PAW PAW
NEW YEARS DAY
1884

FOUND IN A SCRAPBOOK
ON LOOKING THROUGH AN OLD SCRAP BOOK THE OTHER DAY WE FOUND AN ARTICLE WHICH WE THINK WILL BE OF INTEREST TO MANY. THE ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN TWENTY TWO YEARS AGO AND THE CHANGES HAVE BEEN MANY. IT WILL HELP THOSE REMAINING TO RECALL THE HAPPY TIMES ENJOYED YEARS AGO WHEN PAW PAW WAS MUCH SMALLER THAN IT IS NOW. FOLLOWING IS THE ARTICLE:

The first day of the year of 1884 was one of considerable importance in the social history of Paw Paw. It was the first New Year's Day on which any general attempt was made to observe the time honored custom of keeping "open house" and great credit is due the ladies who originated the idea and carried it out so successfully.

Although the weather was unpleasant, a large number of gentlemen, young, middle aged and old, turned out and showed themselves no less enthusiastic than the ladies in their efforts to celebrate the occasion.

The time set for calling was from two to five in the afternoon, but very few had completed the rounds by that time. In fact, some few belated ones were calling at the printing office as late as 8 o'clock p.m. after cards. The most of the callers refused to be bound by any set hours and continued their calls until they had made the rounds.

The following is the list of the ladies who received calls:

Mrs. Dr. Stetler.
Mrs. John Harding.
Mrs. Sarah Patrick.
Mrs. Libbie Lindsay.
Mrs. Gilbert and daughter.
Mrs. Tibbals and daughter.
Mrs. E. R. Case and daughters.
Mrs. Detamore and Mrs. Palmer assisted by Mrs. Jackson.
Mrs. Thompson and Miss Eva Brown.
Mrs. A. Siglin assisted by Miss Sue Spense.
Mrs. Teal Swarthout assisted by Mrs. R. Smith.
Mrs. Bristow assisted by Mrs. Jos. Frantz and Mrs. Ben Frantz.
The Misses Abbie, Juna and Hattie Foley at their place of business.
Mrs. Wheeler assisted by Miss Emma Kennedy.
Mrs. Daniels, Mrs. Hiller, and Mrs. Heslet at the residence of the latter.
Mrs. Sarah Stanton and Mrs. Hattie Jones assisted by Mrs. Allie Clark.
Miss Ida Hendershot assisted by Misses Etta Shoemaker and Carrie Ryan of Amboy.

At nearly all the places refreshments were served. The table decorations in many places were very elegant; also were the toilets of the ladies.

The gentlemen we are happy to say acquitted themselves very creditably. Ben Roberts, Jay Radley and Fred Hunt made the rounds together, and didn't get lost either.

Levi Woodard and brother Charles, though not being much acquainted, made the rounds of the list, and were glad they did. Geo. Lindsay, Ben Wheeler and Bishop Wheeler, made an entertaining trio and left their mark (on the table) wherever they went.

These two staid Methodists, Rev. Tibballs and J. Hepperlin entered heartily into the spirit of the occasion and seemed to have an enjoyable time.

Mssrs. W. S. Clark and W. T. Jones called in company and had such a good time that Jones wanted to start out again Wednesday morning.

Rev. J. H. Carpenter was about the only one who had the courage to make the entire rounds alone. The rest of them wanted someone, so they could brace each other up.

J. H. Thompson and Amos Siglin traveled together in first class style--horse and cutter, etc., and done their share towards relieving the burdened refreshment tables of their load.

P. C. Ransom has been dieting for the past two weeks; consequently he was better able to do justice to the eatables than the other callers. At any rate he seemed to enjoy himself exceedingly.

Dr. Palmer and H. E. Daniels made the rounds together. It is needless to say that at every place where they called, traces of devastation were noticeable among the refreshments after they had left.

Harry Bristow, Dr. Stetler and Ben Frantz started out together. Harry maintained his reputation for unbounded jollity, although restrained by his soberer (?) brother-in-law.

E. G. Cass and Alex Lownsbery traveled the rough and rugged road together and the latter participated so freely in the refreshments that he foundered himself, or else got a bad case of the gout, as he hasn't been able to wear his shoes since.

C. F. Preston and P. S. Brockway were partners in the good work. And at one place we heard of their sitting in the parlor and going to sleep, so happy and contented were they. The hostess kindly woke them up and sent them on their way rejoicing else some of the ladies might not have received their hearty greetings. They got back to their boarding houses safely having taken the precaution to take a map of the state with them.

George Wirrick, Wilbur Pratt and Teal Swarthout started out on foot but the snow was too much for them, so, after making one call, they engaged a horse and cutter--Field's best cutter and his gentlest horse, and rode the remainder of the day. Although there was nothing to drink stronger than sweet cider and lemonade, it is a lamentable fact that these young gentlemen were in the ditch before they got half way round. But they explain that by saying that the horse ran off into the ditch.

H. H. Harrington started out with Bob Richey in tow. But in a short time Bob had to take charge of the Squire. The snow blinded him so he couldn't see. At the first engagement he wore off some one else's hat; at the next place he lost his gloves; and at one place where the table was decorated with a handsome calla lily in the center he attempted to eat it, mistaking it for celery, but a friendly hand stopped the devastation and he still lives.

Taken all in all it was an enjoyable afternoon. And now a start has been made it is to be hoped that each succeeding New Year's Day will be observed in Paw Paw in the same pleasant social way.

In the evening the ladies gave a leap year party in Lindsay's Hall, doubtless as a reward to the gentlemen for good behavior, etc. It was well attended and dancing was kept up till a late hour.

Contributed by Marilyn Widler

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