La Salle County IL Biographies

 

 Mrs. Agnes Mackey
Benjamin Mackey
Norton Mackey
Rush Mackey
Samuel Mackey
George B. Macy
Richard Malony
John Manley

Nathaniel Manville
Barney Martin
Amos W. Merritt
Henry P. and Margaret M. (Wilson) Merritt
JAMES McCORMICK
AMMON B. MOON
 
Reason V. Myers 

 Mrs. Agnes Mackey
Widow Agnes Mackey, mother of Norton, Samuel, Benjamin and Rush, came from Pennsylvania with her sons in 1833, and lived with them until her death, Dec. 15, 1866.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 344 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


Benjamin Mackey
Benjamin Mackey, brother of Rush, from Fayette County, Pa., came in 1833, and settled on Sec. 9. He married Mary Shepherd, and still lives where he first settled. He has eight children: Joseph, married Harriet Trout; George, married Mary Morse; James, Rebecca, Jane, Mariette, William, and Ella.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 344 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


Norton Mackey
Norton Mackey, from Fayette County, Pa., in 1833, settled on S. 13. In 1836, in company with his brother, Samuel Mackey, and John Morgan, laid out the town of Van Buren on his farm, which, like many others laid out about that time, exists on paper only, the blocks, lots and streets are all obliterated by the farmer's plow.
In company with Samuel Mackey, he built a sawmill on Otter creek. He is one of the few residing where he first made his claim, on Government land. He married Elizabeth McCormick; has six children: Libbeus, married Elizabeth Law, is living near the old farm; Charles, married Sarah Morgan, lives at Fairbury; Norton, Jr., married Jane Barnhart; Mary, married Thomas Simpkins; Jane, married Samuel Barnhart; Winfield, married Sarah Law.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 343-344 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


Rush Mackey
Rush Mackey, brother of Norton, came from Pennsylvania at the same time; he married Ann Morgan, and has lived on the farm owned by Wm. Morgan, his father-in-law. He has five children: Burton; William; Howard; Rush, Jr.; Norval, married Christina Morse.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 344 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


Samuel Mackey
Samuel Mackey settled on S. 33, in 1833; sold to Charles McCormick, and removed to S. 1, town of Bruce. In company with his brother, Norton Mackey, built a sawmill on Otter Creek. In 1839, in company with Rees Morgan, built a sawmill on the Vermillion, in the centre of a heavy timbered region, which did a large business for several years; he died in 1854; he was the first Supervisor of the town of Bruce. His widow, Sarah Morgan, is living in Streator. He left children: Malvina married Mat. Morrison; Stephen, married Emma Holly; Minerva, married William Cadwell; George and Jabez, are single; Agnes, married Methuel Bronson.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 383 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


George B. Macy
George B. Macy, from Connecticut, first to Peoria, and to Ottawa, 1836 he married Mary Jennings, who died in 1854. He died about 1864. They left five children: Charles, Eliza, Mary, Anna and Clara.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 263 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


Richard Malony
Richard Malony, from Ireland, in 1835; married Miss Gardner ; settled on S. 33.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 407 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


John Manley
John Manley, from Clinton County, N. Y., settled in Ottawa in 1837; has kept a hardware store either alone or with a partner, for nearly forty years, probably the oldest house in town. A daughter, who had just completed her education, was drowned in the Hudson river. A younger daughter is the wife of Richard C. Jordan, cashier of the City National Bank of Ottawa. Carrie is at home.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, 484 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]

Nathaniel Manville
Nathaniel Manville came from Pennsylvania in 1835; he laid out the town of Manville, which, like many of its cotemporaries, failed to be a town. He died in the south part of the State, leaving two daughters: Clarissa married H. L. Owen; Susan, married E. D. Lockwood, and lives on the old place.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eden, Page 349 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]


Barney Martin
Barney Martin, from Ireland, in 1838.
[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 379 - Transcribed by FOFG NP]



HON. JAMES McCORMICK

Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900.,page 978 - Contributed by Dena Whitesell

HON. JAMES McCORMICK. This gentleman is one of the most prominent citizens of Coulee township, Ramsey county, having resided there since 1883, and has always been associated with every good enterprise or public project which had for its purpose the upbuilding of business or social interests in his community. He is a man of the highest integrity of character, intelligent and well educated, and well merits his high social standing. His home is in section 12, of Coulee township, where he conducts a good farm and enjoys rural life.

Our subject was born in Queens county, Ireland, April 21, 1847, and when he was about six years of age came with his parents to America. He resided in LaSalle county, Illinois, for many years, and was there reared to manhood, and from there enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, in February, 1865. He was in the service eight months, and then returned to LaSalle county, Illinois, and engaged in railroad contract work, grading, for some twelve years. In April, 1883, he went to North Dakota, and at once located on the farm where he now resides, and where he has since engaged in agricultural pursuits. He has made valuable improvements and erected good buildings, and cultivates and owns two sections of land.

Our subject was married, in Wayne county, Iowa, in the town of Allerton, June 22, 1876, to Miss Cynthia A. Carmony, a native of LaSalle county, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. McCormick are the parents of five children, four of whom are now living, and are named as follows: Jessie M., Mabel, Ada C. and James L. A daughter, Margaret, died at the age of fourteen months. Mr. McCormick was elected to the first state legislature in 1889, and his efficient work and popularity while a member of that body is best evidenced by the fact that he was returned to the senate in 1890. He was president of the board of trustees of the North Dakota School for the Deaf four years,, being appointed by Governor Shortridge, and he has been county commissioner for Ramsey county from 1885 to 1889, and was again elected in the fall of 1898, and is now serving. He has always been identified with Republican party politically, and is an earnest worker for party principles.



George A. McFerson

An enterprising business man of Tonica is the gentleman named above, who is successfully engaged in the furniture and undertaking business. He was born in Putnam County, this state, March 29, 1848, a son of Harvey and Mary Jane (Atchison) McFerson. His father was a native of southern Ohio, and his mother of Virginia, and they had eleven children, of whom four are now living, namely: Mary Jane, the wife of Frederick Hannum, of San Francisco; Alice G., the wife of Henry Leininger, of Piper City, Illinois; George A. and Grant, of Kewanee, this state. Harvey McFerson, a farmer, came to Illinois in 1840 and settled in Union Grove, Putnam county, where he faithfully engaged in his calling until 1855, when he came to LaSalle county, locating in Eden township, upon a quarter section of good land which he had purchased, and he followed agricultural pursuits there until 1877; then he moved to Tonica, where he passed the remainder of his life, quitting the scenes of this world in 1878, April 26, at the age of sixty years. His first wife, the mother of our subject, died in 1864, November 14, aged forty-seven years. In her religious sympathies she was a Congregationalism while her husband was a Universalist. In his political views he was a Republican, and in public position he for a time held the office of supervisor of Eden township, and also that of assessor and other public positions. For his second wife he married Martha E. King, who is still living, and by this marriage there were no children.

The paternal grandfather of Mr. McFerson, Alexander McFerson, was also a native of the Buckeye state, of Scotch ancestry, and died in his native state, in middle life, being killed by a kick from a horse. He had three sons and two daughters. The history of the maternal grandfather of our subject is not known.

George A. McFerson was seven years old when the family of which he was a member moved to LaSalle County, and he was reared to the heavy work of the farm until twenty-two years of age, attending school during the winter seasons. In 1869 he married and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Wabaunsee county, Kansas, and followed farming there for five years. (This farm he still owns.) He then returned to LaSalle County, in the winter of 1874, and was employed as clerk by his father-in-law, James S. Underhill, in a hardware store, for a period of five years, and then he purchased his present furniture store, where, in addition to his business of dealing in furniture, he also is an undertaker. He is a well-known and highly esteemed citizen of this county, having been a resident here ever since he was seven years of age excepting when he was in Kansas.

In his religion he is exemplary, being a member of the Methodist church; and he is also connected with Tonica Lodge, No. 364, A. F. & A. M.; of Peru Chapter, No. 60, R. A. M.; Peru Council, No. 12, R. & S. M.; of St. John's Commandery, No. 26, K. T.; and of the Mystic Workers of the World. Of the commandery he was the presiding officer for four years, and was then elected generalissimo, in which office he faithfully served until 1898; and he was senior warden for a number of years. He was the master of the blue lodge for three years. He is also a member of the Eastern Star lodge. Politically he is a Republican, and he has served as town clerk of Eden township for several terms.

On the 16th of December, 1869, he was united in marriage with Miss Maria Underhill, daughter of James S. and Jane (McLean) Underhill, and they have one son, Charles A., who is a conductor on the Illinois Central Railroad, and married Sophia Westmeier. Mrs. George A. McFerson died February 28, 1880 at the early age of twenty-nine years; and for his second wife Mr. McFerson chose, March 12, 1895, Miss Cora C. Gunn, a daughter of Henry and Cordelia (Fisher) Gunn. There were no children by this marriage. Mrs. McFerson died January 12. 1898, at the age of twenty-nine years, a pious and exemplary member of the Methodist church.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]



Amos W. Merritt
Amos W. Merritt, of the firm of Merritt & Bangs, general merchants, Lostant, Illinois, claims Ohio as his native state, his birth having occurred in Belmont County, June 29, 1843. Mr. Merritt is a son of Henry P. and Margaret M. (Wilson) Merritt, natives of Pennsylvania.

Their family was composed of eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, of whom nine are now living: Amos W., whose name introduces this sketch; John E., of White City, Kansas; Isabel W., wife of I. P. Wierman, of Lostant, Illinois; Hannah B., wife of Sewell Gotchell, of Freeport, Illinois; Mahlon L., of Dwight, Illinois; Charles H., also of Dwight; Maggie J., wife of George B. Hager, of Ottawa, Illinois; Isaac E., of Buckley, Illinois; and George L., of Roberts. The father of these children learned the trade of wagon-maker in early life and followed it until he was forty years of age, from that time on giving his attention to farming. He went with his parents from Pennsylvania to Belmont County, Ohio, when he was seven years old, and grew to manhood and married in that state. In 1853 he moved to Illinois and located in Magnolia, Putnam County, where he had a wagon shop for four years, until 1857. That year he came to LaSalle County and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Hope Township, partly improved at the time of purchase. It was principally upon this farm that he reared his family. He lived there until 1882, when he moved to a place near Wenona and lived there twelve years. He died April 13, 1896, at the age of seventy-eight years. His widow is still living, now in her eightieth year, her home being in Lostant. She is a member of the Society of Friends, as also was he. Politically he was a Republican, and at different times held several township offices, including that of supervisor.

The paternal grandfather of our subject was John Merritt. He was a Pennsylvanian, a dealer in boots and shoes, and died in the prime of early manhood, being only twenty-five years old at the time of his death. He left a widow and three little sons.

On his mother's side, Mr. Merritt's grandfather was Amos Wilson, a native of Pennsylvania, born in 1794. Mr. Wilson was twice married. His first wife, Hannah Brown, a native of Pennsylvania, and whose father was an Irishman, he married in Pennsylvania and by her had five children. The family moved to Ohio and located on a farm in Belmont County in 1826, and the same year the wife and mother died, at the age of twenty-six years. In 1828 Mr. Wilson married Miss Anna Morris, by whom he had nine children. They came to Illinois in 1851 and located in Putnam County, on a new farm, where he passed the rest of his life, and where he died January 15, 1881, in his eighty-seventh year.

Amos W. Merritt was ten years old when he came with his parents to Illinois and he has lived in Hope Township, LaSalle County since 1857. His youthful days were passed not unlike those of other farmer boys, assisting in the farm work and in winter attending the district schools. When he started out in life on his own responsibility it was a s a farmer on rented land. He continued farming until 1888 when he moved to Lostant. The following year he was appointed postmaster. While filling this office, in 1890, he engaged in the grocery business and the following year took in a partner M. H. Bangs, his brother-in-law, the firm becoming Merritt & Bangs. They then added a stock of dry goods, boots and shoes, making a complete general store, and have since kept a well assorted stock of general merchandise. They have established a good trade among the leading citizens of the town and surrounding country and are ranked with the enterprising up-to-date business men of Lostant.

Mr. Merritt was married December 30, 1875, to Miss Sarah A. Bangs, daughter of Samuel Lyman Bangs and Margaret (Howard) Bangs. Mrs. Merritt is one of a family of five children - two sons and three daughters - and she has one sister and two brothers living, namely: Jennie, wife of Dr. A. H. Hatton, of Peru, Illinois; J. Edward, superintendent of the township high school, Pontiac, Illinois and Mark H., in business with Mr. Merritt at Lostant. Mr. and Mrs. Merritt have no children. For several years previous to her marriage Mrs. Merritt was a popular and successful teacher, teaching at Rutland and Lostant and for a short time in the academy at Hillsboro, LaSalle County. She was Mr. Merritt's assistant in the post-office during the four years and a half he filled that position. Religiously she is a Methodist and fraternally a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, Mr. Merritt being identified with both the F. & A. M., Tonica Lodge, no. 364, and the O. E. S. Politically he is a Republican. In addition to the office already named, he has served in other local offices, such as township assessor, member of the village school board and member of the village board of trustees.

In tracing the family history of the Bangs and Howard families, we find that both families are from good stock. Samuel Lyman Bangs, the father of Mrs. Merritt, was born in Massachusetts, of patriotic ancestors. His father, Zenas Bangs, was a soldier of the Revolution, and one of his brothers was a soldier in the war of 1812, and his son served his country during the civil war. The early ancestors of the Bangs family came to Plymouth colony in 1623.

Margaret Howard, the mother of Mrs. Merritt, was descended from the royal family - the Howards of England. She is now past eighty years of age, makes her home with Mrs. Merritt, and is remarkably strong and active, both in mind and body for one of her age. Possessed of sterling qualities, the excellent family she has reared owe much to her for what they are and have achieved in life.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900]



Henry P. and Margaret M. (Wilson) Merritt
Mr. Merritt is a son of Henry P. and Margaret M. (Wilson) Merritt, natives of Pennsylvania. Their family was composed of eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, of whom nine are now living: Amos W., whose name introduces this sketch; John E., of White City, Kansas; Isabel W., wife of I. P. Wierman, of Lostant, Illinois; Hannah B., wife of Sewell Gotchell, of Freeport, Illinois; Mahlon L., of Dwight, Illinois; Charles H., also of Dwight; Maggie J., wife of George B. Hager, of Ottawa, Illinois; Isaac E., of Buckley, Illinois; and George L., of Roberts. The father of these children learned the trade of wagon-maker in early life and followed it until he was forty years of age, from that time on giving his attention to farming. He went with his parents from Pennsylvania to Belmont County, Ohio, when he was seven years old, and grew to manhood and married in that state. In 1853 he moved to Illinois and located in Magnolia, Putnam County, where he had a wagon shop for four years, until 1857. That year he came to LaSalle County and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Hope Township, partly improved at the time of purchase. It was principally upon this farm that he reared his family. He lived there until 1882, when he moved to a place near Wenona and lived there twelve years. He died April 13, 1896, at the age of seventy-eight years. His widow is still living, now in her eightieth year, her home being in Lostant. She is a member of the Society of Friends, as also was he. Politically he was a Republican, and at different times held several township offices, including that of supervisor.
[Source: Biographical and Genealogical Record of La Salle County, Illinois, Volume 2, Lewis Publishing Company 1900, Biography of Amos W. Merritt]



AMMON B. MOON

For many years having followed farming in LaSalle county, Mr. Moon is now living retired in Streator, enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. He is one of the extensive land-owners of the community, and his property has all been acquired entirely through his well directed efforts. A native of Eden township, LaSalle county, he was born January 27, 1834, his parents being Albert and Elizabeth Moon. The father was born in Virginia, in 1808, and the motherís birth occurred in Kentucky, January 28, 1818. The Moon family was probably established in the Old Dominion at an early period in its history, for the paternal grandfather of our subject, who was of Scotch and English descent, was a native of that state, and there resided until after his marriage. In 1833 he became one of the pioneer settlers of Illinois, making his home in Reading township, Livingston county, until called to his final rest. Albert Moon, the father of our subject, was reared to manhood in Greene county, Ohio, and when twenty-flour years of age cast in his lot with the early settlers of LaSalle county, his home being on a farm near Tonica. At the time of the Indian massacre in the Black Hawk war there was a company of sixteen organized at Ottawa to bury the victims of the savage cruelty, and Mr. Moon was among the number chosen for that purpose. In the winter of 1833 he was united in marriage with Elizabeth Boyle, a daughter of David and Rachel Boyle, who settled in Putnam county, Illinois, in 1829. Four children were born of this union: Ammon B., of this review; Salanda, wife of Mr. Sawyer; Matilda, wife of H. B. Schuler, of Chicago, Illinois; and Jacob W., who is living at Iowa Falls, Iowa. In 1834 the father of this family disposed of his property in LaSalle county and the following year purchased a tract of land in Reading township, Livingston county. There he carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred on the 19th of November, 1865.

During in infancy Ammon Moon was taken to Livingston county, where the days of his boyhood and youth were passed upon his fatherís farm. He assisted in its cultivation, and after acquiring a practical English education in the common schools he began farming on his own account, his early training in the fields then proving of practical value to him. He secured a farm on section 34, Eagle township, erected thereon a frame residence in the fall of 1856, and the following spring took possession of the place and began its development and improvement. Soon the land was transformed into richly cultivated fields, which yielded to the owner a golden tribute. As time passed he extended the boundaries of his place until it comprised four hundred and eighty acres, and he made excellent improvements upon it, erecting substantial buildings and replacing the first residence with a modern and commodious brick structure in 1872. At other times he has purchased property elsewhere, and in addition to the old homestead he has one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 33 and one hundred and sixty on section 27, making an aggregate of eight hundred acres. After a long and active life upon the farm, during which he won most gratifying success, he retired to private life in 1893, taking up his abode in Streator, where he is now living, surrounded with the comforts which make existence pleasant.

On the 8th of October, 1856, Mr. Moon was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Lyon, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Mills) Lyon. Her father, who was born in Clinton county, Ohio, in 1818, died in Pontiac, Illinois, in 1892 and her mother, who also was a native of the Buckeye stae, passed away in Pontiac, in 1882. To Mr. and Mrs. Moon were born five children, but tow are now deceased, namely: Carrie, who died in infancy, and Lillie who died at the age of five years. The three children now living are Nellie I., William A. and Estelle E. Nellie I. married William Turner and has two children Ė Guy F. and Harry. In 1882 Mr. Turner passed away and his widow afterward became the wife of Dr. O. J. Raub, of Abilene, Kansas, and by this marriage there is one boy, names Stanley. Estelle E. became the wife of Dr. O. D. Holland, of Streator, and they have one son, named Parke.

Mr. Moon is one of the oldest native sons of LaSalle county, and through more than six decades he has watched with interest the progress and improvement which have marked the onward march of time, ever bearing his part in the same. He has been a citizen loyal and true, and in the management of his business affairs he has accumulated a handsome property, which is the merited reward of his earnest, honest labors.

Biographical and genealogical record of La Salle County, Illinois. Chicago: Lewis Pub. Co., 1900.Page 200-202 - Transcribed by FOFG NP



Reason V. Myers
In the person introduced in this article we present not only a pioneer of Neosho county but also a pioneer of Kansas. He was brought into the state in 1859 and passed the nine years preceding his advent to Neosho county in Brown county, near Hiawatha, Kansas. His parents were of the tenant class, very limited in means and came to Neosho county to acquire a home on the public lands then so numerous in Southern Kansas. They took a claim in Canville township in 1868 and remained permanent and respected citizens of the locality.

Mr. Myers was born in LaSalle county, Illinois, November 2, 1857, and is a son and second child of Ransom and Matilda (Cecil) Myers, who had eleven children. The father was born in the state of North Carolina in 1824, and the mother's native state was the same, where she was born in 1828. Of their large family of children, ten still survive. Reason V. was, like his brothers and sisters, educated in the country schools and his training was, therefore, limited. When he began life it was with more of a store of youth and strength than education. He took up farming as a farm hand or tenant, and continued it till he located himself near Earlton and began the improvement of his one hundred and sixty acre tract just south of that place. At this time he engaged in the hay, grain and coal business in the little village and has, since 1895, continued in this occupation. The venture has proven a successful one and he has prosecuted it vigorously. He is well known among the dealers in the markets of Kansas City, Chicago and St. Louis and other points, to whom his consignments have been made and each year until 1901 his weekly output - in season - was a large and profitable one.

On December 25, 1899, Mr. Myers married Miss M. J. Gibson, a daughter of Randolph and Charity Gibson, and born in Neosho county, Kansas on the 18th day of March, 1876. The Gibson's came to Kansas from Indiana and were the parents of eleven children. Mr. and Mrs. Myers' only child is Randall V. Myers, born May 4, 1900. [Source: History of Neosho and Wilson Counties, Kansas, Pub. by L. Wallace Duncan, Fort Scott, Kansas, Monitor Printing Co., 1902; tr. by VB] ========== William Enlow The pioneers are the advance guard of civilization. Their desire for achievement and their personal courage prompt them to hazardous undertakings, to the accomplishment of a purpose for which the succeeding generations are ever grateful. The pioneer is determined, industrious, honorable and almost always poor. If, in his business, he is ambitious beyond his means, the hearty co-operation of a neighbor enables him to carry out his scheme. If misfortune befalls him and adversity seems his business partner for a time he increases his efforts, hugs the anchor of caution and rides into harbor of financial safety with the first favorable wind. He is conscious that his credit is his main capital and that its violation and abuse means ruin and retreat. His business integrity maintained his supremacy is assured and he is a leader throughout his day.
 

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