Online Military Data at Genealogy Trails



Revolutionary War Soldiers Buried in Illinois

©Transcribed by Kimberly Torp, 2004 & 2006



OGLE COUNTY

DANIEL DAY - Lieut. - buried in Daysville Cemetery in Nashua township. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)
DANIEL DAY was born in Keene, New Hampshire, January, 1763. He enlisted April 4, 1780, serving until December under Lieut. Benjamin Ellis and Col. Henry Dearborn. He came to Ogle county, Illinois, and died there in 1838, and was buried in the Daysville cemetery, where a monument has been erected to his memory. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)


RUFUS PERKINS - buried in Buffalo Grove cemetery in Polo township. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)
Rufus Perkins was a native of Massachusetts, born at Bridgewater about 1763. When very young he enlisted at Ashfield in Capt. Abel Dinsmore's company, serving three months. He again served six months under Capts. Canston and Samuel Hughs. He re-enlisted August 10, 1778, with Capt. Enoch Chapin, serving until January 1, 1779; he again served under Capt. Oliver Shattuck and Lieut. Col. Barnabas Sears, being discharged in 1781. He lived in New York. Coming to Illinois in 1847, he settled at Buffalo Grove, near Polo, Ogle county. This aged veteran made the long journey by stage and steamboat to Chicago, and from there to Buffalo Grove by lumber wagon. He died October 30, 1848. A bronze tablet was placed in the Polo Historical Library in his memory by the Historical Society, assisted by the D. A. R. of Rockford, Rochelle, Freeport and Dixon, and by the Grand Army post. The tablet was unveiled by Edgar Thomas Clinton, a great, great grandson of Rufus Perkins.
("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

RUFUS PHELPS - buried in Lindenwood cemetery in Lendenwood. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)
Rufus Phelps - was born in New York state in 1767, where he enlisted for six months in the Dutchess county troops, and was stationed at Fort Herkimer. He was wounded and was discharged from service, receiving a soldier's bounty. Coming to Illinois, he settled at Holcombe, Ogle county, where he died in 1839. His grave was marked by the Rockford Chapter, D. A. R., June 19, 1909. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)





PEORIA COUNTY

Phineas Bronson -
was born in Enfield, Connecticut, November 9, 1764, and died in Peoria county, Illinois, October 24, 1845, and is buried in the Princeville cemetery, where a tombstone, upon which is inscribed, "A Soldier of the American Revolution," tells the story of service. He served in the Third Company of the Second Regiment under Major Benjamin Walbridge and Col. Zebulon Butler. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Crow - was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, in 1758, and died in Peoria county, Illinois, January 25, 1854. He is buried in a private cemetery in Limestone township, near Pottstown. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN M. DERRICK -
buried in Springdale cemetery in Peoria. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

John Dusenberry -
came from New York, where he served in the war in the Third regiment with Col. Rudolphus Rietzman, enlisting in January, 1776. He was first Lieutenant and then Captain of his company. He was wounded at the battle of White Plains, but again served from December, 1777, to March, 1778. He served under Col. David Van Schaik, Col. Philip Van Courtland, and Gen. Samuel Parsons, for two years under Lafayette. He came to Illinois, residing in Peoria, where he died September 26, 1833, aged 81 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

James Harkness -
was a "Minute Man," marching on the first alarm from Pelham, Massachusetts, in Capt. Candless' company, Col. Benjamin Woodbridge's regiment, serving eleven days; he re-enlisted for eight months; and again in June, 1778, serving as corporal and sergeant in Capt. Joseph Perkins' company, Col. Nathaniel Wade's regiment. He was born June 21, 1756, and died at Harkness Grove August 18, 1836, and is buried in the Harkness cemetery, near Trivoli, Peoria county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Paulette Maillet -
was born in 1753 at Mackinac, Michigan. He was an Indian trader and was the founder of Peoria in 1778. Hearing of the defeat of Thomas Brady at St. Joseph, Michigan, in 1777, he decided to revenge the killing of men by the British and Indians. With an armed force they marched to St. Joseph, where they fought like tigers and captured the fort. He returned to Peoria, but lost his life in a quarrel with a Frenchman in 1805. The place of his burial is not known. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

BEN MILLER, SR. -
buried in Brimfield cemetery (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

John Montgomery - was in the Virginia line of troops. He was born in Virginia in 1764 and died in Peoria county, Illinois, January 26, 1845, and is buried in the Princeville cemetery. "A Soldier of the Revolution" is inscribed on his tombstone. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSIAH MOORE
- buried in Springdale cemetery in Peoria. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

ZEALY MOSS -
was a wagonmaster and assistant quartermaster in the Virginia troops. He enlisted in Loudoun county in the spring of 1777 and served two years. He re-enlisted in 1780 and served to the close of the war. He was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, March 5, 1755, and died in Peoria county, Illinois, October 30, 1835, and is buried in Springdale cemetery, Peoria. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

AUSTIN SMITH -
buried in Moffatt cemetery in Peoria. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)


PERRY COUNTY

JOHN BANES
- was born in Virginia. He enlisted at Mecklenburg in 1779, serving five times for three months each and the sixth time for six months, with Capt. Peter Bennett, and George Ferringot, and Cols. William Moore, Ambrose Ramsey, Joseph Taylor, and Major Joel Lewis. He was in the battle of Camden. He removed to Sumner county, Tennessee, and then to Perry county, Illinois, where he died September 2, 1840. He served in the North Carolina troops. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

LEONARD LIPE - was from South Carolina, where he was born about 1755. He served in the troops from that state. After the war he came to Perry county, and settled in Tamaroa township, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN MURPHY - was born in the North of Ireland. Coming to America, he entered the war and was in the battle of King's Mountain, probably with North Carolina troops. He came to Perry county, Illinois, in 1818, settling near Lost Prairie, where he died. Murphysboro, Jackson county, was named in his honor. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)





PIATT COUNTY


OLNEY, CAPTAIN - buried in Marquiss Cemetery in Monticello. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

OLNEY, SAMUEL - served in Lt. Bowen's R.I. Militia (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

THORNTON, SAMUEL - 2nd Lt in 137 Indiana Infantry (?) Buried in Cerro Gordo cemetery. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)


PIKE COUNTY

David CALLIS - served in the war from Virginia. He again served in the U. S. troops after the close of the War of the Revolution. He came to Pike county, Illinois, to reside, and probably died there. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

David KEHR - as born July 27, 1763, near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He enlisted in Northumberland county in April, 1780, serving till August 14, 1780, under Capt. Thomas Gaskin and Col. James Hunter. He was an Indian spy, was taken prisoner and carried to Niagara and kept until July, 1783, when he was set at liberty. Re removed to Ohio, and from there to Pike county, Illinois, where he died after 1839. He is buried near Griggsville. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

James McWithey - was from New York, where he served in the Charlotte county Militia, in the Seventeenth Regiment, New York troops. He removed to Pike county, Illinois, where he probably died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Hugh McNARY - was from North Carolina, where he served in the war. He came to Morgan county, Illinois, and there applied for a pension. He died in Pike county, Illinois. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Joseph OLMSTED - as from Connecticut, where he served in the Fifth Regiment, commanded by Col. Philip Bradley. He enlisted in Ridgefield. He removed to Pike county, Illinois, and in 1832 applied for a pension, but died before it was granted. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Nathanial PERRIN - was from Massachusetts, where he served in the war, enlisting January 6, 1779, serving until June 5, 1780, under Capt. Benjamin Frothingham; he again enlisted, serving from October, 1780, till January, 1781. He removed to Tennessee, where he applied for a pension. He died in Pike county, Illinois. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Abraham SCHOLL - was born December 15, 1765, in Rowan county, North Carolina. He enlisted in 1781 in Fayette county, Virginia, serving several short terms in the Virginia troops under Capts. William Hays, John Constant, Charles Hazelrigg, and John McDowell, with Cols. John Todd, Benjamin Logan, Daniel Boone, and Trotter. He was in the skirmish at Bryant's Station. He came to Pike county and was living at Atlas, where he applied for a pension, but having served less than six months, it was denied. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Howell Sellers - was born in Charlotte county, North Carolina. He was in the North Carolina troops, was in the battles of Stono, Brier Creek, and the siege of Savannah. He came to Illinois, residing in Pike county, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Richard TAYLOR
- was a native of Virginia, where he served as Ensign in the war, enlisting August 4, 1779, in Frederick county. He removed to Illinois, settling in Pike county, where he died very aged. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



POPE COUNTY

Luke Devoir
was from New Jersey, where he served in the war in Capt. Peter Dickinson's company, Third Battalion, New Jersey troops. He came to Illinois and settled in Pope county, where he died in April, 1827. He was pensioned.
("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Charles Dunn
was from Virginia, where he served under Lt. Col. John Cropper. He enlisted November 30, 1778. He continued in the service after the close of the war, and was in the U. S. troops in Pope county
("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Benjamin Glover - served in the war from Virginia, and he also was in the U. S. service after the close of the war. He came to Illinois and resided in Pope county, where he probably died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Daniel Hancock - came from Maryland, where he served in the war. Coming to Illinois he located in Pope county, where he probably died, as he was an aged man. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

David McNeely - was from Virginia, where he served in the war. He came to Pope county, Illinois. He was pensioned in 1820 and died the same year in Pope county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



PULASKI COUNTY


David Strong
The following information is from the Strong family papers at the Cincinnati Historical Society and Heitman's (1903) "Historical Register of the United States Army" and contributed to us by Mark Wagner:

David Strong from Connecticut reportedly was one of the original Minutemen at the Battle of Lexington, the engagement which started the Revolutionary War. He was taken prisoner by the British at the Battle of the Cedars in Canada on May 19, 1776. He returned to the American Army and was promoted to Sergeant and Lieutenant in the Connecticut troops in 1777. He served in a number of engagements including Valley Forge in 1777 and 1778, being promoted to captain by the end of the Revolutionary War. Family records state that he was a relative of patriot Nathan Hale, who was hung by the British as a spy, as well as a personal friend of the Marquis de Lafayette.

Strong remained in the army after the Revolutionary War, serving as a lieutenant-colonel under General Anthony Wayne at the Battle of Fallen Timbers against the Indians in Ohio in 1795. In 1796 he was promoted to colonel and made commanding officer of the 2nd Infantry Regiment. In 1799 he was put in charge of establishing a very large U.S. Army Camp in the lower Ohio River Valley called Cantonment Wilkinson. He arrived with approximately 700 soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Regiment at present-day Grand Chain, Illinois, on January 1, 1801 and began establishing a camp of log huts similar to Valley Forge that eventually contained several hundred cabins. Strong died at at the camp on August 20, 1801, after falling from his horse, possibly as the result of a stroke. He was buried in the post cemetery but his grave is now lost. The camp itself continued on until October, 1802, after which the Army abandoned it. SIU archaeologists relocated the site of Cantonment Wilkinson in 2003-2004 and conducted excavations at the site but were unable to find Colonel Strong's grave. The DAR erected a gravestone for Colonel Strong in the 1930s that is still located on the highway leading to the Ohio River Marina at Grand Chain in Pulaski County, Illinois





PUTNAM COUNTY

JOSEPH B. ALBERT
- Buried in Florid Cemetery in Florid Twp. (source: Genealogical Records, Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

Archibald Allen - was born in Virginia in 1749. He served two months in 1781 with Capt. Charles Shelton and Col. Elias Edmonds, in the Virginia troops. He removed to Maryland, then to Kentucky, then to Indiana and later to Putnam county, Illinois, where he applied for a pension. Not having served the required time it was not granted. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Evans
- was in the Pennsylvania line of troops. He came to Putnam county and there applied for a pension. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Andrew Moore
- served in the Pennsylvania troops. He came to Putnam county, Illinois, and there applied for a pension. He is buried in Union Grove cemetery. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ISAIAH STRAWN
, a native of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, born Oct. 28, 1758. He was too young to enter the service when the war began, his parents being Quakers and opposed to the shedding of human blood, Isaiah remained at home until the fall of 1777, when he enlisted, serving in the transportation line. At the Battle of Germantown, he rushed into battle, seizing the musket of a fallen friend, and neighbor, who had been mortally wounded. Soon after he received a charge of buckshot in his left leg and was carried from the field; one shot lodging in the hollow of his foot. This he never permitted to be removed, carrying it for sixty-four years. He came to reside in Illinois in what is now Putnam County, where he died Aug. 14, 1843, and is buried in Florid cemetery, Putnam County. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917) [Alternate Information: death date of 2 Aug 1843 (source: Genealogical Records, Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)



RANDOLPH COUNTY

JOSEPH ANDERSON was a soldier under George Rogers Clark; he settled on Nine-Mile creek about 5 miles from Kaskaskia, where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

EZEKIEL BARBER, a Connecticut Revolutionary War soldier. He is buried in the Barber Cemetery at Rockwood, Randolph County, Illinois. His grave has been marked by the Sons of the American Revolution, and I have been to his grave in 1997. He is listed by the DAR as Ancestor # 005843. His father, Doctor Samuel Barber of Simsbury Connecticut, was just given status as an American Revolutionary War Patriot last Monday, April, 12. 2010.
Private Ezekiel Barber, b. 12 April 1750, d. in Illinois 1806 in Randolph Co.
Married #1 Lourancy XXXX. d. 1 1778.
Married #2 Elizabeth Goddard. of Barkhamsted, CT 15 Jan 1779.
Buried in Barber Cemetery on Barber Property, in Rockwood, Randolph, IL.

(Submitted by Mary Barnsback Byron)

ROBERT BRATNEY
was born in Ireland; coming to America, he settled in Tennessee where he entered the service. In 1820 he removed to Illinois settling near the mouth of Little Plum creek in Evansville township. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

BENJAMAN BYRUM
was born in New Castle, Penn., in 1753. In the spring of 1781 he came to Kaskaskia. He showed his discharge papers from the service and an oath of fidelity taken at Fort Pitt. He did not live long after coming to Illinois. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

MELLINTON COUCH was in the battle resulting in the surrender of Cornwallis. It is not known from what state he enlisted. He is buried at the Preston U. P. cemetery, 6 miles from Sparta. He first resided in Marion County. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN CLENDENIN was a native of Virginia and served in the troops of that state. After the war he removed to Kentucky, settling in Green County, from there he came to Randolph County, Illinois, locating where the city of Chester now is, he resided on a farm now known as the Porter farm. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JAMES CURRY was a soldier with Clark, he settled near the other soldiers with whom he came, not far from Kaskaskia. James Curry had a thrilling experience with the Indians. He and Levi Teel were out hunting and took possession of a cabin built by David Pagan, which was unoccupied, to remain over night. During the night the Indians appeared, and as Teel stood by the door with one foot near the "cat hole," an Indian thrust his spear through his foot, attempting to pull it out, they pinned his hand thus nailing him to the floor. Curry would not listen to Teel who advised opening the door, but went to the loft and fired, killing three; he then tumbled the whole roof, as it was not nailed on, down on the Indians, killing the chief and disabling others which caused the remaining number to flee. Curry helped Teel to reach Kaskaskia where he remained until he recovered from his wounds. James Curry was chosen by Clark to undertake any desperate or hazardous service. He lived and died on Nine-Mile creek. One day he, with Joseph Anderson, was out hunting, as he never returned, it is supposed that he was killed by the Indians and his body taken away by them. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN DODGE was a native of Connecticut, was a trader at Sandusky, Ohio, before the Revolutionary War. He strongly favored the cause of the Colonists, and as a result was arrested by the British who carried him to Detroit and later to Quebec when he escaped in 1779. In that year he was recommended by Washington to Congress as a man who would be useful in the West. He went to Virginia and was appointed Indian Agent; coming to Kaskaskia he rendered aid to Clark in the work there. He died before 1800 and was doubtless buried in Kaskaskia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN DOYLE a soldier with Clark, settled near Kaskaskia. He was a man of some education and taught one of the earliest schools in the county. He was also a French scholar. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)


CAPT. JOHN EDGAR was born in Ireland, he was in the British Navy. When the Revolutionary war broke out he was a resident of Detroit. He openly espoused the American cause and was seized by the British Commander and sent a prisoner to Quebec; escaping near Montreal he found his way within the American lines. Entering the service he was made captain in the Navy. He remained some time in the service, but came West and in 1784 settled in Kaskaskia. He was a man of great wealth for those times. During the administration of Gov. Arthur St. Clair he was elected to the legislature which convened at Chillicothe, Ohio. He was appointed Major General of the Illinois militia, and in 1790 was made judge of the common pleas court. He died in Kaskaskia in 1832. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN HILERBRAND AND DAVID HIX were soldiers under Clark, coming to Illinois in 1780, they settled on the east side of Kaskaskia river near the mouth of Nine-Mile creek. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM FOWLER was a native of South Carolina where he served in the Revolutionary war, and afterwards received a pension for his service. He came to Illinois in 1816 locating in the Harmon settlement. In 1825 he was living in the township of Mary, where he doubtless died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

PAUL HARROLSON was from South Carolina, where he served in the war. He came to Illinois in 1802, settling on the west side of Kaskaskia river near the mouth of Camp creek. He was a man of prominence in the early days. In 1809 he acted as Justice of the Peace and from 1803 to 1809 he was commissioner and county clerk. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

DAVID HOAR - served from Massachusetts in the Revolutionary war. He remained in the service after the close of the war. Came to Randolph county where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN LAWSON - served in the Virginia line of troops. He came to Randolph county, IL and there applied for a pension, which was not granted, as he had not served six months. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN LIVELY came from South Carolina in 1805; he was in the war from that state. He was seemingly a soldier by nature, as he also served in the war of 1812. He settled in the town of Central where he died in 1826. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CHARLES McNABB was born in Maryland, he enlisted Jan. 7, 1778, was a sergeant in the 6th company 1st Maryland Regiment in Capt. Beaty's company; he enlisted again in the 7th company of the 3d Regiment. He came to Illinois, settling in Randolph county, where he died Nov. 1, 1780. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

HADON MILLS, HENRY SMITH AND ELIJAH SMITH were soldiers with Clark, returning to Illinois, they settled east of Kaskaskia above the mouth of Nine-Mile creek. They were doubtless buried there. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN MONTGOMERY was a private with Clark's soldiers, he returned to Illinois locating four miles from Kaskaskia, where he built a small water mill which was used for many years. He, with many others, was given a body of land for service in the war. He was a well known citizen of the county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

DANIEL MURRAY lived in Kaskaskia with his brother William, before the arrival of George Rogers Clark. He gave Clark substantial aid in Kaskaskia, died there later being shot in a quarrel over some money affairs. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

DAVID PAGAN was one of Clark's soldiers, coming to Illinois he settled on Nine-Mile creek a few miles from Kaskaskia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Descendant Linda Johns adds this info: "He is not buried in Illinois. While he did live on Nine Mile Creek for several years, had a cabin there with a still existing cemetery (still called the Pagan Cemetery) near the cabin assumed to be the family cemetery, David sold his lots in Clark’s allotments and returned to Virginia in the mid 1780’s. He had lost his first wife, Elizabeth Ferrell Pagan, while in Illinois and married a second time in Virginia to my ancestor, Mary Carter Harman. David bought and sold land in Bedford and Franklin counties, Virginia, until after 1800 and appears in numerous court records in both counties post 1780. He last purchased land in Franklin County in 1805 and died there in 1815. In her statement in support of her application for a Revolutionary War pension, Mary Carter Harman Pagan states David died in Franklin County, Virginia in January 1815. David and the two other men from Bedford county with whom (Henry Blankenship and George Key) he enlisted to join the Illinois troops have extensive pension records in the National Archives and Virginia State Archives with depositions about their war service and later life."

Read his widow's application for pension on our Genealogy Trails Franklin County, VA website


-- James & Richard Pillars - were from Virginia and served in the war in the Virginia line of troops. In 1781 they were in Fort Massac, IL and in 1793 they removed to Randolph county. James died there in 1833 or 1834. A granddaughter of James remembers that he died while at a celebration, or reunion, of the old soldiers. Their record of service may be found in Virginia in the Illinois papers. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

RAWLEIGH RALLS was born in Virginia, and served in the Virginia troops, enlisting in the latter part of the war, when quite young. After the war he removed to Tennessee, and in 1809 came to Illinois, settling first in Monroe County, but later on the beautiful ridge afterward known as Rall's Ridge. He only lived a few years after coming to Randolph County. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ROBERT SEYBOK was with Clark's soldiers, he came to Illinois in 1783, and with other settlers was obliged to take refuge in Kaskaskia on account of the Indians. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Sharp - was born in Maryland in 1762. He enlisted in the Fifth Regiment, May 29, 1778. He was made Corporal October, 1781; was discharged May 1, 1781. He removed to Illinois, settling in Randolph county, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

GEORGE STAMM
was born in Maryland. He enlisted at Fredericktown in May 1780 and served until 1783. He was both Private and Musician with Capt. John Smith and Capt. Christian Orendorff and Col. John Eccleston in the Sixth Maryland Regiment. He came to Randolph County, Illinois, and settled at Kaskaskia where he doubtless died. His name is mentioned in the History of Randolph County in various places. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CAPT. JOHN STEELE was a native of Virginia and served as Captain of a company in the Virginia troops. After the war he removed to Tennessee and in 1789 came to Illinois, settling in Randolph County. He was the founder of Steeleville and died Sept. 11, 1820, on the farm where he located. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JACOB STOPPLEBEAN was born in the state of New York, he enlisted in the Albany County Militia, 8th Regt. under Col. Robert Van Rensselaer. He again enlisted in the Levies under Col. Marinus Willett. The story is told of him that coming home after his first enlistment he met some one of his old home friends who informed him that his wife supposing him dead, had married again and removed to parts unknown. Stopplebean re-enlisted and served to the close of the war. After the war he came to Randolph County, Illinois, where he obtained some land. He died in Jan. 1845, and was buried in what is known as the "Hull Graveyard." He was very eccentric, always sitting with his hat on in the house, one of his foibles was that he was two years younger than General Washington. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

LEVI TEEL was a soldier with General Clark and coming to Illinois settled on Nine-Mile creek. He was severely wounded by the Indians when James Curry saved his life. He died in Randolph county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Alexander Whittaker - served in the war from Maryland. After the war he came to Randolph county, IL and thee applied for a pension. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ROBERT WHITEHEAD
was a soldiers with Clark. He came to Illinois, settling near Kaskaskia, dying there at an advanced age. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

HENRY CRUTCHER & JOHN ROBERTS served with Clark. Roberts was a Lieutenant and Crutcher was Quartermaster and later was appointed Commissioner. He with Roberts rendered service by purchasing treasury notes to aid in prosecuting the war. Both these men lived in Randolph County long after the close of the war and are doubtless buried near Kaskaskia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

The records of the French who were loyal to the American cause are mostly lost.

Col. Clark soon after taking Kaskaskia appointed several men as officers to recruit companies to aid in the conquest of Vincennes. Among the number was Francis Charleville who was appointed Captain. He raised 50 men who enlisted for eight months from Jan. 1779. Of the little band of 50 men, only 28 returned to Illinois, and of this number 10 resided in Kaskaskia after the war, and were listed as heads of families or members of the Militia, later. It would be manifestly unjust to make no mention of these loyal French subjects of the American cause, and we must conclude that the men whose names here presented were buried in Randolph County, in or near Kaskaskia:

Bazelle Allere

Michael Antere

Daniel Blouin

Antoine Bienvenue, Sr.

Jerome Danis

Joseph Danis or Daney

Michael Danis

Antoine Lavigne

Joseph Richard

Joseph Toulouse

Joseph ALLERE was a soldier under Clark and lived in Kaskaskia long after the war. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JEAN BAPTISTE BARBAU, Sr. was from New Orleans, born in 1722. He was Commandant at Prairie du Rocher, a justice and deputy county lieutenant. His will is recorded in Randolph County. He died in 1810. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JEAN BAPTISTE CHARLEVILLE AND MICHAEL GODIN were officers appointed by Colonel Todd. They lived in Kaskaskia after the close of the war and were heads of families. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

NICHOLAS JANIS was made Captain and resided in Kaskaskia after the close of the war. It is not known where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

GORDON MILLER - buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Chester. (source: Genealogical Records, Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)



RICHLAND COUNTY

--- KUYKERIDALL - buried in Calhoun cemetery. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

CHARLES REED - buried in Calhoun cemetery. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

ROCK ISLAND COUNTY

WILLIAM MEAD - died 1850, buried in Old Riverside cemetery in Moline. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

THOMAS WOOD - buried in Mausoleum in Moline. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)


SALINE COUNTY

Reuben Bromlet - served in the war from Virginia. He came to what was then Gallatin county, but now is in Saline county, settled in Raleigh township, coming in 1819. He died there and is buried in the Bromlet graveyard. He was a very aged man. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Thomas Hamilton - was born in New Jersey December 24, 1762, He served in the war from North Carolina, enlisting August, 1780, and served three months with Capt. Arthur Forbus under Col. John Paisley. He again served three months under Col. William R. Davie, in Capt. James Wilson's company. He again served from December 1, 1780, for five months in Capt. David Gillaspie's company, and Col. Paisley's regiment. He once more served from March, 1782, for two months under Cols. Edward Gwin and William Washington, also for a few days with Lieut. George Parkes. He came to what is now Saline county, where he died February 14, 1841. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Lewis Howell - served from Virginia. He removed to Kentucky and from there came to what is now Saline county, where he probably died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Roark -
Source: "Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917:

Was born in New Jersey, June, 1760. He served in the war four different times eight months until 1782. He was under Capt. John Fleet, Mark Thompson, John Maxfield, and Michael Catt. He served under Gen. George Rogers Clark, was taken prisoner, carried to Detroit and Canada, was paroled in 1783. He came to Gallatin county, Illinois, but died in Saline county, March 4, 1841 (
Note: Saline County was once part of Gallatin County).
He was pensioned.

View some further information on him




SANGAMON COUNTY


There were present at the unveiling ceremony, descendants of more than half the soldiers whose names are engraved upon the Tablet; aged men and women came from long distances to attend the exercises given in honor of their Revolutionary ancestors.

ISAAC BAKER, was born in Fredericktown, Maryland. He served as a fifer during the last two years of the war. It is not known in what regiment he served. The Maryland records are far from complete. He came to Illinois in 1828, settling in Rochester township where he died in 1848, aged 96 years. So thoroughly was he imbued with the spirit of patriotism, that in the Harrison campaign of 1840, at the advanced age of 88 years, yet with the ardor of a lad, he rode through the streets of Springfield in a log cabin drawn by thirty-two yoke of oxen; the cabin was lined with deer and coon skins, while the barrel of cider with which the campaigners were regaled, spoke eloquently of the apple crop in the forties. Isaac Baker is buried in the Rochester cemetery. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

MOSES BROADWELL, a native of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, born in 1764, entered the army when a mere lad, serving but a limited time near the close of the war, in the 3rd New Jersey regiment, Col. Elias Dayton, enlisting September, 1780. Mr. Broadwell came to Illinois in 1820, settling near Pleasant Plains, where he died [10 Apr] 1827, and lies buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery. [Death date from "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey - other info from "Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917]

GEORGE BRYAN - A native of North Carolina, born in 1758. When quite young, he removed with his parents to Virginia and from there to Kentucky in 1781. He rendered service in defending the Fort, which was named in his honor, against an attack by the Indians. The bravery of one of the young maidens exhibited during this attack of the Indians, won the heart of young Bryan, and a wedding followed in the early autumn. In 1834, Mr. Bryan came to Sangamon county with his children and grand children, dying in 1845, and is buried in the Woodside burying ground.("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN BURTON - born in Mecklinburg County, Virginia, in 1761, enlisted from that county in 1780, for three months in Capt.. Asa Oliver's company, Col. Fleming's regiment, and again in 1781, for three months in Stephen A. Berry's company, Virginia troops. He was at the siege of Yorktown. A pension was granted him in 1833, then a resident of Sangamon county. He died here in 1839 and is buried in Chatham township.("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ENOS CAMPBELL - a Scotchman, early espoused the cause of the Colonies, enlisting in New Jersey, serving six years, for which service he was pensioned. After the war he removed to Pennsylvania and from there to Ohio, thence to Sangamon county in 1835, settling in Gardner township. Mr. Campbell lies buried in Salisbury township. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CHRISTIAN CARVER, a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, born in 1759, entered the service in Surrey county, North Carolina, serving three months from August, 1777, in Capt. Henry Smith's company, and again for the same length of time, November, 1777, in Capt. John Crouse's company. Mr. Carver removed to Sangamon county where he died and is buried in Clear Lake township. His widow, a second wife, received a pension at his death. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

BAZEL CLARK (Barzilla Clark) - was born in Pennsylvania in 1750; he was married in 1773 to Nancy --, who endured peculiar hardships during the war, being confined in a fort where for two weeks she subsisted on parched corn and water. Bazel Clark acted as private in Pennsylvania Militia, Washington county, Penn. They came to Sangamon county in 1821, settling in Salisbury township, where he died September 24, 1840. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

MICHAEL CLIFFORD, born in New Jersey in 1759, enlisted in North Carolina in 1775, serving to the close of the war, was attached to Capt. John Johnson's company in Col. Locke's regiment, was in the battle of Pedee river, and the expedition against the Cherokees in Tennessee. After his death in Sangamon county, Illinois, in 1835, his widow was allowed his pension. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

PHILIP CROWDER, born near Petersburg, Virginia, in 1759, was a true patriot. An elder brother was drafted for the service, but as he had a family, Philip volunteered to serve in his place. Mr. Crowder was present at the surrender of Cornwallis. He was pensioned while living in Sangamon county in 1833, he died in 1844, and is buried in a family burying ground west of the city. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

AQUILLA DAVIS was born in St. Mary's County, Maryland. He was early taken by his parents to Fauquier County, Virginia. He enlisted March 19, 1781, under Lieutenants Robert Craddock and Luke Cannon, with Colonel Thomas Posey, in the Virginia line of Troops. Aquilla Davis and his wife, Isabella Briggs, came to Illinois in 1820, settling near Elkhart; they removed to Fancy Creek township, then back to Elkhart, where he died August 15, 1831. From the family record, it appears that he was buried in Wolf Creek cemetery in Sangamon county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JAMES DINGMAN, born in Northampton county, Pennsylvania, in 1758, entered the service there in 1778, in Captain John Van Etten's fourth company, Col. Jacob Stroud's Regiment, sixth battalion. Near Riverton in Sangamon county, in a family burying ground, rises a marble shaft which marks his last resting place, bearing the following inscription: "James Dingman died September 3rd, 1836, aged 79 years, 11 months and 3 days; a Revolutionary patriot who fought the battles of this country without reward save a consciousness of duty well done." ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ROBERT FISK was one among those who heard the tocsin of the American Revolution sounded April 19, 1775, at Lexington, Mass., his place of residence. Serving as a "minute man", he later enlisted for the entire war, was a sergeant in Capt.. Joshua Walker's company, David Green's regiment. He was given 200 acres of land, a sum of money, and was granted a pension while a resident of Sangamon county. The date of his death is not known. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JAMES HAGGARD was born in Albermarle county, Virginia, 1757. He enlisted from that county in 1780, and again in 1781, in Col. John Lindsey's regiment, Capt. John Henderson's company. He came to Sangamon county, IL to reside and died in Gardner township in 1832, and is buried in that township. A stone marks his grave. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM HAILE - served in the war from Virginia, Richmond county. He was also retained in the service after the close of the war, and was killed by the Indians in 1832. He came to Sangamon county, IL and is probably buried there.("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

EZEKIEL HARRISON
- was a soldier in the Virginia line of troops; was wounded in the battle at Point Pleasant; coming to Illinois with his wife, three sons and one daughter in 1822, he settled in Cartwright township where he died in 1836, and is buried on the farm where he settled. His father, Thomas Harrison, was the founder of Harrisonburg, Virginia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Thomas James - served in the war from Pennsylvania. He came to Sangamon county, IL and died in Rochester Nove 2, 1833. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Jones - was born in Dansbury, Bucks county, Penn, March 13, 1744, but enlisted in the New Jersey line of troops in 1774 for one year with Capt. John B. Scott. He again enlisted in 1775 with Capt. John Seward, and Col. Ephraim Martin for 5 months, and he also served as waiting man for Gen. Putnam. He was in the battle of White Plains. He came to Sangamon county, IL ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN LOCKRIDGE
, a native of Augusta county, Virginia. He early enlisted in the service, and was in many battles, principally Guilford Court House, and the Cowpens. In 1835, he came to Sangamon county with four sons and four daughter, settling in Ball township, where he died in 1848, aged 87 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Abram Lucas - was born in 1756 in Pennsylvania. He enlisted in Capt. Brinton's company, Col. Lachlen McIntosh's regiment, serving four months on the frontier of Pennsylvania and also during an expedition against the Indians. He served as an indian spy. He removed to Sangamon county, IL, and in 1836, he applied for a pension which was not granted, as he had served less than six months. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

THOMAS MASSIE, born 1759, in Albermarle county, Virginia, where he entered the service. At the close of the war he removed to Kentucky, and from there came to Sangamon county, IL, settling in Curran township, where he died in 1835, is buried in the Salem burying ground in Curran. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOEL MAXCY - was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, in 1761. He enlisted in the Virginia line of troops, and was in the battle of Guilford Court House. He removed to Kentucky, and from there to Sangamon county, Illinois, where he died in 1844, aged 83 years. His memory of distinguished officers was clear. He is buried in the old Salem burying ground, where a government marker is placed at his grave. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

PETER MILLINGTON - was a native of faraway Vermont, and was in the service from that state, accompanying Ethan Allen and Benedict Arnold on their expedition to Quebec, was taken prisoner, but when he was released he again entered the service, enlisting under Capt. William Hutchin's company. He was made sergeant, and later lieutenant. He came to Ohio, and from there to Sangamon county, Illinois, settling in Cotton Hill township. He only lived a short time, and is buried in the township where he settled with his son. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ZACHARIAH NANCE enlisted at New Kent county, Virginia, in Col. Harrison's regiment, was in the battles of Monmouth and Stony Point. He applied for a pension while a resident of Sangamon county, in 1833, lived but two years, dying December 22, 1835, aged 75 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN OVERSTREET enlisted in the First Virginia Cavalry, when only fifteen years of age, and again in 1777, for three years in the Fourteenth regiment. He was in many battles; Monmouth, Stony Point, Brandywine, and Germantown, re-enlisting, he was at the siege of Yorktown. He endured great hardships at Valley Forge. After the war was ended he removed to Ohio, and from there to Sangamon county, settling in Fancy Creek township, where he died in 1848, was buried with military honors. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN PEAKE - was born in 1756 in Fairfax county, Virginia. He enlisted for six months under Capt. Henry Lee. Owing to ill health he was discharged, but having recovered his health, he again enlisted in September, 1777, for three months under Capt. Benjamin Harrison, Major Martin Pickett. He removed to Kentucky and was there granted a pension in 1833. He removed to Sangamon county, Illinois, in 1730, settling in Salisbury, where he died December 21, 1841, and was buried in the old Salisbury burying ground, where his grave can still be seen. He was pensioned. John Peake kept a diary for many years which is of great interest. He never married. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM PENNY - was born in North Carolina in 1751. He served as captain of a cavalry company, and passed through great privations during the war. He removed to Pope county, Illinois, and from there to Sangamon county, settling on Richland Creek, where he died, and is buried in the Richland cemetery, Cartwright township. A stone marks his grave. He was pensioned.("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

George Pulliam - came from Virginia, where he served in the war. He was granted a tract of land for his services. He came to Sangamon county, Illinois, and is doubtless buried there. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN PURVINES - was a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, born in 1763, enlisted in North Carolina, serving three years under Cols. William Davis and Wade Hampton, with Capts. James White, William Penny, and Robert Burns. He was in the battle of Camden and in the last skirmish of the revolution, at Stono Ferry, South Carolina. He was given a pension after residing in Sangamon county, he died in 1833, and is buried in the Richland cemetery, Cartwright township. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM RALSTON - was a native of Virginia, enlisted there when young, was present at the surrender of Cornwallis; he removed to Kentucky, and in 1828, came to Gardner township, Sangamon county, Illinois. He died in 1835, and is buried in the Morgan cemetery, Gardner township. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

THOMAS ROYAL, born in Manchester, England, 1758, coming to America, he, with a comrade, enlisted in the war for Independence. The friend was instantly killed in battle and Mr. Royal was wounded in the ankle. At the close of the war, he removed from Virginia to Ohio, and from there to Ball township, Sangamon county, Illinois, where he died in 1834, is buried in the Brunk cemetery, Ball township (may be in Cotton Hill Township according to source: Genealogical Records, Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey]. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN STRINGFIELD - was born in North Carolina about 1760. He served in the North Carolina troops, and was in the battle of King's Mountain, October 7, 1780. He came to reside in Sangamon county in December, 1821, but only lived nine days, dying January 5, 1822. He lies buried nine miles northeast of Springfield. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)


JAMES TURLEY entered the war from Virginia in 1777, in Capt. Thomas Pollard's company, Col. Rumsey's regiment; he again enlisted in 1781, and again for four weeks in Col. Lyon's regiment; he was in the battle of Germantown. A pension was granted him after coming to Sangamon county, Illinois. He died here in 1836, is buried three miles east of Springfield.

JOHN WHITE - was in the Pennsylvania line of troops in Capt. Benjamin Loxley's company. He enlisted in 1776, was pensioned while a resident of Sangamon county, Illinois, died here October, 1853, aged 92 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Cassady; James Waddell - are said to have served in the war, and both are buried in Rochester. "Traditional Records."
There were present at the unveiling ceremony, descendants of more than half the soldiers whose names are engraved upon the tablet; aged men and women came from long distances to attend the exercises given in honor of their Revolutionary ancestors.
("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



SCHUYLER COUNTY

DAVID BLAIR - was said to have been a soldier from Pennsylvania but no record of service has been obtained. He died in Schuyler county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM BLAIR -
was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, in 1760. He enlisted from Cumberland county, May, 1778, serving as a substitute for his father, Alexander, serving two months. In May, 1779, he again enlisted under Gen. John Sullivan, he again served seven months on the frontier until 1781. He came to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

BENJAMIN CARPENTER - was from Virginia, where he enlisted May, 1776. He served when Cornwallis surrendered. He came to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

A. W. CAVALEY - was from Virginia, where he served as agent for James Stewart's Artillery of Virginia. He came to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

HENRY GREEN (aka Greene) - was from Maryland where he enlisted in 1779 under Col. Thomas Wolford in the Second Regiment Maryland troops. He was discharged at Annapolis. He came to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he died May 1, 1837. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JAMES LANMANN (aka Lanman) - enlisted at Charlestown, South Carolina, July, 1776. He was an orderly sergeant in the First Regiment of South Carolina troops. He again enlisted in March, 1781, in North Carolina, under Col. Nathaniel Greene, was in the battles of Guilford Court House, and Eutaw Springs, where he was wounded in the thigh. He came to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

GEORGE TAYLOR was born in Pennsylvania about 1760. He enlisted in Amherst County, Virginia, in 1777 under Colonel Broadhead and General Lachlin McIntosh, when they were at Fort Cumberland; then they moved to the Ohio River, and from there to Detroit, Michigan. He assisted in building Fort Defiance. He again enlisted in 1778 and helped guard the prisoners taken at Saratoga; He came to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned.He came to Illinois, settling in Schuyler County, where he died February 10, 1834. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



SCOTT COUNTY

NICHOLAS CURRY - served in the war from South Carolina. He removed to Lincoln county, Tennessee, but came to Illinois in 1832, settling in Coles county, and from there to Scott county, where he died September 16, 1848. He is buried in the McAlebs graveyard, one and one-half miles north of the town of Bluffs. A stone marks his grave. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JAMES McEVERS - was born in Massachusetts, where he enlisted from the town of Hancock to serve three years in Capt. William Lusk's company, and Col. Benjamin Simond's regiment. He removed to Ohio, and from there to Morgan county, Illinois, but died in 1829 in Scott county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

SOLOMON PATTERSON - served in the war from Pennsylvania in First Company, Fourth Battalion, Cumberland county, under Capt. John McConnell, and Col. Samuel Culbertson. He came to Monroe county, Illinois, but removed to Scott county, where he died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. McCracken, in the town of Manchester. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JESSE STOUT- served in the war from New Jersey. He came to Illinois, settling in Morgan county. He is probably buried in Scott county, as his widow drew a pension there. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH SUMMERS - was born in Kent county, Delaware in 1749, but enlisted in North Carolina, in Guilford county, serving three months under Capt. Thomas Flack, and Col. James Martin. He again enlisted for six months under Capt. Edward Gwynn, and again for three months with Capt. Elliott, and Col. Henry Lee. He came to Morgan county, Illinois, but died in Scott county, and is buried there. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917) Read his Request for Pension on our Morgan County website




SHELBY COUNTY

Elijah Biggs - served in the war from North Carolina. He came to Shelby county, Illinois, and there applied for a pension, but having served less than six months, it was not granted. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Jenkins - was from Hardy county, Virginia, where he served in the war. He came to Shelby county, Illinois, and died there very aged. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Obadiah Wade - served in the Virginia Militia. He removed to Kentucky and there was given a pension. He came to Shelby county, Illinois, and doubtless died there. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



STARK COUNTY

We haven't found any Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in this county





ST. CLAIR COUNTY

ELEAZER ALLEN
- was a native of Connecticut, born in 1755. He enlisted May 1, 1775, for eight months with Capt. James Chapman; again Jan. 1, 1776, for one year under the same captain, and with Col. Samuel Parsons in what was known as "Parson's Continentals." He was in the battles of New York, King's Bridge, and White Plains. He early came to Illinois, settling in St. Clair county, where he applied for a pension. He died in 1828 and is buried in Shiloh Precinct. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

NATHANIEL BELL was born March 5, 1755, in Warren county, North Carolina. He enlisted in Anson county, April 1, 1776, serving fourteen months under Capt. Thomas Potts, Col. Isaac Huger, South Carolina troops; he enlisted again September, 1781, for two months with Capt. Thomas Harris, Col. William Loften, North Carolina troops. He came to Illinois, settling in St. Clair county, where he died January 17, 1835. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

THOMAS BRADY was a resident of Cahokia before the Revolution. Learning of the struggle of the colonies, he raised a small company of men in 1777 and marched to St. Joseph, Michigan. They captured the garrison, but returning, they were overtaken at Calumet and in a skirmish which ensued, two were killed and Brady was taken prisoner. The following year he escaped and finally reached Cahokia. He served under Col. Clark and was elected sheriff of St. Clair county. He died in Cahokia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

M. BOISMENUE was one of the soldiers with Thomas Brady in the expedition against St. Joseph, Michigan. He was wounded and remained with the Indians all winter, returning to Cahokia in the spring. He also served with Col. Clark. He died in Cahokia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

MRS. THOMAS BRADY was better known as Madam La Compt. She was born of French parents in 1734, at St. Joseph, Michigan. She removed to Cahokia, Illinois, in 1770. She rendered distinct service to the Americans by preventing Indian outbreaks during the Revolutionary War. After the death of Mr. Brady she took the name of her second husband, La Compt. She died in 1843 in Cahokia, aged 109 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH CARR - was born in Virginia in 1752, served in the Virginia troops. After the war he came to Illinois in 1793, settling in Freeburg, St. Clair county, where he died March 6, 1817. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN COLLINSWORTH - was born in Virginia in 1761 and served with the Virginia troops. After the war he removed to Claiborne county, Tennessee, and from there came to St. Clair county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)


JOHN CONN
- was a soldier with Colonel Clark. He settled in Cahokia and died there in 1780. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Nicholas Horner - was born in England. He came to America and enlisted in the Pennsylvania line of troops, serving as a ranger on the frontier. He also served in the 4th Pennsylvania Battalion from Jan. 3, 1776, to Jan. 3, 1777, with Col. Anthony Wayne. He was living in Maryland in 1790, but removed to Lebanon, St. Clair county, Illinois, about 1814. He died aged 85 years, and is buried near Lebanon. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH JONES
- was a native of Maryland. He enlisted May 30, 1778, for three years in Pulaski's Loyal Legion. He served as a substitute from Anne Arundel county, Maryland. He came to St. Clair county, Illinois, to reside and died there August 26, 1826. He was pensioned in St. Clair county in 1823. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

THOMAS KNIGHTEN - was a native of South Carolina; was sergeant in the Continental troops. He came to St. Clair county, Illinois, and died there. He was born in 1750; was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH LAMBERT was from Virginia and served from that State. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, to reside, where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

RISDON MOORE - The Moore family came to America from Wales in 1732, settling in Delaware. Risdon Moore was born in Delaware, Nov. 20, 1760. He entered the United States Navy at the age of 16 years and served during the war. He removed to North Carolina, then to Georgia, and later to St. Clair county, Illinois. He was speaker of the Illinois House of Representatives in 1814, and was a member of the first, third and fourth Legislatures. He was strongly opposed to making Illinois a slave state. He was the great grandfather of Gov. Charles S. Deneen. He died in 1828 and is buried three miles east of Bellville. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

REV. EDWARD MITCHELL- was born in Cecil county, Maryland, August 3, 1760; removed with his parents to Virginia, settling in Fincastle, Botetourt county. He enlisted first as a private, then corporal, and was made captain of the First Virginia Rifles; was in the battles of Guilford Court House and Haw River. He was also quartermaster in Col. William Campbell's regiment. He came to St. Clair county, Illinois, in 1818, settling at Turkey Hill. He died December 3, 1837, and is buried on a farm near Belleville. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

LIEUTENANT JAMES MITCHELL - was born in Cecil County, Maryland, March, 1727. He was the father of Edward, and came with him to St. Clair County, Illinois, in 1818. He served in the Albemarle Barracks, was also in the battles of Guilford Court House and Clover Lick, May 1, 1780. Is buried near Belleville. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CAPTAIN JOSEPH OGLE - was born in Virginia. He commanded a company of Virginia troops. His commission was signed by Patrick Henry and is now in the possession of a descendant. He came to Illinois in 1785 from Wheeling, Virginia, settling first in New Design. In 1802 he was a pioneer in locating in Ridge Prairie, near the present town of O'Fallon, where he died in 1821. Captain Ogle was one of the prominent citizens of St. Clair County. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM PADFIELD was born in Maryland. He enlisted in the Revolutionary War and served as a driver of a provision wagon. He removed to Kentucky, and from there came in 1815 to Illinois, settling in Summerfield, where he died, aged 75 years, and is buried three miles south of Summerfield. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

DAVID PHILLIPS was born in Orange County, North Carolina, in 1755. He served in the North Carolina troops, but after the war removed to Kentucky, and then to St. Clair County, Illinois, settling on Richland Creek, north of Belleville. He died in 1826 on the farm where he settled. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CAPTAIN JAMES PIGGOTT was born in Connecticut. He served in the privateering business; removed to Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he commanded a company, being made captain April 6, 1776, serving under General St. Clair. He was in the battles of the Brandywine, Saratoga and other skirmishes. He followed General St. Clair to the west and was placed in command of Fort Jefferson, five miles below the mouth of the Ohio River. He came to St. Clair County and established a fort in 1783, west of Columbia, Monroe County. In 1795 he built a ferry between East St. Louis and St. Louis. He died in East St. Louis in 1799. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN PRIME (or PRIMM) was born in Stafford County, Virginia. He served in the Virginia troops and was pensioned for service. He came to St. Clair County, Illinois, in 1803, settling near Belleville, where he died in 1836, aged 87 years. He was present at the surrender of Cornwallis. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN PULLIAM was born in Botetourt County, Virginia. He served in the Virginia troops in the war; removed to Kentucky and from there came to New Design, Monroe County, in 1796. Later he lived in Fayetteville, St. Clair County, where he died in 1813. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

MARTIN RANDLEMAN was native of South Carolina, and served from that State in the Revolutionary War. He came to Illinois in 1801 and a year later settled in Belleville. He drew a pension in 1831, and died in St. Clair County. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

SAMUEL REDMON - served in the war from Virginia; he came from Rockingham county to St. Clair county, IL, where he applied for a pension, but it was not granted as he had not served six months. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

HOSEA RIGGS was born in Virginia in 1760. He served in the Pennsylvania line of troops. He came to Illinois in 1796, settling in the American Bottom, Monroe County; later he removed to St. Clair County and lived two miles east of Belleville, where he died October 29, 1841, very aged. He was an exhorter in the Methodist Church and was the first minister of that denomination in the county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

LARKIN RUTHERFORD was one of George Rogers Clark's soldiers; was at the storming of Fort Sackville in 1779. He came to St. Clair County in 1800, settling north of Belleville, where he resided for many years, and where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Col. John Thomas, Jr. - was in the South Carolina troops. He served with his father , Col. John Thomas, and when his father was taken prisoner in 1780, he succeeded him in the command of the regiment. HE is known as the "Hero of Cedar Springs" He came to reside in St. Clair county, IL and was made treasurer of the Territory, and later of the State. HE died in Shiloh and is buried in the church yard. He died in 1819. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

BENJAMIN WEST was born in Maryland in 1743. He removed to Botetourt County, Virginia, and entered the service there. He was on the staff of Gen. George Washington. He came to Illinois in 1818, settling in St. Clair County, near Belleville. He died there, a very aged man. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

R.E. WILKIN - buried in Marissa cemetery. (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

THE FRENCH IN ST. CLAIR COUNTY

Many French inhabitants of St. Clair county rendered service to Col. George Rogers Clark. Some remained in the county after the close of the war, while many removed to other States and died there. It is reasonable to suppose that the following lived and died in St. Clair County:

MICHEL BEAULIEU was a justice in Clark's court and later was elected justice in the court of the district in 1779. He died in Cahokia soon after this date. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ANTOINE and JOSEPH CESIRE, father and son, were from Lachine, Canada. Both aided Colonel Clark. Antoine was the most important citizen in Cahokia in 1778. He died in 1779. Joseph was one of the justice in 1781. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JEAN BTE. DUBUQUE was a native of Montreal. He was several times elected justice and greatly aided Clark. After the close of the war he was made commandant. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ANTOINE GIRADIN was a prominent citizen of the community. He was a justice in Clark's court, and was elected a justice of the court of the District of Cahokia in 1779, serving several times in this office. He died in 1802. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

TURANJEAU GODIN gave financial aid to the Americans and was a justice in Clark's court, also appointed captain at Cahokia. His heirs were living in 1783 in Cahokia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JEAN BTE. LA CROIX gave financial aid to the Americans, and was a justice in Clark's court. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH PELTIER was a soldier under Colonel Clark. He remained in Illinois and was living in St. Clair County after the close of the war; was a member of the militia in 1790. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

FRANCIS TROTTIER was one who gave financial aid to the Americans, and was made commandant of Cahokia. He died in Cahokia previous to 1783. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JEAN BTE. SAUCIER was a military engineer. He came to Illinois at an early day and placed Fort de Chartres in 1752. He removed to Cahokia. His son, named for him, was one of the first judges in Cahokia. He died in Cahokia. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)




STEPHENSON COUNTY


We haven't found any Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in this county




TAZEWELL COUNTY

ELLIOT GRAY - was born in Pelham, Massachusetts, born September 17, 1755, where he enlisted under Capt. Elijah Dwight, in the Massachusetts Troops. He came to Illinois, settling in Tazewell County, where he died and is buried near Armington. The Peoria chapter DAR have marked his grave. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Samuel McClintock - was from Virginia, where he was born in Augusta county, in 1763. He served three different times in 1781 under Capts. James Trimble, William Smith, and William Kincaid, with Cols. Sampson Matthews, William Boyer, and Samuel Vance. He was in the siege of Yorktown. He removed to Tazewell county, Illinois, where he died. He was living in 1840. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

David Shipman - was from Virginia where he served in 1780 in Capt. Robert Craven's Rifle company. He served on an alarm towards Blue Ridge, and also with his wagon hauling for the army. He removed to Fayette county, Illinois, and from there to Tazewell county, where he died, and is buried in the Antioc cemetery. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



UNION COUNTY

ALEXANDER BEGGS - was born in Antrim county, Ireland, May 30, 1754. Coming to America he entered the service of the colonies and served in 1776 for four months in Henry Lee's Artillery company; he again enlisted in 1778 for three months and in 1781 for the same period, he also served ten months in 1777. He was captured at Brandywine but escaped that night. He was also in the battle of Stono. He served first in the Pennsylvania troops. After the war he removed to Union county, Illinois, where he died Feb. 4, 1837. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH EDWARDS - was from Virginia, where he enlisted for nine months in 1776 under Col. Adam Slencar, was discharged at Martinsburg, Virginia. He came to Union county Illinois, in 1829. When he applied for a pension he stated that his property consisted of one bed worth $3.00; one axe worth $2.00; one plow worth $3.00 and one hoe valued at $1.00, making a sum total of $9.00. He died in Union county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN ELLIS - was born March 9, 1735, in Frederick county, Virginia. He enlisted in Greenbrier county, serving as an Indian spy from 1773 to 1783; was appointed by Gen. Andrew Lewis and served at Ellis' Fort under Capt. John Cook. He came to Illinois and resided in Union county, where he died May 29, 1834. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JACOB FRICK - was a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born about 1747; he enlisted in the Lower Milford township company, Buck's county, in 1775, under Capt. Harry Huber; he also served under Gen. Griffith Rutherford. In 1823 he came to Illinois settling in Jonesboro precinct, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN HARGRAVE - was born Nov. 23, 1755, in South Carolina, near the line of North Carolina. He enlisted in 1776 for two and one half months with Capt. Dennis Haukins, and Col. Daniel Horry; again in 1780 for ten months with Capt. Thomas Hemphill and Col. Francis Locke; again in 1781 for six months with Capt. Francis Boykin and Col. Charles Middleton. He was in the battles of Ramsour's Mill and Eutaw Springs. He came to Union county, Illinois, in 1809, and is probably buried there. He was pensioned.
("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ELIAS HOUSE - was from North Carolina, where he served in the war. He lost an arm in the service. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Union county, where he died very aged. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CHRISTOPHER LYERLE - was born in 1764 in North Carolina, where he enlisted in 1780 when only 16 years of age in the North Carolina troops in Capt. Archibald Lytle's company and Col. John G. McRae's regiment, serving eighteen months. He came with many others to Union county, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

PETER MEISENHEIMER - came from Cabarras county, North Carolina, where he enlisted in the North Carolina troops. He removed to Union county, Illinois, in 1819 settling in what became known as the Meisenheimer precinct, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

PETER MILLER came from Rowan County, North Carolina. He served in both the North and South Carolina troops and was in many battles. He settled in Anna township, Union County, IL, where he died. He is buried two miles north of Anna. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ELIAS MOIERS was from South Carolina, where he served in the war under Capt. William Williams and Col. William Polk for ten months. He was discharged on the "High Hills" of Santee, South Carolina. He came to Illinos, settling in Union County. In 1828 he applied for a pension stating he was wholly disabled and that he had not asked for a pension sooner because he had been able to work. He enumerated his possessions as one horse, one saddle, bridle and saddle bags. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

TRAVIS MORRIS was born in Richmond County, VA on 12 June, 1758. He enlisted for three months in 1777 with Capt. John Hedges and Col. Jesse Eural in the VA troops. Later, he served in the North Carolina troops, twice, for three months each with Capts. Charles Madden, Samuel Hampton and Major Joseph Winston. He came to Illinois and lived in both Alexander and Union Counties. His place of burial is not known. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN MURPHY was from Burke County, North Carolina. He first fought with the Tories, but becoming convinced that the Continentals were in the right, he entered the army. After the war he came to Cape Girardeau, MO. He then moved on to Alexander County, Illinois and later to Anna, Union County, Illinois in 1816, where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM PARKS served in the war from VA and continued in the service until the end of the war. He came to Union County, Illinois where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

WILLIAM SCOTT served in the war in the New York line of troops, enlisting at the young age of sixteen. He came to Union County, Illinois, where he resided until his death. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN SOWERS was born in Rowan County, North Carolina in 1760. He enlisted July, 1776 serving one month, then again in January of 1781, for three months, and again for three months under Capt. John Lop. He came to Illinois, residing in Adams County, then removed to Union County, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSHUA VICK served in the war from VA. He removed first to Tennessee, then on to Union County, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



VERMILION COUNTY

WILLIAM ADAMS - was a native of Virginia, where he served in the war. After the war he removed to Kentucky. Coming to Illinois in 1825, he settled in Vermilion County, in Newell township, where he died, and is buried in the Martin burial ground. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

DAVID BAIRD - was born in New Jersey March 4, 1760. He enlisted in Monmouth County in the First New Jersey Militia, September, 1776; he reenlisted, serving for different periods each year till the close of the war, serving under Capts. David Gordon, Kenneth Harrison, -- Coons, Samuel Carhart, John Price and Cornelius Schanck; Cols. Asher Holmes, Thomas Henderson and Cahart Walton. He served as private, sergeant, ensign, lieutenant and quartermaster. He came to Vermilion County to reside and died February 20, 1837; is buried in the Lebanon cemetery, Indianola. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOSEPH COUGHRAN was born in Virginia January 16, 1761. He enlisted in June, 1781, in Hampshire County, with Capts James Anderson, Alexander Dick and Isaac Parson, Col. Edwards, serving first four months, and again for two months. After the war he came to Vermilion County, Illinois, where he applied for a pension in 1834. He died March 19, 1845. He is buried in Vermilion County, but the exact place is not known. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JOHN FRAZIER was a native of Virginia, where he served in the war, enlisting near the home of Laurence Washington. He served during the entire war and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis. The place of his burial is not known, but he died in Vermilion County. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JACOB GUNDY was born in Pennsylvania October 13, 1759. He enlisted April, 1779, in Pennsylvania Militia, under Captain Sebastian Wolf and Quartermaster General Robert Patton, in Lancaster County; serving as a teamster for two months, and again for one month. After the war he removed to Ohio, and from there came to Vermilion County in 1830, with his son Joseph. He died in 1842 and is buried in the Gundy burying ground near Bismark. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

DANIEL HARRINGTON was born in Pennsylvania January 1, 1756. He enlisted in September, 1776, with Captain Jacob Treck, Colonel Michael Swope, in York County. He enlisted again, serving under the same officers, and a third time in Maryland, with Captain Daniel Shaw, Col. Edward Cockey, serving in all ten months. He came to Illinois, settling in Vermilion county, where he applied for a pension, where he died in 1836. He was pensioned.

JAMES HULS was born in Virginia in 1761. He enlisted March 18, 1778, in the Fourth Virginia Regiment, with Col. Neville and Capt. John Stith, serving one year. He came to Vermilion County, Illinois, and died there in 1834. His widow drew his pension. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

HUGH KING was born in North Carolina December 17, 1754. He enlisted in Mecklenburg County in 1778; reenlisting twice, serving under Capts. John McRea and William Alexander, Major Davis and Colonel John Moore. He enlisted in the South Carolina troops in 1781, serving with Capt. Andrew Alexander and Col. Wade Hampton in Washington's Dragoons. In all, he served seven times, for a period of two years and ten months. He was in several skirmishes, at Charlotte, North Carolina; Strawberry Fields, Quarter House and Ninety-Six. He removed to Vermilion County, Illinois, where he died, and is buried in Springhill cemetery, Danville. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

THOMAS MAKEMSON was born in Pennsylvania in 1753. He enlisted [in 1777] with William Brown, commander of the Floating Battery, Putnam Station, twelve miles below Philadelphia. He served three years. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Vermilion County, where he died in 1813. He is buried near Oakwood, Illinois. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

THOMAS MORTON was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1752. He enlisted three times in 1775, 1776 and 1777, serving as ensign with Capts. James Elliot and James Lee, Col. Robert Culbertson. In 1780 he removed to Kentucky and served there with the Virginia troops as captain under Colonel and General George Rogers Clark. He was in skirmishes at Statton Island and with the Indians at Chillicothe. He came to Indiana where he was appointed judge in Perry County in 1814. He removed to Vermilion County, IL where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ZACHARIAH ROBERTSON, SR. was a soldier from Virginia, where he served in the war. He removed to Harrison County, Kentucky, and in 1834 came to Vermilion County, Illinois, settling in Newell township. He died on the land where Bismark now stands, at the advanced age of 94 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)




WABASH COUNTY

John Armstrong - came from North Carolina, where he served in the war. He removed to Kentucky, and from there to Tennessee, and in 1815 he came to Wabash county, settling on the land purchased of Levi Compton, where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Robert Bell - was born in the north of Ireland. He came to America and enlisted when only sixteen years of age, serving in the light artillery under Lafayette in the Virginia line of troops. He came from Rockbridge county, Virginia, to Wabash county, Illinois, in 1818, settling in Friendsville precinct, where he died in 1837. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Doughton - served in the Virginia line of troops. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, in 1820, from West Virginia. He died December 1, 1833. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Gordon - was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1763. He served in the war from that state. Coming to Ohio, he removed to Indiana, and in 1819 he came to Lawrence county, Illinois, but in 1829 he lived in Mt. Carmel, Wabash county, where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Jonathan Goss - was from Massachusetts, where he served under Capt. John Minot, Col. Josiah Whitney's regiment, from May, 1777, to July. He came to Illinois and resided in Wabash county, where he died, and is buried in Friendsville. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Hezekiah Hardesty - was born September 2, 1763, on the eastern shore of Maryland. He served six times--March, 1778, one month; May, 1778, two months; September, 1778, four months; April, 1779, one month; October, 1780, one month; May, 1782, one month. He was under Ensign Charles Goodwin and Capts. David Owen, Joseph Cross, Ruble and Joseph Bean, and with Col. William McFarlan and Gen. Lochlan McIntosh and William Crawford in Pennsylvania troops. He came to Lawrence county, Illinois, but for a time resided in Fulton county, returning to Lawrence county. He is buried near Allendale, Wabash county. He died after 1829. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Nathaniel Hendryx - came from New York, where he served in the war. He was in the Albany county militia, in the Seventeenth regiment. After the war he removed to Wabash county, Illinois, where he probably died as he was an aged man before he applied for a pension. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Hunter - served in the Virginia troops under Capt. James Gray in Company 2, in 1778. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Wabash county, where he applied for a pension, but not having served six months it was not granted. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Peter Keen was from New Jersey, where he served in the war. He removed to Ohio, and in 1814 came to Wabash county, Illinois, and was one of the original proprietors of Palmyra, and later moved to Friendsville, where he died in 1840. "New Jersey Records" and "County History."

William Lawson - was from Scott county, Virginia. He served in the Virginia troops. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, and there applied for a pension. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Thomas Pulliam served in the war from Virginia. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, in 1815, settling in the town of Coffee. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Stephen Sommers - was from Connecticut, where he enlisted July 3, 1781, in the First Regiment, commanded by Col. John Durkee. He was born in 1762. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, at an early date, and died there. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Alexander Stewart - was from New Jersey, where he served in both the Continental Army and the militia. He came to Wabash county to reside. The place of burial is not known. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Stillwell - was from Virginia, where he served in the war. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, in 1820, settling in the town of Belmont, where he died. "("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Thomas Thompson - was in the Virginia line of troops. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, and died there January 19, 1829. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Andrew Tuttle - was from Connecticut. He served in the war in Col. Samuel Crawford's regiment from Milford, enlisting September, 1781. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, and is doubtless buried there. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John White - was born in Stafford, Connecticut, May 7, 1761. He enlisted four times, first in 1776 for three months; in 1777 for six months; in 1778 for six months, and the same year for three months. He served under Capt. Abner Robinson. He came to Wabash county, Illinois, and died there September 2, 1834. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Wood - was from Maryland, where he served as ensign in the war. He removed to Wabash county, Illinois, and died there November 4, 1832, and was buried in the Newkirk cemetery, near Friendsville. He made the first permanent settlement in 1809, coming from Kentucky, he brought apple trees from which originated the "Wood Apple." He also built Fort Wood. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



WARREN COUNTY

BENJAMIN BLANKENSHIP, a native of Hampton, Virginia, enlisted in 1777, serving as private in Capt. Anthony Singleton's company, Col. Charles Harrison's regiment was in the battle of Camden. At the close of the war, he came to Shelby County, Ohio, and in 1836, removed to Warren County, Ill., where he died in 1844. [Prepared by Mrs. Helen Nye Rupp of Monmouth]

DAVID FINLEY was born in Belfast, Ireland, March 9, 1761; coming to American when a lad, he enlisted in the Continental Army, serving under Captain Samuel Miller, Col. Aenas Mackey, 8th Penn. regiment. He was in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown. In 1818, Mr. Finley was a resident of Clarke County, Indiana; he removed to Warren County, Illinois, where he died September 3, 1838. Mr. Finley is buried near Oquawka, Henderson County, which was at the time of his death in Warren County [Prepared by Mrs. Helen Nye Rupp of Monmouth]

DAVID LYNN, born in Connecticut in 1764, enlisted in 1780 under Capt. Martin Lord, Lieut. William Lynn (his brother) and in Col. Swift's regiment. After 1832, he removed to Warren County, Illinois, where he died Mr. Lynn is buried on a farm near the cemetery. [Prepared by Mrs. Helen Nye Rupp of Monmouth]

DANIEL McMILLAN - The old cemetery of the "Old South Henderson United Presbyterian Church," contains the grave of DANIEL McMILLAN, a soldier of the Revolution. He enlisted from South Carolina, where he was born in 1752; he died August 14, 1838. [Prepared by Mrs. Helen Nye Rupp of Monmouth]

JAMES MEADOWS
was born in Virginia in 1750. While a young man he went to North Carolina to reside and entered the service from that state. He served until the close of the war. In 1794 he removed to Kentucky, and in 1832 came to Illinois to reside, settling in Warren county. His grave in the Meridan cemetery was marked by the Puritan and Cavalier Chapter, D. A. R., of Monmouth. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)




WASHINGTON COUNTY


George Brown - was from Virginia, born in Chesterfield county in 1752. He enlisted in Charlotte county March, 1780, serving two months with Capt. Thomas Williams; again in 1781 for two months under Capt. Dudley Barrel and Col. Peter Muhlenberg; again he served for two months under Capt. Pickeway and Col. Holt Richardson. He removed to Washington county, Illinois, where he died March 24, 1842. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

James Crabtree - was from Virginia, where he served in the war as ensign in the Washington county line of troops. He came to Washington county, Illinois, and died there. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Conrad Goodner - was from North Carolina, and served from that state. He came to Illinois, settling in St. Clair county, but removed to Washington county, where he died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Thomas McClerken (aka McCLURKIN) - was from Chester county, Camden district, South Carolina. He removed to Kentucky, and from there to Indiana, and thence to Washington county, Illinois, where he died, and is buried near Sparta. A stone tells of his being a Revolutionary soldier. Each year the Grand Army post places flowers on his grave. At the age of 95 years he applied for a pension, but doubtless died before it was granted. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917) Buried in Elkhorn cemetery in Oakdale twp. (source: Genealogical Records, Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)


WAYNE COUNTY

James Clark - was born April 18, 1755, in Rowan county, North Carolina. He enlisted in South Carolina August 1, 1776, serving one year under Capt. John Gowens. He again enlisted for four months with Capt. John Earle; again he served from October, 1777, to July, 1778, as first lieutenant, and again from July, 1780, to June, 1781, and again in 1781 for nine months, all under Capts. William Wood, John Nesbit, Samuel Earle, Henry Wood and James McIllhaney, with Col. John Thomas. Once more this intrepid soldier served his country for three months from June, 1782, and was made captain, and again for one month from August, 1782, making in all seven enlistments. He was wounded in the thigh at Hiamassee and Blackstock's. He removed to Kentucky in 1801, and in 1818 came to Wayne county, Illinois, where he died August 25, 1834. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

George Clark - served in the war from Virginia. After the war he removed to Kentucky, and from there to Gallatin county, Illinois, but died in Wayne county very aged. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

GEORGE GASTON - was born in Lancaster county, South Carolina, July 24, 1761. He enlisted in 1778 with Capt. John Marshall; was taken prisoner and confined in Camden jail for two months. He was paroled, then enlisted again under Capt. William Ingram, also served under Capt. Nisbet, serving until May, 1781. He was in the battle of Hanging Rock. He removed to Indiana, and from there to Wayne county, Illinois, where he died at Fairfield March 7, 1840. He was the first person to be buried in Bovee (Bavea?) cemetery in Geff township. He was one of nine sons of John Gaston to serve in the war. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917 and "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

JAMES GASTON - buried in Bovee Township (source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey)

John Hanson - was born in Virginia about 1761, where he enlisted in 1778 for two months under Capt. Evans Shelby. He again served in 1781 for ten months with Capt. John McIlhaney and Col. Hammond in the North Carolina troops. He removed to Indiana, and from there to Wayne county, Illinois, where he died July 25, 1835, He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JAMES LOCK -
was from Virginia, born in Berkeley county August 24, 1761. He enlisted in 1779 for three months with Capt. Samuel McCutchen and Col. William Bone. He again served in 1781 for three months with Capt. John McCormick and Col. William Darke. He removed to Wayne county, IL, where he is doubtless buried. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)
James Lock was
born August 24, 1761, in Berkeley County, Virginia, served two enlistments. He removed to Kentucky, from there to Tennessee and back to Kentucky before moving to Wayne County, where he died in 1833. He was pensioned. [Source: Laurie Selpien. Memorial stone placed in the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in 1974 thanks to the work of Doris Bland]

JOHN H. MILLS - was born in 1753. He served in the war from South Carolina. He died in Wayne County, in 1840 (aged 87 yrs). [Source: Laurie Selpien. Memorial stone placed in the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in 1974 thanks to the work of Doris Bland]

WILLIAM SIMPSON - was born in Prince William County, Virginia, Oct 14, 1755 and served with the Virginia troops. He removed to Illinois in 1813. he died in Wayne County in 1939 and was buried in the Simpson Cemetery. [Source: Laurie Selpien. Memorial stone placed in the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in 1974 thanks to the work of Doris Bland]

THOMAS SLOAN - born in 1761, served with the North Carolina troops. He removed to Mclean County, Illinois and later to Wayne County where he died in 1840. [Source: Laurie Selpien. Memorial stone placed in the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in 1974 thanks to the work of Doris Bland]

JAMES STUART - was born in South Carolina December 1, 1762, serving five enlistments in the Revolutionary War before removing to Kentucky and later to Wayne county, where he died in 1845. He is buried in the old fairground north of Fairfield. He was pensioned. [Source: Laurie Selpien. Memorial stone placed in the Veterans Memorial Cemetery in 1974 thanks to the work of Doris Bland]

James Stuart - was born in South Carolina December 1, 1762, where he enlisted in 1779 for two months with Capt. H. McClure and Col. E. Lacey. He enlisted again in 1780 for three months, serving with Capt. John McClure; again he served the same year under Capts. John Steele and Philip Walker, and twice more, making five enlistments, under Col. E. Lacey. He was in the battles of Rocky Creek, Hanging Rock, King's Mountain, Fort Granby, siege of Ninety-six, Haddrell's Point and Eutaw Springs. He removed to Kentucky, and from there to Wayne county, Illinois, where he died October, 1845, in Fairfield township. He was pensioned.
("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

ALEXANDER RAMSEY - from South Carolina, enlisted at the age of 16 and serving the last two years of the war. He removed to Hopkins County, Kentucky, from there to White County in 1816, and from there to Wayne County in 1818. He settled in what is now Mt. Erie. He died September 8, 1855 aged 90 years. He was buried in the Mt. Erie Cemetery. [Source: Laurie Selpien. ]


WHITE COUNTY

Daniel Bidwell - served in the war from New York in the Albany county militia, Thirteenth Regiment, with Capt. John McCrea. He removed to White county, Illinois, and died there. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Childress - served in the war from North Carolina. He came to Illinois, settling in Carmi, White county, where he probably died. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Thomas Dagley - probably served in the war from North Carolina. He came to White county, Illinois, and died there. He lies buried in the Union Ridge cemetery, about ten miles south of Carmi. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917) ("[Thomas] Dagley was baggage-master for General Washington in Revolutionary war. During the march of the British, there were guards placed over his wife's house to protect it from the ravages of the troops." Further info)

Hezekiah Davis - was from South Carolina, where he served in the war. He came to Illinois about 1811 and was living in Jackson county, but removed to White county, and died there in 1820. He was wounded in the service. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Clement Ederlin - was from Maryland, where he served as sergeant in the First Regiment in 1776 with Capt. John Haskins and Col. William Smallwood. He removed to Kentucky, and from there to White county, Illinois. He is buried in the Morris cemetery, White county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Edmond Fear - was in the war from Virginia. He came to White county, Illinois, and there applied for a pension, but not having served six months it was not granted. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Samuel Hale - served in the war from Virginia. Coming to Illinois he settled in White county and there applied for a pension. He died in 1849, aged 98 years. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Joseph Hawthorne - served in the war from South Carolina. He came to White county, Illinois, and died there. He was buried in the Enfield cemetery. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Robert Hawthorne - was doubtless a brother of Joseph, and he also served from South Carolina. He came to White county, Illinois, and died there. He was buried in the Enfield cemetery. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Hood - served as ensign in Capt. James Calderwood's company, Col. Daniel Morgan's regiment of Virginia troops, from May 31, 1777, to November 30, 1778. He came to White county, Illinois, and died there in 1827. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Nathan Jaggers - was born October 16, 1759, in Craven county, South Carolina. He enlisted October, 1775, for three months with Capt. Edmund Strange; again in 1779 for three months with Capt. John Nixon, Col. John Winn, in the South Carolina troops. He again enlisted in 1780, serving more than one year with Capts. Thomas Taylor, George Hastin, Shaw and Kirkwood, with Col. Edward Lacy, in the Virginia troops. He again served from February, 1782, for two months under Capt. Neeley and Col. Edward Lacey, and also Col. McDonald in the South Carolina troops. He came to White county, Illinois, where he died August 19, 1839. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Arthur Johnson - was born August 7, 1757, in Brunswick county, Virginia. He served as corporal in Capt. James Knox's company, Col. Abraham Bowman's Eighth Regiment, from May, 1776, to April 30, 1777. He again enlisted January 2, 1777, for three years. He was in Capt. Thomas Berry's company, Eighth Regiment, serving as sergeant; also with Capt. Abraham Kirkpatrick's company, same regiment. He was acting sergeant in Capt. William Crogan's company, Fourth Regiment, and in May, 1779, in Capt. Leonard Cooper's company with Col. John Nevill's Fourth Regiment. After the war he removed to Kentucky, and from there to Indiana, Gibson county, and later to White county, Illinois, where he died October 16, 1839, and was buried in the Seven Mile Prairie cemetery, four miles north of Enfield. A monument has been erected by descendants, upon which is inscribed his military record. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Charles Knight - was from Virginia, where he served in the war. He came to White county, Illinois, and died there. He lies buried in the Union Ridge cemetery, about ten miles south of Carmi. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Henry Morgan - was born in North Carolina December 7, 1758. He enlisted March 24, 1779, for five months with Capt. Robert. McLane and Col. John Collier; in August, 1780, he served one month with Capt. Flower Swift and Col. William Campbell in the Virginia troops. In 1781 he served one year and six months with Capt. Robert McLane and Major Joel Paisley in the North Carolina troops. He was in the battles of Wetzell's Mills, Sandy Creek and Lindley's Mill. He removed to White county, Illinois, and died there February 22, 1849. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Mathias Parr - was from New York, where he served in the war in the Second Regiment, New York troops, under Col. Philip Van Courtland. He was born in 1746. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Fayette county, but removed to White county, where he died at an advanced age. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Scarborough - was born in April, 1762, in Virginia. He enlisted in 1780, serving until April 4, 1781, under Capts. Samuel Selden and James Green. He again enlisted, serving until June, 1783, when he was discharged, serving with Capt. John Hughes and Col. Anthony White. He came to Indiana, and from there to Franklin county, Illinois, and later to White county, where he died August 15, 1846. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Peter Sholl - was a native of Pennsylvania, where he enlisted in the Northampton county militia, first company, under Capt. Adam Stohler, third battalion, and Col. Michael Pabst in 1778. He removed to White county, Illinois, and died at an advanced age. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

William Stewart - was born in Mecklenburg county, North Carolina, in 1763. He enlisted in 1780 under Col. John Patton and was wounded at the battle of Camden. He came to White county, Illinois, and died there in 1856. He lies buried in the old cemetery at Paxton, White county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Thompson - served from Virginia. He came to Indiana and was pensioned there in 1833. Coming to White county, Illinois, to reside, he died in the county. He was pensioned. Ellas Veath or Veach was from Pendleton county, South Carolina. He served in the war from that state. He came to Illinois and settled in White county, where at the age of 74 he applied for a pension. He was pensioned. His widow drew a pension after his death. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)


WHITESIDE COUNTY

Alexander Thompson - was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1758. He enlisted August, 1776, for two months with Capt. Alexander Laughlin and Col. William Clark. He again enlisted in December for the same time and with the same officers. He served again under Col. Arthur Buchanan, all in the Pennsylvania line of troops. He removed to Indiana, and later to Whiteside county, Illinois, where he died at Newton September 25, 1840. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



WILL COUNTY


EBENEZER COLLINS
- was born in New York. He enlisted with Capt. Solomon Wadsworth in the Third Company, Fifth Regiment, called the Van Veghten Regiment. He came to Illinois, settling in Will county. He is probably buried in Homer township. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)
New Information from F. Pinn, genealogy director for the Lockport Area Genealogical and Historical So. (LAGHS):

He is buried in the Lockport City Cemetery. He died June 7, 1845 aged 82 yrs. 10 mos and his wife Anna Collins, died Oct. 22, 1839, aged 71.

JOHN COOK - was born in Hanover, Morris county, New Jersey, December 25, 1761. He enlisted August, 1776, serving two years in the companies of Capts. David Bates, Obadiah Kitchell, Elijah Squire, Benjamin Corey, William Ely, John Scudder, Levi Gardiner, Harrison Baldwin, Lewis Brant and David Lyon with Cols. Benoni Hathaway, Ellis Cook, Sylvanus Seeley and Moses Jacques in the New Jersey troops. He came to reside in Will county, Illinois, where he died near Joliet, October 24, 1837, and is buried in Oakwood cemetery, Joliet. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917) (note: Possible other burial place: Mokena (Old) cemetery.... source: "Genealogical Records", Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey) Bio: http://www.foxsar.org/PatriotJohnCook.html

CHARLES DENNEY - was a native of New York, born in Pauldingstown, Dutchess county, December 25, 1759. He enlisted in the summer of 1777 and served nine months under Capts. Noah Wheeler and Seth Wheeler with Col. Roswell Hopkins in the New York troops. He came to Will county, Illinois, settling near Joliet, where he died August 6, 1839, aged 79 years, and is buried at Mokena, Will county. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)
Bio: http://www.foxsar.org/PatriotCharlesDenny.html


WILLIAM HEWES
was born in Attlebury, Massachusetts, in 1761, he enlisted in June, 1780, serving five months under Capts. Caleb Robinson and Nehemiah Houghton with Col. George Reid in the New Hampshire troops. He came to Illinois to reside and died in Crete, Illinois, Will county, in 1855. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)
Bio:
http://www.foxsar.org/PatriotWilliamHewes.html (This name has possibly been misspelled has "HEINES")





WILLIAMSON COUNTY

John Chandoin was from Virginia, born in 1759. He served in the Virginia troops. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Franklin county, but died in Williamson county, which was formed from Franklin. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Archibald Daniel came from Wilmington, Bladen county, North Carolina. He served in the war from that state. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Franklin county, but removed to Gallatin county, and from there to Williamson county, where he died in 1844. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Benjamin Gill served in the war from North Carolina. He was shot through the ear and was thought to be dead. After the war he removed to Williamson county, Illinois, where he died. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Benaijah Gill served in the war from New Jersey. He came to Williamson county, Illinois, where he died. He was pensioned. Buried in Drake Cemetery ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Moses Jones
was from North Carolina. He served in Capt. Benjamin Bailey's company, North Carolina troops, in the Tenth Regiment, from September 10, 1782, until March 1, 1783. He came to Illinois in 1819, settling in Franklin county, but died in Williamson county, northern precinct. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John G. Lumpkins was from Pittsylvania county, Virginia. He served in the Virginia line of troops. He came to Illinois, settling in Williamson county, where he applied for a pension. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Abel Mann served in the Virginia troops. Coming to Illinois, he settled in Franklin county, but died in Williamson county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Joseph Newton was born in North Carolina in 1760. In 1776 he served as a substitute and was in the battles of Cowpens and Guilford Court House. He came to Illinois about 1815, settling in Pope county. He removed to Williamson county, where he died in 1842. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Painter served in the Virginia troops, and was paid off at Romney. He came to Williamson county, Illinois, and died there. He was pensioned. Buried in Wilson Cemetery ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

Philip Russell served in the Virginia troops and was present when Cornwallis surrendered. He carried a bullet in his body during his life. He removed to Tennessee, and in 1817 came to Franklin county, but died in Williamson county on the farm owned by W. Hindeman. He was pensioned. Buried in Wilson Cemetery ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John Robinson was born in South Carolina in 1750. He enlisted four times, first in 1776 for three months with Capt. John Lyles and Col. James Lyles; he served three months in 1777 under the same officers; again served three months in 1781 with Capt. Jeremiah Williams and Col. Samuel Hammond. He was in several engagements with the Cherokee Indians. He lived in Franklin county, Illinois, but died in Williamson county July 20, 1835. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

John G. Simpkins
was born in 1756, probably in New York state. He enlisted in New York in 1777, serving until 1781 under Capt. John Rudolph and Col. Henry Lee in the Continental Dragoons. He was discharged in South Carolina. He removed to Franklin county, Illinois, but lived in Vigo county, Indiana, then back to Franklin county, but died in Williamson county July 22, 1843. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)



WINNEBAGO COUNTY

SAMUEL CAMPBELL, a native of Massachusetts, born Oct. 8, 1762, was a private in Capt. John Spoor's Company, Col. John Brown's Regiment, serving three months; also serving seven days with Col. John Ashley Jr.'s Regiment. Again under Lt. Moses Hubbard by order of Gen. John Fellows, and with Capt. James Campbell, service six days. Samuel Campbell came to Illinois and settled in Winnebago County, where he died Nov. 8, 1844, and is buried in the Hulse cemetery, Pecatonica. His grave was marked May 26, 1908. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

JEHIEL HARMON was born in Suffield, Connecticut, Oct. 5, 1762, he early enlisted in the service of his country, taking the place of an older brother who was ill and forced to leave the service. His service was during the closing six months of the war. He came to Illinois and settled in Winnebago County, where he died March 3, 1845, and is buried in the West Side cemetery, Rockford. His grave was marked June 14, 1902. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917) (NOTE: The Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey gives the name as JAHIEL GARMON and place of burial as Greenwood Cemetery in Rockford.)

EPHRIAM PALMER was a native of Massachusetts; he enlisted in 1777 when but 17 years of age in Capt. Sylvanus Cobb's Company, for one month, and again for three months with the same leader. In 1778 and 1779 he served one year under Capt. ? Lockwood's Company; Col. John Wood's Regiment. He was taken prisoner June 7, 1779 and confined in the Small Pox Hospital, New York; was exchanged February 1780, and again served his country, enlisting from Salem, New York, as a substitute with Capt. ? Stevens, and as one who was placed to guard the notorious Major Andre. He early came to Illinois, settling in Winnebago County, where he died (in 1852 - source: Genealogical Records, Illinois Society DAR, 1939, compiled by Mrs. Edward J. Filbey) and is buried in the Kishwaukee cemetery, Kishwaukee. His grave was marked in June, 1907. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)





WOODFORD COUNTY

BASIL MEEK was born in Virginia, March 7, 1763; served as a private in Captain Hugh Stevenson's Company from August, 1775, to October. He came to Illinois, settling in what is now Woodford County in 1832. He died near Eureka, Illinois, January 12, 1844, and is buried in Olio Township cemetery near Eureka. A fine monument has been erected to his memory. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

EDWARD FITZPATRICK was born in Ireland, in 1760; came to America when a boy. He entered the service as a private in Captain Armstrong's Company, North Carolina troops. Coming to Illinois, he settled in what is now Woodford County in 1832. He died there November 21, 1834, and is buried in the Fitzpatrick family cemetery near Leon. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)

CHARLES MOORE - was born in Hanover county, VA, Jan. 11, 1763. He enlisted from Salisbury district, Rowan county, NC, serving three months, in Capt. James Craig's company, and Major Montflorance's regiment. He again served 3 months in Capt. Benjamin Smith's company, Col Matthew Brandon's regiment, serving six months' also in Capt. Robert Gladsby's company. He was in the battle of King's mountain. He came to Illinois, settling in Sangamon county near Buffalo Hart Grove, in 1823, but moved to what is now Woodford county. While going to draw his pension the stage upset and from injuries received, he died Sept. 19, 1839. He is probably buried in Woodford county. He was pensioned. ("Illinois Revolutionary War Veteran Burials", 1917)


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