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Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Penn.) December 8, 1824
More than 44,000 bushels of salt were manufactured at the Illinois Saline, in 35 weeks of the former part of this year. In the year 1825, it is expected that from 90 to 100,000 bushels will be made. Messrs. W. Jones and Elisha Harrison, after penetrating the solid rock 563 feet, have struck a fine vein of strong salt water, one mile from the Ohio river, and one and half from Evansville, Indiana. The water is stated to be among the strongest found in the western country.
[Submitted by Nancy Piper]



The [Salem] Record tells of a German woman who came lately to Oregon and found employment on the farm of the Looney's, on the Santiam, near Jefferson, and it was soon discovered in conversation, that she came direct from the house of a brother of Mrs. Looney, the elder, who resides in Illinois, where she had been employed a long time. It seems that, being a widow with one child, she took a fancy to come to Oregon, and the coincidence is remarkable that she should travel thousands of miles to find herself transferred to the service of near relations of the same family.
[Sacramento Daily Union, Volume 1, Number 4, 25 February 1875 - Submitted by Robyn Greenlund]



Dr. D.A.K. Steele has been appointed one of the Assistant Surgeons of the Woman’s Hospital of the State of Illinois.
[The Medical and Surgical Reporter, Philadelphia, Nov. 29, 1875. D.G. Brinton, M.D., Editor - Submitted by Linda Rodriguez]


Phillip Hayward, 12 years old, won the State Spelling Contest held in connection with the annual meeting of the Illinois State Teachers' Association on December 28. He lives in Kewanee. Second place was won by George Durako, Riverton, and third place went to Robilee Kimbro, Duquoin.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Governor Louis L. Emmerson celebrated his 68th birthday on December 27. The day was spent with his children and grandchildren at the executive mansion.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Director Andy Hall, of the Illinois department of public health, has announced that during 1931, 109,000 children were immunized against diphtheria. Antitoxin sufficient to treat more than 5,000 cases of diphtheria was distributed by the department.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Barney Cohen, director of the department of labor, has announced that the free employment offices conducted in Chicago and in fifteen down-states cities, succeeded during 1931 in placing 95,389 at work. The free employment branch, of the department, in spite of the increase demands upon its facilities, operated at a savings of more than $26,000. they did something right back then....
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Chief Highway Engineer Frank T. Sheets has announced that Illinois highway division has under way plans for constructing the equivalent of 1200 miles of new two-lane concrete roads in 1932. it is estimated that this extensive state-wide program will give employment to between 30,000 and 35,000 men. The highway department will insist on the employment at a fair rate of wages.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


The Illinois Power Company Springfield, announces that it will spend $617,800 in 1932 on new construction and improvements.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


The State of Illinois has acquired the famed beauty spot, Apple River Canyon in Jo Davis County, for a State Park.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Progress in Illinois
The Illinois Farm Bureau Serum Association has placed a record order for anti-hog cholera serum and virus for distribution in 73 counties in 1932.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


In Volume of trade, Chicago led the 24 cities reporting on holiday business to the United States Department of Commerce.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


According to the Illinois State Department of Labor, twelve metal industry concerns in Peoria have displayed continued improvement in employment and payrolls for almost three consecutive months.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Work will start shortly on a new $100,00 manual training shop fo rthe Ottawaw high School.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


The Illinois Bell Telephone Company has completed plans for a new $580,000 exchange and building at Winnetka.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


The first reports on health for the new year indicate a much more favorable beginning in 1932 than prevailed at the outset of 1931, according to Dr. Andy Hall, State Health director. Substantial declines were recorded for typhoid fever, measles, scarlet fever, diphtheria, influenza, meningitis, infantile paralysis, pneumonia, and chicken pox.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Frank T. Sheets, chief highway engineer, has announced new state highway construction contracts which call for 11.94 miles of paving and two bridge projects, to cost. in all, $221,861.87.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Attorney General Oscar E. Carlstrom has ruled that counties have no authority to build in cities hard roads wider than through traffic requires, or wide enought to permit curb parking. The opinion declared that any extra width of streets in cities must be provided for by the cities.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


Although the largest percentage of rabbits in the State of Illinois are normal healthy animals, a word of warning regarding the prevalence of tularemia among the cottontails has been issued by the Conservation Department of the Izaak Walton League of America. Tularemia is a disease among rabbits which can be contracted by human beings. It causes a serious and lingering illness, says the league. A number of cases have been reported in the state this year, so the League urges sportsmen to watch their step as one can contract the disease by merely handling an infected rabbit.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


An investigation of more than 8000 cases of appendicitis leads the state department of public health to the conclusion that delaying surgical treatment and relying upon laxatives are the two outstanding factors contributing to the fatality of the disease. Appendicitis causes more than 1300 deaths per year in Illinois.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


During the last forty years, the proportion of widows to the total female population of Illinois has increased 25 percent. State Health authorities attribute the remarkable growth of widowhood to a more rapid improvement in health among women than among men, to the possibility that a widow can secure work to provide her own living more easily than forty years ago.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


The Annual report of the Illinois commerce commission shows a total of 1,138 application, petitions, and complaints filed with the commission during 1931. A total of 1446 hearings were held and 1874 formal orders were issued. The commission collected a total of $80,844 in fees during the year. Through the reduction in gas rates the commission effected an annual saving to gas users of $3,338,500.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


A survey by the Illinois and Federal departments of agriculture with the co-operation of the post office department mail carriers, shows a large increase through the rural in the 1931 fall pig crop saved in Illinois, the corn belt, and the entire United States. About 18 percent more pigs were saved in Illinois this fall than in 1930.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


At its annual meeting in December, the Illinois State Teachers association went on record as being in favor of the federal dry laws and a campaign of education in Illinois' public schools in 1932, seeking to instil respect for the prohibition statutes.
[unknown newspaper, January 1932, submitted by Foxie Hagerty]


KNOW ILLINOIS --- From 1932 Newspapers:



STATE NEWS from 1932 - Submitted by Foxie Hagerty
Senator James Hamilton Lewis will be honored at a reception to be given by the Illinois State Society at Washington, at it first meeting in the new year on January 21. All representatives from Illinois and their wives will be in the receiving line.

Phillip Hayward, 12 years old, won the State Spelling Contest held in connection with the annual meeting of the Illinois State Teachers' Association on December 28. He lives in Kewanee. Second place was won by George Durako, Riverton, and third place went to Robilee Kimbro, Duquoin.

Governor Louis L. Emmerson celebrated his 68th birthday on December 27. The day was spent with his children and grandchildren at the executive mansion.

David R. Forgan, Chicago banker and famed author on financial subjects died at his home in Evanston, December 26, 1931.

Director Andy Hall, of the Illinois department of public health, has announced that during 1931, 109,000 children were immunized against diphtheria. Antitoxin sufficient to treat more than 5,000 cases of diphtheria was distributed by the department.

Barney Cohen, director of the department of labor, has announced that the free employment offices conducted in Chicago and in fifteen down-states cities, succeeded during 1931 in placing 95,389 at work. The free employment branch, of the department, in spite of the increase demands upon its facilities, operated at a savings of more than $26,000.

Chief Highway Engineer Frank T. Sheets has announced that Illinois highway division has under way plans for constructing the equivalent of 1200 miles of new two-lane concrete roads in 1932. it is estimated that this extensive state-wide program will give employment to between 30,000 and 35,000 men. The highway department will insist on the employment at a fair rate of wages.

The Illinois Power Company Springfield, announces that it will spend $617,800 in 1932 on new construction and improvements.

The State of Illinois has acquired the famed beauty spot, Apple River Canyon in Jo Davis County, for a State Park.

Progress in Illinois
The Illinois Farm Bureau Serum Association has placed a record order for anti-hog cholera serum and virus for distribution in 73 counties in 1932.

In Volume of trade, Chicago led the 24 cities reporting on holiday business to the United States Department of Commerce.

According to the Illinois State Department of Labor, twelve metal industry concerns in Peoria have displayed continued improvement in employment and payrolls for almost three consecutive months.

Work will start shortly on a new $100,00 manual training shop for the Ottawa high School.

The Illinois Bell Telephone Company has completed plans for a new $580,000 exchange and building at Winnetka.



Bill Snow, The “Killer,” Dead
His Faithful Wife Mollie Did Not Long Survive Her Hero
Grief Drove Her to Commit Suicide. History of a Well-to-Do Illinois Couple Who Sought Their Fortunes in the Western Country.

New York, Nov., 26 (1894)- The Times prints the following story from its Oklahoma correspondent:
They buried pretty, unfortunate Mollie Snow at Guthrie, O. T., last week, the victim of arsenic administered by her own hand. Three weeks ago the Indian police killed and buried Bill Snow, near Lenapah. “Wild Bill” as Snow was called, was a typical “killer” of the latter-day type, a dapper, well-dressed, flashy-looking young fellow, with jet black hair, big black eyes, and a dime-novel desire to be considered a “bad man.”
When Oklahoma was opened up to settlement in 1889 Bill and Mollie were posted in the Cherokee Strip, ready to make the run for a home. They had a good team of horses, a spring wagon, almost $1000 in money, and had left the old home in Illinois perfectly confident that fortune awaited them in the west; Bill had always been a reader of dime novels, so when he reached Arkansas City, and found that it was fashionable to wear a big six-shooter, be purchased a 44-calibre Colt and a belt. Mollie was shy at first, and did not like to have Bill come to close to her with the ugly-looking weapon, but she finally became used to it.
One day a drunken thug insulted Mollie and drew a pistol on Bill, who interfered. Now was his chance to establish his reputation as a “killer.” And Snow shot “Kickapoo Sam: through the head. For weeks after this neither Bill nor Mollie could sleep well at night for thinking about that lonely grave on the prairie, but the men on the border came to speak of Bill Snow with respect as a “dead game” man whom it would be well to leave alone.
In May, when the final rush for homes came Bill, Mollie and the pistol were in the front rank. Down upon the banks of the Canadian river Bill drove his stakes, and when a couple of Texans came along and concluded to squat upon Bill’s land he warned them off with his six-shooter in his pistol hand. They were preparing to resist when a friend of theirs came along and said, “Better let that fellow go easy; he’s the game chap that killed ‘Kickapoo Sam’ “ and the Texans went on a mile or two further and drove away an inoffensive German, who was not a “game man” and did not carry a big pistol. Bill and Mollie’s claim was first-class bottom land, well timbered, and worth a good deal of money.
When Bill went to Guthrie to prove up on his claim Mollie went along, and when Bill stood in line all day to get a chance to file his vouchers with the land office, she rustled around and got him something to eat and drink and carried it to him. They had money, and both dressed well. Bill proved up all right, and built a nice little house on his claim. Just about this time deputy marshals were in demand and Bill was pointed out as a “game man,” who would be likely to make a good one. So Bill Snow moved to town and began to wear high heeled boots and drink liquor with the boys, dance with the girls at the dance houses, and incidentally to serve some warrants for the United States marshal. Over in the Pottawatomie country he killed an Indian for whom he had a warrant, and later on he had a warrant, and later on he had a shooting match with a half breed Mexican over a pretty girl of the town.
This latter affair comes to the ears of Mollie, his wife and she concluded to follow Bill some night. By this time Bill had become so popular that he spent the thousand-dollar nest egg, sold his claim on the Canadian, and was about through with the proceeds of that. He had advanced from the stage where they call a man “game” and had become noted as a “killer.” As he remembered the dime novel days in Illinois, he wished some of his old chums could hear of his exploits, so he had a local writer give him a sendoff.
This newspaper notoriety stirred up other “bad men” with records, and Bill had to defend his title with his pistol, with the result that he killed a man named Dennis over in the Chickasaw country. When he returned to Oklahoma he was more of a hero than ever. But his money was almost gone, and he had an extravagant girl on his hands, the former mistress of the Mexican whom he had killed. Added to this, he went into politics, and tried to be elected sheriff. His record as a “killer” was not in his favor, and he was defeated by the better class of people.
About this time his wife, Mollie, followed him to a questionable house in company with a man, a friend of Bill’s. They came upon the “killer” unexpectedly in the hall, and Bill mistaking the reason for his wife’s presence in the house, shot the man with her. He was arrested and thrown into jail. By this time many people who were afraid of him conspired to see that he got justice and was hanged. Political enemies wanted to see him removed, and the decent people thought that an example should be made of him as a representative “killer.”
His wife, Mollie, was almost the only friend he had left. With all the money at her disposal she managed to arrange matters so that Bill escaped before the time set for his trial. All he had left was his six-shooter, his reputation as a “killer,” and a horse which he stole from the sheriff. Every one’s hand was now against him, and he rode south into the wild country around the Wichita Mountains, and then he joined the Rogers gang.
He now gone through all the stages from a “tenderfoot boomer” to a “game man,” and thence to a recognized “killer,” and now he had landed in the “desperado” rank. He held up stages and robbed express cars. He got all the notoriety his nature craved. Still his Illinois wife clung to him, and a year ago she even visited him at his retreat in the hills. But the officers followed her and became so hot on her husband’s trail that she had to leave. A few weeks ago an Indian scout caught Snow napping and shot him full of holes. Mollie learned of his fate and committed suicide; her hero, the “game” man, the “killer,” and lastly the “desperado,” was dead.
[Fort Worth Gazette; Fort Worth, Texas; November 27, 1894; Transcribed as written by C. Pinkston]

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