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Richland County, Illinois
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Mrs. Harriet GADAU, formerly Harriet ARNOLD, was born in Olney Township, June 7, 1841. Her parents were among the earliest settlers of the county. She married Peter SHERER, December 10, 1857; he was born in Germany, April 29, 1830. When six years of age he came with his parents to America; they remained a short time in Ohio, then came to this locality, where he lived till his death. He became the father of ten children, eight living -- George, Elizabeth, Anna, John, Peter, Margaret, Minnie E. and Harriet. Henry GADAU married Mrs. Sherer, August 15, 1882. He is a native of Germany, and has resided in Edwards County the past fifteen years, where he owns a farm. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

Frank P. GILLESPIE, County Treasurer, was born in Washington County, Penn., October 13, 1838, and was the seventh of ten children born to William L. and Elizabeth (BEALL) GILLESPIE, natives of Washington County, and of Irish and English descent respectively. William was educated and married in Pennsylvania, where he followed farming until the spring of 1853, when he removed to Illinois, settling first near Springfield, and residing there for some three years. In 1856 he came to Jasper County, and bought a farm near Sainte Marie, where he lived until his death, on May 27, 1862. His wife died one week later, on June 5, 1862. They were both devout members of the Catholic Church. During the administration of TAYLOR and FILLMORE, Mr. GILLESPIE was a cleark in the Census Department at Washington. Frank P. received a good education, and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty-five years of age, when he began clerking in a store at Olney, remaining there some fifteen years. In November, 1877, he was elected Treasurer of Richland County, and was re-elected in the year 1879, and again in 1882, the latter time for four years. Mr. GILLESPIE was married September 12, 1864, to Mary A. KELLY, of York, Penn. Four children have been born to them, of who two, John B. and Ellen L., are living. He and wife are both members of the Catholic Church. Mr. GILLESPIE is a Democrat in politics and one of the leading citizens of Richland County. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

Henry GODEKE was born in the Province of Hanover, Germany, April 9, 1849, and is the youngest of five children born to Frederick C. and Johanna F. (WALBRECHT) GODEKE, both natives of Hanover. Frederick C. GODEKE in early life learned the weavers' trade, following it in connection with farming several years. He was for a time a soldier in the Hanoverian Army. In 1858 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Warrick County, Ind., where he bought a farm, and where he resided until his death, July 10, 1860. Henry GODEKE, the subject of our sketch, received a fair common school education in his native land, and also in the United States. At the age of seventeen he went to learn the gunsmiths' and tinners' trades, at Georgetown, Ohio, serving an apprenticeship of four and a half years, after which he followed the gunsmiths' trade as journeyman. In 1873 he opened a gunsmiths' shop at Columbus, Ky., where he remained one year. In 1874 he came to Olney, Ill., where he opened a shop and has since been doing good business. He was married, November 28, 1876, to Lizzie VON ALMAN, a native of Indiana. Two children have blessed their union. Mr. GODEKE is a member of no church. Mrs. Godeke is a member of the German Reformed Church. Mr. GODEKE is a member of the Olney Lodge, No. 76, A.O.U.W., and of the Select Order of Uniformed Knights, A.O.U.W. In politics he is a Democrat. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

William GODEJOHANN, cigar manufacturer, was born in Prussia, October 21, 1849, of parents Casper and Franziska C. (MOEHLENBROCK) GODEJOHANN, Prussians, William being their only child. Casper was brought up and married in his native land, and followed agricultural pursuits. In 1857, he brought his family across the ocean to the United States, settling first in Macon County, Ill. He remained there until 1865, when he went to Belleville. In 1864, his wife died, in the membership of the Lutheran Church. In 1865, Mr. GODEJOHANN remarried, and moved to Fayetteville, and in 1873, came here, then returned to Fayetteville, lliving there until his death, March 26, 1882, belonging to the Lutheran Church. William's schooling was very limited. He worked on a farm until his sixteenth year, when he was apprenticed to the trade of cigar-making at Belleville, serving there for three years, when he worked for the firm from which he had received his instruction for about seven and a half years, became a partner, and in 1873, exchanged stock with P.J. KAERCHER, of Olney, and today has a successful trade. He employs from seven to twelve men, and is turning out about 350,000 cigars annually. His is the most extensive factory in this part of the state, and his trade extends through southwestern Indiana. In 1871, he married Louise LUBBEN, of Saint Louis, Mo. They have had four children, of whom three are living. Mr. GODEJOHANN belongs to the Olney Lodge No. 76, Olney Legion, No. 18, Uniform Order of Select Knights, A.O.U.W., and is a Republican. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

John GRUBER, boots and shoes, was born in Canton Berne, Switzerland, February 12, 1847, and is the oldest of four children born to John and Susan (AMETER) GRUBER, both natives of Switzerland. John Gruber, Sr., was educated and married in his native land, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years. In 1850, he emigrated to the United States and settled in Olney Township, Richland Co., Ill., where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in the summer of 1853. John Gruber, Jr., the subject, received a limited common school education in youth, but has by his own endeavors, since he became a man, acquired a fair practical business education. After his father's death he made his home with his uncle and stepfather, until he was seventeen years old, when he went to learn the shoemakers' trade, serving an apprenticeship of two and a half years. He followed the trade until 1869, when he was employed as a salesman in a leather store at Olney, for about three years. In 1872, he removed to Mount Carmel, Ill., where he was engaged in the draying business for fourteen months. He then returned to Olney, where he was again employed in the same leather store until 1879. He then accepted a position as traveling salesman for a harness and collar manufacturer house in Evansville, Ind., and continued in that business for fourteen months. In the fall of 1881, he opened a boot and shoe store at Olney, and has since done a good business, in that line. In August 1876, he was appointed school treasurer of Olney Township, which office he still holds, and in the spring of 1883, was elected Clerk of the same township. He was married, October 23, 1870, to Frances F. DORNEY, a native of Wabash County, Ill. Six children were born to them, only three of whom are living. Mr. GRUBER is a member of Olney Lodge, No. 140, A.F. & A.M., also, Richland Lodge, No. 180, and Olney Encampment, No. 61, I.O.O.F. Of the last name body, he is at present treasurer. He is a Democrat, and one of the enterprising business men of the city. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

Frederick GRUNEISEN- was born in Switzerland, May 10, 1844. His father, Jacob GRUNEISEN, was born in Switzerland, February 14, 1804, and in 1848, emigrated to America and settled in Richland County, Il, and began farming on a rented farm, but soon saved enough to buy 100 acres, and at his death owned a fine farm of 200 acres, where our subject now lives. His death occured September 15, 1880. The mother of our subject died in Switzerland, in 1846. Mr. GRUNEISEN has been twice married; on June 18, 1864, to Louisa FAITZ, a native of Switzerland. She was born in 1848, and died March 12, 1869. They had one child, Louisa.  He was next married, in 1871, to Susanna BURGNER, who was born September 28, 1854. Five children have been born to them -- Mattie, Jacob, Matilda, Caroline, and Rosinia. Mr. and Mrs. GRUNEISEN are members of the Reformed Church, and Mr. GRUNEISEN is a Democrat.


John C. Groves-who is engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 8, Denver Township, Richland County, is a native of the Keystone State, his birth having occured in Brown County, September 12, 1886. His grandfather served as a drummer in the war of 1812, and spent the greater part of his life in Virginia. Richard Groves, the father of our subject, was born in Fauquier County, that State in 808, and spent the days of his boyhood upon a farm. He there married Susanna Evans, who was a native of the Old Dominion and was of Irish descent, her father having emigrated to this country from the Emerald Isle. In 1836, Mr. Groves started with his family for Ohio, but while in Pennsylvania his team ran away and one of his legs was broken. This___led his remaining in the Keystone State for a year, and during that time John was born. The family located in Licking County, Ohio, and purchased a tract of timberland from which an excellent farm was developed. For fourteen years during the winter season, the father worked a cal mine on his own place. In 1857 he went to Mercer County, Mo, where he and his wife died within a few weeks of each other. They were faithful workers in and earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics, Mr. Groves was a life-long Democrat. Mary Jane their eldest child, is the wife of William Bridge, of Missouri; John C. is the next younger, James M. who served throughout the late war, is living in Schyler County,Il, Leah Catherine is the wife of Charles Booth,of Missouri, and Daniel H. who was also one of the boys in blue, follows farming in Missouri.
[Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]



JOHN C. GROVES, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 8, Denver Township, Richland County is a native of the Keystone State, his birth having occurred in Brown County, September 12, 1836. His grandfather served as a drummer in the War of 1812, and spent the greater part of his life in Virginia. Richard Groves, the father of our subject, was born in Fauquier County, that State, in 1808, and spent the days of his boyhood upon a farm. He there married Susanna Evans, who was a native of the Old Dominion and was of Irish descent, her father having emigrated to this country from the Emerald Isle. In 1836 Mr. Groves started with his family for Ohio, but while in Pennsylvania his team ran away and one of his legs was broken. This necessitated his remaining in the Keystone State for a year, and during that time John was born.
The family located in Licking County, Ohio, and purchased a tract of timberland, from which an excellent farm was developed. For fourteen years during the winter season, the father worked a coal mine on his own place. In 1857 he went to Mercer county, Mo., where he and his wife died within a few weeks of each other. They were faithful workers in and earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics Mr. Groves was a life-long Democrat. Mary Jane, their eldest child, is the wife of William Bridge, of Missouri; John C. is the next younger; James M., who served throughout the late war, is living in Schuyler County, Ill.; Leah Catherine is the wife of Charles Booth, of Missouri; and Daniel H., who was also one of the boys in blue, follows farming in Missouri.
In a log cabin of Ohio, upon a farm largely covered with stumps and rocks, our subject remained until twenty-one years of age. He attended school only about three months in the year and during the remainder of the time performed the arduous task of clearing and developing wild land. In the fall of 1857, he went by team to Missouri, where he remained four years. He came to Illinois during the exciting times which attended the breaking out of the late war, and in the fall of 1861 bought land, constituting a part of his present farm. He purchased forty acres, upon which he built a log house and barn. His cash capital consisted of $30, and he had a team, three colts, a wagon and his household effects. He has been a hard worker and as the result of his labors his financial resources were increased and he now owns ninety acres of good land, highly cultivated and well improved, upon which he carries on general farming.
Mr. Groves has never been an office-seeker, but was called upon to serve as Assessor and faithfully discharged the duties of the position. He is member of the Farmers' Mutual Benefit Association, and for thirty-five years has held membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He cast his first Presidential vote for James Buchanan and was then identified with the Republican party until 1892, when he supported Weaver.
The lady who bears the name of Mrs. Groves was formerly Miss Catherine Gray, daughter of Robert and Jane (Adams) Gray. Her parents removed from Ohio to Iowa, later to Missouri, and their last days were spent in this county. The father, born July 6, 1799, died November 18, 1872, and the mother, born February 21, 1799, died September 11, 1863. Mrs. Groves is a native of the Buckeye State. By her marriage she has become the mother of three children, but the eldest became the wife of James Crosby and died leaving three children; Ara Adna and Ora Ole, twins, are at home. During his thirty-two years' residence in the county, Mr. Groves has proved himself a valued citizen, and has gained the esteem of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact.  Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.416 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


SETH W. GARD, pioneer of Denver Township, was born in Wabash County, Ill., August 6, 1829, is the son of Justus and Anna (Oman) Gard, eldest of fourteen children and is of Irish German extraction. His father was born in Ohio, and his mother in the Empire Statte. The maternal grandparents of Mr. Gard were born in Germany, and came to America previous to the Revolution. Justus Gard came with his parents to the territory that now composes the State of Illinois, when seven years of age. They were among the first settlers of Illinois, having settled there in 1814. The father, died in Wabash County in 1870, and the mother in 1854. In June, 1852, the subject came to Richland County, Ill., and entered 160 acres of land, upon a part of which his present residence now stands. He came to Denver Township with only 85 cents in money, and now owns 380 acres of good land, 220 acres of which are improved. He is one of the best farmers and stock growers in the county. Mr. Gard's marriage took place February 6, 1853, to Sarah J. Ulm, of Clay County. To this household were born seven children. Mrs. Gard died April 1, 1870. Our subject was re-married the same year, choosing Eliza J. (Helpman) Conklin. Mr. Gard was formerly a Whig, but now is a Republican, and cast his first Presidential vote for Scott. He has been a Mason since 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Gard are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Gard served as Assessor of Denver Township for the years 1860 and 1861, and in 1872 was elected Justice of the Peace, and four years later was re-elected. He is one of the leading farmers of the township, and the last ten years has marketed about $500 worth of pork.
 [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]

JOEL GARDNER, farmer, was born December 18, 1825, in (then) Lawrence County, Ill., and now lives within a quarter of a mile from the spot on which he was born. Joel is the son of Thomas and Frances (Calhoun) Gardner. His father was born in Georgia, and his mother in South Carolina. Thomas moved to Indiana, where he engaged in farming, and in about 1822 emigrated to Illinois, and entered ninety three acres of land known as the Peter Colvin farm, and there he died, January 9, 1864, in his seventy second year, His wife died October 10, 1855, aged sixty years. She was the daughter of Hugh Calhoun, from whom Calhoun Prairie derived its name. The subject of this sketch was born and reared on this farm, and when he reached the age of twenty one, his father gave him sixty acres, where he has since lived. He at first built a log cabin 16x18 feet, and there five of his children were born. In 1858 he built his present residence, which cost about $1,000. He has two barns, one built in 1857 and one in 1874, at a cost of about $700. His fruit house, 12x24 feet, cost about $300, and he has an orchard of about three acres, inclosed with a very substantial wire and hedge fence. Mr. Gardner has added other lands since coming here, and now owns 200 acres, and his is one of the best improved farms in this locality. In August, of 1862, he entered the service as First Lieutenant of Company H, One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois Infantry, served about one year, then resigned on account of ill health. Mr. Gardner has been Justice of tie Peace about sixteen years, and has been several terms Supervisor. He was elected one of the three County Commissioners this election, which was to fill a vacancy on the County Board. When his father first came to this county, their nearest post office was Lawrenceville, a distance of twenty miles. Our subject was married in 1846, to Rachel E. Heap, who was born in Muskingum County, Ohio, January 10, 1827. She died January 24, 1873. This union was blessed with nine children, three sons and six daughters. His second marriage was to Mrs. Sarah E. Edwards, November 26, 1874. She was born in La Rue County, Kentucky, June 23,1838. They have one son. She has five children by her former marriage, four sons and one daughter.
 [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


THEODORE GHARST was born January 19, 1840, in Lancaster County, Penn. His father carried on the shoemaking trade there, and with him Theodore learned that business. In 1863 he came to Claremont, opened a shop, and has since carried on his trade. He bought a farm of fifty acres in the spring of 1882; this land joins the village of Claremont, and this he cultivates, as well as carrying on his other business. He enlisted in 1861 in Company B, Sixteenth Ohio Infantry, and served three months. He was married in the fall of 1861 to Adaline Greenwood, of Pennsylvania. Eight children have blessed this union, five sons and three daughters. Mr. Gharst is now school director and Commissioner of Highways.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


FRANK P. GILLESPIE, County Treasurer, was born in Washington County, Penn., October 13, 1838, and was the seventh of ten children born to William L. and Elizabeth (Beall) Gillespie, natives of Washington County, and of Irish and English descent respectively. William was educated and married in Pennsylvania, where he followed farming until the spring of 1853, when he removed to Illinois, settling first near Springfield, and residing there for some three years. In 1856 he came to Jasper County, and bought a farm near Saint Marie, where he lived until his death, on May 27, 1862. His wife died one week later, on June 5, 1862. They were both devout members of the Catholic Church. During the administration of Taylor and Fillmore, Mr. Gillespie was a clerk in the Census Department at Washington. Frank P. received a good education, and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty five years of age, when he began clerking in a store at Olney, remaining there some fifteen years. In November, 1877, he was elected Treasurer of Richland County, and was re-elected in the year 1879, and again in 1882, the latter time for four years. Mr. Gillespie was married September 12, 1864, to Mary A. Kelly, of York, Penn. Four children have been born to them, of whom two, John B. and Ellen L., are living. He and wife are both members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Gillespie is a Democrat in politics, and one of the leading citizens of Richland County. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


HENRY GODEKE was born in the Province of Hanover, Germany, April 9, 1849, and is the youngest of five children born to Frederick C. and Johanna F. (Walbrecht) Godeke, both natives of Hanover. Frederick C. Godeke in early life learned the weavers' trade, following it in connection with farming several years. He was for a time a soldier in the Hanoverian Army. In 1858 he emigrated to the United States and settled in Warrick County, Ind., where he bought a farm, and where he resided until his death, July 10, 1860. Henry Godeke, the subject of our sketch, received a fair common school education in his native land, and also in the United States. At the age of seventeen he went to learn the gunsmiths' and tinners' trades, at Georgetown, Ohio, serving an apprenticeship of four and a half years, after which he followed the gunsmiths' trade as a journeyman. In 1873 he opened a gunsmiths' shop at Columbus, Ky., where he remained one year. In 1874 he came to Olney, Ill., where he opened a shop and has since been doing a good business. He was married, November 28, 1876, to Lizzie Von Alman, a native of Indiana. Two children have blessed their union. Mr. Godeke is a member of no church. Mrs. Godeke is a member of the German Reformed Church. Mr. Godeke is a member of the Olney Lodge, No. 76, A. O. U. W., and of the Select Order of Uniformed Knights. In politics he is a Democrat.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
  

ORLANDO W. GRAY, pioneer farmer of Richland County, was born near the town of Weston, Vt., August 27, 1833, is the son of Abel and Betsey (Pettingill) Gray, is next to the youngest of twelve children, and is of English descent. The parents were natives of New Hampshire. When Orlando W. was three years ot age he emigrated with his parents from Vermont to Richland County, Ill., and after a journey of eight weeks, settled one mile east of the present site of Olney. Our subject's grandfather was born in England, and came to America about a century and a half ago. When Orlando W. was eighteen years of age, he was compelled to begin the world for himself. He first worked at constructing a line of telegraph extending from Louisville to Saint Louis, and in 1854 came to where he now lives, first entering forty, then eighty acres, then forty again, and now owns 480 acres of good land, 320 acres of which are improved. His first house was a frame, and was one of the first of the kind in that section. Mr. Gray was married January 18, 1855, to Emaline Ulm, a native of Wabash County, Ill. To this union have been born twelve children. He is a thorough Republican and a member of the Masonic Fraternity since 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Gray are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject has long been one of the leading farmers of Richland County, and is one of its first settlers and prominent men. He is in all particulars a self made man and his wife is also one of the pioneer women of the State. Mr. Gray was appointed postmaster of Boot Post office in 1857.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]  


ORLANDO W. GRAY, one of the early settlers of Richland County, who follows farming on section 18, Denver Township, was born in Vermont, August 27, 1833. His father, Abel Gray, was born in the old Granite State, and after a residence of some years in Vermont came to Illinois, in 1836. The remainder of his life was passed near Olney, where he died in 1861, at the age of seventy years. He had served as a Captain in the War of 1812. He was a natural mechanic, and could make anything out of wood, from a dainty piece of ornamental work to a wagon. When he came to the county there were only three houses in Olney, two of these log cabins. He obtained wild land on the State road from the Government, and developed a farm. He was a well educated man, and in this community became a prominent citizen. By his ballot he supported the Whig party, and in religious belief he was a Methodist. In the State of his nativity, he married Betsy Pettingill, whose father was a native of England. The following are the children born unto this worthy couple: Betsy Clara, now deceased; Mrs. Maria Talley, of Olney; Harriet Ulm and Pettingill, deceased; William, who is living a retired life in Olney; Mrs. Ruth Dewhirst, of Denver Township; and O. W., of this sketch. The Gray family made the journey to the West by teams, and were eight weeks upon the road. Our subject was then only three years old. He was reared upon the new farm which his father developed, and remained with his parents until eighteen years of age, when he began to earn his own livelihood by working as a farm hand. He bought the last Congressional land in the county, obtaining the money for this purchase by working on the telegraph line from Louisville, Ky., to St. Louis, Mo. He bought one hundred and twenty acres, for which he went in debt, but soon paid off the indebtedness and twenty-five per cent, interest additional. Not a furrow had been turned or an improvement made upon the property, but he at once began to clear, plow and plant, and has placed under a high state of cultivation three hundred acres of rich land. His farm comprises three hundred and thirty-six acres, and is one of the best in the county. He also engages in stock-raising, and this branch of his business has been alike successful.
Mr. Gray was married January 18, 1855, to Emeline Ulm. The children born of their union were Coriden C., who married Emma Davis, and died in 1890, at the age of twenty-seven years; William T. S., who wedded Florence Adams and is an agriculturist of Denver Township; Rosetta J.; Pearly B.; Florence Irene; Minnie, wife of John Tennyson, a Methodist minister; Bertha Prudence, and Seth O., who died in 1893, at the age of thirteen years. The children have all been provided with good educational advantages, and William was a student in the Olney High School.
Mr. and Mrs. Gray hold membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which they are liberal supporters. He cast his first ballot for the Whig candidate in 1856, voted for Abraham Lincoln in 1860, and was a stanch Republican until within a few years. He is now independent in politics. He belongs to the Farmers' Mutual Benefit Association. He was Postmaster of Boot Postoffice for ten years, and is now serving his fourth term as Supervisor of Denver Township. One of the honored pioneers of Richland County, he has for fifty-seven years been an eye-witness of its growth and upbuilding. He carried dinner to the men who were engaged in securing the logs for the first school house and church in Olney. In many ways has he been prominently identified with the development of the county, and the community recognizes in him a valued citizen, whose upright and honorable life has won for him universal confidence and esteem. He is justly proud of the county which he has seen transformed from an almost unbroken wilderness to one of the leading counties in southern Illinois.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.580 - Submitted by Judy Edwards
 

 



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