Genealogy Trails


Richland County, Illinois
Genealogy and History


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J. ROBERTS -- merchant, of the firm J. ROBERTS & Son, dealers in hardware, staple and fancy groceries, etc, was born in Ohio in 1829, and is the third of the ten children of John and Sarah (SARGENT) ROBERTS, the former a native of Wales, the latter of Virginia. John ROBERTS was in early life a sailor, later a farmer; he died in Ohio at the age of eighty-three, his wife being yet alive, aged seventy-nine. Our subject resided at home until he was twenty-five years of age. In 1855, he married Miss ZIMRODE, daughter of Nehemiah BICKNELL, a native of Ohio. After marriage, Mr. ROBERTS purchased 170 acres in West Virginia, on which he remained nine years; this he then sold and removed to Noble Township, purchased 320 acres and remained two years; he afterward removed to Ohio, where his wife died in 1870, leaving three children -- Arthur B., Z. Ella and Albert. He next married Miss Fannie V., daughter of N. R. Nye, a native of Ohio. This union gave issue to four children -- Alma, Frank H., Willie G., and Charlie N.  After this marriage, Mr. ROBERTS returned to Richland County, and lived on his previously occupied farm until he began his present business, which he managed in connection with farming, having a good farm of 320 acres. Mr. ROBERTS was township Supervisor in 1872, and has been school trustee for five years. He is a Knight Templar Mason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]



JOHN ROBERTS, who devotes his time and attention to general farming, operates two hundred acres of land on section 6, Noble Township, Richland County, where he has a pleasant home and all the surroundings of a good farm. He was born in Washington County, Ohio, July 16, 1829, and is a son of John and Sarah (Sargent) Roberts. The family is of Welsh descent, and the paternal grandfather of our subject died in Wales. The father was born in that country, and in early life was a sailor, but in 1822 he abandoned the sea and took up his residence near Marietta, Ohio, where he followed farming for some time. He afterward bought a farm of three hundred acres in Meigs County, Ohio, upon which he made his home from 1830 until 1869, when he was called to his final rest. He died at the age of eighty-three years. His wife survived him until 1884, and passed away at the age of eighty. He was a member of the Baptist Church, and she held membership with the Methodist Church. The maiden name of Mrs. Roberts was Sarah Sargent. She was born in Wood County, Va., and was a daughter of Enoch Sargent, a Virginian farmer, who died in his native State at an advanced age.
In the Roberts family were thirteen children, eight sons and five daughters: William; Thomas, deceased; John; Robert and Frank, both deceased; Henry E.; Cinderella and Elizabeth, both of whom have passed away; Rowena, Adelaide, Sarah C. and two sons who died in infancy.
John Roberts, of this sketch, spent his boyhood days in attending the district schools, and working on his father's farm in Meigs County, Ohio. Under the parental roof he remained until twenty-six years of age, when, on the l0th of May, 1855, he formed a matrimonial alliance with Miss Zimrode A. Bicknell, daughter of Nehemiah and Julia (Larkin) Bicknell. Her parents were natives of Rhode Island, but resided in Meigs County at the time of their marriage. Five children were born of that union: Arthur B., who wedded Miss Kate Rowland, of Olney; Zimrode E., the wife of Fletcher Jacques, of Owensville, Ind., by whom she has two children, Mary and Stewart; Albert J., who married Miss Kittie M. Gifford, April 18, 1893, and resides in Minneapolis, Minn.; and two sons who died in infancy. The mother of this family was called to her final home in 1870, at the age of thirty-four years. She was a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. Roberts was again married, April 11, 1872, his second union being with Miss Fannie V., daughter of Rodocquey Nye. They have become the parents of three sons and a daughter: Alma, Frank, Willie and Charlie.
After his first marriage, Mr. Roberts removed to West Virginia, where he followed farming and boating. For about sixteen years during the winter seasons, he propelled a flatboat. The year 1864 witnessed his arrival in Illinois. Here he purchased land, to which he has added until now two hundred acres yield to him a golden tribute in return for his care and cultivation. He has a fine orchard covering twenty-five acres, and other good improvements are upon the place.
Mr. Roberts, his wife and daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he has served as Classleader and Steward for some years. He takes an active interest in church work, and has been a faithful laborer in the cause of Christianity. Socially, he is connected with Noble Lodge, No. 362, A. F. & A. M.; Richland Chapter No. 38, R. A. M.; and Gorin Commandery No. 14, K. T. He exercises his right of franchise ill support of the Republican party, and has held various local offices. In 1882 and 1883 he served as Supervisor, and is now acting as Highway Commissioner. Those who know Mr. Roberts esteem him highly as a man of sterling worth and strict integrity, and he is accounted one of the leading farmers of Noble Township. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.584 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


James K. RONEY was born July 4, 1884, in Coshocton County, Ohio, and is the son of John RONEY, who was born in Harrison County, Ohio. The family came to German Township, Richland County, in 1856, and James K. assisted on his father's farm till the breaking out of the war. He enlisted, in 1861, in Company A., Sixty-Third Illinois Infantry, and served to the end of the war. He participated in the battles of Mission Ridge, Lookout, Mountain, Florence, S.C. with SHERMAN on his " March to the Sea", and others. He then returned home and has since been engaged in farming. Mr. RONEY was married in 1867, to Ann LATHROP. She was born in German Township. They have two sons and two daughters. Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]

L. D. RONEY was born September 17, 1840, in Coshocton County, Ohio, and in 1856, the family immigrated to Illinois and settled in Richland County. His father died December 31, 1880, aged sixty-seven years. L. D. enlisted in July 1861, in Company E, Eleventh Missouri Infantry, and served til the end of the war. He participated in the battle of Island No. 10, siege of Corinth, battle of Iuka, second battle of Corinth, siege at Vicksburg, Spanish Fork and others. On his re-enlistment in December 1864, he was commissioned Lieutenant, and later was promoted to Captain, which commission he held until he mustered out at the close of the war. He then returned to German Township, where he has since followed farming; he now occupies the farm formerly owned by his father, and which consists of 152 acres. He married in September, 1871, E. HART. She was born in West Virginia. Two sons bless this union. Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]

R. H. RUNYON -- farmer, was born in Highland County, Ohio, February 26, 1840, is the fifth of thirteen children, and is of Irish-German extraction. His parents were born in Rockingham County, Va., and in 1831, emigrated to Ohio and there remained nineteen years, or until 1853, when they removed to Richland County, Il., and settled in Decker Township, and here the father died in 1855 and the mother in 1883. When R.H. was seventeen years of age he began the battle of life for himself and two years later found himself teaching his first school. He taught in the Gray district, and was paid $27.50 per month, for a term of three months. For thirteen years he continued in this profession, teaching during the winter.His marriaged occured July 14, 1867, to Sarah A. JONICAN, a native of Highland County, Ohio. They had three children -- Jason S., Alice and Albert R. In 1856, Mr. RUNYON, came into possession of that portion of the real estate inherited from his father that he now owns. It was not improved until 1860. Mr. RUNYON is a Democrat and cast his first presidential vote for McCLELLAN. In 1861, he was elected Township Assessor of Decker Township, and held this position for six consecutive years, and was then elected Supervisor and held this office one year, when he was again elected Assessor, and remained in office for thirteen years. In 1880, he was appointed to take the census of Decker Township. Mr. RUNYON is one of the pioneers of the township, and has long been one of its principal men.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


REUBEN H. RUNYON, who is engaged in farming on section 27, Decker Township, has long been a resident ofRichland County, and is numbered among its early settlers. His birth occurred in Highland County, Ohio, February26, 1840. The family is of Irish descent, having been founded in America by the great-grandfather of our subject.His father, Samuel Runyon, was born in Rockingham County, Va., in 1807, and there remained until twenty three years of age. He was an excellent student and acquired a good English education. In 1830 he emigrated to Highland County, Ohio, where he purchased a tract of timberland of one hundred and twenty acres, and began the development of afarm, whereon he made his home until his removal to this county in 1853. Here he purchased six hundred acres of land, comprising the farm which is now the home of our subject. It was all wild prairie, not a furrow having been turned or an improvement made. He had started out in the world a poor boy, but ere his death had become a man of considerable property. He passed away in 1855, at the age of forty-five years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Nave, died in 1886, at the age of seventy-two.
In the Runyon family were ten children. Susanna, born in Virginia, died in Richland County. Josiah and Uriah, twins,were born in Ohio. The latter is now deceased, and the former is a farmer of Mt. Erie, Ill. George W. is living in Wayne County, Ill.; Reuben is the next younger; Lydia M. is the wife of John Totten, of Decker Township; PhoebeA. is the wife of John Spain; Samuel S., who served in the Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, is a farmer of this locality; James K. Polk, who enlisted at the age of seventeen and served for three years in the late war, is now an agriculturist of Wayne County. The parents of this family were members of the Lutheran Church and were highly-respected citizens.
In his native State, Mr. Runyon, our subject, attended the public schools and the academy of Hillsboro. At the age of thirteen he came with his parents to Illinois, driving a team. He aided in the development of the home farm until his father's death, which occurred when he was only fifteen years of age. A tract of wild land then came to him as his share of the estate. Before he was twenty he had planted a good orchard upon it, the first on the prairie, and to fruit-growing he devoted his energies during the summer months, while in the winter season he taughtschool in this neighborhood for fourteen years. In addition he also discharged his official duties. When a young man of twenty-one he was elected Assessor and has held that office for sixteen terms. He also served two terms as Supervisor, and in 1880 was Census Enumerator. Since attaining to man's estate he has been prominent in publicand official life, and the community recognizes in him one of its most valued citizens. He still owns ninety-six acres of the home farm, upon which is a five-acre peach orchard, and he has the place under a high state of cultivation and improvement.
On the 14th of July, 1867, Mr. Runyon married Sarah A. Jonachan, a native of Highland County, Ohio, and unto them have been born three children. Jason S., born June 5, 1869, aids his father in the operation of the home farm; Alice is the wife of John Collins, a farmer of this township; Albert R., born in 1882, completes the family. On matters of national importance, Mr. Runyon supports the Democratic party, but is independent in local politics.His wife is a member of the United Brethren Church. He manifested his loyalty to his country during the late war by offering his services to the Government, but as the quota was filled the company which he joined was disbanded. He is a man of sterling worth and strict integrity, and his honorable, upright life has gained for him high regard. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.279 - Submitted by Judy Edwards
 

ALBERT RATCLIFF was born in Olney, Richland Co., Ill., August 7, 1845, and is the oldest of nine children born to Thomas and Catharine H. (Ranstead) Ratcliff. Albert Ratcliff, the subject, received a good education at the common and select schools of Olney. February 26, 1864 he enlisted in Company B, Ninety Eighth Illinois (Mounted) Infantry, which formed a part of the famous Gen. Wild­er's Brigade. He served with his regiment in all its marches and engagements until the close of the war, being mustered out with the regiment at Nashville, Tenn., September 8, 1865. He participated in the battles of Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, Selma, Ala., as well as many other lesser engagements. After his return from the army he attended school for a time, and then learned the blacksmiths' trade, which he has followed ever since. In 1878 he engaged in the manufacture of mill picks, at Olney. III., in connection with following his trade. At this he is and has been doing an extensive business. In 1879 he discovered a new process of working and tempering steel, which gave him a decided advantage over other pick manufacturers. His pick became very popular with mill men generally, and finds a market in almost every State and Territory in the Union. Mr. Ratcliff was married October 28, 1866, to Emma Flowers, a native of New Richmond, Clermont Co., Ohio. Eight children have blessed their union, six of whom are yet living. Mrs. Ratcliff died March 25, 1883. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; Mr. Ratcliff is also a member of the same church. He is also a member of the I. O. M. A., and of the G. A. R. In politics he is a Republican, and is one of the old settlers and prominent business men of the city and county. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


THOMAS RATCLIFF was born in Kent County, England, April 8,1824, and is the seventh of thirteen children born to William and Mary A. (Miller) Ratcliff, both natives of England. William Ratcliff received an ordinary common school education in his native land, where he was also married, and where he engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years. In 1830 he emigrated to the United States with his family, first settling at Buffalo, N. Y., where he was employed at plastering for two years. In 1833, he removed to Richland County, Ohio, where he bought a farm, and was engaged in farming, in connection with his trade of plastering, for about four years. In 1837 he came to what is now Olney Township, Richland Co., Ill., where he entered 160 acres of land upon which he erected a log house, which he subsequently improved, and upon which he resided until his death, which occurred November 9, 1868. Thomas Ratcliff, our subject, received a common school education in youth and was employed on his father's farm until he was eighteen years old, when he went to learn the blacksmiths' trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years. He then went into partnership with the man with whom he learned his trade, at Olney, Ill., and after one year bought him out. He continued to follow the trade in connection with the manufacture of wagons and plows and general repairing, for some twenty five years. He then engaged in the sale of wagons, agricultural machinery and implements at Olney, and at which he has since been doing an extensive business. Mr. Ratcliff has been a member of the Board of County Supervisors for several terms; has also held the office of Alderman of the city, and director of the city schools, and is at present one of the directors of the First National Bank of Olney, having been a stockholder in that corporation ever since its organization. He was married on September 19, 1844, to Catharine H. Ranstead, a native of Vigo County, Ind. Nine children have been born to them, eight of whom are living. Mrs. Ratcliff is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics Mr. Ratcliff is a Republican, and is one of the early settlers and prominent business men of the city and county. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


LLOYD RAWLINGS (deceased) was born in Ohio on June 10, 1803, and died on September 26, 1883 At an early day he came to Lawrence County, III., which at that time comprehended the eastern portion of Richland County. On August 20, 1828, he was married to Matilda Ruark, who was born December 30, 1813, in Indiana. To them were born twelve children, nine of whom survive, viz.: Mary J. (now Mrs. Johnson); Shadrach, farmer; Elizabeth (now Mrs. James Callon); Melinda (now Mrs. W. Proctor); Maria (now Mrs.. K. Eggler); Samuel, now a practicing physician at New Harmony, Ind.; George, farmer; Joseph, in Colorado, mining; Levi, living at the homestead and managing the farm. Their sons, John, George, and Shadrach served in the army during the late war. John died on November 27, 1867. Mr. Rawlings' married life extended over the space of fifty five years, two months and ten days. His widow still survives him. Since 1839 he had been a worthy and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; was an affectionate husband, a kind father, and honest and upright in all his dealings. The first sermon preached in this section of the country was listened to in his log cabin on Calhoun Prairie. In April, 1849, Mr. Rawlings, with eleven others, from Richland County, went the overland route to California. While there, and while he and a companion were deer hunting, he, being temporarily separated from his companion, was attacked by a full grown, savage grizzly bear. The bear came upon him so suddenly that he knocked his gun out of his hand with his paw, and seizing Mr. Rawlings' head in his mouth, proceeded unceremoniously to reduce it to a pulp. With Mr. Rawlings it was a life and death struggle. In the meantime he was calling for help from his absent companion, who, hearing his cry of distress, rushed upon the scene, killed the bear, and saved him. Mr. Rawlings carried the marks of this struggle to the grave, but outlived his rescuer by twenty years. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


HON. ELBERT ROWLAND, M. D., was born in New York City, April 28,1832, and is eldest of eleven children born to Townsend H. and Eliza (Sands) Rowland, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere. Elbert was educated in a log cabin in this county, as his father moved here in 1840. Our subject, by close application, has acquired a practical education since he reached manhood; and he is an extensive reader and well posted in history, as well as the cur­rent literature of the day. In 1855, he began studying medicine, with Dr. J. L. Flanders, of Olive, Lawrence Co., Ill. After two years here, in 1857, he attended the New York Medical College, graduating from the Department of Chemistry in 1858, and from the Medical Department one year later. Dr. Rowland then began prac­ticing in New York City, where he remained until 1861, when he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the One Hundred and Twenty-Seventh Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry. He remained until 1864, when he resigned his position in the army and came to Olney. During the last year of his service in the army he was Acting Surgeon. Since 1864 he has lived in Olney, and has enjoyed an extensive practice. The Doctor was married, January 23, 1862, to Kate D. Mallary, a native of New York City. Five children, two sons and three daughters, bless this marriage. Dr. Rowland is not a member of the church; he belongs to Olney Lodge, No. 140, A. F. & A. M., Richland Chapter, No. 38, R. A. M., Olney Council, No. 55, R. & S. M., Gorin Commandery, No. 14, K. T., and the G. A. R.r Olney Post, No. 92, of which he is at present Surgeon. He is a Dem­ocrat; was chairman of the Central Committee, of this county, for seventeen years, and in 1882 was elected to the lower branch of the State Legislature, receiving a clear majority of 1,219 votes. The Doctor is a member of the Board of Censors, of the College of Phy­sicians and Surgeons, at Evansville, Ind., is Health Officer for this city, President of the Board of Examining Surgeons for the Pension Department, and in 1880 was on the committee to examine candi­dates for West Point cadetship. He is an excellent debater, clear, precise and forcible. The Doctor is a pioneer of Richland County, ranks high in his profession, and is respected by all his acquaintances.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]



HON. ELBERT ROWLAND, M. D. has won a prominent place in political, professional and social circles of Richland Country. He now resides in Olney and is a representative of one of its honored pioneer families. He was born in New York City, April 23, 1832, and is a son of Townsend and Eliza (Sands) Rowland. With his father he came to Illinois in November, 1840, being then a lad of only eight summers. The family settled in what is now Bon pas Township, where the father entered land from the Government and began the development of a farm.
Elbert was educated in a log-cabin school, and was reared to manhood amid the wild scenes of frontier life. He remained at home with his parents until seventeen years of age, and then began clerking in a grocery store. He then traveled for a year and a-half, after which he entered upon the study of medicine, completing his education in that line after a two-years course in New York. He was graduated in the Class of '58 from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, after which he opened an office and practiced in his native city until the breaking out of the war. When the Union was in danger and his country needed his services, he responded to the call for aid, in August, 1862, and became First Assistant Surgeon of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York Infantry. He was Acting-Surgeon of the regiment most of the time. In June, 1864, he was attached to the Army of the Potomac, with which he served until the close of the war.
When the war was over Dr. Rowland came to Illinois, locating in Noble, Richland County, where he engaged in the practice of his profession for fifteen years. He then came to Olney, where he has since resided. He belongs to the Centennial Medical Society, and to the County Medical Society, of which he was Chairman twenty-one years. The Doctor ranks high in his profession, and his skill and ability are acknowledged by a large and constantly increasing practice.
In his political affiliations the Doctor is a Democrat. He served as a member of the Thirty -third General Assembly of Illinois, to which he was elected by a majority of twelve hundred and sixty-two. He received the unanimous vote of the convention to which he was nominated, and was then elected by a very flattering majority, as has been seen. His great personal popularity and the confidence and high regard reposed in him by his fellow-citizens are shown by the fact that this was the first time the District ever went so strongly Democratic.
On the 23d of January, 1862, in Bridgeport, Conn., Dr. Rowland married Miss Kate Mallary, only daughter of Sherman Mallary, a real-estate dealer of New York. The lady is a native of Stanford County, Conn. Five children have been born of their union: Kate, wife of A. B. Roberts, a lawyer of St. Paul, Minn.; Theresa, wife of E. E. Edwards, of Evanston, Ill.; Charles T., a druggist; Edna and Elbert. The mother of this family was called to her final rest June 7, 1891. She was a member of the Swedenborgian Church, to which the Doctor and his daughter also belong.
Dr. Rowland is a public-spirited and progressive citizen, and takes an active interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community and its upbuilding. The cause of education finds in him a warm friend, and for twenty-one years he served in an efficient manner as School Director. He is now serving as Health Officer, a position he has filled for twelve years. The Doctor was the organizer of the United States Board of Pension Examiners, and was its President for three years. Socially he is a member of Olney Lodge No. 140, A. F. & A. M.; Richland Chapter No. 38, R. A. M.; and the Council. He also holds membership with the Grand Army of the Republic. He has been engaged in the active practice of his profession in this county since September, 1864, and has worked his way steadily upward until he now holds a rank among his professional brethren of which he may well be proud. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.289 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


JOHN C. RUSH was born in Hastings, Barry Co., Mich., June 28, 1838, and is the younger of two children born to Henry H. and Christina (Snell) Rush, the former a native of Hamilton and the latter of Darke County, Ohio, and of German descent. Henry H. Rush received his early education in his native county, where in early life he learned the gunsmith and blacksmith trades. In 1837 he removed to Hastings, Mich., where he followed his trade for a short time, and in 1839 he went to Darke County, Ohio, where he edited a Whig paper for several years. In 1855 he came to Olney, Ill., where lie has since lived a retired life. He is a member of the Baptist Church, in which church he has been a minister for over forty years. He is also a member of the Masonic Fraternity. John C-Rush, the subject, received a fair common school education in his youth. At the age of eighteen he went to learn the bakers' trade, serving an apprenticeship of four years. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company F, Eighth Indiana Infantry, for the three months service, and served with that regiment until the expiration of its term of service. In the spring of 1862, he again enlisted in Company A, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, and was appointed Sergeant at the organization of his Company. With this regiment he served in all its marches and engagements until July 30, 1864, when he was taken prisoner, being surrendered by Gen. Stoneman. He was confined in the Andersonville prison until the spring of 1865, when he was removed to Florence, S. C., thence, with others, further north, with the hope of keeping them out of the way of Gen. Sherman's army. Finally, they were paroled at Goldsborough, N. C. He was then a mere skeleton, weighing only from sixty five to seventy pounds, and unable to walk. When he reached home his parents did not recognize him. He was mustered out with his regiment at Indianapolis.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
  

ELI C ROBERTS was born September 19, 1817, in Sullivan County, N. Y., was reared in Ontario County, and was the son of Hezekiah and Hannah (Clason) Roberts. Hezekiah in his younger days worked at the cabinet making business, and also served in the war of 1812, but on account of ill health contracted in the service, he went to the Hot Springs to regain his strength and there died. The subject of this sketch removed to Noble County, Ind., in 1845, and there engaged in farming. In 1872, in company with his son Charles, he came to Richland County, EL, there bought his farm of 157 acres, and then returned to Indiana. In the following year he returned, bringing his family. Here they have since resided. His farm has been improved with a comfortable house built in 1879, at a cost of $1,200, and a barn built in 1877, costing about $800. He has also planted about four acres of orchard. He was married in 1847 to Abigail Allen, he was born January 15,1828, in Vermont, and died in 1859. They had five children, four living, all sons. His second marriage took place in the fall of 1861, to Elizabeth Miller. She was born in Ohio, and died in 1867, aged thirty years, and his third marriage was in 1868, to Sarah Miller. She was born July 23, 1845, in Ohio. They had four children, three living, two sons and one daughter. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

T. J. ROUSH was born in Richland County, Ohio, on August 29, 1841, and when a child came with his parents to Richland County, Ill. Here he received his training, and assisted his father on the farm. At the breaking out of the late war, he enlisted in Company K, Twenty First Illinois Infantry, and served about three years. He participated in the battles of Corinth, Stone River, Per­ryville, and others. At the battle of Stone River he was wounded by a mini ball in the thigh. Since his return from the army he has been engaged in farming. He owns 180 acres of land, fifty acres of which are improved. In March, 1865, he married Elizabeth E. Key, of Fairview. Five children have been born to them, viz.: George, Mattie, Luella, Ada and Chester. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


SHADRACH RAWLINGS was born January 3,1835, in Olney Township, and is the eldest son of the late Lloyd Rawlings, who was one of the earliest settlers of this county. Shadrach enlisted in 1862 in Company H, One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois Infantry, and served to the end of the war. He participated in the battles of Vicksburg, Champion Hill, and Magnolia Hills; he was taken prisoner at Mansfield, La., was confined in prison at Tyler, Texas, fourteen months, was then paroled, and returned home, having been promoted to Corporal. He has since been engaged in farming. He was married, May 8, 1856, to Rachel E. Bell, a native of Guernsey County, Ohio. She died in 1869, aged thirty five years, leaving four children, Sarah C (now Mrs. Berry); Mary M.. (now Mrs. Whitmer); Eva B. and Charles E. Rose Ida, wife of Mr. Newton, died in February, 1882, aged eighteen years; John A. died in infancy. His second marriage, in 1870, was to Mary J. Miszer, of Stark County, Ohio. They have two children, Jonathan R. and Mary J. Mr. Rawlings has been school director since his return from the army. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]

 
DAVID L. M. RICHARDSON was born May 7, 1836, in Perry County, Penn., and was the son of Joseph Richardson who was born in England. Joseph emigrated to America in 1810, settled in Pennsylvania, engaged in farming, and died in the spring of 1882, in his eighty third year. David L. M. moved to Highland County, Ohio, in 1853, and there engaged at farming. On June 21, 1857, he came to Richland County, and settled in Claremont Township. Here he owns one hundred acres of land where he now resides. Mr. Rich­ardson enlisted April 17, 1861, and was mustered into the service at Springfield Ill., April 21, in Company D, Eighth Illinois Infantry. Ex-Governor Oglesby was Colonel of this regiment. Mr. Richardson is with one exception the only resident soldier who enlisted from this county at the breaking out of the war on the call of President Lincoln for 75,000 men for three months. He, after serving this enlistment, at once re-enlisted in the call for 300,000 men for three years' service. His second enlistment was at Cairo, Ill. He participated in the battles of Fort Henry, Tenn., Fort Donelson, Shiloh, and there received a wound in his right thigh by a limb falling from a tree, of Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Miss., Champion Hill, charge at Vicksburg, and there received a severe wound in the right shoulder. He was then transferred to a company in the veteran reserve corps by special orders, and was mustered out as Corporal at the close of his service. He was married in 1867 to Susanna C. Miller. She was born in Switzerland, and at the age of five years came with, her parents to America. They have four children, two sons and two daughters. He is a member of the G. A. R. and A. O. U. W., and a member of the Christian Church. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]
 

JAMES I. RICHEY, live stock dealer, is a native of Blount County, Tenn., and was born May 5, 1847; a son of James H. and Matilda (Adams) Richey, Tennesseeans, of Scotch and English descent respectively. James H. was educated and married in his native State, and farmed until 1851, when he went to Crawford County, Ill. In 1865 he came to Denver Township, in this county, and lived there till his death, on November 13, 1876. He and wife were Presbyterians, and he was an elder for over thirty years in that body, and belonged to the I. O. O. F. His wife died August 27, 1879. Her father, Isom Adams, was cousin of John Q. Adams. James I. received a limited education, but by his exertions acquired a good business education. He worked upon his father's farm until his thirtieth year, and in 1878 was elected Sheriff of this county, and was re-elected in 1880, serving in all four years. Since 1882 he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits, in which he is succeeding. He is also dealing in live stock in this county. On August 8, 1878, Mr. Richey was married to Emma E. Younge, a native of Indiana, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Richey belongs to the several Masonic bodies of Olney, viz.: A. F. & A. M., R. C M., R. & S. M., K. T., and K. of P. In politics he is a firm Democrat. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


CAPTAIN WILLIAM RHODE, clothing, was born in Germany, December 6, 1834, and is the fifth of six children born to Conrad and Anna C. (Yackel) Rhode, natives of Germany. Conrad was born January 10, 1796; was educated and married in Germany, and followed the wagon makers' trade until he died, on May 19, 1866. At the age of sixteen he entered the Prussian army, and served for eight years, which included the wars with Napoleon I. He was with those who occupied Paris in 1813. He served as Tax Collector and President of the Council of the village. These offices have never gone out of the family since, and are now held by his eldest son, Christian H. He and wife belonged to the Lutheran Church, for which body he had filled various official positions. William received a good education in the Fatherland, and at the age of sixteen, in 1851, emigrated to the United States, going first to Sandusky, Ohio. He learned the trade of cabinet making, and then went to Tiffin County, where he worked as salesman for three years; then was employed in the grocery and provision business in the same place for one year. October 15, 1861, he received a commission as Second Lieutenant in and helped recruit Company D, Fifty Eighth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served until his discharge, at Columbus, Ohio, January 15, 1865. In October, 1862, he was promoted First Lieutenant and Adjutant of the regiment, and in June, 1864, was made Captain, and assigned to detached service at Vicksburg, Miss. In April, 1864, he received a gold medal of honor for meritorious service, on which were inscribed Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, and Vicksburg, by order of Major General McPherson. In 1865 he came to Olney, followed the hardware business until 1877, and in 1878 engaged in the clothing business, also carrying a stock of hats, caps, boots and shoes, as well as gents' furnishing goods. He has been a Supervisor of Richland County, and for thirteen years past has been one of the Directors of Olney public schools. He married, in February, 1861, Caroline J Rauch, of Tiffin County. Five children were born to them, of whom two sons and one daughter survive. In May, 1883, Mr. Rhode visited his native land, returning in August of the same year. While he was there the medal alluded to served him as a passport to all parts of the German Empire. He belongs to the A. O. U. W., I. O. M. A., and the G. A. R.; is a Democrat in politics, and quite prominent here.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


HENRY D. RIDGELY was born on May 8, 1813, in Virginia. When a child he came to Wabash County, Ill., with his parents, and was raised there on a farm, assisting his father till the age of twenty one. He then took up the coopers' trade, which he followed for several years, after which he purchased 240 acres of land, selling it afterwards, and in 1838 coming to this section. On his arrival here he bought 160 acres of land, and during the war he owned over 1,600 acres. He has probably handled more land than any other man in the county. In 1839 he was married to Irena Harrison, who was born in Wabash County, in 1822. Ten children, eight of whom are living, hove been born to them, two sons and six daughters, as follows, to wit: Robert (now a merchant at Parkersburg, this county); John (an assistant on the farm); Sarah E., Mary (now Mrs. James Parker); Ellen (now Mrs. Talley); Hannah (now Mrs. Michaels); Nancy Ann (now Mrs. Smith); Elsie J. (now Mrs. Staninger). Mr. and Mrs. Ridgely are members of the Christian Church.  [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]


EDMUND W. RIDGWAY, M. D., was born in Harrisburg, Penn., September 29, 1812, and is the second of ten children born to Richard and Sarah (Cowall) Ridgway, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and of English and Welsh descent respectively. Richard's great-grandfather was among the Quaker colonists who landed with William Penn in 1682. He settled at Egg Harbor. Richard, father of our subject, was well educated and brought up on a farm. He went to Philadelphia, and was employed as a salesman. After a time he removed to Bradford County, there married, and ran a gristmill, in company with his brother. In 1810 he came to Harrisburg, Penn., and took a contract for manufacturing the bricks for the Pennsylvania State House. He followed brick making for many years. In 1820 he moved to Mansfield, this county, and was engaged in the same business for eighteen years. In 1838 he went to Wabash County, Ill., and bought a farm. His wife died there in 1850, and his death occurred in 1855. Edmund W. received a good education, and, when a boy, was bound out to a saddler, where he learned that trade. When his time had expired he began studying medicine in Mansfield, Ohio, and completed the course. In 1844 he attended medical lectures at Willouorhby, Ohio, and in 1846 came to Olney, and practiced here with excellent success until January, 1863, when he retired from active practice. In 1872 he received the honorary degree at the Louisville Medical College. Dr. Ridgway stands high in his profession, and his ability is acknowledged by the profes­sion. He was married in March, 1835, to Mary Carrothers, of Mans­field, Ohio. Ten children blessed this union, only four of whom, two sons and two daughters, survive. Mrs. Ridgway died May 18,1880, a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which the Doctor belongs. He is a member of Richland Lodge, No. 180, I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Republican, and very prominent in the circles in which he has moved so long. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]



EDMUND W. RIDGWAY, M. D., a physician and surgeon of Olney, who for many years has been prominent in the medical fraternity of Richland County, was born in Harrisburg, Pa., September 12, 1812. His parents were Richard and Sarah (Cowell) Ridgway, the former a native of New Jersey, and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father was of English descent, and the founders of the family in America came to this country with William Penn. There were five sons and five daughters in the Ridgway family, of whom four are now living: the Doctor; William; Eleanor, widow of David Spitler; and Sarah, widow of George Case. The father of this family spent many years of his life in brick-making, and manufactured the brick of which the State House in Harrisburg, Pa., was constructed.
In 1821 he emigrated to Richland County, Ohio, where he followed brick-making and farming until 1838, when he removed to Wabash County, Ill., spending the remainder of his life with his sons. He held to the religious belief of the Society of Friends, and died in Wabash County in 1862 at the age of eighty-two years. His wife passed away ten years previous, when sixty-two years of age. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
The history of the Ridgway family is indeed an interesting one. The first to receive advancement was Stephen Ridgway, one of the Stewards of the City of Dexter. Sir Thomas Ridgway, his son, was employed in Ireland in a military capacity under Queen Elizabeth, and planted the first Protestant colony on the Emerald Isle. He was High Sheriff of Devon in 1600, and received Knighthood at the accession of King James to the throne of England. He was elected one of the Knights of the Shire for the County of Devon in the first Parliament called by that prince, who continued to employ him in some of the highest places of trust and command in Ireland, and had him sworn in in the Privy Council. The family in this country are no doubt heirs to a large property in England, the securing of which has engaged their attention for some time, and their right to the same would be established if the record of one man could be found.
The grandfather of the Doctor was a farmer of New Jersey and reared quite a large family. He was killed on the streets of Philadelphia, at the age of fifty years, being run over by a horse and carriage. He married Jane Burr, the only sister of Aaron Burr, who was Vice-President. The maternal grandfather was a sea-captain, who probably came from Wales to this country. He died in Bedford County, Pa., where his family lived while he was on the water.
Dr. Ridgway was a lad of nine years when he went to Richland County, Ohio, where he was reared. His early education was obtained in the common subscription schools, and he later studied in Mansfield, Ohio. When a boy, he was bound out to learn the trade of saddle-making, and when his time had expired he began the study of medicine with Dr. Abraham Blymyer, with whom he completed his course. In 1844, he attended medical lectures in Willoughby, Ohio, and in 1846 he emigrated to Illinois and began practice in Richland County. In 1872, he received the honorary degree of the Louisville Medical College. Locating in Olney, he continued the practice of his profession with excellent success until 1885, when, on account of his advanced years, he retired. He had steadily worked his way upward and had gained an eminent place in professional ranks.
On the 24th of March, 1835, Dr. Ridgway wedded Miss Mary Carruthers, of Mansfield, Ohio, daughter of Samuel and Mary (Dye) Carruthers, natives of Pennsylvania. Six sons and four daughters were born unto them: Maria, John, Richard, Rebecca, William, Sarah, Edmund, George, Mary and Horace. Richard, John, Rebecca and Horace died in early childhood. Edmund and Maria grew to mature years, were married and had families, but are now deceased. Maria married Frank McHumphreys and both died, leaving a son, John, who is now a prominent lawyer in Seattle, Wash. William has been three times married. He wedded Josie Clarke, then Anna Frost, and his present wife was Miss Effie Brines. They live in Mt. Carmel, where he carries on a drug store and practices medicine. Sarah is the wife of William Bowers, a druggist of Olney, and they have two living children: Catella, wife of Ed Sebree, a railroad employe living in Denver; and Ernst. Edmund F., who died August 22, 1878, married Miss Emma Goforth, by whom he had two children: Van F. and Edmund G. George, an optician of Mansfield, Ohio, wedded Marie O'Kean, and they have three children: Lillian, Donald and George. Mary is the wife of Dr. William A. Thompson, a practicing physician of Olney, by whom she has three daughters: Edna, Sarah and Helen. Mrs. Ridgway, wife of the Doctor, died May 18, 1880, at the age of sixty-two years. She and her husband were for many years members of the Methodist Church.
The Doctor is now in his eighty-first year, but retains the vigor and youthfulness of a man in his prime. He can jump up and knock his heels together twice before touching the floor. He came to Illinois to benefit his health, which at that time was very poor, and since then he has never been known to be ill. The Doctor is one of the oldest Odd Fellows in the State, having been initiated at Mansfield, Ohio, in 1836, and he now belongs to Olney Lodge No. 180, I. O. O. F. He is a member of the Centennial Medical Society of Southern Illinois, and in politics, is a Republican. He twice voted for William Henry Harrison and twice for Benjamin Harrison, the illustrious grandson of the Tippecanoe Hero. The Republican party has ever found in him a stalwart supporter. Besides his own residence, Dr. Ridgway owns several other dwellings in Olney. Hardly any figure on the streets of this city is more familiar than that of our subject, who for almost half a century has here made his home. Prominent in professional and social circles, he has won the friendship of all with whom he has been brought in contact, and it is with pleasure that we present this record of his life to our readers.  Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.518 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


TOWNSEND H. ROWLAND was born in Long Island, N. Y., September 6, 1805, and was the second in a family of five children born to Tredwell H. and Susan (Arthur) Rowland, natives of Long Island, and of French-Irish and English-German descent, respect­ively. Tredwell H. was educated and married in his native town, and followed the carpenters' trade in New York City until his death, which occurred in 1825. During the war of 1812 he was a Lieutenant in a company of New York militia. Townsend H. received a poor education, and at sixteen years of age was apprenticed to the tailors' trade in New York City, serving for three years, and afterward fol­lowing that trade until 1832, when he was obliged to find some other employment, owing to failing health. He followed teaming, marketing and farming in the vicinity of the metropolis for six or eight years, and then moved, in 1840, to Lawrence County, in this State, farming for two years. In 1842 Mr. Rowland went to Bon-pas Township, this county, and settled on 240 acres of wild land. He erected a cabin, improved the farm, and resided there until 1865, after which he rented it and came to Olney, since which time he has not been engaged in active business. In 1826 Mr. Rowland was united in marriage to Eliza Sands, of Long Island. She has borne her husband eleven children, of whom four sons and six daughters are living. In politics he is a Democrat, and is one of our respected pioneers and valued citizens. Mr. Rowland does not belong to the church, and is very liberal in his views. [Counties of Cumberland, Jasper and Richland, Illinois: Historical and Biographical; F.A. Battey & Co, 1884]    


TOWNSEND H. ROWLAND, who is now living a retired life in Olney, has for many years been a resident of this city, and is numbered among the honored pioneers of Richland County, dating his residence here from 1840. He is a native of the Empire State, his birth having occurred on Long Island, September 6, 1805. He is of English descent and is a son of John Rowland. The days of his boyhood and youth were spent in his native State, and in early life he learned the tailor's trade, which he followed for a number of years. In fact he carried on that line of business until his removal Westward in 1840.
Before leaving the East Mr. Rowland was married to Elizabeth Sands, only daughter of Richard Sands, and a native of New York. They became the parents of ten children, six sons and four daughters, all of whom grew to mature years. The eldest is Dr. Elbert; Richard died in July, 1889; Margaret is the wife of Julian Taylor, of Princeton, Ind.; Mary is the wife of Alfred Bell, of Hopetown, Ind.; Theresa married Capt. J. I. Judy and they make their home in Lawrenceville, Ill.; Lydia became the wife of G. F. Cinter, of Jacksonville, Fla., and died in the spring of 1892; Eliza is the wife of Marion Gaddy, of Bonpas Township, Richland County; William H. married Ann Gaddy and makes his home in St. Louis; Seth D. is a lawyer engaged in practice in Francisville, Ill.; and Ann is the wife of E. S. Wilson, ex-State Treasurer of Illinois.
Mr. Rowland continued to engage in the tailoring business in New York until 1840, when he decided to seek a home and fortune in the West, and came to Richland County, Ill., and here settled.
In the year 1865, he removed to Olney, where he has since made his home. For many years he engaged in farming and was very successful in that line of business, but now at the age of eighty-seven j-ears he is living a retired life. In 1875, he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 17th of November.
In politics Mr. Rowland is a Democrat, having supported the principles of that party since casting his first Presidential ballot for Gen. Jackson. He has served as School Director for several years, and was President of the Board of Trustees for three years. While in New York he served as a member of the Board of Examiners to examine the cadets at West Point, and was a member of the Board of Directors of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, of Evansville, Ill. Before the war he was Assistant Surgeon of the militia of New York. Mr. Rowland is a self-made man. Since an early age he has been dependent upon his own resources, and the success of his life has all been achieved through his own efforts. As before stated, he is numbered among the honored pioneers of the county, having been identified with its history for more than half a century. He came here when it was almost an unbroken wilderness and has seen its great development and advancement.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.340 - Submitted by Judy Edwards

 



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