La Salle County IL Biographies
L

 

LA
 Isaac H. Lamb
Edward F. Lambert
John R. Lambert
William Lancaster
Elias C. Lane
M. C. Lane
Samuel Lapsley
Dixwell Lathrop
W. T. S. Lavinia

LE
 F. Le Beau
Oranzo Leavens
Alva Lee
WILLIAM H. LEISER
Edwin S. Leland
Lorenzo Leland
Thomas Leniar
James M. Leonard
John Leonard
Mr. Leonard
David Letts
N. M. Letts
Asa Lewis
Charles L. Lewis
Martin Lewis
Samuel Lewis
Samuel R. Lewis
Zimri Lewis

LI
Job G. Lincoln
Giles Lindley
Philo Lindley
Steward Liston
Ebenezer Little
Fernal Little
James Little
Moses Little

LO
Christopher Long
David Loring
John Loring
William R. Loring
George Low
John Loyd

LU
Benjamin Lundy
John W. Lyman

 LA

Isaac H. Lamb
Isaac H. Lamb came in 1838, and settled on S. 32.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Waltham, Page 465 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Edward F. Lambert
From the farm have come many of the ablest financiers and businessmen of this country, as well as representative men in every walk in life. The subject of this sketch, now a prosperous lumber merchant of Tonica, LaSalle County, was born on a farm in Putnam County, Illinois, November 10, 1858, and has spent most of his life in the routine of farm work, at the same time developing powers of mind and body which are now serving him in good stead.

He is a son of John R. Lambert, a well-known citizen of this locality, who is represented elsewhere in this work. Both he and his estimable wife, Emily, were born in this state, where their respective parents were pioneers. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Joel Lambert, who was of Scotch-English descent, was a native of Kentucky, whence he removed to Indiana, and at an early age settled near Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, where they were engaged in farming. He died when in the prime of life, leaving two sons and a daughter. The maternal grandfather, George Hiltabrand, was of the sturdy old Pennsylvania-Dutch stock. In 1829 he came to this state and took up his abode in Putnam County, hauling wheat and other produce from his farm there to Chicago for years. During the Black Hawk War he was active as a home guard, and was a sergeant in his company. John R. Lambert was born near Galesburg, and grew to manhood there and in Putnam County. Since the war he has lived in Hope Township, this county, until he retired, in the fall of 1896, to become a citizen of Tonica. He commenced at the foot of the ladder leading to success and steadily working his way upward, buying land when good opportunities offered, and now he is the fortunate possessor of four hundred and eighty acres. He was engaged in the cultivation of one place in Hope Township for twenty-seven years and still owns the property. The land had been entered by his father-in-law, and under his own judicious management it has become one of the most valuable country homes in this section, improved as it is, with a modern house, substantial barns and sheds, shade trees, fences and orchard. Since he came to the village, he has purchased a pleasant house and lives with our subject and family, as his wife died in 1886.
?
He has borne an important part in the affairs of his community, at different times acting in the offices of township clerk, school director or school trustee, and for many years he was a member of the Democratic county central committee. He aided his sons in getting started in their independent careers, helping each to buy farms, one hundred and sixty acres in extent, one located in Hope Township and the other in Eden Township.

As stated at the beginning of this article, Edward F. Lambert is now in the prime of manhood, forty years of age. Since he was two years old he has lived in LaSalle County, where he obtained his education in the district schools, supplemented with a course of study at Eureka College. He early became thoroughly acquainted with agriculture, carried on the old homestead with his brother, on shares, for some years, and gave his time and attention to the cultivation of his farm until three years ago. In 1896 he bought the Robinson lumber-yard in Tonica, and now deals extensively in all kinds of lumber and building material. Prompt and business-like in his methods, he merits the patronage which he receives and his trade is steadily increasing from year to year. He still owns the quarter-section of land which his father assisted him to buy, and has made good improvements upon it. Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. Like his father, he uses his franchise in favor of the nominees of the Democratic Party. At present he is serving as one of the trustees of this town, and formerly he was one of the district school trustees in Hope Township.

One the 21st of December, 1887, Mr. Lambert married Miss Julia B., a daughter of William Borngasser, and four children bless their happy home, namely: Emily V., Edward R., Evelyn Fern and Carl Russell. Mrs. Lambert's mother died when she was a child, and she was reared as a member of the household of Simeon Hiltabrand, the maternal uncle of our subject.

He has borne an important part in the affairs of his community, at different times acting in the offices of township clerk, school director or school trustee, and for many years he was a member of the Democratic county central committee. He aided his sons in getting started in their independent careers, helping each to buy farms, one hundred and sixty acres in extent, one located in Hope Township and the other in Eden Township.

[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Biography of Edward F. Lambert]




John R. Lambert
He is a son of John R. Lambert, a well-known citizen of this locality, who is represented elsewhere in this work. Both he and his estimable wife, Emily, were born in this state, where their respective parents were pioneers. The paternal grandfather of our subject, Joel Lambert, who was of Scotch-English descent, was a native of Kentucky, whence he removed to Indiana, and at an early age settled near Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois, where they were engaged in farming. He died when in the prime of life, leaving two sons and a daughter. The maternal grandfather, George Hiltabrand, was of the sturdy old Pennsylvania-Dutch stock. In 1829 he came to this state and took up his abode in Putnam County, hauling wheat and other produce from his farm there to Chicago for years. During the Black Hawk War he was active as a home guard, and was a sergeant in his company. John R. Lambert was born near Galesburg, and grew to manhood there and in Putnam County. Since the war he has lived in Hope Township, this county, until he retired, in the fall of 1896, to become a citizen of Tonica. He commenced at the foot of the ladder leading to success and steadily working his way upward, buying land when good opportunities offered, and now he is the fortunate possessor of four hundred and eighty acres. He was engaged in the cultivation of one place in Hope Township for twenty-seven years and still owns the property. The land had been entered by his father-in-law, and under his own judicious management it has become one of the most valuable country homes in this section, improved as it is, with a modern house, substantial barns and sheds, shade trees, fences and orchard. Since he came to the village, he has purchased a pleasant house and lives with our subject and family, as his wife died in 1886.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Biography of Edward F. Lambert]



William Lancaster
William Lancaster settled at an early day on the Magnolia road, that runs through the town; he served as Town Supervisor.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Hope, 481 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Elias C. Lane
Elias C. Lane, from Ohio to Putnam County in 1845, then to Hickory Point in 1853, and to Sec. 8 in 1855, where he still resides, at the age of about 90 years, with his son, W. H. Lane.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Allen, 476 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



M. C. Lane
M. C. Lane, son of Elias C., from Brown County, Ohio, entered land on Section 9 in 1851, and occupied it in 1856.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Allen, 477 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Samuel Lapsley
Samuel Lapsley, from Pennsylvania to St. Louis, and from St. Louis to La Salle, in 1830; made a farm on the present site of La Salle, where the old Catholic church stood, extending as far north as Fifth street, and as far east as Joliet street. He built a saw-mill on the Little Vermillion; his claim proved to be on canal land, belonging to the State, and he lost his improvements; he died in 1839.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 373 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Dixwell Lathrop
Dixwell Lathrop, from Norwich, Ct., came in 1835; was employed by a company in Norwich to select and purchase land. He arranged to enter land at Rockwell, adjoining La Salle, returned and brought out his family in 1836.
As the agent of Charles and John Rockwell, of Norwich, he laid out the town of Rockwell, and in 1838 was reinforced by a colony from Norwich and vicinity, called the Rockwell Colony. The town of Rockwell was at this time at the height of its prosperity, and the arrival of the colony was supposed to insure its ultimate success ; but the summer and fall of 1838 were seasons of unexampled sickness throughout the West; malarious disease existed to an extent unknown before or since. It was particularly severe along the wide and low bottom lands of the Illinois. The Rockwell colonists were all sick, many died, the survivors scattered through the country, and the town never recovered.
La Salle being selected as the termination of the canal made that the centre of business, and Rockwell will doubtless be a pleasant suburb of its successful neighbor. Notwithstanding the failure of the town, Mr. Lathrop retained the confidence of the Rockwell Company; is residing in La Salle; he has been a successful amateur farmer and bee culturist, and is highly respected. His first wife was from Norwich, Ct., his second wife was Miss Foster. He had one daughter, who died aged 17.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 375-376 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


W. T. S. Lavinia
W. T. S. Lavinia, from Pennsylvania, in 1S36. Lawyer, preacher, plow inventor and manufacturer, and pawn broker; died in Chicago about 1870. A man of talent, but of peculiar temperament; when poor, an excellent preacher, but with money in his pocket better suited for a lawyer or pawn broker.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, P Ottawa, age 232 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


LE

F. Le Beau
F. Le Beau came from St. Louis, lived here five or six years, then went South.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 370 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Oranzo Leavens
Oranzo Leavens, from Vermont, last from Canada, in 1836. Was deputy under Sheriff Woodruff, and magistrate for the last eighteen years, since April, 1858. He married the widow of Loring Delano. One daughter.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 234 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Alva Lee
Alva Lee, from Pennsylvania. Settled near Lowell, and run the Lowell saw-mill. He went to Utica, and then down the river.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 341 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]




WILLIAM H. LEISER

WILLIAM H. LEISER, one of the publishers of the Mendota Reporter, went to work in a print shop as soon as he left school and has never for any length of time been away from the smell of printer's ink and the activities of a printing and publishing business. He has built up a splendid paper in the Mendota Re porter and most of his experience in news paper work has been in his native city.

He was born at Mendota, October 10, 1882. His father, George W. Leiser, was born in Hamburg, Germany, learned the trade of shoe maker in the old country and coming to America before the Civil war, lived for two years in Pennsylvania, then settled in Peoria and later in Mendota. He was a pioneer shoemaker and continued active in the shoe business throughout the remaining years of his active life. He died at Mendota in 1900 and his wife in 1907.

He married Miss Adelheid Harnesser, of Alsace-Lorraine. Of their four children three are living, William H., George, of Mendota, and Mrs. Emma Elsesser, of Chicago.

William H. Leiser attended the common schools of Mendota and had several years in high school. When he quit school, in 1897, he became a printer's devil in the office of the Mendota Reporter. It was with this paper that he completed his apprenticeship. For one year he was employed as a printer with the Old Bureau County Republican at Prince ton and returned to Mendota to become press foreman of the Mendota Sun Bulletin. He was with the Sun Bulletin twenty-one years, until 1919, when he and George W. Nisley bought the Mendota Reporter. Both are practical printers and newspaper men, and their efforts have been responsible for making the Mendota Reporter the third largest country paper in Illinois. In 1927 they bought their chief rival, the Sun Bulletin, with which Mr. Leiser had been connected for so many years, and consolidated the good will and plant of this with the Reporter.

Mr. Leiser is a Republican, a member of the Catholic Church, Knights of Columbus, B. P. 0. Elks and Izaak Walton League. He is editor of the local Elks paper. He has always been interested in politics as a news paper man but has never aspired to any public office. He is a member of the Illinois and National Press Associations and is a stock holder in the Mendota National Bank.

Mr. Leiser married, May 28, 1906, Miss Gertrude Sonntag, of Mendota. They have two sons, Richard J., born May 17, 1908, and William R., born in 1914.

[Biographies from "ILLINOIS, The Heart of the Nation" by Hon. Edward F. Dunne, Volume IV,1933,  Transcribed and Donated by Kim Torp ]


Edwin S. Leland

Edwin S. Leland came from Massachusetts, in the fall of 1835! He was born in the State of Maine, and when quite young, his father, Judge Sherman Leland, removed to Roxbury, Massachusetts. Edwin S. read law in his father's office, and was admitted to the bar in 1834. A year later he located in Ottawa, and in 1839 removed to Oregon, Ogle County. In 1840 he was married to Margaret B. Miles, of Boston. He returned to Ottawa in 1843, and in 1852 he was chosen Judge of the Ninth Judicial Circuit, composed of six counties, to fill the unexpired term of Judge Dickey, who had resigned. In 1866 he was appointed by the Governor to fill the unexpired term of Judge Hollister, and in 1867 was elected by the people to the same bench, for the full term of six years; in 1873 he was re-elected for the Sixth Judicial Circuit, composed of the counties of Bureau and La Salle, which position he still holds. Judge Leland has been President of the Board of Education of Ottawa, and identified with the educational interests of the place, and has been Mayor of the city. He was one of the principal actors, if not the prime mover, in the formation of the Republican party. A mass meeting was held at Ottawa on the 1st of August, 1854, a large and very distinguished one, which organized a new political party, and christened it Republican. Judge Leland presided at that meeting, and drew up the platform of principles then adopted, as well as the original call for the meeting. The principles enunciated in that platform were soon affirmed throughout the Northern States.

Judge Leland has three children. George M. married Frances C. Cross, is a lawyer ; Sherman E., married Louise Poote; and Georgiana J., married H. F. Gilbert, all in Ottawa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 235-236 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Lorenzo Leland
Lorenzo Leland, from Graf ton, Mass., to Peoria, November, 1834, and to Ottawa, July, 1835; a lawyer by profession. He served as Clerk of La Salle Circuit Court from 1842 to 1849, and as Clerk of the Northern Division of the Illinois Supreme Court from 1848 to 1867, an able and popular officer. Mr. Leland's present wife is Flora Prescott, the widow Thompson when he married her. The children are Cyrus A., who married Nellie Thomson, and Lorenzo, Jr., who constitute a law firm in Eldorado, Kansas. Marcia is at home.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 237 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Thomas Leniar
Thomas Leniar, and wife, Mary Hawes, to Ottawa 1836, and to Northville 1840. Has three children: Otis K., Helen A., and Luther J.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 428 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


James M. Leonard
James M. Leonard, came from Middleborough, Plymouth County, Mass., in the spring of 1834, and settled at Vermillionville. He married, second wife, Minerva Dimmick. In company with Seth Eaton, he erected a dam and saw-mill on the Vermillion, in April, 1835, and completed a flouring mill in 1836; the company kept a store, and for several years did a heavy business in the flouring mill, but were unfortunate in losing their dam several times. Mr. Leonard died in 1852, leaving one son and two daughters by his first wife, and one son and one daughter by his last wife, who died in 1874. Manning Leonard, son of above, married Miss Sumner, and died at Tonica, in 1870; Eliza Ann, married Charles Todd, who died of cholera at La Salle in 1852 ; Fanny, died in 1852.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 332 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Leonard
Dea. John Leonard, from near Boston, Mass., in 1831, came with the Northampton colony in company with Mr. Jones; they located at Bailey's Grove. Jones died soon after, and Leonard eventually married Jones' widow, and settled on S. 18, T. 32, R. 2. He was deacon and an active member of the Congregational church; a radical abolitionist, he had the reputation of keeping a station on the Underground Railroad ; he removed to Galesburg, where he died in 1866; his wife, and two children, Levi and Sarah, died there also.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 291 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Mr. Leonard
Mr. Leonard, from Rochester, N.Y., came in 1839. His children were : Harvey, a bachelor, was a Justice of the Peace for several years went to La Salle, and died there ; Cornelia, married A. D. Brown, of Peru ; Greaty married Mr. Robins, of Peru ; Mary Ann, died single, in Chicago; Julia Ann, married Lucius Rumrill, of Peru; Caroline, married Charles Noble.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 365 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


David Letts
David Letts, and wife, widow Dunnavan, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1830; made a farm on S. 4, T. 32, R. 1; kept a store at Dayton, and at Ottawa. He was School Commissioner of the county ; removed to Louisa County, Iowa, and died there, in 1852. James R., and Noah H., sons of David, moved to Iowa, the first in 1855, the last in 1861.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 348 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


N. M. Letts
N. M. Letts, son of David, married Miss Grove; his second wife was Mrs. Holderman; resided on the old farm, at Cedar Point, till 1854, when he sold to Franklin Corwin, from Ohio, and moved to Iowa, and is living at Lettsville ; a large dealer in cattle.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 348 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Asa Lewis
Asa Lewis, from Troy, N. Y., came in 1837, remained four or five years, and went to Wisconsin. His son, Cyrus B., married Mary C., daughter of Christopher Champlin, and lives at Marseilles.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 449 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Charles L. Lewis
Charles L. Lewis is at present the county attorney of Otter Tail County, Minnesota, with headquarters at Fergus Falls, the county seat of said county. Mr. Lewis is a native of Ottawa, Illinois, and was born on the 8th of March 1852. He is the son of Hon. Samuel R. and Ann (Harley) Lewis who were natives of Pennsylvania.

Samuel R. Lewis came to Illinois when fourteen years of age with his parents, who were Jehu and Rachel Lewis, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. He was a farmer by occupation, and on coming to Illinois settled in Putnam County. He had a family of three children - Joseph, Elizabeth and Samuel R. Jehu Lewis, the grandfather of the subject of our sketch, died in Putnam County, Illinois. The grandmother died in Ottawa, La Salle County, of that State. The Lewis family is of Welsh and English descent.

Hon. Samuel R. Lewis was reared on a farm in his early life and has followed that occupation ever since. He is now located at Ottawa, Illinois. He is an extensive farmer and deals largely in blooded stock, principally horses. From 1856 to 1860 he held the office of treasurer of La Salle County and from 1879 to 1883 was State Senator. He had four sons - William R., a farmer living in La Salle County, Illinois; Edward C., early in life a lawyer, but for the last ten years engaged in raising blooded stock, horses and cattle; Charles L. and Samuel M., a farmer who runs the home farm. The father's family being in good circumstances, the children were all well-educated. The father is still living, is a republican in politics and is one of the prominent men in that party in the State of Illinois.

Charles L. Lewis, the subject of our sketch, remained under the parental roof until he was eighteen years of age. Up to this time he had attended school during the winters and worked upon the farm during the summer months. On reaching the age of eighteen he attended the high school at Ottawa, Illinois, for one year, after which he spent four years in the University of Chicago, then two years at Oberlin College in Ohio, from which institution he graduated in 1876. He then spent one year at home on the farm, after which he read law in the office of Judge Charles B. Lawrence, of Chicago, continuing his reading through the years 1878 and 1879. In 1879 he was admitted to the bar in Chicago, and in the fall of that year moved to Fergus Falls, Otter Tail County, Minnesota, where he tried his first case in a justice's court.

During the year 1882 he was associated with M. R. Tyler. This partnership was dissolved in 1883. Mr. Lewis has followed his profession with good results throughout his entire career in Fergus Falls. In 1880 he was elected clerk of the school board, which position he held for three years. He was elected county attorney in 1884 and re-elected in 1886, being the present incumbent of that office. He is one of the stockholders and a director in the Otter Tail Flouring Mill; is president of the Fergus Falls Electric Light and Power Company. He has made numerous investments in real estate in the city and county, owning several valuable farms and considerable village property.

Mr. Lewis has always been a stanch republican, was a delegate to the Chicago convention in 1888, and was one of the supporters of the present president of the United States. He has been an important factor in local and State politics and has been a delegate to the State convention several times.
Mr. Lewis was married in 1880 to Miss Jennie D. Moore, the daughter of Charles D. Moore, of Minneapolis. Three children have blessed this union - one daughter and two sons. Their names are - Laura, William M. and Charles L., Jr.

The subject of our sketch has been very successful in all his business and professional transactions in Fergus Falls. He has been prominent in politics, careful in his profession, and has rendered valuable aid in all that has tended to the improvement of his adopted city. He owns a fine cottage residence which he built in 1880 in the western part of the city. His property is beautifully located on a rise of ground overlooking the city.
[Source: Illustrated Album of Biography of the Famous Valley of the Red River of the Valley of the Red River of the North and the Park Regions, Including the Most Fertile and Widely-Known Portions of Minnesota and North Dakota, Chicago, Alden, ogle & Company, 1889]




Martin Lewis
Martin Lewis, came from Plattsburg, N. Y., in 1834 ; settled on S. 28, and died in 1837.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 441 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Samuel Lewis
Samuel Lewis, and wife, Delia Ward, (who died in 1865), came from Tompkins County, New York, in the fall of 1835. In 1844 went back for one year. Settled on S. 3. His children are: Edward W.: Charles F., in Somonauk.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 424 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Samuel R. Lewis
Samuel R. Lewis is of Quaker parentage; his parents, Jehu Lewis, and Rachel Mills, from Penn., settled in Putnam County, in 1833. Samuel R., with his wife, Ann Harley, removed to Section 21 in Fall River, in 1843. He held the office of County Treasurer two successive terms; has been Supervisor of the town several terms, and is now chairman of the County Board. His children are: William, who married Ellen Eichelberger, lives in Grand Rapids: Edward C., educated for and admitted to the bar -he married Nellie Armstrong, and took charge of the large farm and stock business left by his wife's father, J. W. Armstrong; Charles, has just graduated from Oberlin College, and is now in the law office of Lawrence, Campbell & Lawrence, of Chicago: S. Morris is in Chicago University. Mrs. Lewis, mother of Samuel R., died in 1874; her son buried her beside her husband in the Quaker burying ground at Clear Creek, Putnam County.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Fall River, Page 392-393 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Zimri Lewis
Zimri Lewis, and wife, Hannah Brown, came from Dryden, Tompkins County, N. Y., in 1835 ; kept a hotel in Peru for several years ; spent the last year of his life with his son-in-law, S. W. Raymond, in Ottawa, where he died in 1867. Had three children: Lorilla, married S. W. Raymond, now in Ottawa; Zimri, Jr., in California; William, died of cholera in 1849.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 369 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


LI

Job G. Lincoln
Job G. Lincoln came from Middleborough, Mass., with William Gray, in 1837; a carpenter by trade. Married Elizabeth Thatcher, and settled on S. 2, T. 32, R. 2; removed to Oregon.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 336 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Giles Lindley
Giles Lindley, from Connecticut to St. Louis, from there here in 1840 ; married Jane Knight, from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, who is living in La Salle. Mr. Lindley died, leaving nine children.


Philo Lindley
Philo Lindley, from Seymour, Connecticut, came in 1836 ; married Cordelia Merritt; was seven years Clerk of the Circuit Court of La Salle County, and County Clerk one term ; was Quartermaster of the Fifty-third Regiment Illinois Volunteers, and was killed near Altoona, Mississippi, 1863 ; his widow resides in Ottawa, with three children-Philo, George, and Laura M.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 380 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Steward Liston
Steward Liston, and wife, came from New York in 1837. He died about 1850. He had three children : Lemuel, married Lois Townsend ; Lucy, married Henry Newton ; Maria, married John Warren.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 421 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Ebenezer Little
Ebenezer Little, and wife, Phebe Palmer, from New Hampshire, in 1838, and settled on S. 9, T. 32, R. 2. He died in September, 1839; his widow died in February, 1864. They left seven children: George, is married, and lives in Southern Illinois; Charles, a graduate of Hamilton College, came West, in 1840, and died soon after ; Moses, married Miss Cook, died in Iowa; Fernal, lives in Southern Illinois; Mary, is the wife of C. Dryer, and lives at Lowell ; Dorcas D., married Alexander Eaton; Sarah, married Henry Thatcher, and lives in Oregon ; Elizabeth B., is the wife of John Morehead, of Vermillionville ; Alice, married E. Leavenworth, and died in Southern Illinois.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 336-337 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


Fernal Little
Fernal Little, from New Hampshire, came in 1837; went to the south part of the State.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 299 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


James Little
James Little, and wife, Polly Cook, came from New Hampshire, in 1839, and bought the farm of Nathaniel Eddy on S. 24. He died in 1842, and left four children: Daniel, married Mary Jones, and removed to Geneseo ; Lucy, married Isaac Gage, of Brookfield ; Moody, married Esther Newton, lived at Tonica, and died in 1848 ; John, married Frank Bassford, now in Southern Illinois.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 352-353 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



Moses Little
Moses Little, son of Ebenezer, came from New Hampshire in 1837; settled on Section 33; removed, and died in Iowa, November, 1856.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 299 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



LO

Christopher Long
Christopher Long, and wife, Miss Booth, from Licking County. Ohio, in 1827, first located on the Drake farm in company with Moses Booth, his brother-in-law, on Covell creek, and in the fall of 1831 settled on the N. W. ¼ S. 13, T. 38, R. 4. He died in March, 1846, aged 51; his wife died in 1832; his second wife, Mary Alvord, died in Sept., 1846, aged 42. He had five children : Catharine, married Elias Trumbo, now living in Rutland ; Elizabeth, married Jonathan Stadden; Lewis, married Miss Barbour, of Miller; Jane, married a Mr. Murphy, of Ottawa ; and William.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 279 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



David Loring
David Loring, brother of John, from the same place to Ohio; came here in 1836. Married Elizabeth Nichols, and settled on S. 6, T. 33, R. 5; removed to Nebraska.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 319 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


John Loring
John Loring, and wife, Louisa Micca, from Bloomfield, Ontario County, New York, came here in 1835, and settled on S. 31, T. 3-1, R. 5, where he still resides. They have five children: Eliza Jane, married Milton Peister, of Rutland; Hulbert, married Mary Bosworth-his wife is deceased, and he lives with his father; George, and Alzina, are at home.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 319 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



William R. Loring
Wm. R. Loring, from New York, came here in 1838, married Jane Micca, and settled on S. 32, T. 34, R. 5; now in Benton County, Iowa.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 317 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


George Low
George Low came from New York in 1838 ; shoe and harness maker, then merchant; went to Iowa; kept hotel; then to New York ; died there, and was buried in Peru.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 370 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Loyd
John Loyd and wife came from Ohio to Putnam County in 1831, and to Ottawa in 1856; they both died several years since. Their children are: Thomas, married Louisa Strawn, and lives in Kansas ; Mary Ann, married a Mr. Horham, and died in Colorado ; Sarah, is the widow of David Strawn; Jane, is the wife of Charles H. Green, of Farm Ridge; Abram, lives near Morris; Marion, is in Michigan ; Washington, married Miss Eichelberger, and lives at Wenona.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 248 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]


LU

Benjamin Lundy
Benjamin Lundy, settled in the town of Vermillion in 1838. His reputation is so world-wide that among the old settlers he deserves more than a passing notice. His ancestors were from England and Wales, and both his parents belonged to the Society of Friends. He was born at Hardwich, Sussex County, New Jersey, January 4, 1789. His educational advantages were a few months only at a common school. He learned the trade of a saddler at Wheeling, Virginia, and as that place was then a great slave mart, he became strongly impressed with the enormity of slavery. He here formed the acquaintance of William Lewis, and sisters, one of whom he afterwards married, and set up his business of saddler, at St. Clairville, on the Ohio. Although successful in business, he soon left it for the more congenial employment of working for the freedom of the slave. Lecturing, forming anti-slavery associations, and editing an abolition paper,' was the commencement of a work to which he devoted his life. When he entered the field he promised never to leave it till he ceased to breathe or the object was accomplished; he kept his word and died in the harness. Like Howard, the philanthropist, he made it a life-work, regardless of the sacrifices, privations and personal dangers that beset his path. His was such a character as the world seldom produces. It crosses the plodding, selfish track of common humanity like a luminous meteor passing athwart the somber darkness of the midnight sky. Men pause while the evils and wrongs of society are exposed; and those who are ever prone to travel thoughtlessly and without inquiry, in the ruts their fathers made, even though they may be stained with the blood of suffering innocence, have their dormant and sleeping consciences aroused.

Lundy was the first anti-slavery apostle, whose whole life was an offering on the altar of human rights; his efforts aroused and enlisted Tappnn, Goodell, Garrison, and others, who became his coworkers, and who carried on the work after Lundy had gone to his rest.

He started an anti-slavery paper at Mount Pleasant, Ohio, in 1821, called the '' Genius of Universal Emancipation." This paper he published sometimes as a weekly, but generally as a monthly, with slight interruption, till his death, a period of eighteen years. After issuing eight monthly numbers he removed his paper to Tennessee where he continued till his removal to Baltimore in 1824. The circulation of his paper was quite satisfactory, especially so in most of the slave-holding States. His treatment of the subject, though firm and decided, was mild and conciliatory, yet it soon aroused the demon of slavery, and often exposed him to personal danger. On one occasion in Tennessee, two ruffians entered his office, shut and locked the door, and demanded the recantation of an article published in the "Genius," but he coolly faced and held them at bay till help arrived.

The circulation of his paper had become so general over the whole country, that he thought its publication in one of the Atlantic cities would increase its efficiency; he selected Baltimore as being central, and within the shadow of the dark pall of human slavery, and located there in 1824. In 1828, he made a tour through New England, lecturing and forming his favorite anti-slavery societies, and increasing the circulation of his paper. On this trip he first made the acquaintance of Arthur Tappan, in New York; of William Goodell, in Providence, and of William Lloyd Garrison, in Boston. Previous to this time, neither of those gentlemen had been very active in the anti-slavery cause.

In November, 1828, he again traveled over New England and New York, and delivered forty-three lectures while on the trip. The following winter he was assaulted and nearly killed in the streets of Baltimore by Austin Woolfolk, a slave-trader, for commenting on his conduct. The judge, before whom Woolfolk was tried, told the jury that Lundy got no more than he deserved, and when the jury rendered a verdict of guilty, the judge fined him one dollar, and gave the offensive article to the grand jury, informing them that it was libelous, but the jury thought otherwise, and found no bill. The same winter Lundy went to Haiti in the interest of some manumitted slaves who were settled there in a state of freedom. While in Haiti his excellent and amiable wife and co-worker died, leaving him with a family of five children. Though keenly sensitive to his loss, his efforts in his life work were soon renewed with his usual vigor.

In the spring of 1859. he went again to Haiti on a similar mission. That spring Wm. Lloyd Garrison joined him at Baltimore in editing the "Genius." Garrison was more severe in his language than Lundy, and was soon imprisoned for libel, and compelled to leave Baltimore. Soon after, a similar experience awaited Lundy, and he was compelled to remove his paper to Washington.
In the years 1830 and 1831, he traveled most of the time, taking some of his type and his subscription list with him. Stopping each month at some village printing office he would get the loan of press and types, issue his monthly edition, mail to his subscribers, and go on lecturing and forming societies; but Washington was nominally the place of publication.

Lundy visited Texas and Mexico three different times, to procure grants of land on which he could locate emancipated slaves, and raise cotton and sugar by free labor. He found encouragement in Texas, but the filibustering on that contested field about that time defeated the object. He obtained a grant of 138,000 acres in the Mexican State of Tamanlipas, on condition he should introduce 250 families; this scheme received much favor at home, but the arrangement was also defeated by the Texas imbroglio.

In these enterprises, Lundy seemed to trust in Providence, but more in his own industry and indomitable pluck. On his arrival at Metamoras, on his journey to Mexico, his funds gave out; he at once rented a room, went to work at his trade of saddler, earning sometimes five dollars per day, and when his purse was replenished, he again went on his way; lie had frequently done this before.

His paper was prominent in all public questions where slavery was involved. With the co-operation of John Q. Adams, he fought the enterprise of the Texan invaders, as he had before in 1823 and '24, taking a leading part in opposition to the attempt to introduce slavery into Illinois. It is singular, in the light of the subsequent history of the anti-slavery contest, that the movement inaugurated by Lundy should have made such headway in the slave States. His paper for August, 1825, states that he had more subscribers in North Carolina than in any other State. At an election in Baltimore, in 1826, Raymond, the anti-slavery candidate, received one seventh of the votes cast; this and other indications show that there was a healthy anti-slavery sentiment at the South, but the aristocratic slaveholders then, as since, when aroused, crushed it out and silenced its voice. A very unfortunate occurrence took place on the 3d of August, 1831, in the insurrection of about fifty slaves in Southampton Co., Va., under a fanatical preacher by the name of Nat Turner. They procured arms and commenced an indiscriminate massacre of all they met, without distinction of sex or age, to the number in all of sixty-three, when they were dispersed. At the same time a plot for an insurrection of the slaves of several counties of North Carolina was discovered, and rumors of plots elsewhere were rife. The natural effect of all this was to prejudice the public mind against all anti-slavery efforts, and to embitter the contest between the pro's and anti's. There is no probability that the anti-slavery movement had any influence in the Nat Turner insurrection ; Turner was a fanatic, and probably insane ; he claimed to have been commanded from heaven to do what he did.

In August, 1836, Lundy commenced in Philadelphia the publication of a weekly paper devoted to emancipation, called the National Inquirer, and in 1838 relinquished its publication, and was succeeded by John G.. Whittier. The " Genius," as a monthly, was published during this time at Philadelphia, where it had been removed from Washington.

A large hall, costing $30,000, built by abolitionists and others, was opened on the 14th of May, 1838, and several abolition meetings and discussions held therein. On the evening of the 17th, a mob assaulted and burned the hall, with little opposition from the police; the firemen protected the adjoining building, but did nothing to save the hall. This was done in staid Quaker Philadelphia, and shows the bitter contest then being waged on the slavery question. Lundy's books, papers, clothing and other personal effects were all burned in the building.

He had for sometime contemplated moving his paper to the then opening North-west. He left Philadelphia in July, and arrived in Illinois in September. Disappointed in an attempt to start his paper at Hennepin, he accepted a proposition from the citizens of Lowell, LaSalle Co., and moved there in the winter of 1838-9, built a house and printing office, and purchased a tract of land four miles distant. Here his paper was published rather irregularly, for the want of funds, having at first no help but his two sons, one of whom attended to the farm.

In August he was attacked with bilious fever, then prevalent in that locality, and died on the 22d of August, 1839, in the 51st year of his age. His remains were buried in the Friend's burying ground on Clear creek, in Putnam County, Ill.

The foregoing gives but a faint idea of the self-sacrifice, indomitable perseverance, and whole-souled philanthropy of Benjamin Lundy, for whatever may be the views of any one on the slavery question, it cannot be denied that he deserves the name of a philanthropist in the broadest sense. He was not a fanatic; his views were broad and catholic, as is shown by the toleration of his efforts at the South, where his paper was as well received as at the North. His efforts at colonization were broad and comprehensive, showing a cool head as well as a warm heart; always conciliatory, but never yielding an iota of the rights of our common humanity, his was just the organization to lay broad and deep the foundations of universal emancipation. With an open and pleasing countenance, genial, and winning manners, he made friends of all his associates, while his convictions of truth and right were as firm as the granite hills; neither poverty, sickness, affliction, toil and privation, mob violence, or the heel of the beastly Woolfolk, could swerve him from his purpose.

His weapons were argument, reason, justice, and right, clothed in the garb of plain Quaker simplicity and sincerity; and when the contest became intensely embittered, and insane passion put reason and right at defiance, it was, perhaps, well that he should quietly go to his rest beneath the peaceful sylvan beauties of the prairie, where coming generations will chant the praise of the Quaker philanthropist, whose quiet voice spoke terror to Tyranny's hosts, and inaugurated the work that finally broke the fetters of the slave.

Mr. Lundy left five children, two sons and three daughters: Susan, married Wm. Wiseman, of Putnam County, now in Kansas; Eliza, married Isaiah Griffith, live in Iowa. Mr. Lundy's sons are both dead. Charles died in Oct., 1858; his widow, Mrs. E. M. Lundy, is living at Granville, Putnam County. Benjamin, married, practiced medicine in Magnolia, and died there, leaving one son, William L., the only male descendant, who is clerk in a drug store, in Henry; his widow married C. C. Gappin, and lives in Lacon. Esther, the twin sister of Benjamin, died single. Zebina Eastman was assisting Mr. Lundy in the publication of his paper, at the time of Lundy's death, and immediately after commenced the publication of the "Western Citizen," an anti-slavery paper, at Chicago, which was continued for several years, and was really a continuation of Lundy's work in the Northwest.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 301 -309 Transcribed by Nancy Piper]



John W. Lyman
John W. Lyman, and wife, Jerusha Newcomb, came from Charlotte, Vt., in 1833; he settled on Section 24. He has one child: John, married Emma Ford, second wife, Miss Williams.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 397 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]
 

 Back To LaSalle County Illinois History and Genealogy