Putnam Co. IL News Items from the Past

Clear Creek

Taken From the Henry Republican

February 8, 1877

Clear Creek

There will be quite an emigration from Clear Creek, in a week or two. The parties going are J. W. Price, I. P. Wierman, George Marsh, Levi Gunn and O. Smith. They all locate in the same school district, within seven miles of Great Bend, Kansas, and hence near neighbors. All are most excellent citizens and their departure is lamented by all their neighbors and friends. They will almost be a community of themselves and they are the right metal for fine school houses, churches, etc. Boys, good luck to you.

Magnolia grange No. 179 is one of the most enterprising of the country societies. It is composed of a large number of the best farmers and their wives about Clear Creek, and they seek to make it of use and benefit to the community. Through efforts of this grange, a course of lectures has been provided, which includes some of the most noted speakers in the country. The grange has also donated $50 for the beginning of a library, which will be added to from time to time. The books obtained are a number on agricultural subjects, some scientific works, and a number of the noted books of fiction. The selections are good, and the community will profit by them.

February 8, 1877

Clear Creek

Magnolia grange No. 179 is one of the most enterprising of the country societies. It is composed of a large number of the best farmers and their wives about Clear Creek, and they seek to make it of use and benefit to the community. Through efforts of this grange, a course of lectures has been provided, which includes some of the most noted speakers in the country. The grange has also donated $50 for the beginning of a library, which will be added to from time to time. The books obtained are a number on agricultural subjects, some scientific works, and a number of the noted books of fiction. The selections are good, and the community will profit by them.

December 5, 1878

A light snow Sunday morning

John Taylor and wife of Wenona spent last Sunday with friends at this place.

Last Friday evening the young of the neighborhood gathered at Wm. Hull's.  All report a "good time," and say they propose to accept the invitation of Mrs. Hull to "come again."

Most of the swine "lit out" out of this country last Monday and Tuesday at the rate of $2.60.

Thanksgiving is over, and now nothing to do but prepare for the coming holidays.  All should make some arrangements for these long winter evenings.  Lay in a store of reading matter, so the winter may not pass unprofitably.  This is the season when the farmers has the most leisure.  The time when the best opportunities are offered him for intellectual improvement.

May 8, 1879

Clear Creek

John McNabb has just taken down a fence that was built 30 years ago. He hauled the lumber from Chicago on a wagon. The posts were charred where they came in contact with the soil and some looked as if they were good for several years yet.

November 20, 1879

Clear Creek - Friends quarterly meeting will be held at the yearly meeting house at this place next Saturday. Meeting will be held at the same house on the Sunday following; also the Center R. R. club will meet at that house next Sunday evening.

Another of our C. C. ladies, Miss Lizzie price, was married last week. The lucky man this time was Prof. Picking of Lostant. Next!

July 22, 1880 - Clear Creek

Almost a freeze up here on Monday evening.

J. L. Mills and P. Mills are on the sick list. Eva fell down cellar and don't feel so well as she might.

No July wreaths yet, as far as we have heard.

Hay harvest mostly through with; oats harvest has commenced, and as we go into the field, thw owner of the grain repeats again the little rhyme, which he thinks of once a year, and has for 50 years, to give the men an idea of how he wants his work done:
Little sheaves, bound tight.
Close to the butt, that's right.
But oh, isn't that a hard thing to do; just think of it. Here lies a grip, hears in all directions, butts hard to find, straw 4 feet long, and from that to 3 1/2 inches; grip large enough for a haycock, machine about four rods behind you, and just across the road a selfbinder with the driver half asleep; then for a poor fellow to give a look at the grip, then a wistful gaze at the selfbinder which is doing its work just as easy with a 94 degree sun boiling down as though it stood at zero, and then have some one sing out "Little sheaves, etc." Don't it make him feel, that is, a sensation comes over him "so peculiar and funny, its funny when you feel that way."

John Swaney wants a good farm hand.

Bozzy.



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