Lee County Biography

Thomas J. Buckaloo
Dixon Township


Thomas J. Buckaloo, who owns and operates one hundred and forty-one acres of land on section 15, Dixon Township, is a worthy representative of one of the honored pioneer families of the county. His parents here located in an early day, more than half a century having passed since they became residents of Dixon Township. His father, Joseph Buckaloo, was born in the Keystone State, Pennsylvania, of Dutch parentage, and after attaining to mature years, wedded Miss Eliza Kerr, who was born in the same locality as her husband, but was of Irish descent. In 1889 (This must be an error -possibly 1839? - Joseph died in 1852 in IL), with their two children, they emigrated Westward by way of the water route to Savanna, Ill., and from thence came to Lee County. A few years after their arrival Mr. Buckaloo purchased the farm on which our subject now resides, and it continued to be his home until his death in 1852, at the age of forty years. His widow died January 11, 1892, being seventy-six years of age. She was a member of the Presbyterian Church. The surviving members of the family are T. J., of this sketch; and Amanda H. and George W., who are living in Dixon.

Mr. Buckaloo, whose name heads this sketch, has spent his entire life in this locality. He was born near his present farm on the 11th of March, 1842, and has ever followed agricultural pursuits with the exception of two years, when he worked at the trade of a carpenter. He was only ten years old when his father died, but with his mother he remained until his marriage. In Ogle County he formed a matrimonial alliance with Miss Maggie A. Craddock, a native of Hagerstown, Washington County, Md., and a daughter of John and Amelia Craddock, the former born in England, and the latter in Maryland. About the time he attained his majority, her father crossed the briny deep to this country, and as a farmer began life in America. After his marriage he determined to try his fortune in the West, and with his family located in Ogle County, Ill., settling in Pine Creek Township, where he established one of the first mills in that section. He was doing a good business when he went to Peru, where he contracted the cholera, which was then epidemic. He had barely time to reach home before his death occurred. Mr. Craddock was an industrious and energetic man, and had the respect of all who knew him. His wife survived him some time, and died about the close of the war in July, 1865, in Buffalo Grove township. Her only son that lived to be grown was a soldier of the late war, and died in Chicago, in July, 1890. Three daughters are yet living, one of the number being the wife of our subject.

Five children have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Buckaloo, Clinton C., who was educated in the Dixon schools and the Normal College, and is now teaching; Mabel E., who is successfully engaged in teaching; Grace A., Libby and Allen T., are at home. Mr. Buckaloo and his wife have many friends throughout the community, who esteem them highly for their sterling worth, knowing them to be upright people, possessing many excellencies of character. In politics he is a Republican, but takes no active part in public affairs, preferring to give his entire attention to his business. He has made of his life-work a signal success, and is now the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and forty-one acres, improved with all the neccessary buildings, and stocked with good horses and cattle, while its fields are well tilled and yield to him a golden tribute.

1892 Portrait and Biographical Record - Lee County Pg 193

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