History of Brookfield Township, LaSalle County, Illinois

Brookfield Township

Brookfield embraces T. 32, R. 5, and that part of T. 33, R. 5, which lies south of the Illinois river. The first township is nearly all prairie, while the fraction is all timber or bottom land. The first settlement commenced in 1833 and was confined to the skirts of the timber adjoining the prairie, or to the bottom along the Illinois, while the settlements have gradually extended south over the prairie region during the forty years that have intervened.

It is all now occupied by a thrifty and prosperous people, although an old pioneer will recognize in the southern part the prairie grass and wild flowers of the early day, reminders of the olden time, and that the civilized occupancy is comparatively recent.

[Source: History of LaSalle County, Illinois by Elmer Baldwin, Chicago, Rand, McNally & Co., Printers, 1877, SKETCH OF THE PIONEER SETTLERS OF EACH TOWN IN THE COUNTY, Brookfield, Page 445-446 - Transcribed by Nancy Piper]

Brookfield Township

Page 47-65

Brookfield Township comprises congressional township 32 north and range 2 east; also, that portion of township 33 north and range 2 east which lies south of the Illinois River. It is bounded on the north by Manlius Township, on the east by Grundy County, on the south by Allen Township, and on the west by Grand Rapids and Fall River Townships. The southern portion of the township is a level prairie and is poorly drained. The northern portion is more uneven, especially near the river, and is drained by Kickapoo Creek and other smaller streams. The northern part is skirted with timber, and it was at the edge of this timber and in the river bottom lands that the first settlements were made. Improvements gradually extended southward, and now the township is thickly settled and is dotted by comfortable farm residences, school-houses and churches. The flat prairie has been drained and is now under cultivation. Brookfield is an agricultural township; stock-raising is engaged in to a limited extent.

Early Settlers

George W. Armstrong, the first settler in Brookfield, came from Licking County, Ohio, with his mother, Mrs. Elsa S. Armstrong in 1831. he made a claim on section 28, but John Hogaboom jumped it and finally bought it for $28. Armstrong then made a claim on section 1 and moved on it in the autumn of 1833; he made a farm and has resided there since except when a contractor on the Illinois & Michigan Canal. Mr. Armstrong has been a prominent politician; has been Supervisor and Chairman of the board, and has served several terms as a member of the Legislature.

John Drain came in 1833 from Licking County, Ohio, and died in 1835 at the house of Abraham Trumbo. Dr. Frederick Graham settled on section 8 in 1836, and for many years was a practicing physician. Levi Jennings, with his wife and a large family of children, settled in Brookfield Township in 1834, some of whom are still residents of Illinois. Eldridge Gerry Clark accompanied the Jennings family to La Salle County and died soon after his arrival. William H. Goddard, a dentist, came from Boston prior to 1835, but four years later went to Louisville, Ky. Richard Edgecomb, now of Ottawa, settled in Brookfield Township in 1835. Rev. George Marsh, a native of Norfolk County, Mass., came to Illinois in 1835 and settled in Brookfield Township, where he died Dec. 10, 1877, aged eighty-one years and seventeen days. He was a Presbyterian clergyman and his influence was such as is always felt from contact with a pure life. George S. Maxon settled on section 2 in 1837 and died in 1867, aged seventy-three years, his wife having preceded him in 1861. Their only living child, David, lived on the old homestead. Asa Lewis, now of Wisconsin, came in 1837 and remained four or five years. Isaac Gage settled on section 8 in 1837. He married Lucy, daughter of James Little, of Eden. Gershom Burr, from Fall River, Mass., came in 1839 and settled on section 20. In 1834 he moved to Ottawa. Reese Ridgeway settled on section 4 in 1834, and Stephen G. Hicks settled on section 30. Peter Consols and John Wilcox settled on section 30 in 1834. Guy Dudley settled on section 25 in 1833. Captain Tylee, now of Vermillion, settled in Brookfield in 1838, Oliver H. Sigler in 1840 and Silas Austin in 1836.

Organization

The township of Brookfield was organized April 2, 1850, and an election was held at which P. S. Blanchard was chosen Moderator, and George Marsh, Clerk.

Following is a list of the principal township officers from that time to the present:

Year

Supervisor

Clerk

Assessor

Collector

Commissioner of Highways

Justices

Constables

1850

George S. Maxon

George Marsh

Isaac Gage

D. Reed

M. Gage

F. S. Maxon

Stephen Jennings.

P. S. Blanchard

M. D. Smith

R. E. Edgecomb

S. M. Rogers

1851

S. M. Rogers

G. Marsh

Isaac Gage

D. Reed

D. Reed

S. M. Rogers

G. S. Maxon

S. Austin

R. E. Edgecomb

 

1852

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

I. Gage

A. Austin

James O. Crocker

P. S. Blanchard

I Gage

S. M. Rogers

R. E. Edgecomb

S. Austin

R. Sigler

 

1853

G. W. Armstrong

George Marsh

A. Watson

O. H. Sigler

W. Tyler

S. Austin

D. Reed

L. Tuttle

O. Richardson

O. H. Sigler

J. Galloway

1854

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

Isaac Gage

S. Austin

L. P. Osgood

G. W. Armstrong

J. O. Crocker

P.S. Blanchard

G. S. Maxon

 

1855

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

J. B. Crocker

G. W. Armstrong

J. O. Crocker

> P. Osgood

 

J. B. Crocker

O. H. Sigler

1856

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

J. B. Crocker

G. W. Armstrong

G. S. Maxon

I. B. Wright

 

 

1857

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

O. H. Sigler

R. Hopper

R. Miller

J. B. Wright

 

 

1858

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

J. B. Crocker

J. O. Crocker

L. Watson

R.T.A. Alberty

P. S. Blanchard

G. S. Maxon

 

1859

Isaac Gage

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

A. L. Powers

L. O. Osgood

R. Miller

S. Frink

 

David Miller

O. H. Sigler

1860

Isaac Gage

G. Marsh

J. B. Wait

G. Marsh

R. Miller

S. M. Frink

L. P. Osgood

 

B. E. Hadley

W. G. Smith

1861

Isaac Gage

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

J. H. Powers

L. P. Osgood

H. Jennings

W. P. Miller

 

 

1862

Isaac Gage

George Marsh

G. S. Maxon

A. H. Powers

J. B. Wait

M. Carey

J. H. Powers

G. S. Maxon

B. E. Hardy

O. H. Sigler

1863

Isaac Gage

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

S. M. Frink

L.P. Osgood

 

A. S. Dean

1864

 G. W. Armstrong

Byron Robison

G. Thomas

F. M. Gurnes

M. D. Smith

 

T. J. Clark

1865

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

P. G. Thomas

F. A. Jennings

D. Reed

 

S. Probasco

1866

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

G. S. Maxon

F. A. Jennings

A. Hall

G. S. Maxon

Squire Ewer

T. J. Clark

H. Dodge

1867

J. H. Powers

G. Marsh

R. Miller

J. B. Crocker

J. O. Crocker

S. Carpenter

R. Miller

B. E. Hadley

D. Miller

1868

G. W. Armstrong

John Snook

M. Carey

W. G. Smith

S. Probasco

 

 

1869

G. W. Armstrong

George Marsh

 

W. G. Smith

John Merriman

 

W. G. Smith

1870

G. W. Armstrong

G. Marsh

P. Simon

H. P. Averill

W. G. Smith

Jo. O. Crandall

W. G. Smith

P. Sheed

J.L. Armstrong

1871

G. W. Armstrong

John Snook

P. G. Thomas

N. Elbert

M. Proderick

 

James Cooley

1872

G. W. Armstrong

J. J. Marsh

P. G. Thomas

J. Heaton

A. F. Powers

 

G. W. Rose

1873

G. W. Armstrong

M. O’Loughlin

P. G. Thomas

N. Elbert

S. Probasce

W. G. Smith

J.O. Crocker

N. Elbert

Spencer Cox

1874

G. W. Armstrong

M. O’Loughlin

P. G. Thomas

J. Heaton

Thomas McCabe

John Merriman

N. Elbert

C. Shaul

M. Bearden

1875

G. W. Armstrong

M. O’Loughlin

P. G. Thomas

Thomas O’Leary

N. Elbert

 

John Devane

1876

G. W. Armstrong

M. OLoughlin

P. G. Thomas

N. Elbert

I. Gage

 

Samuel Probasco

1877

 M. O’Loughlin

John Snook

P. G. Thomas

M. Kierden

T. McCabe

N. Elbert

W. G. Smith

B. Elbert

M. Kierdon

1878

M. O’Loughlin

John Snook

P. G. Thomas

B. Elbert

M. Mulverhill

 

S. Probasco

1879

M. O’Loughlin

J. Snook

P. G. Thomas

S. Probasco

R. J. Gage

 

 

1880

G. W. Armstrong

J. F. Snook

J. Latimer

P. G. Thomas

 

G. Tanner

Wm. Crowley

1881

G. W. Armstrong

M. Mulverhill

P. G. Thomas

J. Latimer

M. Mulverhill

G. W. Shaver

James Davis

1882

Isaac Gage

J. J. Marsh

P. G. Thomas

W. M. Bragg

W. A. McCollum

O. A. Johnson

J. f. Snook

J. Brodreick

F.
Rohrt

1883

M. O’Loughlin

J. J. Marsh

P. G. Thomas

W. Bragg

P. G. Thomas

 

James Friffin

E. Welsh

1884

M. O’Loughlin

J. J. Marsh

P. G. Thomas

F. Rohrt

T. McCabe

 

G. W. Shaver

1885

J. J. Marsh

F. F. Frazee

P. G. Thomas

F. W. Rohrt

M. Mitchell

John Snook

O. A. Johnson

F. W. Rohrt

P. G. Thomas

Brookfield Township has eight school-houses, one town hall and one church. The society to which the church belongs was organized as a Presbyterian church in December, 1833, in South Ottawa. It was transferred to Brookfield Township, April 30, 1840. Rev. G. W. Elliott was one of the early pastors. Meetings were first held in private houses and then in the school-house until 1867, when the present church, on the northeast corner of section 18, was built. Rev. L. M. Gates preached the dedicatory sermon. The church has recently undergone repairs. For the last five or six years the pulpit has been supplied by ministers of other denominations. Rev. O. M. Dunley, a Methodist clergyman, supplies at present, every alternate Sunday. The Sabbath-school numbers about forty, with J. J. Marsh as Superintendent. Rev. George Marsh was pastor of the society for many years.

Population

The census returns show a decrease from 1870 to 1880 in the population of Brookfield Township, the official figures being for the two years given, 1,237 and 1,080.

Biographical


Nathaniel Cole

Page 54-55

Nathaniel Cole was born in Thompkins County, N.Y., Sept. 13, 1837. At the age of ten years, he, with his parents, moved to La Porte County, Ind., and there he was reared. In 1857 he came to Deer Park, this county, remaining three years. He then went to Kansas and bought a farm in Douglas County. Sept. 13, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Ninth Kansas Militia. He was first engaged at Prairie Grove, Arkansas, Van Buren and Fort Smith under Colonel Linn, and under General Blunt served on the plains in Texas and Colorado. Was disabled by blindness in one eye, the other being permanently injured also. He served out his full term of enlistment and now receives a pension of $24 per month. At the expiration of his service he returned to this county and Jan. 1, 1865, he was married to Evaline L., daughter of William and Mary (Moorhead) Trout, of Deer Park, now residents of Vermillion. Mrs. Cole was born in Farm Ridge, Jan. 1, 1844.

Mr. and Mrs. Cole made their residence in the town of Earl, he owning a farm of 160 acres there. In 1867 he sold his place and moved to Leland, remaining there one year. He then went to De Kalb County, where he worked a rented farm. In 1869 he moved to Utica, and in 1877 made his present home in this county, the homestead consisting of seventy acres on section 26, township 33. Mr. and Mrs. Cole have four children - Nellie D., born 1865, married to John M. Yoder, of Seneca, Ill., Nov. 10, 1865; William C., born 1868; Mary I. E., born 1870, and Charles N., born 1875. In politics Mr. Cole is a straight-out Republican. He is a member of G.A.R. Post, No. 324 of Seneca.


Patrick Dunn

Page 55

Patrick Dunn, section 21, Brookfield Township, LaSalle County, is a native of Ireland, where he was born March 16, 1830. He was reared on the farm of his father, Wm. Dunn, till his twenty-first year, when he came to the United States with no capital but strong hands and a stout heart, and built for himself a home in the land of equal rights and privileges for all. Landing at New York City he traveled to Connecticut where he removed to his present home. Buying at first wild prairie, he has since added 180 acres and now owns a very valuable farm, which he keeps in good state of cultivation. His residence is comforatable and convenient. In the year 1864 he married Johanna Sheehan, who is also a native of Ireland. They have seven children - William J., Thomas F., Edward, May T., Anna, Emily and Margaret. The family are members of the Catholic church. In politics Mr. Dunn is a Democrat, though in local elections votes independently. Commencing a poor man in a strange land, Mr. Dunn is now in a condition of prosperity, always and only the results of frugality.


Squire Ewer

Page 55

Squire Ewer was born in Cattaraugus County, N.Y., Feb. 4, 1828, the sone of Eleazer and Elsie (Bailey) Ewer. His father was born in Massachusetts and his mother in Onondaga County, N.Y., they being married in the latter State. As his parents in early life were poor, he, at the age of twelve years commenced life for himself, working at farm work in its season, thus clothing and educating himself during the winter months. His after life shows the energy of the boy in improving his limited advantages. When he was eighteen years of age he went to Miami County, Ind., where he remained about twelve years, in the employment of others. Dec. 19, 1850, he was married to Lucinda Clymer, born in Warren County, Ohio, 1830. Her parents, Joseph and Eliza Clymer, were among the first who settled in Jefferson Township, going there in 1832. After his marriage Mr. Ewer bought a farm of eighty acres and lied in that county until February, 1856, when he came to this township, buying and occupying 160 acres in section 32. Selling the farm in 1867, he moved to Seneca and engaged in the general mercantile trade with his brother-in-law Dr. Keener Clymer, under the firm name of Clymer & Co. In 1869 he sold out to his partner and made his home in section 10 of this township, buying it from Washington Watson. It consisted of 100 acres and he has since added to his real estate by buying ninety acres on section 3. This together with his home farm makes 190 acres of very valuable land. Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ewer six are now living - Martha Ann, wife of Robert Seaman, a Methodist minister now stationed in Knox County, Ill.; Merritt and Wallace K., both residents of Harrison County, Iowa; Emma May and Willow M., both a home and Resina A., a student at Geneseo Normal School. The deceased are Genevie, who died at the age of twenty-two, and Eliza, who died when four years old. Mr. Ewer's father, Eleazer Ewer, lived with him the last twenty years of his life, he had done much good all his life, being an Evangelist, and died at the advanced age of eighty-six years. His principal work was in Western New York, Miami County, Ind., and in Maryville County, Wis. Mr. Ewer is striving to give his children all the advantages possible as regards education. Although not connected with any church at present, he is active in support of Christian work. In politics he affiliates with the Republcian party. Both himself and father were active workers in the anti-slavery movement, his father casting the first and only Abolition vote in Cattarangus County for three years, under threats of mob violence. They are also strong temperance men, both in theory and practice, believing that strict prohibition is the surest and shortest way to get rid of the curse of intemperance.


Isaac Gage

Page 56-57

Isaac Gage, one of the pioneers of La Salle County, was born in Orford, Grafton Co., N. H., Nov. 7, 1815, a son of Isaac and Ruth (Stone) Gage, who were born, reared and married in Massachusetts. Soon after their marriage they settled in Orford, where they resided till their death. Our subject was reared on a small farm, and when old enough he began assisting his father who was a stone-work contractor, building bridges, walls, etc. In the spring of 1837 he went with his uncle, Aaron Gage, to Chicago, Ill. He reached Chicago April 14, where he remained till July 5, and finally reached Ottawa about July 10, and shortly afterward obtained work with Levi Jennings, Jr., with whom he made his home for several years. Jan. 1, 1845, he was married to Lucy Little, a native of Grafton County, N.H., a daughter of James and Polly Little (both deceased) who were early settlers of Eden Township, La Salle County, coming here in the fall of 1839. Four children have been born to this union - Louisa C., wife of S. T. Osgood, of Marseilles; Harriet E., at home, Ida A., deceased wife of J. S. Balkin, her death occurring Dec. 23, 1884; and B. Frank at home. After his marriage Mr. Gage settled on the place where he has since made his home, but the small house which he first occupied has giving place to one of the finest residences in the township, and the homestead which then contained but eighty acres of slightly improved land, has increased to 480 acres of well cultivated land.

Mr. Gage came to this township a poor man, but by industry, frugality and good management, he is now one of the wealthiest citizens. Beside the homestead he owns 160 acrea of land in this township, and his real estate in Marseilles is worth about $25,000. He is one of the oldest settlers in this township, and is one of the active and most influential business men in the county. In politics he is a Republican, and before the organization of that party, he was a Whig, casting his first vote in 1804 for General Harrison. He was active in the organization of Brookfield Township, and has always been identified with public affairs. He was the first Assessor, and has held almost every position of trust in the township.


Richard J. Gage

Page 57-58

Richard J. Gage, section 5, Brookfield Township, was born in Orford, Grafton Co., N.H., Dec. 8, 1842. His parents, Jesse F. and Sophronie (Howard) Gage were natives of New Hampshire and were married in Orford, that State, April 28, 1831. His father was previously married, Aug. 16, 1827, to a second cousin, Maria Gage, who died April 25, 1829. By this union he had one son - Thomas W., who is now living in Linn County, Kan. By his second marriage he had six children, three of whom survive - Henry H. and Mrs. Maria E. Whesdon, a widow, residents of Evanston, Ill.; and Richard J., our subject, the youngest child. Maria died in infancy, in 1834. Mrs. Harriet E. Wheadon died in Chicago in 1880, and Mary J. died in 1847 in her seventh year. Mr. and Mrs. Jesse F. Gage, with their children, came to Chicago in November 1844, living there several years. They then moved on a farm in Cook County, remaining there until April, 1854, when they became residents of Brookfield Township, renting land a few years. About 1860 they established their home on section 5. Nov. 1, 1864, the father died, aged sixty-four years, ten months and eight days. Richard J., our subject, lived with his parents until Aug. 12, 1862, when he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Infanctry. Dec. 7, 1862, he took part in an engagement at Hartsville, Tenn., and was shot through the right lung. As soon as able to leave the hospital, Mr. Gage returned home. The regiment was on guard duty the following winter at Camp Douglas, Chicago, and in the spring of 1863, was again at the front. At the battle of Chickamanga Mr. Gage was taken prisoner and incarcerated in Libby Prison for six months, when he was exchanged, toward the close of the war. He rejoined his regiment at Kenesaw Mountain and participated in all the engagements till July 20, 1864, when he was severly wounded at the battle of Peach Tree Creek and received an honorable discharge from Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Feb. 5, 1865. For his gallant service, Mr. Gage receives a pension of $8 per month. March 3, 1870, he married Laura Scanland, a native of Kentucky, born Dec. 11, 1843, a daughter of John Scanland, who died in Collinsville, Ill., in 1871. Her mother died many years ago in this county. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gage - Maggie H., Jesse R., John L., Lucy M. and Susie L. Mr. Gage is a member of Joseph Woodruff Post, Nov. 281, G.A.R. Marseilles. He now owns a farm of 200 acres.


William Frederick Graham

Page 58-59

William Frederick Graham, son of Dr. Frederick and Amy (Haight) Graham, was born May 12, 1815, and in his thirteenth year he was apprenticed to learn the printer's trade in the old Journal of Commerce office, in New York , remaining there six years. William F., our subject, came with his parents to this county, and now owns and occupies the old homestead on section 8, Brookfield Township. In politics he is a Democrat. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Fifty-third Illinois Infantry, and was honorably discharged Nov. 12, 1864, as Sergeant, after which he returned to Brookfield Township and is still living on the old homestead.


Frederick Graham

Page 58-59

Frederick Graham was born in Westchester County, N.Y., July 10, 1785, and in early life studied medicine and subsequently became a successful practitioner, establishing himself in New York City. He was married Aug. 12, 1810, to Amy Haight, born in Westchester County about 1791, and to them were born two children - Mary S., born May 23, 1811, living with her parents till her death, Dec. 12, 1879; and William F., our subject, who was the main-stay of his parents in their declining years. In 1834 Dr. Graham abandoned his profession and came West to Ottawa, La Salle Co. Ill. He made a home on section 4, Brookfield Township, to which he removed his family in February, 1835. In 1850 he changed his residence to section 3, where he was engaged in farming till his death, May 13, 1863, leaving his family 320 acres of land. His widow died June 16, 1867, aged seventy-eight years. The Doctor practiced medicine but little after coming to this county. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he was a Democrat. He was an upright, honorable citizen, and is well remembered by all of the old pioneers.

Thomas Holt

Page 59

Thomas Holt was born in Otsego County, N.Y., March 24, 1825. His parents, Curtis and Fannie Holt, were born and reared in Kent, England. Coming to the United States in 1823, they, with their two children, Curtis and Fannie, settled in Otsego County, N.Y.

Curtis enlisted in a New York regiment and was killed in battle. Fannie married William Sanders and is living in Wisconsin. When our subject Thomas, was fifteen years of age his parents settled in Walworth County, Wis., and later moved to Reedsburg, Sauk Co., Wis., where they resided until their death. At the age of seventeen years Thomas commenced life for himself. Leaving his parents he returned to Otsego County, N.Y., and in 1851 married Rhoda Ann Balch, who was born in that county Dec. 26, 1823. Two years later they left there and settled on section 15, Brookfield Township, where they have ever since resided. They were accompanied by Mrs. Holt's parents, Henry T. and Catherine R. Balch, whom they cared for until their death; the father's death taking place in 1869 in his eighty-second year and the mother dying Sept. 22, 1859, aged sixty-eight years. Their farm contains 160 acres of valuable land. Mr. Holt has two brothers, who are residents of this township; Charles, who came here in 1865, and who had been in the army with the Wisconsin Infantry, and John, who settled here in 1869, who had served five years in the regular army. Two children have been born to Mr. and mrs. Holt - Martha A., wife of Nathaniel Baker, who have their home on part of Mr. Holt's farm; and Avaline R., wife of Frank L. Coville, who live in this township. Mr. holt has been identified with the Republican party since its organization, but in local election votes for the best man. His father was a Whig.


John Kennedy

Page 60

John Kennedy, section 21, Brookfield Township, was born in Ireland, Feb. 19, 1929, and has resided in La Salle County since 1853. He was married to Miss Mary M. Cabe in 1855. Their children are now abe to provide for themselves. He owns a farm of 240 acres, and controls a farm of 160 acres. He is in politics a Democrat, casting his first vote for President Pierce.


Michael Mitchel

Page 60

Michael Mitchell, section 19, Brookfield Township, was born in County Galway, Ireland, March 17, 1830. His father dying when he was but twelve years of age, he, with his widowed mother, his brothers, William and Peter, and his sister Mary, came to the United States, landing at New Orleans, Nov. 28, 1852. Going directly up the river to St. Louis, Mo., they remained there a few weeks, going from there to Marseilles, this county. Peter is now deceased, but the mother, with her children Mary and William is living in Brookfield. Michael Mitchell is a thorough practical farmer and has established himself well in Brookfield Township. He owns a splendid farm of 160 acres of well-improved land, besides having one of eighty acres improved land on section 20. Aug. 28, 1855, he married Margaret Haley, who was also a native of County Galway, Ireland, and who was born in 1837, coming to Philadelphia in 1848. Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have three sons and three daughters - May Ann, a school-teacher by profession; Peter, who is married and living on his farm on section 20; Ellen J., wife of John Cull of this township; Margaret B., Michael P., and John W., the three latter living at home. The family are all members of the Catholic church. In politics Mr. Mitchell is a Democrat. His is Commissioner of Highways, and has served several terms as School Director. He is one of the most liberal men of Brookfield Township, active in the support of all that tends to public good, and a valued and reliable citizen.


Michael O'Loughlin

Page 60-61

Michael O'Loughlin, section 28, township 32, Brookfield, La Salle County, was born in the County of Clare, Ireland, Nov. 18, 1845. He came to the United States with his parents in 1849, and settled in the State of Wisconsin, from thence to La Salle County, Ill., in 1866. His parents, Andrew and Ellen O'Loughlin, lived in Brookfield until 1882, then retired from the farm and are now living in Chicago. The subject of this sketch, with rather limited means to begin with, has acquired a very fair share of the world's goods, and, better still, a good name. He owns at present 400 acres of land, all under a good state of cultivation. In 1869 Mr. O'Loughlin was married to Miss Mary A. Carey, daughter of the late Mathew Carey, of Brookfield, who, with his brothers, were contractors on the Illinois and Michigan Canal in 1838. She is a native of Ottawa. Mr. O'Loughlin stands well in the esteem of the people of his township, having been elected repeatedly Supervisor, School Treasurer, and other minor offices. Mr. O'Loughlin is ranked among Brookfield's best citizens - public spirited and enterprising.


Luther P. Osgood

Page 61-62

Luther P. Osgood was born Sept. 20, 1818 at Wendall, Franklin Co., Mass. He is the son of Luther and Lucy Osgood, who were born, reared and married in Massachusetts. His grandfather, Josiah Osgood, was an officer of the Revolutionary war, and his father served in the war of 1812. The latter moved to Verona, Oneida Co., N.Y., in 1824, where he followed farming until his death, in 1850, at the age of seventy years. His widow died in 1856, aged eighty-one years. The homestead in Verona is now owned by a grandson, Beman Osgood. Luther P. Osgood, our subject was reared a farmer and has always followed that avocation, though in early life he was, for a short time, engaged in clerking in the mercantile trade, and later was owner and operator of a saw-mill in the State of New York. April 29, 1840, he was united in marriage with Catharine Toll, who was born in Verona, Oneida Co., N.Y., April 14, 1821, and commenced married life in that town. In 1847 he moved to Volney, Oswego County, living there until he came to Brookfield Township, where he has resided since, his homestead property covering the old pioneer farm of Mr. Godard, settled on in 1834. The original purchase was 320 acres. He also had a cash capital of $1,200. He now owns a valuable farm of 480 acres, his residence and farm buildings denoting thrift and enterprise. Of eleven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Osgood, eight are now living - Lucy M., married to George Marsh, Jr., a clerk in the War Department at Washington, D.C., for the past twenty years; Simon T., of the firm of Gage & Co., Marseilles, Ill.; Susan, wife of Lieutenant Henry Upton, of Pierce County, Neb., who was a member of the One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Infantry; Catharine M., wife of Charles M. Carpenter, of Morris, Ill.; Frances, wife of Marshall N. Armstrong, attorney at law, at Ottawa, this county; Henry D., Luther P., Jr, and Charles D., living at home. Those deceased are Beman, died in Oswego County, N.Y., aged ten months; Willard, died in Illinois, aged four years, and Florence died in Illinois, aged two years and six months. In early days, Mr. Osgood was a Whig, but on the organization of the Republicans, identified himself with that party. Mr. Osgood has been a resident of this county for many years, and has always taken an active interest in all that pertains to the public good, and has won the confidence and esteem of a wide circle of acquaintances. He and his wife are members of the Baptist church, of Seneca.


Darius Reed

Page 62-63

Darius Reed, the fourth of a family of six of Reuben and Hannah (Bailey) Reed, was born in Monroe County, N.Y., June 3, 1816. He was reared on a farm, receiving a limited education, his youth being spend in hard labor. When he was seven years of age he left his native county with his parents, and for five years following he had no settled home. The family lived a short time at Olean Point, Pa., thence moved to Eastern Kentucky, and later to Cincinnati, Ohio, where the mother died of consumption and later the two daughters, Tirzah and Alvenia died. Angeline is also deceased. Ansel, Emeline and our subject are still living, the two former residing in Kendall County, Ill. After the mother's death Darius and Ansel were bound out until twenty-one years of age to Colonel Reese Price, of Cincinnati, but two years later the Colonel went insane, and the brothers were released from his service. In the meantime, the father, Reuben Reed, was again married to Mrs. Hannah (Hibbard) Shaw, and with his family he went to Chicago, Ill., where Levi, the first child of his second marriage, was born Oct. 1, 1827, he being the first white male child born in the limits of the present city of Chicago, now living in Pekin, Ill. In 1827, the family moved to what is now La Salle County, Ill., and shortly after Darius was again bound out, this time to James Galloway, his brothr being bound to Moses Booth, and his sister to Lewis Bailey. He remained with James Galloway until 1836, after which he worked on his own account as a farm laborer until his marriage, March 4, 1841, to Mary H. Ford, born Dec. 22, 1812, in Weymouth, Mass., a daughter of Aaron and Mary Ford, who settled in Illinois in 1822. To this union were born two daughter, Mary Alvenia, died, aged one month, and Emeline A., who, since her mother's death, March 26, 1881, has been her father's housekeeper. After his marriage, Mr. Reed commenced life on rented land at Hickory Point, and in 1844 he settled on the farm on section5, Brookfield Township, where he has since resided. He is the owner of 160 acres of land, 120 acres being under high state of cultivation and forty acres being timber land. Mr. Reed has been a resident of La Salle County for fifty-eight years, and has held many local offices of trust, among which may be mentioned, Commissioner, Township Collector and School Director. He is a member of no church, lodge or society, but lived a good practical life. In politics he was formerly a Whig, but since the organization of the Republicans he has been an active worker for that party.


George Washington Rose

Page 63

George Washington Rose, section 17, Brookfield Township, was born in Otsego County, N.Y., April 10, 1821. He is the eldest son of William and Ruth (Comstock) Rose, both of whom were natives of that State, where they resided until their death. At the age of twelve years the subject of this sketch commenced the battle of life for himself, working for different families. At sixteen he provided a modest home for his parents, who had before been obliged to rent, leaving them comfortable in a home of their own. Oct. 8, 1849, he came West, reaching Chicago, thence to the end of the railroad, Wheaton, where he was engaged in chopping cordwood through the winter. The following spring he came to La Salle County, where he rented what is now known as the old Rugg farm. His first land purchase was eighty acres on section 31 of this township; he afterward bought eighty acres of school land, and improved his property quite rapidly. After residing there three years Mr. Rose bought 160 acres in section 17, and made his home there. The naked prairie has been converted into finely cultivated fields, and now he occupies one of Brookfield's fine residences, which he erected in 1877. He now owns 240 acres of improved land. In 1844 he married Miss Balch, daughter of Henry and Catharine Balch, of New York State. Mrs. Rose's parents are now deceased. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rose, who are all living - William H., Catharine (now wife of James Getchell), George W., Jr., Albert, Emma J. and Truman D. Although not having many educational advantages in his youth, Mr. rose has, by exercising common sense, observing keenly passing events and being self-reliant, compensated very largely for his deprivations. Mr. and Mrs. Rose are consistent and long-standing members of the Methodist Episcopal church, Mr. Rose doing good Christian work as Class Leader and Steward for many years. No family in the township are more respected for good, kind, neighborly qualities than the family of G. W. Rose.


John Sullivan

Page 63-64

John Sullivan is a native of County Cork, Ireland, where he was born in 1841. His mother, Catharine (Crawley) Sullivan died when he was young, and his father, Timothy Sullivan, with his two sons, John and Michael, came to the United States, landing at New York in May, 1857. He spent the following season in Onondaga County, and then moved to Cook County, Ill. In the spring of 1858 John came to this county and engaged in farming in Rutland Township. In 1864 he bought eighty acres of land in that township, and soon after married Miss Elesia O'Hair, born in New York State March 30, 1846. In 1860 his father and brother came from Cook County to this county. His brother Michael enlisted in a Will County regiment and served until the close of the war, and afterward made a home in Livingston County. The father lived with John for several years, and afterwards made his home with Michael, where he died in 1881, aged seventy-seven years. Michael lives in South Nebraska and owns 160 acres of land. John sold his eighty-acre farm, and in 1874 he moved to the town of Brookfield and bought 240 acres on section 12. He also owns 340 acres in Baker Township, O'Brien Co., Iowa. On his home farm he has over 2,000 tile drainage, and his farm in under a high state of cultivation. Mr. Sullivan is one of the most enterprising farmers of the township. Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan had eight children born to them, of whom five are living: all are at home - Francis, George, Anna, Mary and Joseph; William and Henry (twins) died when quite small, in 1881, and Johnnie die Sept. 15, 1884, aged thirteen years and two months. In politics Mr. Sullivan is a Democrat. Mr. Sullivan and family are members of the Catholic church at Seneca.


P. George Thomas

Page 64-65

P. George Thomas was born at Clifton Park, Saratoga Co., N.Y., Feb. 3, 1833. His parents, John and Susan L. (Maxon) Thomas, were born in Berlin, Rensselser Co., N.Y. His grandfather, Peleg G., and his father George Thomas, were born in Rhode Island, the former a soldier in the war of 1812, and the latter an officer in the Revolutionary war. Jairus Maxon, father of Mrs. Thomas was a Lieutenant in the war of 1812. John Thomas and family settled in Brookfield Township in 1864 on land now owned by our subject, on section 33, where the father died in 1881, aged eighty years. His widow yet survives and lives on the homestead with her son. P. George Thomas, whose name heads this sketch, and his brother Charles, now living in Seneca, came to this county in 1858. George has followed farming since coming here.

The first nine years he managed the farm of his uncle, George P. Maxon, on section 2, of this township. He was married Dec. 31, 1862, to Jane Farrell, daughter of James and Nancy Farrell, who now reside at Fall River, this county, where they settled in 1857. Mrs. Thomas was born in Baron County, Ky., Jan. 4, 1836. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have had three children, tow of whom are living - Philip d. and Alida, both at home. The eldest child died in infancy. In politics Mr. Thomas affiliates with the Democratic party. He is a member of Seneca Lodge, No. 532, A.F.&A.M. He has been Township Assessor, which position he has held almost continuously for the past nineteen years. He has also served as Commissioner for six years, School Treasurer sixteen years and School Director many years. Our subject has five brothers and two sisters living - Mrs. Indiana Grossbeck, Rensselaer County, N.Y.; John A., Meriden Conn.; Charles H. R, a druggist at Seneca; Frederick, a farmer at Brookfield; Frank M., in railroad office, Seneca; William J., clerking with his brother Charles H.R; and Mrs. Fanny M. Weidman, a resident of Ottawa.

[Source: History of La Salle County, Illinois Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages and Towns, Educational, Religious, Civil, Military, and Political History, Portraits of Prominent Persons and Biographies of Representative Citizens. - Volume II - Chicago Inter State Publishing Co., 1886, Chapter III - Transcribed by Nancy Piper ]