Perry County, Illinois
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Rose Federer's Scrapbook

Transcribed & furnished by : Nancy Purtill

 

Rose Federer's Scrapbook
      Rose Ellen Crow Federer was born in Indiana in 1854 and married Frederick Federer, son of John and Frances Jane Federer, in 1874 in Vermilion Co., Indiana. She died in 1920 in Decatur, Macon Co., Illinois. Rose and Frederick's children were Agnes S. Federer Bebee, who was born in 1875 and died in 1919, Fred Federer, who was born in 1879 and died in 1954, and Karl E. Federer, who was born in 1886 and died in 1951.

      The family lived in Parsons and Chetopa, both in Labette Co., Kansas, and Du Quoin, Perry County, Illinois, and the clippings seem to be from newspapers in those areas, but primarily in Du Quoin. Rose Federer's scrapbook seems to have been completed after her death, because her obituary is pasted in the midst of the clippings, which also include recipes, household hints, and fashion news. The order in which the clippings were collected isn't clear, so they have been grouped here according to category. The spelling and punctuation are exactly as given, except for obvious typographical errors.

 

General News

ADAMS EXPRESS. -- We have noticed that the attachees of the Adams Express Company are always men of superior business qualifications and gentlemanly, polite and accommodating habits and manners. We are reminded that this is a fact by our intercourse with their Agent at this place -- Mr. Fred Federer, of the popular firm of Robbins & Federer. He is always punctual and transacts the business of Company to the satisfaction of all.

* * *

A Well-known and Distinguished Newspaper Man.
      John T. Beem, veteran editor of the Du Quoin Tribune, and well-known as the oldest newspaper man in Southern Illinois, recently celebrated his seventieth birthday. Despite his advanced years his health is unimpaired, and yet, in the forty-two years during which he has published the Tribune, he has never taken a vacation. Mr. Beem possesses a remarkable memory, and one of his chief delights is to recall many of the interesting events in the history of Southern Illinois. He was born in Pittsburg, Pa., August 23, 1840. At an early age he displayed unusual newspaper qualifications, and at the age of twelve years entered the office of the Alton (Ill.) Telegraph. He held situations on the St. Louis Democrat in 1856, and enjoyed the distinction of being one of the eight charter members of the first typograph union, organized in St. Louis in that year. In 1857 he became foreman of the Cairo (Ill.) Gazette, and held the same position with the Alton (Ill.) courier in 1858. He became half owner of the Alton (Ill.) Telegraph in 1859, but disposed of his interest in the paper, in 1862, to enlist in the Army, where he served for three years with the Ninety-seventh Illinois regiment and the Chicago Mercantile Battery. In June, 1868, he located in Du Quoin and took a position with the Du Quoin Tribune, and ever since that time has been continuously identified with that paper, one of the oldest weekly papers in Southern Illinois.
--- American Bulletin [1910]

* * *

RALPH BUSBY TO KANSAS
Resigns as Executor. With Wife Mother, and Sisters, to Live at Parsons.
      Ralph H. Busby, eldest son of Col. William Busby and until today one of the executors of the Busby estate, has resigned as executor, leaving the entire responsibility of winding up the affairs of his father with Elmer C. Millton, and, accompanied by his sisters, Mrs. Lusk and Miss Ruth, left this afternoon for Parsons, Kansas, where they will make their future home. Mrs. William Busby and Mrs. Ralph Busby are already in Parsons.
      None of the Busby furniture has been removed from McAlester but it is given out as practically certain that all of the family except Mr. and Mrs. Roy Busby and Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Endicott will make their future home in Parsons, where the family originally lived. Paul, the younger son, is in school, but will join the family in Parsons later.

* * *

      Rev. Frank H. Wright, the Indian evangelist, who preaches and sings the Gospel, and who has been attracting large congregations in St. Louis, is a friend of Mrs. R. E. Federer and family, of our city. He and his brother are residents of South McAlister, Indian Territory, and with other friends, were often guests at the Federer home during the sojourn of the family in South McAlister. The Indian residents are all proud of their race.

* * *

      Grover Macklin and Karl Federer have each been on the sick list.

* * *

      His many young friends are glad to know that Karl Federer is recovering from an illness which kept him confined to his home nearly a week. He is now at his post of duty in Mr. Higgins' jewelry store.

* * *

      Karl Federer, recently of South McAlester, Indian Territory, has accepted a pleasant position in the jewelry store of Mr. J. J. Higgins.

* * *

      Karl Federer has resigned his position in Mr. J. J. Higgins' jewelry store where he has been employed for more than a year past, to accept the position of head salesman in the shoe department of Pope's store. The new position came to him unsolicited. The place was made vacant by Chas. Sheehan, who resigned to accept a position in the large new clothing store of Mr. T. H. Davison.

* * *

      A novelty in the way of a souvenir post card is sent us by our young friend Mr. Karl Federer, of South McAlester, Indian Territory. The card is of chamois, and has in burnt design the picture of an Indian camp scene, with the invitation, "Come, lunch with me." Karl enjoys living in the Indian Nation, but prefers Southern Illinois, and is contemplating returning to our city.

* * *

      Mr. Fred C. Federer, formerly of this city, sends us illustrated documents in the interest of Parsons, a booming city in Kansas.

* * *

      F. C. Federer, for several months past bookkeeper in the First National Bank, left yesterday for California, where he expects to locate.

* * *

      A son was born to F. C. Federer and wife Monday afternoon.

* * *

      F. C. Federer is making a record of all the right of way deeds of the Parsons & Pacific for the use of the company.

* * *

      Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Federer since leaving Chetopa have added to their already nice little family another son and heir. He arrived last week and weighed 10 pounds. The Advance extends congratulations, and hopes the little one will get F. C. out of bed these cold mornings at 5 o'clock as our sixty-five-horse-power-ling hopeful does ye editor.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer, while attempting to alight from a spring wagon at her home Friday evening, her dress caught and she was thrown heavily to the ground. She fell on her head and shoulders and was severely bruised, and is now confined to her home in consequence of the unfortunate accident.

* * *

      Mr. F. C. Federer left Monday to take a position in the First National Bank of Parsons. He will remove his family there in a few weeks. It is with regret that we see Mr. F. and family leave Chetopa, for in the year that they have lived here they have shown themselves honorable, genial, social citizens. Mr. F. is a thoroughly reliable business man, attentive and accommodating. And the fact that he leaves the bank of Clark & Bates of this place to accept a similar position for Mr. Lee Clark of Parsons, senior member of the firm of Clark & Bates but further evidences the kind of a man he is. Though sincerely regretting the departure of such citizens, we heartily wish them success and a pleasant home in Parsons.

* * *

      Agent Teadstone, of the Missouri Pacific at Chetopa, has resigned on account of ill health and J. C. Standiford, formerly the Missouri Pacific agent at Chanute, has been appointed in his stead, and was in the city yesterday en route to Chetopa to take charge of the station.

* * *

Accepts Position Elsewhere
      Karl E. Federer left our city the former part of the week for Carbondale, where he accepts a position with the J. A. Patterson & Co. Shoe Department. He will be entrusted with the entire buying and selection of the stock for this company, who carry a high grade, superior quality of goods. The new position comes in the line of advancement, and came to Mr. Federer unsolicited. Mr. Patterson had heard of his qualities as a salesman, and made him the offer wich he has seen fit to accept. During the past several years, he has been a faithful and valued clerk in the shoe department of the firm of Messrs. Pope & Co., who regret his departure from his employ. Their associations have been mutually pleasant and helpful. Mrs. Federer will remain with her mother's family in our city until a residence can be found in Carbondale, when their household effects will be moved, which will probably be within the next few weeks. Mrs. Rosa E. Federer, who has made her home with her son and wife, expects to leave within a few days for St. Louis, where she will enjoy a visit with her daughter, at Hotel D'Arles; later she expects to visit in Decatur. Their many friends sincerely regret the loss of this estimable family from our midst. Mrs. Federer's husband, the late Fred Federer, was a prominent resident of Du Quoin, in former years, and was an extensive property owner. The latter's mother emigrated from Switzerland to our city, and was among the most esteemed and respected of the substantial pioneers.

* * *

      Between 11 and 12 o'clock last Tuesday morning the residence of Mrs. Minerva Bingham burned to the ground. Most of the contents was saved, but in a damaged condition. Residence and contents insured for $5,000. This is the first affliction to the family since the death of Mrs. Bingham, which occurred eleven years ago the day before the fire. As Mrs. Bingham's children were all born in this residence, the loss of their homestead is greater than the value, and cannot be replaced by any amount of money. Mr. W. G. Bingham and his bride returned from their wedding tour about two weeks ago, and commenced housekeeping with Mrs. Bingham, intending to make that their future home, but the fire has deprived them of that privilege and made a sad beginning in their married life. The family has the sympathy of our citizens.

* * *

DR. TENBROOK HAS RESIGNED.
Quit the Practice of Medicine and Dr. Smith Associated With Dr. Kreel.
      Dr. A. Tenbrook, who, with Dr. J. C. Creel, have been the local physicians and surgeons for the M., K. & T. Railroad company, has resigned and Dr. Albert Smith has been appointed in his place. The resignation of Dr. Tenbrook was due to the fact that he has decided to give up the active practice of his profession. No statement could be secured from him today regarding his plans for the future, as he is now hunting in Mississippi, and when the hunt is finished Mrs. Tenbrook will join him in an extended visit south and east. Dr. Tenbrook and Dr. Creel have been the Katy physicians and surgeons here for the past nine years, and Dr. Tenbrook has been practicing medicine in Parsons for the past twenty years or more.
      Dr. Creel will move into the suite of rooms over the postoffice in the Smith building with Dr. Smith as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made and he will be associated with Dr. Smith. The appointment of Dr. Smith will meet with general approval here where he is known as one of the most skillful surgeons and one of the best doctors in the city. Dr. Lucas will probably make a change in the location of his dental rooms, and when this is done Dr. Creel will occupy that room as his private office.

* * *

A card:

Christian Church
Du Quoin, Ill.
FOR CHRIST AND THE CHURCH.
Topics: July 1907 to January 1908.
Consecration meeting, first Sunday of month
Business " last " " "
OFFICERS
President, Leo Williams
Vice-President, Lydia Hatfield
Rec. Secretary, Anna Golden
Cor. Secretary, Coral Hatfield
Organist, Lora Clark
Asst. Organist, Maggie Ellis

COMMITTEES
Prayer Meeting: Gabrilla Long, Mrs. Ed. Wheatley, Karl D. Pope, Tena Golden, J. T. Sweatt Social: Mrs. H. O. Pope, Cora Hatfield, Harley Cox, Nina Sims, Robert Plumlee, Robert Haggard
Lookout: Karl Federer, H. O. Pope, Theodore Dunn, Fay Williams, Lutitia Wilson Sunday School and Information: J. T. Sweatt, Maggie Ellis, Karl D. Pope, Gladys Hatfield, Pastor
Music: George Benton, Lulu Cox, Isabel Davison, F. W. Disburg, Leo Williams
Missionary: Mary Nettleton, Mrs. S. T. Ring, Julia Sims, Fay Williams, Edna Davison
Literature: Ida Sims, Lutitia Saunders, Mary Nettleton, F. W. Disburg, Robert Haggard
Relief: Mrs. J. T. Sweatt, Mrs. Ed Wheatley, F. W. Disburg, Maggie Ellis, Mrs. W. E. Baker
Flower: Julia Sims, Robert Plumlee, Bessie Longshore, Lydia Hatfield, Myrtle Steinwax

* * *

OUTSIDE DEEDS ARE TESTS OF CHRISTIANS
Rev. James H. Snowden Says God Admits All Classes to His Kingdom.
      The pulpit of the First Presbyterian Church from which Rev. Dr. W. J. McKittrick, now retired, formerly delivered his brilliant epigrams, was filled by a preacher of somewhat the same striking originality of thought and speech, yesterday morning. Rev. Dr. James H. Snowden of Pittsburgh preached on "The Twelve Gates." He is an editor and pastor, renowned n the Presbyterian Church. The sermon, taken as its title indicated, from a text in Revelation, was not at all a forecast of mysteries, but a pertinent application of the "twelve gates" of the kingdom of God "both on earth and in heaven," to the varying needs of humanity.       "On either side are three gates, open day and night, offering easy entrance, warm welcome and abundant hospitality," said Dr. Snowden. "The city of God stands facing four sides, so that from whatever direction the weary traveler may come, he will find a gate. God wants all his people at home, and he has made it easy for them to get in.

SALVATION IS NOT DIFFICULT.
      "The impression sometimes obtains that salvation is a very difficult thing. We are told that we 'must fight the good fight,' and that 'even the righteous scarcely are saved.' Now the difficulties in the way of salvation all lie not in the kingdom, not in God, but in us and in the world.       "There are various doors of salvation, adapted to every class and condition, age and temperament. We are not all saved the same way. In fact, every one finds his own gate. We differ in our disposition and circumstances. One is converted in the morning, another late in the evening. One may come in suddenly, under an impulse, another slowly. One has an easy, comfortable conversion and is born a second time as unconsciously as the first time; one may have a sharp experience, almost as strong as a convulsion. One comes in at the door of the mind, another at the door of the heart. There are these different types of conversion, and it is proper that each should have his own.

RELIGIOUS OPINIONS DIFFER.
      "These many gates admit all kinds of people into the church. We are disposed to think that all people ought to be like us, and when they differ, we are apt to think they are in danger of judgment. Perhaps we are least tolerant in regard to differences of opinion on religious matters. There are small sectarians that would put all people in the world into their little theological machine and bring them out the same size and shape. Now God has not built all people after the same pattern. He has given gifts differing even as the stars and as the grass blades, every one of which has its own touch of beauty.       "A denomination is a group of people thinking the same along certain lines. It is generally better that a denomination should flock together. In the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York there are seven chapels, in each of which service is conducted in a different language. It would not tend to harmony to remove the partitions and merge these polyglot services into one, yet all are good. Our denominations may be viewed as chapels in which we worship. No doubt there are too many partitions. Some of them have come down, others have grown fragile and seem about to crumble, but some of them will endure long in the interest of efficiency."

CHURCH OPEN TO ALL CLASSES.
      The speaker presented an imaginary picture of "the gates," some of them "Methodist gates," others Baptist, Roman Catholic, Anglican, Greek Orthodox and so on through the list of denominations. He referred humorously to the slight divisions in his own denomination.       "We see Presbyterian gates, United Presbyterian, Southern Presbyterian, Reformed Presbyterian," he said. "Let us be thankful there are some 'Reformed' Presbyterians, and let us be assured they all enter the same gate.       "The same principle will apply to the individual church. We should have the doors open to all classes. The church of God is not a social club. It is not for the rich or the poor, the cultivated and refined or the outcast. It is just for sinners, for every one whom the Father loves and for whom Jesus died. So keep the doors open on every side.       "The doors swing outward as well as inward. After we have seen Jesus we are to go out for service."

 

 

Social News

      Mrs. Frances Martin pleasantly entertained at her home Sunday in honor of her cousin, Mrs. Rosa E. Federer, of South McAlester, Indian Territory, who is her guest.

* * *

SOCIETY AT THE ARKANSAS CAPITAL
Special Dispatch to the Globe-Democrat.
      Little Rock, Ark., June 10. -- The good old summer time has come early to get a front pew, but it has not caused a hitch in the social merry-go-round. One of the most elaborate bridge parties of the season was given on last Wednesday by Mrs. John T. Jarrell and her daughter, Miss Ruby Jarrell. Quantities of flowers gave the house a gala day air and dozens of electric fans cooled the atmosphere. The handsome prize was won by Mrs. Elizabeth Kell Rose. Among the guests were: Mesdames W. B. Plunkett, W. C. Bond, Sterling R. Cockrill, Sidney Ables, Ashley Cockrill, J. H. Hancock, Hamlin, Speed, E. G. Thompson, S. W. Reyburn, F. L. French, R. M. Butterfield, H. W. Morrison, De Jay Rogers, H. K. Cochran, F. W. Gibb, Gordon Greenfield, Rainey Williams, H. M. Bennett, G. R. Williams, Ned Heiskell, Moorehead Wright, Frederick Hanger, John Fordyce, J. K. Tunnah, J. R. Vinson, Chester Tunnah, F. B. T. Hollenberg, W. M. Kavanaugh, J. M. Rose, Jacob Hollenbeck, Thomas Samms, C. M. Taylor, Guy C. Smith, George B. Rose, Powell Clayton, C. C. Rose, Sterling Tucker, Clarence Rose, Herman Kahn, H. H. Foster, E. B. Kinsworthy, W. S. Mitchell, A. E. Shields, Roger Young, Frank Vinson" [the rest of the clipping is missing]

* * *

      Mrs. Rosa E. Federer, recently of South McAlester, Indian Territory, who has been spending a pleasant winter with her daughter, Mrs. Agnes Stewart, of St. Louis, arrived in our city this evening, and will make her home with her son Karl, at the residence of Mrs. Katharine Maclin. Her many friends will be pleased to welcome her. This friend has been a reader of the paper since leaving Du Quoin nearly 25 years ago.

* * *

      Mrs. Flo Leonard, of Parsons, Kansas, and Mrs. R. E. Federer were entertained at dinner at the St. Nicholas Hotel one day last week, as guests of Mrs. Tillie Briggs. The last named visited Mesdames Federer and Leonard several years ago when both ladies were residents of Parsons.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer left our city Saturday morning to remain until Thanksgiving as the guest of her only daughter, Mrs. A. F. Stewart. During her absence, her son, Karl Federer, will take his meals with Mrs. Katharine Maclin. Mrs. Stewart resides in St. Louis.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer returned last Friday night to her home in our city, after a pleasant visit of some weeks as the guest of her daughter, Mrs. A. F. Stewart, of 5245 McPherson street, St. Louis; she was also entertained at the handsome homes of several friends in that city.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer left our city Saturday morning for St. Louis, where she will spend at least a portion of the summer months at the beautiful home of her daughter. A number of friends were at the depot at that early hour to bid her good bye and wish her a pleasant visit.

* * *

      Mrs. Rosa E. Federer was entertained Wednesday at the hospitable home of Ald. and Mrs. Chas. Ross. Her son Karl was entertained Tuesday evening at the handsome home of Mr. F. J. Schleper and family.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer is entertaining her friend, Miss Cahill, of St. Louis. This is her first visit to our city; she will remain about two weeks.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer and Karl were entertained at supper last week at the pleasant new home of their friend, Mrs. Tillie Briggs.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer and son Karl left this morning for St. Louis, after a most delightful visit of two weeks with relatives and many friends in our city. Mrs. Federer will enjoy several days in St. Louis, and will also visit friends at her old home in Parsons, Kansas, before returning to the South. Karl will proceed direct to his home in South McAlester, Indian Territory.

* * *

      Mrs. Rosa E. Federer and son Karl are now cosily located in the residence of Mr. R. D. Poe, on East Keyes street.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer and Karl, at their new home on Keyes street, pleasantly entertained the TRIBUNE family at dinner last Friday.

* * *

      Miss Ethel Swayne, who is enjoying her vacation with her father's family in our city after attending the State University the past school year, entertained a large party of young friends last Thursday evening. Several of the guests of the evening had returned from distant colleges, and the glad meeting between classmates and young friends, proved one of the delightsome features. During the evening, the gifted young hostess served tempting refreshments. The guest list numbered: Miss May Talbot, of Parsons, Kansas; Miss Florence Coulter, of Girard, Kansas; Miss Mabel Van Keuren, of Birmingham, Alabama, Miss Edith Entsminger, of Carbondale, Misses Rosamond Kimsey, Gussie Hall, Lilla Johnson, Nina Valentine, Hattie Hamilton, Emma and Tillie White, Florence Higgins, Helen Blakeslee, Ruth Kimmel, Myrtle Ward, Lillian Pope, Gertrude Humphrey, and Messrs. Edward Hamilton, Karl Federer, Harry Sanford, Louis Kelly, Walter Forester, Lucius Humphrey, Percy Brown, Howard Kimmel, Eugene Prentice, Archie Lehn, W. E. McCormish.

* * *

      A quartette of young friends, Karl Federer, Walter and Fred Forester and Robert McElvain, took their guns and game bags to the McElvain farm on labor day, where they enjoyed an outing.

Camp
Two miles S. E. of De Soto Ill.
May 30, 1906.

To the Editor,
Du Quoin, Ill.

      Are having a big time on Big Muddy. Our records so far: Karl Federer, one toad, one eel and three bites; Robert McElvain, one worm and one fish; Fred Forester, two bites; Arch Lehn, two frogs; Walt Forester, one fish that he never landed.

      This card is sent by the following young friends: Walter and Fred Forester, Karl Federer, Bob McElvain and Archie Lehn, who are enjoying a week of camp life on the banks of the Big Muddy, as indicated above. They may not have broken the record as fisherman but there can be no question as to their unalloyed enjoyment of the outing, for a finer company of boys never graced the stretches of that noted stream. We shall hold ourselves in readiness to accept all kinds of "mutual admiration" statements upon their return.

* * *

      Karl Federer was host at a holiday dinner to his young friends, Walter Forester and Robert McElvain. The latter is home from the medical college at St. Louis for his vacation. The young host's mother, Mrs. R. E. Federer, had a bountiful dinner for the guests, who enjoyed greatly the informal social hour.

* * *

      Karl E. Federer, of South McAlester, Indian Territory, arrived in our city last week, and is the guest of his relatives, Mrs. Frances Martin and son, on the West Side. He will probably make his home in our city or Centralia.

* * *

A Parlor Dance.
      Mrs. M. E. Howell entertained at her home Saturday evening, in honor of her young niece, Miss Fleta Rankin, of Streator, this State.
      The spacious floors were waxed, and dancing formed the prominent feature of entertainment. The numbers consisted of waltzes and two-steps.
      Delightful readings were given by Mrs. W. B. Maclin and Miss Nellie Davis.
      Vocal and instrumental music was pleasingly furnished by Miss Minnie Croessmann.
      The guest of honor possesses a sweet cultivated voice, and delighted her music-loving friends with choice vocal selections.
      Refreshments of fudge were served the happy company.
      Mrs. C. E. Blakeslee and Miss Pauline and Mrs. Frank Dry were present and ably assisted in entertaining.
      The following guests accepted invitations:
      Misses Victoria Zoeckler, Ruby McElvain, Beulah Ghent, Myrtle Ward, Elmina Ward, Edna Heinmiller, Nellie Davis, Pearl Davison, Minnie Croessmann, Agatha Mitchell, Edith Pope and Fleta Rankin.
      Messrs. Grover Maclin, Karl Federer, Virgil Center, Charles and Harry Kane, John Hamilton, Bob McElvain, Harry Ghent, Fred Forester, Artie Holden.

* * *

      Miss Edith Pope very delightfully entertained a large company of young friends at her parents' beautiful home last Thursday evening. Dancing was the principal feature of entertainment. Refreshments of maccaroons, nabisco wafers, and hot chocolate with whipped cream were daintily served.
      Out of town guests were Miss Rankin, of Streator; Miss Webb, of Pinckneyville; Miss Heinmiller, of St. Louis; Miss McElvain, of Pinckneyville; and Messrs. Federer, of So. McAlester, Indian Territory, and Kane, of Murphysboro.

* * *

      Harry and Miss Beulah Ghent have been entertaining their young friends, Charles and Harry Kane, of Murphysboro. A party was tendered these brothers at the home of Engineer Ghent last Friday evening.
      Other out of town guests were Miss Rankin and Mr. Federer.

* * *

      Miss Rosamond Kimzey very delightfully entertained at her beautiful new home one evening last week the following guests: Misses Kathleen and Florence Higgins, Gussie Hall, Gertrude Humphrey, Helen Blakeslee, and Messrs. Karl Federer, Percy Brown, Louis Kelly, Harry Sanford, Eugene Prentice. A tempting luncheon was daintily served. Progressive euchre formed the leading feature of the evening's entertainment.

* * *

      Miss Pearl Davison entertained the following young friends Tuesday evening: Miss Rankin, and Messrs. Karl Federer and Grover Macklin. Flinch was enjoyed, and during the evening luscious home-made fudge was served.

* * *

      Mrs. Fred Federer and daughter, of Chetopa, are visiting acquaintances here.

* * *

      Mrs. R. E. Federer returned yesterday morning from a visit with friends at Chetopa.

* * *

      Carl Federer went to Chetopa yesterday to visit relatives.

* * *

      F. C. Federer and Miss Agnes and Master Fred, of Parsons, were visiting their friends here last Saturday.

* * *

      Mrs. Rosa E. Federer, of South McAlester, Indian Territory, arrived in our city Sunday evening for a visit with her cousin, Mrs. Frances Martin, and many friends. She is accompanied by her 17-year old son Karl, and her daughter, Mr. Allan Stewart (nee Agnes Federer) is expected to arrive in Du Quoin tomorrow.
      Mrs. Federer is the widow of the late Frederick Federer, who with his mother (now deceased) were prominent residents of our city, owning much land and valuable property.
      This is Mrs. Federer's first visit to her early home for nearly a quarter of a century; she notes many changes, but remembers remarkably well the friends of those early years. She has been a constant reader of the Tribune during the years that have intervened.
      Since leaving our city this friend has resided in Parsons, Kansas, and for the last several years has made her home in the Indian Territory. Her eldest son Fred is connected with a large wholesale house in So. McAlester, and Karl is learning the jeweler's profession.
      Mrs. Federer and children have been enjoying a visit at the world's fair.
      Their friends in Du Quoin take pleasure in making their visit among us a pleasant one.

* * *

South McAlester, Indian Terr.
December 4, 1904
      I never visited anywhere where I so thoroughly enjoyed myself as I did while in Du Quoin, and my trip there shall always remain as one of the bright spots of my life.
      Remember me to all who may inquire.

Sincerely,                     
Karl E. Federer           

* * *

      F. C. Federer, son of Mrs. Federer, of our city, together with his family, were visiting friends here the first of the week. Mr. F. has gone to Parsons, Kansas, to accept a position in a railroad office, and knowing him to be a most excellent and trustworthy business man, we wish him success in his new home.

* * *

(clipping dated Du Quoin, Ill., Nov 25, 1904)
      Mr. Thomas Horn and little sons, Masters Thomas and Sylvester, returned Sunday evening from St. Louis, where they enjoyed a brief visit at the home of the boys' grandmother. They also attended the fair, and witnessed the burning of the Missouri State building. Mrs. Horn thinks if the pictures of the governors were saved, and presumably they were, the loss of the building is slight, and the fire was well timed. Mr. Horn has been taking his children to the fair on Saturdays for some weeks past. On the train coming homeward he was surprised to greet Mrs. Rosa Federer, of South McAlester, Indian Territory, a friend of his father's family, and the unexpected meeting was a source of mutual pleasure.

* * *

[ the following is dated June 15 in a handwritten note on the clipping]
A Buffet Luncheon.
      In honor of Miss Leota Cooper, of Kansas, Mrs. Karl E. Federer delightfully entertained at her home on East Keyes street, Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Dr. Bebee, of St. Louis, was also present, the guest of honor being an early friend of her mother's family, while residents of the Sunflower State.
      This is Miss Cooper's first visit to Du Quoin, and the many restful, old-fashioned residences, and the green world about, appeals to her favorably in contrast to her more metropolitan home in the western city of Parsons.
      Fragrant cut flowers filled the parlors everywhere with their perfume. Gay-colored nasturtiums in whose bright petals "beauty plays her idle freaks where varied colors run," were the blossoms used in the dining room. And sprays of sweet peas and cultivated roses -- everyone a beauty, more than thought can tell -- graced other rooms. These blooms of many varieties and as many different hues, seemed almost to nod a graceful welcome to the friends, and added to the happiness of the social hours.
      Gorgeous sunflowers, with their large round disks and yellow rays -- typical of the chosen flower of Miss Cooper's home State -- were painted on the score cards used in the floral contest of the afternoon, in which Wild Flowers, having transposed letters were to be plucked from this garden of guessing.
      A study of those aggravating letters of the alphabet was much like the charm of a half remembered face or name that teases you with its familiarity and yet exasperates you with its very strangeness!
      The first favor, a pair of blue silk stockings, embroidered by Mrs. Bebee, was awarded Miss Edythe Pope.
      The guest of honor prize was a tiny silken handkerchief in exquisite Maderian work.
      A nosegay of sweet peas was given Miss Grace Lehn as the consolation favor.
      The guest brought with them their fancy work, and during the happy afternoon found "enough of labor to avoid unrest."
      In the lighted dining room, a buffet luncheon was faultlessly served.
      Veal sandwiches, olives, coffee with whipped cream, luscious cakes and ice cream formed the two-course menu.
      Miss Cooper presided at the coffee urn.
      The rare pieces of beautiful hand-painted china, costly pieces of Mexican drawn work, and hand-embroidered doilies and center-pieces added a picturesque charm to this delightful buffet luncheon.
      The guest list included the members of the KuZuke Club and a few invited friends, all of whom hope they may in future have the pleasure of renewing the acquaintance formed with the guest of honor upon this social afternoon.
      The invited list included:
      Miss Cooper.
      Mesdames --
            Sanford, Jones, Stanard.
      Misses --
            Fallon, Jakle, Hall, Lehn, Valentine, Dry, Hatfield, Ghent, McElvain, Pope, Stacy, Allen.

* * *

      Mrs. Rose Federer, who has been a resident of our city during the past three years, left on the early train Tuesday morning for St. Louis, where she will be the guest of her daughter until after the festivities of centennial celebration; she then expects to enjoy an extended visit in Decatur. Her many friends sincerely regret her departure from Du Quoin, and she will be greatly missed in church, social and Eastern Star circles.

* * *

      Karl Federer, who recently became a resident of Carbondale, spent Sunday afternoon with his wife and mother in our city; the former joined him the early part of the present week. These young people will be nicely located, occupying furnished rooms for the present; they expect to go to housekeeping next spring. Mr. Federer expresses himself as well pleased with the prospects in every way, and is confident that both he and wife will be pleased with the city where they have chosen to locate.

* * *

In Camp.
      A congenial party of young friends left our city bright and early Monday morning, to remain until Thursday on the banks of the Little Muddy, east of Hallidayboro. The ladies of the party went down on the train, while the gentlemen traveled overland with the necessary luggage. They carried camp stools, hammocks, plenty of provisions, etc., and went prepared to thoroughly enjoy the outing.
      The party were fortunate in having two excellent chaperones in the persons of Dr. and Mrs. Bebee, who have been visiting at the home of the latter's mother, Mrs. Federer, in our city. The latter expects to visit the young people the last day they are in camp.
      A note from the merry party received Tuesday, reads:
"In Camp on the Little Muddy east of Hallidayboro.
                                                                                               July 14, 1908.
      We are having a mighty fine outing, and everybody is getting a good 'tanning.' No mishaps, fortunately.
      Yesterday the fishermen landed some beauties that would make Jonah's whale look like a minnow.
      All send best wishes.
           Dr. and Mrs. Bebee,
           Julia Sims,
           Karl Federer,
           Nina Valentine,
           Fernie Fallon,
           Flossine Stacy,
           Fred Forester,
           Walter Forester,
            Archie Lehn.

      P.S. -- All the mosquitoes in Illinois serenaded the camp last night."

* * *

      The fishing party who have been camping on the lakes at Hallidayboro returned home last evening. They report a delightful time. The party was composed of the following: Misses Fernie Fallon, Julia Sims, Flossine Stacy and Nina Valentine and Messrs. Walter and Fred Forester, Karl Federer and Archie Lehn. They were chaperoned by Dr. and Mrs. Beebe.

* * *

Society News and Gossip.
      The young people rehearsed for the Society Minstrels all last week and did not have time for social functions of any kind, consequently last week was a very dull week. The event of the week was a wedding, the marriage of Miss Minnie May Cowden, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Cowden, to J. P. McDown, which occurred on Wednesday evening at the home of the bride, Rev. O. E. Hart, pastor of the Prebyterian church, officiating. The guests were called together by the wedding march from "Tannhauser" by Wagner, at the close of which the familiar strains of Mendelssohn's wedding march announced the approach of the bridal couple, preceded by Allen C. Stewart, groomsman, and Miss Agnes S. Federer, bridesmaid. "Sweet Spirit Hear My Prayer" was played during the ceremony and at the close the bridal march from Lohengrin was played. After congratulations, refreshments were served, during which the orchestra "discoursed sweet music," which added greatly to the entertainment. Then followed a vocal solo by W. T. Neligh and a piano solo by Miss Reamer. The grounds were brilliantly illuminated and the house was beautifully decorated with ferns and flowers, the bride and groom standing beneath an arch of flowers. The bride wore a dainty white gown trimmed with satin and lace. The wedding was largely attended and many elegant presents were received. The honeymoon will be spent at home.

* * *

      [the first part of this clipping is missing]
next Thursday evening for the benefit of the worthy poor of the city. The programme will be as follows:
Music . . . . . Orchestra Welcome address . . . . . Miss Bertha Cornelius
Chorus . . . . .
Recitation . . . . . Katie Cooper
Music . . . . . Alberta Ratliff
Recitation . . . . Miss Maud Young
Dialogue. . . . . Little Folks
Music . . . . . Miss Agnes Federer
Recitation . . . . . Miss Eva Cooper
Song . . . . . Girls
Recitation . . . . . Miss Bertha Wirt
Music . . . . . Miss Nellie Ballard
Recitation . . . . . Carl Cornelius
Music . . . . . Orchestra
Dialogue
Song . . . . . Miss Clara Harper
Recitation . . . . . Hazel Reed
Good Night Song . . . . . Miss Ada Hacker and Miss Agnes Federer

      Anyone knowing of needy persons are requested to enclose name and place of residence in a sealed envelope and deposit at the door. The entertainment begins at 8 o'clock. Admission 10 and 15 cents.

 

 

Weddings and Engagements

MARRIAGE LICENSES
      Marriage licenses were issued today to the following:
      Percy Morgan age 19 and Mina Miller age 18, both of McAlester.
      O. M. Upton age 21, and Lula Voles age 18, both of Savanna.

* * *

(with a handwritten note, "August 24, 1908")
A Quiet Wedding.
      Mrs. Karl E. Federer and Miss Julia Sims were quietly united in marriage Monday evening, Rev. George W. Wise officiating. The simple ceremony was performed at the Christian parsonage, corner Peach and Poplar streets. The only witnesses present were Mr. Walter Forester and Miss Gladys Hatfield, special friends of the groom and bride.
      The date of the wedding of this popular young couple was a surprise to even the immediate relatives of the contracting parties, the mother of Mr. Federer and Miss Sims both being in St. Louis at the time.
      After the ceremony, the bride and groom repaired to the tasteful home of the latter's mother, on Keyes street, where they will begin their married life.
      Mr. Federer is a self-made young man, and possesses sterling attributes and qualities that lead to success. He is a popular salesman in the shoe department of Messrs. Pope & Co., where he has made his presence and worth felt. He is an active worker in the church of his choice, and a general favorite at church and social functions. Possessing a marked talent for drawing, his former instructors have urged his taking it up as a study and becoming a professional cartoonist. Mr. Federer's ancestors came from Switzerland, and his paternal grandmother possessed valuable property and land, including the Summers place, a portion of the latter ground being disposed of to the Odd Fellows' cemetery association; also a number of homes about our city were owned by her. Mr. Federer's boyhood was passed in Parsons, Kansas, and before coming to Du Quoin he spent several years in South McAlister, Indian Terr. He has a wide circle of friends to congratulate him upon his marriage.
      Miss Sims is the youngest daughter of a Southern family, her mother being Mrs. Asenath Sims, widow of the late Dr. J. R. Sims, one of the best known practitioners in our city, who met death some few years ago while in the performance of his professional duties. She would have completed the High School course with the Class of 1908, but was solicited by the County Supt't to teach the Slawson school the past winter, which she did to the satisfaction of all concerned. She possesses superior talent as a reader, and has won several gold medals in contests with Southern Illinois high school students. Her church membership is with the Main Street Christian church of Du Quoin. Her friends unite in wishes for her happiness.
      Mr. Federer and bride are now "at home" to friends at the home of Mrs. Rosa Federer.

* * *

      Miss Estell Austin Drew, whose engagement to Mr. John Ehrhart, Jr., was recently announced, has selected December 8 as the date for her marriage, which will be a large church affair, at the West Presbyterian Church. Miss Drew will be attended by her two cousins as maids of honor, Miss Elizabeth Cockrell of Jerseyville, Ill., and Miss May Noble of Grafton, Ill. Miss Dorothy Winn of St. Louis will be maid of honor.

* * *

Ehrhardt-Drew Wedding.
      At 8 o'clock last evening at the West Presbyterian Church, Miss Estelle Austin Drew became the bride of Mr. John Ehrhardt, Jr. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Francis Russell. The bridge, who was given away by her uncle, Judge N. E. Utt of Chicago, was handsomely gowned in white satin trimmed with a great deal of beautiful old family lace, the tulle veil being held in place with a coronet of lilies of the valley. She carried a shower of bride roses and lilies of the valley. Miss Dorothy Winn, who was maid of honor for the bride, wore white messaline satin draped and trimmed with lace and caught with a single handsome pearl ornament. She carried a sheaf of American beauty roses. The bridesmaids were Misses May Noble of Grafton, Ill., and Elizabeth Cockrell of Jerseyville, who were gowned in delicate blue messaline trimmed with silken fringe and pearls. They also carried American beauties. Mr. Everett Raeder was best man for the groom and the groomsmen and ushers were Messrs. Charles Cockrell of Jerseyville, Walter Boehmer and Milton Boehmer. A small reception followed the ceremony at the home of the mother of the bridge, Mrs. Austin T. Drew of 5937 Vernon avenue, which was prettily decorated, the drawing room and hall being embowered with white roses and lilies of the valley, and the dining room done in American beauty roses. After receiving the congratulations of those present the bride and groom left for a Southern honeymoon tour. They will make their home for a time after their return with the mother of the bride, although they will go to housekeeping in the spring.

* * *

WAS COMPLETE SURPRISE
Karl Federer and Miss Julia Sims United in Marriage at the Christian Parsonage
      The friends and relatives of Miss Julia Sims and Karl Federer were completely surprised last evening when they heard of their marriage at the parsonage of the Main Street Christian church.
      The young couple were quietly married by their pastor, Rev. Wise, after which they went to the home of the groom's mother in Sellew addition where they will make their home.
      The marriage was a complete surprise, not even the closest relatives knowing that it was to take place last night although it was expected at some future time.
      The bride is the youngest daughter of Mrs. J. R. Sims. She is very popular and her friends are numbered by her acquaintances. Mrs. Federer is a member of the Main Street Christian church and is an earnest and faithful christian worker. She is an accomplished young lady and has gained quite a reputation as a reader. She taught school the past year in the Slawson district.
      The groom is the son of Mrs. Kate Federer, He is a young man of excellent qualities and has many friends in this city. He is employed in the shoe department at Pope's store and is held in high esteem by his fellow clerks and his employer. He is also a member of the Christian Church and is a faithful worker.
      The CALL joins their many friends in congratulations and wishes them a long and happy life together.

* * *

      Richard T. Briggs and Miss Tillie Hill, both of this city, were joined in wedlock at the residence of the bride's parents, on South Division street, last evening, Nov. 7, at 8:30 o'clock.
The TRIBUNE extends hearty congratulations, and wishes them a happy wedded life.

* * *

CAT IS LET OUT OF BAG.
      The cat, a black paper cat, was let out of the bag, a crepe paper bag, last night at the home of S. J. Wear, on East Perry St. when Miss Maude Wear entertained her co-workers in Pope's store and members of K. P. C. club. The cat as soon as it came out of the bag showed it had some interesting and surprising news for the guests. Attached to the cat's neck was a red heart and on this the announcement of the approaching wedding of the hostess Miss Wear, to Ormand J. Sweatt.
     The plan of the announcement was unique in all details. Previous to the serving of the third coarse of the sumptuous quail supper, Mrs. S. J. Wear and Mrs. Joe Davison came into the dining room and stretched from end to end of the table a string. On this string the paper bags as above described were attached.
     The wedding as announced, will be at the home of S. J. Wear, Dec. 5. It will be the culmination of a romantic courtship started when the two were attending school.
      Mr. Sweatt is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Sweatt. He is now engaged in the tailoring trade with his father on North Division St. He is a graduate of the Du Quoin Township High school.
      His fiancee, Miss Wear, is a charming young girl of this city, a member of the K. P. C. club and popular in social circles. She has until lately been employed as clerk in Pope's Dry Goods Co. store.
      They intend to reside at 601 North Washington Boulevard, which has already been furnished by the groom to be.

 

 

Obituaries

      Mrs. Frances Federer died Monday evening, March 19th, at her late home in Parsons, Kansas, in the 90th year of her age. The funeral services were held from the residence of Mrs. R. E. Federer, 1601 Stevens avenue, at 4 o'clock P. M., Tuesday, March 20th. Many friends in our city will learn with regret of the death of this dear old lady. For many years she resided in Du Quoin, where she won the friendship of all those with whom she came in contact here. She was born in the year 1811, and came to this country in early life from Switzerland. Mrs. Federer was possessed of a goodly share of worldly goods. Since leaving our city, she has made her home with her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Rosa Federer, where she has been most tenderly and devotedly cared for. The closing years of her useful life have been crowned with contentment and peace. A daughter-in-law, three grandchildren and one niece are her only surviving relatives.

* * *

Death of an Estimable Young Lady.
      A letter was received in the city yesterday announcing the death of Miss Lottie Cares, which occurred at Hailey, Mo., last Tuesday. She was stricken with typhoid fever on the second of the month and was ill about ten days. The deceased was the estimable daughter of C. F. Cares, who until about a year ago resided in this city and was engaged in the shoe business, and the announcement of her death will be read with sincere regret by a large circle of friends and acquaintances, among whom she was a general favorite. She was possessed of many lovable traits of womanhood, and the sympathy of many friends in this city is extended the bereaved parents.

* * *

Death of Frank Hacker.
      Frank Hacker, son of John Hacker, of this city, died at Kansas City on Sunday afternoon, after a short illness of typhoid-malarial fever, aged 21 years, 11 months and 7 days. His father and mother were at his bedside when he passed away.
      The deceased was a well-known and popular young man who had spent the major part of his boyhood in Parsons, and prior to his going to Kansas City, where he held up to his death a prominent and responsible position in the main office of the Swift Packing Co., he filled a number of important trusts in the service of the M., K. & T. in our city.
      He was a young man of exceptionally good traits of character, and few young men have held a higher place in the estimation of our people and when the news of his death reached the city it was received with universal regret among his friends and acquaintances.
      The remains were brought to the city yesterday afternoon, and were met at the depot by many sorrowing friends and conveyed to the family residence on East Crawford avenue, where the funeral services will take place this afternoon at 2 o'clock, Rev. O. E. Hart, of the Presbyterian Church, officiating.

* * *

Gone to Her Reward.
      After a lingering illness of a few weeks Mrs. Mary A. Shields died Sunday morning and was buried from the Presbyterian church Monday afternoon, the services being conducted by Rev. W. C. Porter of Ft. Scott, who paid a touching and eloquent tribute to the memory of the deceased. At the close of his sermon he made the following personal reference to this noble woman:
      "Mary A. White was born in Greenville, Ill., July 21, 1820, was married to J. P. Shields of Pittsburg, Pa., Feb. 18, 1847. Soon after her marriage they removed to the south, then returned to Illinois where they continued to reside until they came to Kansas in 1871, settling in Chetopa, where she has since resided. Some two years ago, she buried her husband, and to-day loving hands will bear her mortal remains away to sleep their last sleep, beside those of the man she loved -- 'In hope of the resurrection.' She has dwelt among you for a quarter of a century, and it is fitting you should bear her to her rest. How shall I speak of her in this presence? You have known her so long and so well that words from me must sound empty. What I would say you have seen and experienced. But I may not withhold my tribute. 1st, she was a faithful wife; 2nd, she was a loving and devoted mother; 3rd, she was an intelligent, earnest, consecrated christian. She 'Knew whom she had believed.' Her great desire was that He should be magnified in her life. She gave herself as few ever do to the practical work of the duties in life and the church. In the Sunday school and by the couch of the suffering and in the home darkened by affliction, her ministries have brought comfort and healing. In missionary work at home and abroad she was intensely interested, and as a leader was zealous and wise. And here I cannot do better than to quote the words of her son: 'Her whole life has been one of devotion to works of purity and the general good of her race.'
      She was president of the W. C. T. U. for 10 years. In this work of protection for the young she was zealous and untiring. No opposition could turn her aside, and tho of an affectionate disposition -- shrinking from conflict -- yet such was her loyalty to convictions of right and duty. The continued existence of the Union and the work it has been able to do in moulding public sentiment is in no small measure due to her. The weight of years, the infirmities they bring, could not dampen her ardor or lessen her zeal. ["]
      In the death of Mother Shields our community has lost a woman of a noble character and a lovely life. It has been the writer's good fortune to have known her for over 25 years and he can bear testimony to the purity of her life and the unselfishness of her nature. A few months ago she sought a private interview with the writer, and among other things said she knew she would soon be called hence and wanted to 'set her house in order, and be ready when the summons came.' She seemed anxious to do a little more work for Him to whom she had given her life and love, and consulted us as to the practicability of her plans. The work she proposed seemed to be the outgrowings of a heart filled with gratitude and love for her divine Master. Such women are a blessing to the world, and by their death the world is poorer but heaven is richer. Truly, her children may rise up and call her blessed."

* * *

      Another good old Mother of Israel has been summoned from her labor on earth to receive her reward in the mansions of eternal rest, and join her companion who preceeded her a short time since. Mrs. Mary E. Shields, of this city, received the message Sunday night and her spirit returned to the God who gave it. Funeral services over the remains were conducted at the Presbyterian church Monday afternoon, by Rev. Porter, of Fort Scott, after which the remains were interred in Oak Hill cemetery beside those of her late husband. Mrs. Shields lacked only a few days of being 76 years of age. She had been in very feeble health for a long time, and her demise was not unexpected. She was one of our pioneer settlers, and was a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, and highly esteemed by all who knew her. She leaves three grown children, J. F. Shields, Ada Long and Fannie Shields to mourn her death.

* * *

Former Parsons Woman Dead at Little Rock
     
      Word has been received here of the death of Mrs. Agnes Bebee at her home in Little Rock, Ark., on January 8. Burial was in Decatur, Ill., where her mother and brother, Fred Federer, reside.
      Mrs. Bebee was formerly Miss Agnes Federer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Federer, former residents of Parsons. Mrs. Bebee's father was at one time employed as bookkeeper at the First National bank. She is survived by her mother and two brothers, Fred Federer of Decatur, [torn] and Carl Federer, of Carbondale, [torn]

* * *

[The first part of this clipping is torn.] ". . . parsonage, the .P . . . residence on South Division street, in one of which (the Brovart home today) Agnes was born. Her happy girlhood was spent in Indiana and Kansas. Her parents lavished upon their first-born and only daughter all that love could prompt and ample means gratify. Her friends are deeply grieved at her sudden demise.
      "It seems strange Death should come to her
      Life was her heritage and friends,
      Was Death not her friend, too? That may be --
      Death welcomed her so tenderly."

      A clipping from a Decatur, Ill., paper states --
      "Mrs. Agnes Bebee, sister of Fred Federer, of 636 West Packard street, died Wednesday night at her home in Little Rock, Ark. Her death was caused by bronchial pneumonia, after a short illness, and was wholly unexpected. A brother, Karl E. Federer, of Carbondale, left at once for Little Rock, and will bring the body to Decatur. The mother, Mrs. Rosa E. Federer, also came from Carbondale to await the arrival of the body, and is now at the home of Fred Federer.

The Last Rites
      The funeral of Mrs. Agnes Bebee was held at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon,, at the residence of Fred Federer. The services were conducted by Rev. Freeman A. Havighurst, pastor of the First Methodist church. The music was furnished by Mrs. Vern D. Sleeter and Miss Mary Uhler.
      The flowers were in charge of Mrs. Theodore Each, Mrs. Asa Morris, Mrs. Whitemash, Mrs. Grace Campbell. The pallbearers were R. C. Peck, Theodore Each, Edward Hill, Asa Morris.
      Among the messages of sympathy was one from a western friend, expressing the sentiment of her affection.
      "Agnes, bright, sunny, happy little girl when I first knew her, was the one pupil of all that Parsons, Kansas, school that I thought of most often through the years, even before I met her here four years ago. She was so sweet-spirited, loving, generous, self-sacrificing. Surely now she is being rewarded for all her suffering those years she was so brave."
     A close friend of the bereaved mother, describing the hallowed memories of the funeral, writes, in part:
     "Well, you know they (Agnes and mother) had been making their home with (Ida) a sister-in-law, in Little Rock, Ark. The weather had been so cold and the gas was so poor it failed to heat the house, so she went to the hotel, which was well heated. On Tuesday morning -- less than a week ago -- she felt badly. Wednesday she was worse, and at some minutes past 8 o'clock -- that night -- was dead.
     "It came as a surprise, for none tho't she was in so critical a condition. She passed away -- seemingly -- without a pain, which is a great comfort to the dear mother. Everything that could have been done for her was. They had the best nurse the city afforded. The physician and his wife stayed with her all the time, also other friends.
     "She was put away so nicely. A beautiful silver gray casket, and the flowers were beautiful, and so many, some coming from distant towns. She was laid away in a beautiful pink voile dress. She loved the bright and beautiful things of earth. The remains were a triumph of the embalmer's art. She looked so peaceful and happy, and the longer we kept her the prettier she seemed.
     "Had a service before leaving Little Rock, also one her yesterday afternoon from Fred's home, well attended, and such beautiful, consoling words were spoken by the Methodist minister. He reminded Mrs. Federer of Rev. Maxton. Two young ladies sang Rock of Ages and Nearer, my God, to Thee.
      "I believe I told you Karl went to Little Rock to accompany the remains to Decatur and did not arrive till 3:30 Saturday afternoon. While the funeral services were going on, a long distance message came announcing Ida's sudden death. The undertaker told them to call again, as Agnes's funeral was in progress. Thus when Mrs. Federer returned from the cemetery her grief was doubled.
      "Julia Federer came from Carbondale Saturday morning to attend the funeral, also Agnes's very dearest friend from St. Louis. She and Karl went home Sunday evening, as Karl is to go to Little Rock to attend Ida's funeral. It will be hard on him, as he has not fully regained his strength from his illness with flu . . . . The people here were so nice and good to them. . . . The cemetery here is a beautiful resting place."
"Only a moment of dark,
A dream of the fleeting night.
Dear, I am very glad for you
That all of the trouble is past,
And I would that as swiftly silently,
The summons might come to me."

* * *

THRU RAIN TO FUNERAL
BODY OF MRS. J. A. STERRETT IS ON ITS WAY TO OHIO
      Throngs of McAlester people braved a downpour of rain, this morning, to attend the funeral of Mrs. J. A. Sterrett, who died in her apartments at the Yowell flats late Tuesday evening. The M. E. church, where the funeral was held, was filled with friends of the family and a gorgeous embankment of flowers, the tribute of friends and lodges, adorned the pulpit and casket.
      The McAlester chapter of the Eastern Star assisted in the funeral service, the sermon of which was preached by the Rev. Jean L. LaGrone. All banks of the city closed during the hour of the funeral.
      The body, accompanied by Dr. Sterrett and his two sons, Frank M. Sterrett of Fort Worth, Texas, and J. M. Sterrett of Corcoran, California, was shipped this afternoon to Troy, Ohio, the old family residence, where it will be buried Saturday.

* * *

RAILWAY NOTES.
      F. C. Federer, auditor of the Kansas City & Pacific, died last night at 12:45 o'clock.

* * *

      F. C. Federer, auditor of the Kansas City & Pacific, is dangerously sick and fears are entertained that he will not recover.

* * *

      F. C. Federer, general auditor of the K. C. & P. railroad, died last night after a long illness. He was highly esteemed by all who knew, and the community loses an excellent citizen. His death was caused by tumor. The funeral will take place at 2 p.m. tomorrow from the Methodist church.

* * *

March 22nd. 1889.
      There will be a special communication of Parsons lodge No. 117 to-morrow at 1 o'clock sharp, Mar. 23, 1889. For the purpose of attending the funeral of F. C. Federer. All Masons in good standing please attend by order.
S.B. NEWTON W.M.

* * *

Death of F. C. Federer.
      F. C. Federer died at 1 o'clock yesterday morning of a cancerous tumor of the liver, after a lingering illness. The deceased at the time of his death was general auditor of the Kansas City & Pacific railroad and a most excellent citizen. In regard to social life, to business life, to family life, it would be hard to find a better man, taking him through and through, than was F. C. Federer. He has resided here some five years, coming here from Chetopa, where he was employed in the banking house of Clark & Bates. He leaves a wife and three children. The funeral will take place from the Methodist church at 2 o'clock this afternoon and will be attended by Parsons Lodge No. 117, A. F. and A. M., of which he was a member.

* * *

A black-bordered card:
      DIED -- At Parsons, Kansas, 12:45 A.M., March 22, 1889. Mr. F. C. Federer, Age 49 years, 9 months, and 22 days. Funeral Services at 2 o'clock p.m., March 23d, at the Methodist Church. Friends of the family are invited.

* * *

A Card of Thanks.
      To all the neighbors and friends, who so kindly assisted me and sympathized with me during the illness and death of my beloved husband, I desire to express my heartfelt gratitude. I do not know who contributed the beautiful floral tributes, and as I cannot reward you better than to simply say that I fully appreciate your kindness, my prayer is that He who knows all will justly reward each of you.

MRS. ROSA FEDERER.

* * *

      Mr. F. C. Federer, of Parsons, died Friday at Parsons of cancerous tumor of the liver. He leaves a wife and three children. Mr. Federer lived in Chetopa a while a few years ago, and won the esteem of all. He was a model man, and a gentleman in every sense of the word. While here he united with the M. E. church. His family will have the sympathy of their many friends here in their great loss.

* * *

Died, at Parsons, Kans., March 22, 1889, Mr. F. C. Federer, aged 49 years, 9 months and 22 days.
      This announcement is of more than ordinary moment to our citizens, with whom Mr. Federer has lived the better part of his life. He was formerly express agent at this point, and his life was marked as a singularly careful, attentive and prudent business man. During the past six years or more he was book-keeper to a bank in Parsons, in which city his family and his mother still reside. In his death, the writer loses a true and valued friend.

* * *

      Sylvester Bingham, youngest son of Mrs. Minerva Bingham, died last Sabbath morning after a short illness. The funeral services were conducted from the residence, Monday afternoon, by Rev.J. E. Jenkins. The bereaved mother and family have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad bereavement.

XENIA.

* * *

SKETCH OF MRS. MARTIN'S LIFE
      Mrs. Frances Martin, widow of Michael Martin, and mother of John Martin, of this city, was born in St. Louis April 2, 1847, and died at her home in Four Mile, February 16, 1911, after a two weeks' illness.
      She came to Du Quoin upon her father's death at the age of nine years to live with her aunt, Mrs. Federer, the grandmother of Karl Federer. After two years she returned to St. Louis where she lived until after the war when she again made her home in this city, coming with her mother, Mrs. Anna Kunz.
      In February, 1879, she was married to Michael Martin, brother of John Martin, Sr., of this city. Her husband died January 24, 1889 and she continued her residence upon the farm with her other son, Joseph, except for about eight years when she lived with her son, John in this city.
      Deceased was for years and until her death a consistent member of the Catholic church.

* * *

Death of S. J. Thurber.
      Samuel J. Thurber died at his residence in this city at 12 o'clock Sunday night at the age of 51 years. The funeral to take place from the Presbyterian church at 2 o'clock this afternoon.
      The deceased was an old and highly esteemed resident. For many years he was a locomotive engineer on the M., K. & T. railroad, and his death was the ultimate result of injuries sustained in a wreck at Sedalia, Mo., while in the discharge of his duties.
      In jumping from his engine his head was fractured, causing the loss of his mind, and with the hope of restoring which he was sent to the insane asylum at Osawatomie, but his case was hopeless, and about two weeks previous to his death he was brought to his home here, it being evident that he was failing fast and could not survive many days.
      During his last hours he was surrounded by his family and friends and every attention that could be bestowed upon him was given him.
      He was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, a Knight Templar and an Odd Fellow, and was respected and esteemed by all who knew him.
      He leaves [torn] and two children, who have the sympathy of the community in their sad bereavement.

* * *

Mrs. E. F. Swift Died Suddenly Last Night.
And Various Other Items of News and Gossip of More or Less Interest Picked Up by "The Sun's" Reporters.

Mrs. E. F. Swift dies suddenly.
      Mrs. E. F. Swift died suddenly last night at her home on West Clark avenue. She had been complaining of rheumatism for several days, but retired last night feeling better than usual. Shortly after 11 'clock Mr. Swift was awakened and found his wife in great pain. Drs. Smith and Tenbrook were hastily summoned, but when they arrived, Mrs. Swift was dead. Her death is attributed to heart trouble. The death of Mrs. Swift, coming as it did, will cause widespread surprise and grief among her large circle of friends and acquaintances, but few of them being aware that she was even ill.
      The deceased was one of the early residents of Parsons, her husband being among the oldest employes at the M., K. & T. railroad shops. She was a most highly respected lady and her sudden demise will be read with sincere sorrow by a host of friends, whose sympathys go out to the stricken husband in his sudden hour of grief.
      The deceased was nearly 60 years of age and was a prominent member of the Order of Eastern Star, being among the charter members of that society. The funeral services will probably not take place before Monday afternoon, awaiting the arrival of a son from Laredo, Texas.

* * *

A black-bordered card:
      Funeral Notice. DIED -- Monday evening, March 19th, 1900, Mrs. Frances Federer, Aged 89 years, 11 months and 10 days. Funeral services from the residence of Mrs. R. E. Federer, 1601 Stevens Avenue, at 4 o'clock P.M., Tuesday, March 20th, 1900. Friends of the family invited to attend.

* * *

A black-bordered card:       DIED -- At Parsons, Kansas, 12:45 A.M., March 22, 1889. Mr. F. C. Federer, Age 49 years, 9 months, and 22 days. Funeral Services at 2 o'clock p.m., March 23d, at the Methodist Church. Friends of the family are invited.

* * *

KARL FEDERER'S MOTHER DIES
Death Came Suddenly While Mrs. Federer Was at the Home of Son.
      Mr. and Mrs. Karl Federer and children were called to Decatur yesterday on account of the sudden death of Mr. Federer's mother. She died at the home of her son at Decatur with whom she was living. The message of her death was received while Mrs. and Mrs. Federer were spending Christmas with Du Quoin relatives.

* * *

Mrs. R. E. Federer, Decatur.
The Last of Earth
Rose E. Federer --
Translated
      A message came to friends Sunday afternoon, announcing the death of Mrs. Rose Federer, at the home of her son Fred in Decatur. Beyond the veil she is with the Redeemer in whose faith she lived and labored and loved.
      God's finger touched her and she sleeps. A beautiful letter from Mrs. Federer, written a few hours before s he expired, reached us Monday. But for our friend there had dawned another morn than ours.
     At this writing we have no particulars, hence defer memorial sketch until next week.

It is Enough
      Come up Higher
Let not your heart be troubled; in my Father's house are many mansions
I go to prepare a place for you

At last, release.
      A long brave fight through weary years -- the dread specter ever before her, Rose E. Federer bravely, heroically approached the grave. She effectually hid her physical suffering, confiding the secret of her life to no sympathizing human ear. Her devoted sons were not aware of her affliction until she had passed from them to that country where there is no pain.
      Years ago, it would now seem, the brave little woman realized she was a victim of the dread cancer.
      Her over-sensitive, refined nature led her to wrongfully imagine that friends would fear and shun her. And in silence she struggled on, bearing alone the appalling burden. The sudden death of an only daughter, Agnes, less than two years ago, left her heart broken. Then the hidden malady made rapid inroads upon the frail constitution. Physicians were baffled. She coughed incessantly. A few days before the end her last physician insisted on the use of the x-ray. Then it was she broke into tears and told what she had known through the long, long years.
      The good surgeon assured her the disease was not contagious and the form from which she suffered would have most readily yielded to treatment in proper time.

O"er the hill the sun is setting and the Christian cries with rapture "I am one day nearer home"
     Her last hours were full of agonizing suffering, but mercifully brief. It is thought a touch of pneumonia hastened death -- her passing was so sudden. She sank into peaceful slumber.
      He who has passed through Gethsemane was abiding, abiding in her heart and where He led she followed on thro sorrow, shadow or sun. She triumphed over tribulation, and he that overcometh shall not be hurt of the second death.

Came to our city when a bride
      Rose E., widow of Fred Federer came to our city in the 70's. Here her eldest child Agnes was born. From the time she came here a bride she loved Du Quoin and that little neighborhood on South Division street. The prosperous little family had valuable property holdings, and the young bride invested in the Summers' country seat -- picturesque, a fine, lofty manse near to Nature's heart, for it was then out "in the beautiful country."
      Returning to Indiana, their son Fred was born. Karl was born later in Parsons, Kan. And there the noble husband and father died when the baby boy was scarce two years of age.

Like as a Father pitieth his children
      Mrs. Federer was alone with her children and an aged mother-in-law.
      Seeing the end from the beginning, it seems miraculous she could surmount the obstacles -- all the while an invalid herself. Too much cannot be said of her unfaltering devotion to Grandma Federer. And see the patience exhibited and love expended upon her fatherless children.

A humble follower of the lowly Nazarene
      Deceased was a true Christian, a life-long Methodist and active worker in the church of her choice. Numerous were the deeds of mercy she performed. She ardently loved her Savior, and we know that eye hath not seen the glory which God hath prepared for them that love Him.

Her life was one long melody
      It is not strange such a nature as hers was a lover of music. Her heart was full of gladsome song. Her life one unbroken melody. During her sojourn in Kansas for years she found pastime in raising mocking birds which would sing in the moonlight all night long and turn the darkest days to music.

Roses typical of her life
      She bore the name of a flowret fair, and her gentle life was as fragrant as the Rose. The roses bloom for humanity and fill our hearts with gladness. They speak of beauty which is to be perpetual, a beauty and holiness imperishable. Rose Federer cultivated choicest flowers, and how they bloomed for her and blossomed as the rose. The fading flowers become previous memories. And when the petals are fallen, leaves are gone all -- the memory of the kindliness and the deeds of thoughtfulness of them who planted them here speaks of eternal spring -- a summer time as enduring and immortal as the life made fragrant by them.
      She was the embodiment of the little song "Be a Blessing." She followed all the way with her Lord, followed Jesus all the way along. Would you "shine in glory brighter than the sun? Try to be a blessing till your work is done."

The Master is come and calleth for thee
      A few weeks ago she wrote she knew her life work was nearly done.
      Her house was in order.
      All was in readiness.
      Bright minded and sweet she was despite increasing weakness and suffering. She remembered loved ones with gifts on Christmas day, and opened her own valued gifts.
      An artist, a genius she was with her needle, and rarest point lace and intricate patterns of embroidery were designed and deftly fashioned by her.
      Mrs. Federer was always attractively and becomingly gowned, the soft hair faultlessly dressed. The last day of her sojourn on earth she appeared sweet and pensive in a silk kimona with figured chrysanthemums.
      She died at the home of Fred and wife, who made her last days blessed and full of sweet content. Karl and wife of Carbondale reached the dying mother soon after she expired. She struggled to live until their arrival.
      The day of her burial was severely cold, 5 below zero, with sleet and snowfall. The service was conducted by the Methodist minister, who is said to be like our own kindly Rev. Maxton. The remains were tenderly laid to rest in beautiful Fairview cemetery.
      Looking beyond the things which are seen, it is a joy to think of her in that Upper Garden there in that home of the soul where flowers unfading bloom -- where pleasures banish pain.

* * *

[On a card, on the back of which is written in pencil, "For Your Sleeping Room."]
Sleep Sweet
Within this quiet room,
Oh, thou,
Who'er thou art,
And let no mournful yesterdays
      Disturb thy quiet heart,
Nor let to-morrow scare thy rest
      With dreams of coming ill,
        Thy Maker
           Is thy changeless friend.
      His love surrounds thee still.
Forget thyself and all the world,
Put out each feverish light,
      The stars are shining overhead,
        Sleep Sweet,
          Good Night!
             Good Night!

 

 

Rose Federer's Scrapbook

 

      Submitted by Nancy Purtill with many thanks to Jane Federer Purtill, my lovely and much loved mother-in-law, for her grandmother's scrapbook.

Transcribed & furnished by : Nancy Purtill           

 

 


2009     Wayne Hinton

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