History of Adams Township, LaSalle County, Illinois

Adams Township

Adams embraces T. 36, R. 5. It lies on the north line of the county, and is drained by Little Indian creek, which runs southwardly near the centre of the town, and furnished a fair supply of timber for the early settlers. The Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad passes northeastwardly across the north side of the town, and Leland Station is a thriving village. The first settlement was in 1836, but the settlements were few, and scattered, till the advent of the railroad, after which the town rapidly filled up.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Adams, Page 454-455 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Adams Township

Topography  - Pioneers - Elected Officials

Biographical

(Andrew Anderson, Nelson Anderson, Frederick Bastian, Reuben Brunson, William Callagan, William Cottew, Arthur H. Dale, Frank Dale, Knud Halverson, Ole H. Hanson, Darwin Hinkley, Jacob C. Jacobson, Dr. Charles D. Jones, Rasmus O. Jorstad, Andrew A. Klove, Carl F. Oakfield, Knud T. Olsen, Alfred S. Pederson, Robert Rumney, John F. Safeblade, Thomas F. Thompson, Arthur H. Warner)

Adams embraces congressional township 36 north, range 4 east. De Kalb County bounds it on the north, Northville Township on the east, Serena on the south and Earl on the west. It is a prairie township and is drained by Little Indian Creek, which enters the township in the northwest corner and flows southeast, passing near the line of sections 34 and 35. This stream is skirted by timber; the rest of the township is prairie land, and tilling is greatly resorted to. The township had a slow growth until the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad was built across the northern part, in 1853, when its resources began to be rapidly developed and it is now thickly settled and in a prosperous condition.

Pioneers

The first settlement was made by Mordecai Disney and his son-in-law, Sprague, who settled on section 27, in 1836. They claimed the whole township and sold land to all who came, for a year or two, and then left the county. Nathan Townsend came from Sulivan County, N.Y., in 1836, and the first winter lived in Ottawa, settling the following spring on section 27, Adams Township. He died in 1857. Aaron Beardsley came to the county in 1835, from Massachusetts, and in 1836 settled in Adams Township.

Joshua Richardson, Reverins Wilcox and his son Aaron came in 1837. Henry G. Beardsley, William Sargeant, Reuben Bronson and Nathaniel S. Pierce came in 1838. Andrew Anderson, Ole T. Oleson, Halvar Nelson came from Norway in 1836, and the same summer located in La Salle County, and the following spring settled on sections 21 and 22, Adams Township. Thove Tilotson and Paul Iverson came in 1837 from the same country, and in 1839 came Hans O. Hanson and Osman Thomason. Ansel Dewey settled here in 1849, having lived in Troy Grove several years previous.

Among the pioneers of the township was the Lett family. Thomas Lett bought a partially improved claim of Mr. Doyle and mad of it a fine farm which is now owned by his heirs. He sleeps in the family cemetery. A daughter, now Mrs.Cottew, is a prominent resident of the township, and a talented cultured lady. Her literary productions have been published in the leading journals of the country.

Official

Adams was organized as a township April 2, 1850. On that day an election was held at the school-house near the residence of Mr. Hupps. Allen E. Wilcox was chosen Moderator and William Fleming, Clerk. The following are the principal officers that have served from that time to the present:

1850 -

Supervisor, E. S. Beardsley; Clerk, W. Fleming; Assessor, Reuben Bronson; Collector, L. C. Beardsley; Commissioners of Highways, A. Skinner, S. Brayton and O. Jacobs; Justices, A. E. Wilcox and W. Cullen; Constables, Harvey Blake and James Tomlin.

1851 - Superviosr, E. S. Beardsley; Clerk, William Fleming; Assessor, Charles Townsend; Collector, James Tomlin; Commissioners of Highways, N. Anderson, A. Dewey and S. Brayton; Justices, A. E. Wilcox and W. Cullen; Constables, James Tomlin and Harvey Blake.

1852 - Supervisor, William Cullen; Clerk, W. Fleming; Assessor, W. Fleming, Collector, James Tomlin, Commissioners of Highways, A. E. Wilcox, C. Townsend and Jacob Johnson.

1853 - Supervisor, William Cullen; Clerk, William Fleming; Assessor, N. Gould; Collector, James Tomlin; Commissioners of Highways, John Reed, R. Bronson and W. H. Crapses.

1854 - Supervisor, E. S. Beardsley; Clerk, William Fleming; Assessor, John Read; Collector, J. A. Whitmore; Commissioners of Highways, C. Olson, A. Whitmore and Henry Mouvin; Justices, John Whitmore and William Cullen; Constables, James Tomlin and J. A. Whitmore.

1855 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, James Morse; Assessor, Evert Stoutenburgh; Collector, James Tomlin; Commissioners of Highways, O. M. Hanson, E. K. Berry and John Read; Justice, A. Whitmore.

1856 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, James Morse; Assessor; W. Cullen; Collector, A. A. Klove; Commissioners of Highways, N. Anderson, Henry Hum and James Fleming.

1857 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, E. Carptenter; Assessor, Ira Kiff; Collector, A. A. Klove; Commissioners of Highways, Horace Carpenter, James Fleming and O. M. Hanson.

1858 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, W. R. Steward; Assessor, N. S. Pierce; Collector, A. A. Klove; Commissioners of Highways, John Montague, C. Halverson and J. B. Knight; Justices, A. A. Klove and Henry Hum; Constables, D. Hum and J. J. Millay

1859 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, H. J. Hanaford; Assessor, A. A. Klove, Collector, A. Satter; Commissioners of Highways, R. Bronson, H. Halverson and C. Teurborn.

1860 - Superviosr, William Fleming; Clerk, H. J. Hanaford, Assessor, E. Stoutenburgh; Collector, A. Satter; Commissioners of Highways, R. Bronson, R. Halverson and A. Dewey.

1861 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, H. N. Hannaford; Assessor, N. S. Pierce; Collector, A. F. Satter; Commissioners of Highways, R. Halverson, A. Dewey and R. Bronson; Constable, C. R. Hannaford.

1862 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Cler, S. Brown; Assessor, N. Anderson; Collector, Thomas Iverson; Commissioners of Highways, Ira Kiff; Justices H. Night Lauder and R. Bronson; Constables, T. Iverson and D. Hum.

1863 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, C. S. Hubbell; Asessor, H. Hum; Collector, A. T. Satter; Commission of Highways, James Townsend

1864 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, C. S. Hubbell; Assessor, E. Stoutenburgh; Collector, J. Read; Commissioners of Highways, J. D. Knight and A. P. Hudgens.

1865 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, C. S. Hubbell; Assessor, E. Stoutenburgh; Collector, T. Iverson; Commissioner of Highways, A. P. Hudgens.

1866 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, A. D. Shephard; Assessor, H. E. Gedney; Collector, Ole H. Halder; Commissioner of Highways, Henry Merwin; Justices, E. M. Konne and Henry Hum; Constables, D. Hum and A. Vatter.

1867 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, J. S. Bishop; Assessor, Henry Hum; Collector, D. Hum; Commissioner of Highways, J. B. Harmon

1868 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, D. Richolson; Assessor, A. A. Klove; Collector, B. W. Brayton; Commissioner of Highways, A. P. Hudgens.

1869 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, D. Richolson; Assessor, Thomas Welsh; Collector, E. Carpenter; Commissioner of Highways, B. F. Rogers.

1870 - Supervisor, William Fleming; Clerk, c. F. Oakfield; Assessor, Thomas Welsh; Collector, T. F. Rolfe; Commissioner of Highways, R. Rumney; Justices, Henry Hum and D. Richolson; Constables, D. H. Knight and A. Potter.

1871 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, C. F. Oakfield; Assessor, T. L. Welsh; Collector, J. C. Jackson; Commissioner of Highways, J. C. Smith

1872 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, C. F. Oakfield; Assessor, T. L. Welsh; Collector, E. H. Nelson; Commissioner of Highways, K. Holverson; Justice, R. Bronson

1873 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, C. F. Oakfield; Assessor, Henry Hum; Collector, A. Potter; Commissioner of Highways, R. Rumney; Justice, C. F. Oakfield; Constable, A. Potter.

1874 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, C. F. Oakfield; Assessor, H. Hum; Collector, G. Cooper; Commissioner of Highways, R. Holmes; Constables, E. H. Nelson and George Hum.

1875 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, C. F. Oakfield; Assessor, T. L. Welsh; Collector, Thomas Thompson, Jr.; Commissioner of Highways, D. H. Knight; Constable, Thomas Barnes.

1876 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, E. Carpenter; Assessor, W. Kennedy; Collector, H. T. Thompson; Commissioner of Highways, R. Rumney; Justice, E. M. Kinne

1877 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, E. M. Kinne; Assessor, Henry Hum; Collector, N. J. Nelson; Commissioner of Highways, R. Holmes; Justices, E. M. Kinne and Henry Hum; Constables, T. Barnes and S. Hum.

1878 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, E. M. Kinne; Assessor, Samuel Dunevan; Collector, A. N. Anderson; Commissioner of Highways, P. A. Peterson.

1879 - Supervisor, a. A. Klove; Clerk, E. M. Kinne; Assessor, Samuel Dunevan; Collector, Ole G. Edwinson; Commissioner of Highways, P. A. Peterson

1880 - Supervisor, A. A. Klove; Clerk, T. F. Thompson; Assessor, W. Rumney; Collector, Samuel Thorson; Commissioner of Highways, R. Holmes.

1881 - Supervisor, Samuel Dunevan; Clerk, T. F. Thompson; Assessor, C. D. Harman; Collector, T. F. Thompson; Commissioner of Highways, J. A. Johnson; Justices, N. J. Whitney and Henry Hum; Constables, S. Hum and C. M. Potter.

1882 - Supervisor, Samuel Dunevan; Clerk, T. F. Thompson; Assessor, C. D. Harman; Collector, T. T. Thompson; Commissioners of Highways, R. Rumney and R. Bronson.

1883 - Supervisor, Samuel Dunevan; Clerk, T. F. Thompson; Assessor, C. D. Harman; Collector, T. T. Thompson; Commissioner of Highways, Ole M. Hanson; Constable, H. D. Potter.

1884 - Supervisor, Samuel Dunevan; Clerk T. F. Thompson; Assessor, C. D. Harman; Collector, G. O. Cooper; Commissioner of Highways, W. T. Boston.

1885 - Supervisor, A. N. Anderson; Clerk, T. F. Thompson; Assessor, Ole J. Hill; Collector, T. T. Thompson; Commissioner of Highways, C. Farly; Justices, N. J. Whitney and Henry Hum; Constables, Thomas Barnes and Joseph Moore.

Outside of the village of Leland, Adams Township has six school-houses and one church. Much attention is paid to the public schools and as a rule they will average reasonably well with the first township in the county. The church belongs to the Wesleyan society and is situated on section 26.

The foreign population in Adams is made up largely of Norwegians, who settled here in an early day and many have come since then. The Norwegians are a hard-working, industrious people. They live economically and are perfectly honest and upright in their dealings, and are quiet and law-abiding citizens.


Biographical

Frederick Bastian

Page 21

Frederick Bastian, section 36, Adams Township, was born in Alsace, France, June 16, 1839. When he was an infant his father, Charles Bastian, died, and his mother afterward married Louis Stauffer, who brought the family to America in 1845, settling in Northville Township, where he resided many years. Our subject subsequently settled in Adams Township, where he remained three years, after which he lived in Serena Township for seven years, when he returned to Adams Township, where he has since been engaged in farming and stock-raising. He has been successful in his agricultural pursuits, and now has a fine farm containing 156 acres. He was married Feb. 18, 1862, to Magdelena Girolt, and of the eight children born to them six are living - Caroline, Libbie, Ella, Daniel, William and Edward. While living in Serena Township Mr. Bastian served as Tax Collector, and also six years as School Director. He has also held the office of School Director in this township six years. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Association.

Reuben Brunson

Page 21-22

Reuben Brunson, residing on section 26, Adams Township, was born June 16, 1817, in Green County, N.Y., a son of Benoni Brunson, a native of Connecticut, of English descent. His father is now deceased. He settled in La Salle County, Ill., in 1838, making the entire journey by teams. He first entered eighty acres where he now resides, and began making a home, and by his persevering energy and economy he is now the owner of a fine farm of 295 acres, where he is engaged in farming and stock-raising, paying special attention to the raising of short-horn cattle, of which he has a good herd. He was married Dec. 25, 1845, to Deborah Townsend, daughter of Nathaniel Townsend, who came with his family to this county when Mrs. Brunson was in her ninth year. Of the eight children born to this union, five survive - Ruhama, Albert E., Jay, Alice and Arthur. Ruhama married Theron Beresford, of Saunders County, Neb., and has five children - Elytta, Aure, Vinelle, J. R. and Euphemia. Albert married Anna Barton, and lives in Lancaster County, Neb. Alice is the wife of Dr. Thomas P. Butler of Clay County, Neb., and has three daughters - Minnie, Myrtle and Vena. Mr. Brunson was the first Assessor of this township after its organization. He has served as Justice of the Peace four years and was Highway Commissioner over twenty years, and has held other offices of trust and responsibility.


Arthur H. Dale

Page 22-23

Arthur H. Dale, dealer in live stock, at Leland, was born in Luzerne County, Pa, Feb. 2, 1846, a son of Frank Dale, of this place. When he was an infant his parents moved to De Kalb County, Ill., and in 1861 removed to Leland, La Salle County. Our subject was in the grain business at this place for a time, then was engaged in the hardware business eight years, and at the same time dealt in stock. He went to Plattsburg, Mo., in 1870, thence to California, where he remained till the fall of 1872, then returned to Leland, where he has since been dealing in all kinds of stock. He was married in December 1875, to Louie H. Gedney, a native of La Salle County, and daughter of Henry E. Gedney, of Ottawa, Ill. Mr. Dale is at present serving as School Director, Village Treasurer, and is Treasurer of the Board of Highway Commissioners. He has also served several terms as Village Trustee. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity. He has a farm of eighty acres in this county, and also owns a half interest in sixty-eight acres in another part of the county. His wife is the owner of a farm of 320 acres. Her father, H. E. Gedney, came to La Salle County in an early day and settled in Ottawa. He was editor of the Constitution, now the Ottawa Republican, for some time, and afterward lived on a farm near Ottawa. He is now living retired from the active duties of life, with the exception of looking after his large property in Ottawa.

Frank Dale

Page 23

Frank Dale was born Jan. 23, 1812 in Yorkshire, England. He was the son of David Dale, a native of England, who came to the United States in 1819, settling in the wild woods of Luzerne County, Penn. Frank Dale came to Port Huron, Mich., in 1834, and to DeKalb County, Ill., in 1836. He established the first store in Somonauk in 1857. He came to Leland, Ill., in 1859, and engaged in the grain business, remaining there ten years. He then returned to DeKalb County, remaining here seven years, and then came to Leland. Aug. 17, 1833, he married Maria Webster, a daughter of John Webster. They were parents of eleven children, eight of whom are living - Clara, Carolina, Mary, Susan, Arthur H., John W., James F. and David M. Mrs. Dale died Aug. 21, 1872, and Mr. Dale was again married Dec. 7, 1873, to Mrs. Sarah E. Kiff, widow of Ira Kiff, and daughter of Joseph Whitson. She had four children by her first husband, three still living - Joseph, Jesse and Jennie. Mr. Dale owns 116 acres of land here in Adams Township, and Mrs. Dale owns seventy-five acres in DeKalb County, Ill. Mr. Dale is Chairman of the Board of Village Trustees. He is a member of the Methodist Protestant church in which he was ordained Deacon. He is President of the DeKalb County Pioneer Association.

Knud Halverson

Page 23-24

Knud Halverson, section 21, Adams Township, was born near Christiana, Norway, July 20, 1813, the son of Halver Knutsen, a native of same place. Mr. Halverson came with his parents to the United States in 1838, and lived in Rutland Township, La Salle Co., Ill., until 1840, when he came to Adams Township, which as since been his home. He was married in 1841 to Elizabeth Olson, a daughter of Ole Thompson. They are the parents of ten children, eight of whom are living - Nels, Alex, John, Charles, Betsey, Annie, Ellen and Elias. Two sons, Halvre and Ole, died while fighting for the Union in the late war. Mr. Halverson commenced life in limited circumstances. He worked on the Illinois Canal until he made enough to purchase two cows. When the family reached Chicago they had no money, and had to walk all the way from there to Marseilles, women and all. He worked hard, and by good management he now owns 130 acres of land. He was Highway Commissioner for ten or twelve years. He and his family are members of the Lutheran church.

Ole H. Hanson

Page 24

Ole H. Hanson, farmer and stock-raiser, section 15, Adams Township, was born in Norway, Jan. 22, 1827. He was a son of Hans Olson, a native of Norway, who is now deceased. He came to the United States in 1839, and settled in La Salle County, and the following spring located in Adams Township, where our subject has since lived. His father died here about forty years ago. Mr. Hanson was married March 22, 1855, to Miss Isabella Osmonson, a daughter of Charan Osmonson. They are the parents of six children - Henry M., George M., Emma C., Charles F., Joseph and Simon. Henry married Miss Julia A. Klove and lives in Lee County, Ill. He has three children - Ada, Ruby and Orvil. Emma married Christian Jacobson, and lived at home with her father. Mrs. Hanson died Jan. 92, 1873. Mr. Hanson has always followed agricultural pursuits, and is the owner of 220 acres. He is a member of the Lutheran church.

Darwin Hinkley

Page 24

Darwin Hinkley, physician and surgeon of Leland, Ill., was born in Norfolk, Va., Aug. 29, 1809, a son of Samuel Hinkley, a native of Georgetown, Me. The genealogy of the Hinkley family is as follows: In 1635 Samuel Hinkely, his wife and four children came from County Kent, England, and settled in Massachusetts. His son Edward married a daughter of the Indian chief Massasoit, and another of his sons Samuel, was Governor of the colony eleven years. Edward Kinley's son Samuel settled in Brunswick, Me., in an early day, and his son Edward settled in Georgetown, Me., his son John being grandfather of our subject. The latter was a native of Massachusetts, and was a Captain in the war of the Revolution, where he met his death. Our subject's father was Quartermaster in the war of 1812. Our subject was a soldier in the Aroostook war in Maine, and also served in the late war three years, for which he raised part of the Fifty-third Illinois Infantry, Coggswell's Battery.

He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Fort Donelson and Lookout Mountain, and was discharged in 1864 for disability, for which he draws a pension. He began reading medicine in 1832, and graduated from New York Medical College in 1834, and from the Chicago Medical College in 1860. He came to La Salle County, Ill., in 1846, and practiced four years at Hardin, since which he has practiced at Leland. He was married in Pennsylvania to Cynthia Hayden, in 1835, who died in 1836, leaving one son - Samuel F., a wholesale merchant in Stockton, Cal. Mr. Hinkley was again married in 1838, to Martha C. Pease, daughter of Captain Lemuel Pease (deceased). Of the four children born to this union two are living - James B. and Frances, married George Holmes, of DeKalb County, Ill., by whom she has seven children - Ella, Mary, Wright, George, Letitia, Bert D. and Clyde R. Samuel F. married Mary De Wolf, of Cincinnati, Ohio and has two children - James was a soldier in the late war, enlisting in Company E., Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry, and also served five years in Company H, Sixteenth United States Infantry. He married Mary Dailey, and to them have been born one son - William W. James is now a traveling salesman for the San Francisco Tea Company. He is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow orders. The Doctor is a member of the Boylston Medical Society, of Boston, Mass.

Jacob C. Jacobson

Page 25

Jacob C. Jacobson, general merchant, Leland, Ill., was born in Norway in April, 1835, a son of Christian B. Jacobson. In 1857 he came to the United States, and located in Leland, Ill. He worked on a farm four or five years and then was employed in Simonson & Peterson's store, and later in Wm. Kennedy's drug store till 1875, when he embarked in business for himself. He carries a full line of dry goods, clothing, groceries, crockery, provisions, etc. His stock is valued at $8,000 and his annual sales amount to $20,000. Mr. Jacobson was married in October, 1857 to Caroline M. Carlson. They have had three children; but two are living - Christian and Jacob. Andrew M. died at the age of nine years. Mr. Jacobson has served his fellow townsmen as Trustee and Collector and at present is School Trustee. He is a member of the Lutheran church.

Dr. Charles D. Jones

Page 25-26

Dr. Charles D. Jones, physician and surgeon, of Leland, La Salle Co., Ill., was born Jan. 22, 1850, son of William L. F. Jones, late of Northville, who came to La Salle County in 1840, living for three years previous in Kendall County. Our subject received his primary education at Fowler Institute of Newark, Ill. He graduated from Chicago Medical College in March , 1877. He practiced one year in Mercy Hospital. In July, 1878, he came to Leland, where he has worked up a good practice. He was married May 14, 1879, to Miss Anna J. Barnes, daughter of Thomas Barnes, of Leland. Two children were born to them - Truman W., born Dec. 6, 1881, and Elma G., born March 14, 1885. Mr. Jones was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and of the Masonic fraternity. He is a member of the Aurora Medical Society; also of Northern Illinois Medical Society.

Rasmus O. Jorstad

Page 26

Rasmus O. Jorstad, farmer and stock-raiser, section 10, Adams Township, was born near Stavanger, Norway, Jan. 13, 1825, a son of Omund Jorstad, deceased. He came to America in 1855, settling in this township, where he has since resided, and where he owns a fine farm of 138 acres. July 10, 1849, he was married to Annie C., daughter of Jonas Anderson. To this union have been born eleven children, of whom seven are living - Christina, Jonas, Martha, Peter, Margaret, Erasmus and Helen. One son, Omund, accidentally shot himself while on a hunting expedition in Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Jorstad are members of the Lutheran church.

Andrew A. Klove

Page 26-27

Andew A. Klove, farmer and stock-raiser, Adams Township, was born near Bergen, Norway, May 30, 1828, a son of Andrew Klove, who brought his family to the United States in 1843 and settled in Racine County, Wis. In 1854 Mr. Klove came to La Salle County, Ill., and located in Leland, where for eleven years he was engaged in the mercantile business. In 1865 he began farming, and in that vocation has been very successful and now owns 440 acres of valuable land. He is a self-made man, the only assistance he ever had being $700 from his father, when a young man. Mr. Klove is a successful stockraiser, paying special attention to Holstein cattle. He was married March 9, 1855 to Randvei Grover, born in Norway, Dec. 14, 1835. She came to America with her parents in 1837, and the first three years lived in Chicago; then moved in Kendall County, Ill., and in 1850 settled in Adams, La Salle County. They have had sixteen children, seven are living - Julia, Andrew, Clara, Lydia, Josephine, Martha and Noah. Julia is the wife of Henry Hansen of Lee, Ill., and has three children - Ada, Ruba and Orville. Andrew married Hannah Mosey, Oct. 8, 1885. He is a member of the mercantile firm of Petersen & Klove, of Leland, Ill. Mr. Klove and his family are members of the Lutheran church. He has held the position of Township Collector two years, and was Assessor of the same length of time. Was Justice of the Peace four years, and Supervisor ten years. He has held the office of Notary Public for twenty-six years. He was a member of the first Board of Trustees for the village of Leland, which position he has since frequently filled. He is Secretary of the Adams Mutual Fire Insurance Company, which office he has held since its organization in 1875.

Carl F. Oakfield

Page 27

Carl F. Oakfield was born in Coblentz, on the Rhine River, Germany, Dec. 22, 1826, a son of Jacob Oakfield, of Germany. Mr. Carl Oakfield was reared in his native place, and educated at Berlin. He learned the architect's trade, at which he worked in his native county, and in 1852 he came to the United States, stopping a few months in New York City, then came to Bureau County, Ill., and was civil engineer on the Chicago, Burlinton & Quincy Railroad nearly three years. He then went to Emporia, Lyons Co., Kan., in 1857, where he worked a farm until 1862, when he came to Arlington, Ill. He entered the Union service in the late war in a Missouri regiment and served one year as First Lieutenant, then went to Pennsylvania and was made Captain of Company C., Twenty-second Regiment United States colored troops, where he served until the close of the war. He went to Iowa and was a civil engineer on a railroad. He then came to Leland in 1867, where he was engaged as a grain merchant until his death. Dec. 15, 1855, he was married to Eliza M. Aldrich, a daughter of Ira Aldrich, of Arlington, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. Oakfield were the parents of seven children, six of them living - Julia E., Cora M., Clara T., Otto, Bismarck and Maude. Harry is deceased. Mr. Oakfield died Sept. 10, 1875.

Knud T. Olsen

Page 27-28

Knud T. Olson, section 15, Adams Township, was born in Riskedal, near Stavanger, Norway, Jan. 1, 1811, a son of Ole Knudsen, a native of Norway, but now deceased. Our subject was married in his native country in June, 1837 to Isabelle Aslagsdatter, a native of Norway, by whom he had seven children, five of whom are yet living - Ole K., Reginia, Andrew, Charles and Martin. Mr. Olsen brought his family to the United States in 1850, first locating in Freedom Township, La Salle Co., Ill., and since 1857 he has made his home in Adams Township. His family are members of the First Norwegian Evangelical Free and Independent Lutheran Church at Leland. His son Ole married Julia Jensen and resides in Freedom Township; Regina married Halver Warren and resides near Eagle Grove, Iowa. Andrew lives at Huxley, Iowa; he married Elsie Jensen. Charles married Johanna Johnson and lives in Shelby County, Iowa. Martin is farming on the homestead in Adams Township. He is unmarried.

Alfred S. Pederson

Page 28

Alfred S. Pederson, of the firm of Pederson & Klove, dealers in clothing and men's furnishings, at Leland, was born in Chicago, Dec. 27, 1859, where he lived till he was twelve years old. In 1871 he came to Leland where he has since lived, with the exception of two years spent in a dry-goods store in Chicago. He had but small means in 1878 when he commenced business, but is now one of the well-to-do merchants of the place. He carries a full line of everything pertaining to his business, and is carrying on a good trade, which he has gained by his strict attention to business and gentlemanly deportment. He also owns and runs a grocery and provision store at Leland. His father, who was a native of Norway, died in 1868. His widow makes her home with our subject at Leland.

Robert Rumney

Page 28

Robert Rumney, a farmer and stock-raiser, section 24, Adams Township was born in the County of Kent, England, Sept. 20, 1831. He was a son of James Rumney, a native of the same county, who immigrated to America with his family, and lived in Niagara County, N. Y., till his death which occurred Sept. 23, 1853. Our subject came to La Salle County, Ill., in the fall if 1853, and the following spring the remainder of the family followed. During the late war he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Fifth Illinois Infantry, and was in the battle of Resaca, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea. He was discharged on account of wounds received at Lawtonsville, S. C. He was married Dec. 7, 1858, to Ann M. Skinner, daughter of Andrew Skinner, an early settler of this county, but now deceased. Mrs. Rumney died October 19, 1876, leaving six children - Celia A., who married Albert Brayton of this township, and has two children - Bessie May and Ernest Gray; Andrew S., William J. Esther M. Wallace and Ida M. Mr. Rumney was again married Sept. 11, 1877, to Mary A. Clark, daughter of William Clark, of Northville Township, this county.

Mr. Rumney has been a resident of Adams Township since coming to this country. He has a fine farm of 240 acres where he is engaged in farming and stock-raising. He has held the office of Highway Commissioner nine years, and has served twelve years as School Director. He is a member of the Baptist church. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.

John F. Safeblade

Page 28-29

John F. Safeblade, a merchant of Leland, La Salle County, was engaged in his present business. He carries a full line in general stock, and is building up a good trade. He was married may 28, 1884 to Miss Emma Harkison, a daughter of John Harkison, late of Aurora, Ill. They are parents of one child. Mr. Safeblade is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Thomas F. Thompson

Page 29

Thomas F. Thompson, of the firm of Thompson & Anderson, grain merchants, dealers in coal, lime, cement and hair, of Leland, was born in Norway, Sept. 7, 1832. He was the son of Thermod T. Flattre, of Leland, a native of Norway. Mr. Thompson came to the United States in 1844, settling in the town of Norway, Racine Co., Wis., where he remained until 1852, when he went to Chicago, and then went to Leland in 1854, and engaged with A. A. Klove, for two years, then sold his interest to Mr. Klove. Then went to Atchison County, Kan., and engaged in running a saw-mill for two years, then went to Creston, Ill. And kept store for eight years. He then went to Leland, and engaged in his present business. He was Town Clerk for five years, is a member of the Lutheran church, in which he was confirmed in 1848. June 19, 1861, he was married to Miss Caroline Satter, a daughter of Ole T. Satter. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson were the parents of ten children, six of them living - Lewis T., Stanley O., Cora M., Nellie E., Jeannette O., and Charlotte T.

Arthur H. Warner

Page 29-30

Arthur H. Warner, of the firm of Warner Brothers, dealers in stoves and tinware, was born in Northville, Ill., June 6, 1853, the son of George Warner, native of England. His parents removed to Mendota, La Salle Co., Ill., in the spring of 1855, where Arthur H. Warner was reared and educated. He learned the tinner's trade at that place and worked there three years. He then went to Chicago and worked six months, then returned to Mendota where he remained six months, then came to Leland, Ill., where he has since lived with the exception of one year and a half at Joliet. He engaged in his present business in March 1885, and is doing a good trade. In October, 1881, he was married to Miss Nellie McCauley, a native of La Salle County, a daughter of Patrick McCauley. One child, George R., has been born to them.

John S. Warner

Page 30

John S. Warner, of the firm of Warner Brothers, dealers in hardware, stove, etc, of Leland, was born in Northville, La Salle Co., Ill., Jan. 21, 1847, son of George Warner of England, who was brought to the United States when a child, and early settled in La Salle County, Ill., now deceased. John S. Warner was educated and brought up in Mendota, La Salle County. He has worked on the railroad for sixteen years, commending on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy as switchman, when he was twenty-one years old. He was brakeman on a freight train, between Galesburg and Aurora until 1870. He then went to Michigan, and was conductor on the freight and passenger trains for the Northwestern Railroad Company for eleven years, but during this time he spent one year at Mendota, Ill., as yard-master for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. After he stopped working on the railroad he spent four months at Escananba, Mich., fishing. He then went to Minnesota, and as engaged as conductor on the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railroad, where he remained two years. He came to Leland in March, 1885, and engaged in his present business, and is doing a good trade. They keep a full line of stoves, tinware, kitchen furniture, cutlery and sporting goods. In December, 1872, he was married to Frankie Blom, a daughter of William Blom, of Moneminee, Mich. Two children have been born to them - Harry D. and Claudie M.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois - Volume II - Chicago Inter State Publishing Co., 1886, Chapter, I, Page 9-20 -Transcribed by Nancy Piper ]