Hudson, from Virginia, lived at Old Utica, about two years, and went back to Virginia in 1838.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 358 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Hull

Henry Hull, from Stamford, Duchess Co., N. Y., came in 1838, and remained here two and a half years.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 423 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Kirjeth A. Hunt

Kirjeth A. Hunt, from New Milford, Ct., wife and five children, came from Connecticut in 1836 and settled on S. 19, on the premises bought of Noble W. Merwin; remained one year, and returned to Connecticut. He sold his farm to Dr. Johnson Hatch.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 385 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Hupp

John Hupp, from Licking County, Ohio, came through by wagon, and settled on Section 23 ; went to California in 1850. His children are: Sedgwick, living in Serena; Wilson was drowned in Columbia River; Havilah resides in Serena ; Jane, married James Moore; Cemantha married Ira Bayley, of Grundy County: Stephen in Iowa; George at Northville; Riley in Serena; Louisa married Joseph McKim.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 437-438 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Harmon Hurlburt

Dr. Harmon Hurlburt and wife, from Vergennes, Vermont, in 1834; was a physician of large practice, in Ottawa, for several years; he died June 8th, 1845. His widow is living at Montpelier, Vermont.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 236 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Henry Hurlburt

Henry Hurlburt, brother of Dr. Harmon, came from Vermont at the same time; married Olive Tichener; was Sheriff of this county from 1846 to 1850 ; is now living in Joliet.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 236 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Israel Hutchinson

Israel Hutchinson, from New Jersey, came in 1837, and settled on S. 32, where he still resides; he married Mary Burgess, and has had fifteen children.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 297 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Jonathan Hutchinson

Jonathan Hutchinson, from New Jersey, came in 1837; married Dorothy Burgess; moved to Iowa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 297 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


A. Hyatt

A. Hyatt, and wife, sister of Jesse Pugsley, came from New York in 1837; merchant with Mott, and Postmaster ; left in 1840, and is living East.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 370 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

 

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