LaSalle County Illinois Biographies, Sketches and Obituaries

D

(Index Not linked)


Dick Daily

Andrew Dall

David Dana

Aaron Daniels

Benjamin Daniels

Jonathan Daniels

Thomas Dart

Dr. Davidson

Mr. Davis

William H. Davis

James Day

Reason Debolt

Loring Delano

Lucien Bonaparte Delano

Bartlett Dennison

George L. Densmore

Ansel Dewey

Justin Dewey

Roswell Dewey

Jacob Dice

T. Lyle Dickey

Dickinson Daughters

Samuel Dickinson

Zenas Dickinson

Zenas Clark Dickinson

Daniel Dimmick

Ephraim Dimmick

Isaac Dimmick

Marvin W. Dimock

Mordecai Disney

Hiram Divine

Corrin Doane

Ezra Dominy

William Donnell

Albert Dow

John R. Dow

Warren Dow

Elza Downey

James Downey

John Downey

Thomas Downey

Myron D. Downs

John Drain

Charles Dresser

William Dresser

Chester Dryer

Guy Dudley

Martin Dukes

William Dunlap

Albert Dunnavan

George M. Dunnavan

William L. Dunnavan

James Dyke

Dick Daily

Dick Daily came from Cork County, Ireland, to La Salle County in 1839; married Sarah Ann McCormick ; has served as Constable many years.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, 485 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Andrew Dall

Andrew Dall, from Norway, to New York, 1825, in the sloop ; here, 1834 ; settled on S. W.1/4S. 1, T. 34, R. 4 ; died at Salt Lake.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 282 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

David Dana

David Dana came from Vermont in 1836 ; blacksmith by trade; was a farmer in Bureau County, now in Chicago.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 369 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Aaron Daniels

Aaron Daniels, and wife, Maria Sanders, from Licking County, Ohio, in the fall of 1831, settled on S. 33 ; now in Kansas.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 287 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Benjamin Daniels

Benjamin Daniels, from N. Y.; living with James Whitmore.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 426 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jonathan Daniels

Jonathan Daniels, and wife, Mary Channel, from Licking County, Ohio, in the fall of 1831, bought a claim of Wm. Stadden, on S. 83, T. 34, R. 4. They had two children : Elizabeth, married Joseph Kleiber; Judith, married Wm. Stadden.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 284 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Thomas Dart

Thomas Dart, from Virginia to Indiana, came here in 1834 ; settled on S. 15, resided here a few years, removed to Missouri, and died there. One daughter, Sarah, married Enoch Spradling ; another, Lina, lives at Shabona's Grove, widow of James Price.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Mission, Page 419 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Dr. Davidson

Dr. Davidson, said to have been from Virginia, was doubtless the first American citizen, and the first white man, after the French occupants, that settled in the county; he built a cabin, and occupied it in the early summer of 1823, on the south bank of the Illinois river, nearly opposite the west end of Buffalo Rock, and traded with the Indians. He lived alone, and was found dead in his cabin in 1826. No kind hand smoothed his pillow, or moistened his parched lips; he died alone, leaving no kindred to mourn his departure. Such is the short but sad story of the first pioneer where so numerous and busy a population now live. Dr. Davidson was a well educated physician; he left a large amount of manuscript which was not preserved.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Page 225-226 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Mr. Davis

Mr. Davis, from Kentucky; settled on Indian creek, S. W. i S. 2, in 1830-the first in that region.

His wife was daughter of John Hays, the first settler at Peru-they, with five children, were killed at the massacre. Their three oldest sons escaped.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Freedom, Page 395 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William H. Davis

William H. Davis, clerk for Kinney; went to the Au Sable.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 370 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James Day

James Day, mother and sister, came from the city of New York in 1832; the sister died, the mother returned to New York, and James became insane, and left. Mr. Day laid out the original town of South Ottawa. Their family history is a sad one; they were educated, refined and intelligent people; Miss Day died of calomel salivation, the result of the murderous medical practice of that day.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 260 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Reason Debolt

Reason Debolt, and wife, Emma Grove, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1829 ; one of Green's party; settled on S. 11, T. 34, R. 4 ; in 1833 sold to Loring Delano, and moved to the N. E.1/4 of S. 16, where he now lives. Mrs. Debolt died in 1843. Children: Elma, married a Mr. Hupp, and lives in Iroquois County; Barbara, married David Connard, and died in 1851; Lovina, is living in Ohio; George, married Miss Sutton, and lives in Dayton; Jesse, died in the army; Cyrus, married Elizabeth Dunnavan.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 278 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Loring Delano

Loring Delano, a native of Vermont, and wife, Sarah Hardaway, from Utica, New York, in 1833, kept a hotel, and is well remembered as the host of the old "Fox River House," at that time the crack hotel of Ottawa; he was very fond of hunting, and kept his larder well supplied with game. He died in 1849. His widow married Oranzo Leavens. His children are: Charles, now in Florida; James, in California; Edward, somewhere West.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 232 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Lucien Bonaparte Delano

Lucien Bonaparte Delano, brother of Loring, from Utica, New York, 1836, a stone mason by trade, and an active Democratic politician; witty, and quick at repartee, his burlesque stories and bon mots will be long remembered. He died in 1870; his widow, Mary Ives, lives in Ottawa. He left four children: Lucien is in Ottawa; Cornelia at home; Benton is in Marseilles; Elizabeth married. George Porter.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 232 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Bartlett Dennison

Bartlett Dennison, and wife, Jane Lindley, came about 1834. He sold goods, and owned a saw mill on Indian creek; went to California, and died there.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, South Ottawa, Page 263 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George L. Densmore

Geo. L. Densmore, and wife, Maria Bronson, came from Woodbury, Ct., in 1840, lived in Ottawa one year, and then went on to Section 25 ; he served one term as Justice of the Peace, and died in 1872. His widow occupies the old farm, with Marius, her only son.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 346 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ansel Dewey

Ansel Dewey, and wife, Philancy Alvord, from Lenox, Mass., settled near Troy Grove, and removed to the town of Adams in 1849, where he still resides. He has eight children: Mary E., married Samuel Dewey; Milton E., married Rebecca J. Brown; Maria L., and Frances C., are at home; Chauncey B., married Miss Blodget in Vermilion County ; Wm. A., at home ; Henrietta, married Charles S. Brown in Vermillion Connty ; Charles O., in Ottawa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 457-458 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Justin Dewey

Justin Dewey came from Ohio in the fall of 1833, and settled on Section 13. He died in 1849, aged 70 years.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 405 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Roswell Dewey

Roswell Dewey, from Great Barrington, Berkshire County, Massachusetts ; settled here in 1838; died in fall of the same year. Had children: Sarah, married the Rev. Nahum Gould ; William R., married Paulina Pratt, now in Mendota.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 406 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Jacob Dice

Jacob Dice, from New York, about 1837; settled on S. 6; he sold to Hoffman. He married the widow Hays, and soon returned to New York.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 444 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

T. Lyle Dickey

T. Lyle Dickey was born in Kentucky October 11th, 1811, graduated at Miami University in 1831, taught school three years, came to Illinois in the fall of 1834 (first to Macomb County), read law with Cyrus Walker, was licensed to practice in 1835, located at Rushville in 1836, and in the fall of 1839 came to Ottawa, and, till 1848, followed a circuit practice, going to each county in the circuit. In 1846 he raised a company of infantry, which was part of Colonel Hardin's regiment in the Mexican war. After six months' service, he resigned on account of sickness. He was elected Circuit Judge in 1818, the circuit being composed of twelve counties, which office he resigned in 1852. In 1854 he opened a law office in Chicago. Judge Dickey states that in the speculation previous to 1837, and in the revulsion then, he became bankrupt for several thousand dollars, and remained so for twenty-one years; that he opened the law office in Chicago to enable him to pay off his old debts, in which he succeeded, paying both principal and interest, some of it at twelve per cent, for the twenty-one years. In 1841 he inherited one-third of an estate of negro slaves worth $15,000, which he refused to use or sell, but gave the slaves their freedom. He opened an office in Ottawa in connection with General Wallace and his son Cyrus E. Dickey, where he practiced till 1861, when he raised and commanded the Fourth Regiment of Cavalry. Was one year Chief of Cavalry on General Grant's staff. He was in the army two years: from 1861 to 1863. In 1867, with General Hurlbut and the Governor, he was a commissioner to urge upon Congress the building of the Illinois and Michigan Ship Canal. In 1866 was the Democratic candidate for Congressman at large, and ran against John A. Logan, the latter being elected. From 1868 to 1870 he was United States Assistant Adjutant General; practiced law for three years; then moved to Chicago, and was Corporation Counsel till elected Judge of the Supreme Court in December, 1875.

Judge Dickey has been twice married. His first wife was Julia Evans; his second Mrs. B. C. Hirst, of Maryland. He has four children living, all by his first wife: Martha, widow of Gen. W". H. L. Wallace, is living in Ottawa; John J. married Carrie Honey, of Wisconsin: he is telegraph superintendent at Omaha; Charles H. married Anna Alexander, of the Sandwich Islands, daughter of an early missionary: he is a merchant at Maui Island, Haiku, Sandwich Islands; V. Belle married C. H. Wallace, brother of General Wallace: he is also a merchant in the island of Haiku. Judge Dickey's oldest son, Cyrus E., was killed at the battle of Cross Roads, Red river, at the time of Banks' defeat. He was Assistant Adjutant General, with the rank of Captain.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Ottawa, Page 248-250 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Dickinson Daughters

Six sisters of Clark and Samuel came with the parents: Caroline, married Mr. Johnson, she is deceased; Cemantha, married Robert Shepherd, now a widow in Chicago; Amelia, married Mr. Wood, she is now deceased; Susan, married and lives in Chicago ; Olive, married Mr. Munger, in Montana; Margaret, married Mr. Fairchild, now in Indianapolis.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 359 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Samuel Dickinson

Samuel Dickinson, son of Zenas, came from New York to Utica in 1835. He was a partner with Jas. Clark in a large contract on the Illinois & Michigan Canal, at Utica, and subsequently, for several years successively, captain of the steamboats Dial, La Salle, and Belle, running from the head of navigation of the Illinois to St. Louis. He went to California in 1850, and died there in 1851. He never married.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 359 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Zenas Dickinson

Zenas Dickinson, with his wife, Mabel Clark, came from Granby, Mass., in 1836, and settled on Section 10. Mrs. Dickinson died in August, 1846. Mr. Dickinson died in November, 1857.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 358 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Zenas Clark Dickinson

Zenas Clark Dickinson, also son of Zenas, came from Massachusetts with his father in 1836 ; settled on Section 10, where he still resides. His wife was Harriet Donaldson ; they have six children-all at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Utica, Page 359 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Daniel Dimmick

The first settler in the town was Daniel Dimmick, who came from Mansfield, Ct., in 1824, to Washington, Richland County, Ohio, and from Ohio to Peoria in 1828, to near Princeton, in Bureau County, in the spring of 1829, and in 1830 to near Lamoille, and went to Hennepin during the Indian war. In 1833 he settled on Sec. 26, in the present town of Dimmick. Mr. Dimmick had much new country experience. He carried the chain to lay off the town of Zanesville, in Ohio, in a wind-fall, and he lived many years in his final home, almost secluded from neighbors and society. He held the office of Justice of the Peace. He died at the home of his son, Elijah, in 1861. Mr. Dimmick had six sons and two daughters. Elijah is the only one remaining here; he married Mary E. Philips, second wife, Caroline Foot, and has seven children. He says that in the spring of 1833, while in Hennepin, his father sent him to Dixon to inquire of Mr. John Dixon if it was safe to come back, and Mr. Dixon assured him that it was, and they then went on their claim in the town of Dimmick.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Dimmick , Page 466-467 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ephraim Dimmick

Ephraim Dimmick, brother of Isaac Dimmick and wife, Jerusha Dunham, from Wayne County, Pa., in the fall of 1833, and settled on S. 33, T. 32, R. 2 ; his wife died in 1848; he is still living with his son-in-law, J. P. Wiswall, at the ripe age of 90. His children were one son and three daughters: Franklin, who married Harriet Hubbard, and settled on S. 26, T. 33, R. 2-was a joiner by trade, and a successful farmer-he died in 1866, leaving eight children; Julia, married J. P. Wisvvall; Sophia, married Lewis Rugg, and resides in Pontiae ; Minerva, married James M. Leonard-died in 1875.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 329-330 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Isaac Dimmick

Judge Isaac Dimmick, and wife, Clarissa Norton, from Wayne County, Pa., came West in the spring of 1833; he returned and brought out his family in the fall, and located at Vermillionville. He laid out and was the owner of the town of Vermillionville, which promised well for a time, but like many other towns of that day, refused to grow faster than the surrounding country, and was forced, with them, eventually to yield the palm to the railroad centres. Mr. Dimmick held the office of Judge in Pennsylvania, and was County Commissioner for several terms here. He removed to Ottawa, where he died, aged 91. His children were: Lawrence W., who came with his father in 1833, married Cynthia Jenks, was Deputy Surveyor, and settled on T. 32, R. 2, where he died in 1852; Esther, married Dea. Wood, she died in 1856; Dr. L. N., a physician, married and practiced at Freedom, then at Ottawa, where he kept a drug store, and is now living at Santa Barbara, California ; Philo C., married Sarah Yost, and for his second wife, Miss Stewart-occupied the old farm, then joined his brother in the drug store in Ottawa, now at Santa Barbara, California; Ann, with her mother, lives in Ottawa; Olive, is now the widow of James Van Doren, and lives in Ottawa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Deer Creek, Page 325-326 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Marvin W. Dimock

Marvin W. Dimock, from Washington, Ct., came in 1838. He bought the farm of Rees Morgan, and married Jane, daughter of Solomon Brown. In 1850 he sold to Hiram Jackson, from Pennsylvania, and removed to Ottawa. In 1805, while showing a friend the animals in the park of Judge Caton, he was killed by a vicious elk.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Farm Ridge, Page 385-386 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Mordecai Disney

Mordecai Disney, and son-in-law, Sprague, settled on S. 27, in 1836, on the east side of Little Indian creek, and were the first in the town ; they claimed all the country, and sold claims to all that came ; they left in a year or two, probably to repeat the same speculation elsewhere.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 455 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Hiram Divine

Hiram Divine, and wife, Betsey Torrey, came from Green County, Pa., in 1839; settled in the town of Eagle, on Section 12 ; was a farmer and nurseryman ; he died in 1871; his wife died in 1847. Emma, lives in Champaign County; Luther, is in Iowa; Charlotte, is Mrs. E. B. Darling, of Streator ; Mary, is insane ; Alvin, Celia and Elma, are the remaining children. Second wife's children, Clemens and Lucien.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 444-445 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Corrin Doane

Corrin Doane, from Boston, came in 1834; married Harriet Johnson-his second wife was Hannah Stilson, sister to S. T. Stilson. He died in May, 1836. He had two sons : Hazen, married and lives in Earl; Samuel J., died in the army.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Northville, Page 431 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Ezra Dominy

Ezra Dominy was born at East Hampton, L. I., 1876-with his wife, Rhoda Smith, and family, came from Plattsburg, New York, in 1835, with a wagon, by the Lake shore, to Illinois, being six weeks on the road; settled on S. 28. The Dominy family, descendants of Ezra, with their wives and husbands, held a reunion in September, 1873 ; there were 100 present, including children, grand children, and great grand children. His children are : Rebecca, who married Robert Greenless, of Dayton; Nathaniel, married Philinda Finch, in Grand Ridge ; John, in Iowa ; Belinda, married Martin Lewis, now dead : Sally, died single ; Lorenzo, in Serena; Ezra A., married Ann Eliza Pool, in Serena ; Gilbert, married Mary E. Pool ; Betsey, married Jacob Peterson,in Serena; Anna, married Matthias Pool, in Serena. Mr. Dominy is living with the last named, at the ripe age of 91. Mrs. Dominy died in 1873, aged 87.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Serena, Page 439 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Donnell

William Donnell, born in Ireland, came to New York in 1835 and to La Salle County in 1837, and settled on Section 4; married Miss T. Mackey. Their children are: Agnes, Porter, Margaret, Alice, Mary, and Ross-all at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Bruce, Page 344 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Albert Dow

Albert Dow came from Boston in 1835. He married Miss Frances Johnson, of Boston, and settled on the claim left by John R. Dow; his wife died soon, and he married Martha Miles, and had one son and two daughters ; he is now living in Chicago. He resided in Ottawa several years.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 431 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John R. Dow

John R. Dow returned to Boston in the fall of 1834, and his two brothers occupied his claim. He is now living in New York.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 431 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Warren Dow

Warren Dow, from Boston, came in 1834. He married Miss Alice B. Champney, of Boston ; has one son and three daughters ; he now lives in Wisconsin. He resided in Ottawa several years, and in Marseilles.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Earl, Page 431 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Thomas, John, Elza, and James Downey

Thomas, John, Elza, and James Downey, four brothers from Painesville, Ohio, in 1834 ; settled on Secs. 15 and 16; Thomas served as Justice of the Peace ; he died about 1850. John and Elza removed to Magnolia, Putnam County ; James left, after a short residence here.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Eagle, Page 443 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Elzy Downey

Page 654 Magnolia Township

Mr. Downey is a farmer, living in Magnolia township. He was born in Greenbrier county, Va., in 1810, and moved to Belmont county, Ohio in 1814, thence to LaSalle county, near Ottawa, in 1832, locating in Putnam county in 1838. He married Mrs. Nancy Johnston in 1838, who was born in Ross county Ohio in 1814. Mr. D. has one child by a former marriage, Robert; and Mrs. Downey one by a former marriage Sarah J. (Gowman). They are members of the Methodist church. Mr. D. is a man of diversified ability; in engaged in butchering part of the time, and has also run a cider mill for several years past; and was constable for two terms.

["The  Record of Olden Times or Fifty Year on the Prairie" embracing sketches of the discovery, exploration and settlement of the country. by Spencer Elsworth,   Lacon, IL Home Journal Steam Printing Establishment Copyright Date MDCCCLXXX (1880)]

Myron D. Downs

Myron D. Downs, from Connecticut, in 1837; he married Elizabeth Allen; he sold goods in Rockwell and went to Chicago in 1838, or 1839, where he is now living.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, LaSalle, Page 380 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

John Drain

John Drain came from Licking County, Ohio, in 1833. He died at Abraham Trumbo's in 1835.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 447 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William and Charles Dresser

William and Charles Dresser, from Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in 1837; tailors by trade; went to California in 1849.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Peru, Page 367 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Chester Dryer

Chester Dryer, from Seneca County, N.Y., in Dec., 1835, his family came in June, 1836. A sad fatality attended his family; his second son, Calvin, died in 1840; his oldest son, William, died in 1841, and his wife, Sarah Hobro, died in 1842. Of seven children by his first wife, one only survives, Keziah, wife of Sanford Harwood, living in Iowa. Mr. Dryer's second wife is Mary Little; they have one daughter. He brought in the first threshing machine-a four-horse power that delivered the grain on the ground from the cylinder to be cleaned by the hand mill -an imperfect implement, but far better than tramping out the grain on the ground with horses or cattle. Mr. Dryer has held the office of Justice of the Peace for several years.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Vermillion, Page 298 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Guy Dudley

Guy Dudley settled on Section 25, in 1833.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 450 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Martin Dukes

Martin Dukes, from Kentucky, in 1836, settled near McKernan, and after two or three years moved to Iowa.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Otter Creek, Page 462 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William Dunlap

William Dunlap, from New York, came to Troy Grove in 1836, and remained here two or three years. He had three sons and two daughters: Nathaniel, Minzo, and M. L. The last was a prominent horticulturist, and was for many years distinguished as the agricultural correspondent of the Chicago Tribune over the signature of "Rural."

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Troy Grove, Page 407 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Albert Dunnavan

Albert Dunnavan, from Licking County, Ohio, came with Letts to Cedar Point in 1830 ; remained there one year, then came to Rutland and settled on S. 13 ; in 1831 married Nancy, daughter of John Green, and still lives on the old farm. Has eight children : Samuel, married Miss Munson; David ; Isaac, is out West; Joseph ; George, married Miss Rogers ; Katharine, married Frank Brandon ; Jane, married Aaron Howe ; and Anna.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 287 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

George M. Dunnavan

George M. Dunnavan, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1830, with David Letts, who settled on Section 3 in town of Eden. Mr. Dunnavan remained at Cedar Point, as it was then called, till 1835, when he settled on S. 7, T. 34, R. 4, on Buck creek timber. He married Catharine Green, daughter of John Green. There are ten children: Silas L., is in Montana; Louisa Jane, married D. S. Green, and resides at Central City, Colorado; Emma, married Andrew Brown and lives in Ottawa; Lucien G., is at Central City, Colorado; Frank W., Mary E., Charles, Belle, Cora and Edward, are at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Dayton, Page 272 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

William L. Dunnavan

William L. Dunnavan, from Licking County, Ohio, in 1830, made a claim southwest of Peru; sold to Ish, and settled on Section 22 in 1831. He was married in the fall of that year to Eliza, daughter of John Green, by David Shaver, Esq., being the first wedding in town. Has six children: Albert; Emma, married a Mr. Kite ; John; Elizabeth, married Cyrus Debolt; Jesse, married Maggie Burk; James, at home.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Rutland, Page 278-279 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

James Dyke

James Dyke, and wife, Mary Sabin, from Connecticut, came here in 1837, settling on S. 5, T. 33, R5; was killed by the fall of a tree, February, 1844, leaving a widow and six children, all now dead but one, Eunice, who married Perry Baker, and lives in Missouri.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Manlius, Page 318 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]