Genealogy Trails


Richland County, Illinois
Genealogy and History


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JAMES ELOT SHARP, one of the honored pioneers and representative farmers of Richland County, who owns and operates one hundred and sixty acres of fine land on sections 2 and 22, Bonpas Township, was born near Owensville, Gibson County, I and., January 15, 1833. His parents, James E. and Sarah (Risk) Sharp, were natives of Kentucky. The Sharp family is of English origin. The grandparents, Thomas and Elizabeth (Eliot) Sharp, were both natives of Maryland, but the latter was of Irish descent. In 1803 the Sharps removed to Indiana, and about five years later the Elot family also emigrated to that State.
It was in January, 1835, that the father of our subject came with his family to Richland County, Ill., locating on section 25, Madison Township, where he lived until his death, in January, 1879. Upon the farm which he purchased he found a log house and about thirty acres of cleared land. He first bought one hundred acres, but made additions to this from time to time until his landed possessions aggregated four hundred acres. His house was built in the form of a fort for protection from the Indians, but the red men never caused him and his family any trouble. Thomas Sharp was the first permanent settler in Gibson County, Ind. The Cherokee tribe then living there was at first friendly, but afterward joined Tecumseh in the war against the whites, and James Sharp, Sr., served for three months under Gen. Harrison in the War of 1812 against the Indians, being stationed at Ft. Ellison, on the present site of Vincennes, Ind. The mother of our subject died in March, 1881, in her eighty-seventh year. There were six children in the Sharp family. Perry, who died in infancy; John Wesley; Mrs. Lucinda By ford; Hiram; Mrs. Sarah J. Marshall, now deceased; and James E.
The subject of this sketch was only about two years old when the family came to Richland County. With them he experienced the hardships and trials of pioneer life, being reared amid the wild scenes of the frontier. His educational privileges were very limited, the nearest schoolhouse being three miles away. He was early inured to the arduous labor of developing a farm, as he assisted his father in clearing the laud, of which he afterward inherited one hundred and twenty acres. He afterward added to this until he was the owner of four hundred acres, two hundred acres of which he cleared and broke himself. In 1886 he sold that land and bought his present farm, which he has greatly improved, making it one of the best in the locality. He now has one hundred and ten acres under cultivation, and the remaining fifty acres are pasture and timberland. In 1890 he built a commodious and pleasant residence, which is the abode of hospitality.
Mrs. Sharp, the mistress of this home, was in her maidenhood Miss Celia J. Pullen, of Parkersburgh. She, too, was a native of Gibson County, Ind., and a daughter of William H. Pullen, who was born in Georgia. She became the wife of our subject November 11, 1856, and by their union were born nine children, of whom four died in infancy. Those living are: George W.; Charles H.; Eva A., wife of C. Walter; James T. and Leander F.
Mr. Sharp cast his first Presidential vote for Gen. Fremont, and has supported each candidate of the Republican party for the Presidency since that time. He is independent in local politics, and has never been an office-seeker. He prefers to devote his energies to his business interests, in which he has met with excellent success. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.295 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


ROBERT JASPER HENRY, a well-known farmer and highly respected citizen of Richland County, who makes his home on section 11 , Decker Township, has the honor of being a native of Illinois. He was born in Crawford County in 1852, and is a son of Robert Henry, a native of Tennessee. When his father was a young boy he left his native State and came to Illinois, where he grew to manhood and was married. In those early days the Indians were still numerous in the neighborhood and there were many hardships and trials incident to pioneer life to be endured. In 1865, when our subject was a lad of thirteen years, Mr. Henry came with his family to Richland County, and located upon the farm which is now the home of his son Robert. His last years were spent in Missouri, whither he went in the hopes of benefiting his health. His death occurred about fifteen years ago. His wife passed away in the winter of 1892. Mr. Henry followed farming throughout the greater part of his life, and also engaged in dealing in horses. He was a member of the Christian Church.
The subject of this sketch was the seventh in order of birth in a family of nine children. His entire life has been passed in Illinois. His early boyhood days were spent on a farm in Crawford County, but at length he came with his parents to this County. He was the eldest son of the family, and at the death of his father all the business cares and management of affairs fell to him. The occupation to which he was reared he makes his life work, and in connection with general farming he also engages in stock-dealing, making a specialty of the purchase and sale of horses. His fine farm comprises two hundred and eighty acres of rich land, upon which is a good orchard of twenty-five acres.
In 1880, in Decker Township, Mr. Henry was united in marriage with Miss Sarah A. Johnson, a daughter of A. V. Johnson, and a native of this county. Her entire life has been spent in the neighborhood which is still her home. Two children grace their union, a son and a daughter, Altie and Claude. Mr. and Mrs. Henry hold membership with the Union Methodist Episcopal Church, and are people of sterling worth, whose many excellencies of character have won for them an enviable position in social circles. Our subject cast his first Presidential vote for Horace Greeley, and has since been a stalwart Democrat. He has met with good success in his business career, and his good management and enterprise, supplemented by methodical business methods, have gained for him a handsome property. He is now numbered among the substantial agriculturists and highly respected citizens of the community in which he makes his home.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.297 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


PAUL WEIDNER, a prominent farmer of Denver Township, Richland County, living on section 18, and one of the substantial citizens, was born in Vanderburg County, Ind., May 22, 1846, and is one of seven children, whose parents were Adam and Catherine (Seigler) Weidner. They were both natives of Germany, and in that country their marriage was celebrated. The father was a carpenter by trade. In 1835 he came with his family to America, and in Indiana purchased wild land, from which he developed a farm, making his home thereon until 1855. He then came by wagon to Illinois, driving with him thirty-five head of sheep and twenty head of cattle. He purchased land at $4 per acre and built a double-log cabin, which is still standing. There were no improvements upon the place, but his labors soon worked a great transformation, and at his death he owned an excellent farm. At one time he owned six hundred and eighty acres of land. He began life empty-handed, but in the legitimate channels of business achieved wealth. He was a life-long Democrat and a good citizen. His wife died in 1865, and he was called to his final rest February 2, 1873. Of their family, Agnes is the wife of Jacob Rein hard, who occupies the old homestead in Indiana; Sarah is the wife of Mr. Kipling, of Noble Township; Philip runs a carriage factory in Salem Springs, Ill.; Mary is the wife of Jo Klinger, of Clay County; Mrs. Margaret Negley is living in Denver Township; Adam is a farmer of Comanche County, Tex.; and Paul completes the family.
Our subject was only ten years of age when he came to Illinois. As soon as he was old enough to manage the plow, he began work in the fields, and has since been engaged in farm labor. He took an active part in clearing and opening up his present farm, upon which he has lived since his boyhood. On the 5th of April, 1866, in Denver Township, he was united in marriage with Miss Sallie Dash, who was born in Indiana, April 20, 1849, and is a daughter of Adam Dash, a native of Germany. They have four children. John, born May 6, 1867, married Annie Ament and is a farmer of Denver Township; Adam, born June 15, 1869, is married; Rachel, born February 5, 1871, died October 9, 1875; George, horn October 2, 1872, died October 29, 1872; Joseph, born May 1, 1875, is at home; Paul Edward, born September 9, 1882, died March 27, 1883; and Dora M. was born August 18, 1889.
The Weidner family has a fine home situated on an excellent farm of three hundred and eighty-seven acres. In addition to the pleasant residence, there are good barns and outbuildings, and all the modern improvements and equipments which go to make up a model farm of the nineteenth century. Mr. Weidner is a man of excellent business ability and has now become a wealthy citizen, owing to his good management, enterprise and industry. In 1868 he cast his first Presidential vote and he supported the Democratic party until 1892, when he voted for Gen. Weaver. He is a man of firm convictions, unwavering in his support of what he believes to be right. His business career has been a straightforward and honorable one, and in all the relations of life he has gained the confidence and good-will of all with whom he has been brought in contact. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.297 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



WILLIAM B. TOLLIVER, who carries on agricultural pursuits on section 32, Denver Township, has lived in Richland County since 1861, and in the third of a century which has since passed has been prominently connected with the upbuilding and development of the community in which he makes his home. He was born in Lawrence County, Ind., February 12, 1839. Tradition says that two brothers from England crossed the Atlantic, settled in North Carolina, and were the founders of the family in America. Both the grandfathers of our subject were natives of that State. Jesse Tolliver was a large land and slave-holder there.
Allen Tolliver, father of our subject, was born in North Carolina in 1803, and grew to manhood on a plantation. In 1824, he emigrated to Indiana, where he made a claim and developed a good farm in the midst of the forest. He owned large tracts of land in Illinois and the Hoosier State, but died on the old homestead in Indiana, after having gained a fortune to leave to his family. He married Susan Finger, a lady of German descent, who died in 1847. His death occurred February 21, 1891. He was a man who had the respect of all who knew him and lived an honorable, upright life. With one exception the twelve children are all living. Frances is the wife of Abraham Davis, of southwestern Missouri; John is an extensive landowner of Lawrence County, Ind.; Jesse is living in Noble, Ill.; Joseph served in the Confederate army, and is now a farmer of Arlington, Tex.; William is the next younger; Jacob is a successful farmer of Richland County; George is living on a farm near Noble; Riley, one of the boys in blue, makes his home in Washington; Kate, Mrs. Field, lives in Oklahoma. After the death of his first wife, Mr. Tolliver married Mahala Laswull, who is now living in Denver Township at the age of eighty-two years. She became the mother of two children: Henry, a farmer of this county; and Susan, now deceased.
The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood in a log cabin and upon a farm covered with rocks and stumps. Many hours of his youth were spent in clearing these away. On attaining his majority he left home to begin life for himself. In November, 1859, he came to Illinois, and, purchasing a team, operated a rented farm in Jasper County for two years. In the fall of 1861 he came to Richland County and bought one hundred and twenty acres of land, upon which he has since resided. He now owns one hundred and forty acres of well-improved and highly cultivated land, and is successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits.
In March, 1863, Mr. Tolliver married Rebecca J., daughter of Moses and Rachel Hawkins, who located in Jasper County in 1852. Mrs. Tolliver was born in Jefferson County, Ind. To her husband she has proved a faithful helpmate and not a little of his success in life is due to her aid. She has become the mother of six children, but only two are living; Allen D. died when nine, and Avery J. died when six years of age; Cora E., who was a successful teacher of the county, is now the wife of Albert Slack, a farmer and carpenter of Jasper County; Charles G. aids in the operation of the home farm.
For many years Mr. and Mrs. Tolliver have been members of the Baptist Church, in the work of which they take an active interest. He has served as a member of the County Board of Supervisors for two years, has been School Trustee and Highway Commissioner. His first Presidential vote was cast for Abraham Lincoln, and since that time he has usually supported the Republican party. His duties of citizenship are ever faithfully performed and he is alike true to every public and private trust. His true worth and ability have made him a valued member of society and have won him high respect. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.309 - submited by Judy Edward


MICHAEL GALLAGHER, a prominent farmer and representative citizen of Decker Township, Richland County, whose home is on section 11, is a native of the Emerald his birth having occurred in West Meath County, Ireland, in 1823. His father, James Gallagher, spent his entire life in that county, and in pursuit of fortune followed the occupation of fanning. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name of Elizabeth Riley. and was also a native of the same locality. They had a family of nine children, of whom three sons came to America.
At the age of seventeen years, Michael Gallagher crossed the Atlantic. He was accompanied by his mother, sister Marcella and brother Patrick. They sailed from Liverpool, and after a pleasant voyage of eight weeks landed at New Orleans, whence they made their way by boat to Evansville, Ind., joining John Gallagher, brother of our subject, who had preceded them to the New World. Michael worked on the railroad for a year, and then with the money which he had saved purchased in 1854 forty acres of land, the nucleus of his present farm. The mother lived with her children until her death, and was buried on the homestead of our subject.
Mr. Gallagher had very limited educational privileges, and his advantages in other directions were almost as meagre. He early learned hard work, however, and thereby developed a self-reliance and force of character that have proven of incalculable benefit to him in his later years. After locating upon his farm he practiced an economical and thrifty course of living, and the industry and enterprise which have characterized his entire career marked his efforts. In that way his financial resources were increased, and from time to time he added to his landed possessions until his farm now comprises two hundred and forty-three acres of valuable land, which yields to him a golden tribute in return for the care and labor he bestows upon it. He has also given land to his children.
In 1858 Mr. Gallagher married Libby Hughes, who was born in Decker Township, as was her father, John Hughes. Her mother, whose maiden name was Mandy Morris, was a native of Kentucky. Eight children have been born to our subject and his wife: Joseph, Jesse and George, who are farmers of Richland County; Michael at home; Thomas at home; Mandy, wife of John Williams, of Wayne County; Lydia, wife of William O. Donnell, of this county; and Libby A., who is still under the parental roof. The children were all born and reared on the home farm and have received good educational advantages, which have thus fitted them for the practical duties of life.
Mr. and Mrs. Gallagher are active and faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics, he has been a stanch Democrat since casting his first vote for James Buchanan. Thirty nine years have passed since Mr. Gallagher came to Richland County, and his long residence here has made him one of its respected and valued citizens. He has aided greatly in the development and upbuilding of the county and with its history his life is inseparably connected. Mr. Gallagher need never regret his emigration to America, for he has here found a good home and many warm friends.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.313 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



ABEL RIDGELY, a well-known farmer and stock-raiser, residing in Richland County, claims Illinois as the State of his nativity. He was born in Wabash County, February 16, 1820, and is the eldest of fifteen children whose parents were William and Hannah H. (Simmons) Ridgely. The father was a native of Maryland, and probably was of Scotch descent. At a very early age he was left an orphan. He became a ship carpenter at Baltimore, but in March, 1817, came to Illinois and settled near Mt. Carmel, a pioneer of that locality. His wife was born in the Empire State, and was a daughter of Stephen Simmons, who when a small boy emigrated from his native England to America. At the age of fifteen, he entered the Colonial army, and for meritorious conduct in the struggle for independence was promoted to the rank of Colonel. William Ridgely assisted .Stephen Simmons to build the first vessel ever constructed in Portsmouth, Ohio. The parents of our subject came to Illinois on a keel-boat, landing at old Palmyra, a place not now in existence. The members of the Ridgely family were William H., Henry D., Lloyd G., Orrick, Abel, Absalom, Mrs. Eliza L. Greenhood, Mrs. Orenda Harrison, Mrs. Henrietta Parker, Charles and Nicholas (twins), Medad, Samuel, Maria, and one who died at birth.
The subject of this sketch received but limited educational privileges. At the age of twenty -six he left home and began working at the carpenter's trade. In January, 1852, he married Lizzie L. Clodfelter, of Edwards County, Ill., and they became parents of four children: George A., William S., Alice L. (wife of William Martin), and Edwin A. The mother of this family died about 1862, and later Mr. Ridgely wedded Phoebe Ades, by whom he had a daughter, Lizzie L. The second wife died in 1873. On the 18th of October, 1882, he married Mrs. Mary C. Bland, of Edwards County. By her first husband, L. H. Bland, she had five children: Mrs. Eva Wyatt, Lloyd, Bessie, Wade and Mary.
In 1864, Mr. Ridgely arrived in this county. Locating in Olney, he built a hardware store, which he carried on for a few years. About 1865, he bought his present farm, and it has since been his home. At one time he owned seven hundred acres of land, but much of this he has given to his children. For many years he raised the largest and best crops of wheat grown by any farmer in this part of the country, but as he has disposed of much of his land, his crops are consequently smaller, but none the less excellent in quality. His farm is well equipped with good buildings and other improvements, and comprises some of the best land in the county. In December, 1892, his fine home was destroyed by fire, but with characteristic energy he has begun to rebuild. For several years after coining to this county, Mr. Ridgely also dealt in farming implements, and before his arrival he traveled for several years selling fanning-mills.
In politics Mr. Ridgely is a Republican, but has never been an office-seeker. He and most of his family, are members of the Christian Church. The cause of education finds in him a friend, and he takes an active interest in all that pertains to the welfare of the community and its upbuilding. We see in our subject a self-made man, who began life empty-handed, yet has worked his way upward, until he is now one of the most prosperous citizens of the county. Before he was ten years old, he earned a half-shilling by chopping wood for his grandfather, and to this little nucleus he kept adding until he had $200 when he became of age. His indefatigable industry and good management have been the factors in his success. He has never undertaken any business enterprise in which he did not succeed. Although he has carried on business amounting to many thousand dollars annually, he has never owed any man a dollar which he was not prepared to pay on demand, a fact of which he may well be proud. His whole career has been marked by the strictest integrity and honor, and he has won universal confidence and high regard.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.316 - Submitted by Judy Edwards


JOHN J. FAUSNACHT, a popular and leading farmer of Noble Township, Richland County, living on section 12, traces his ancestry to one of the Revolutionary heroes. His great-grandfather, Jacob Fausnacht, emigrated to the New World from his native Germany, and aided the Colonies in their struggle for independence. At the battle of Brandywine, he was taken prisoner and was nearly starved by the British. After the war he lived in Pennsylvania, where he followed farming. The grandfather, John Fausnacht. was born in Berks County, Pa., and became a pioneer settler of Stark County, Ohio, where, in the midst of the forest, he hewed out a farm, which is still in the family. He married a Miss H inkle, and both died in the Buckeye State.
Israel Fausnacht, father of our subject, was born in Berks County, Pa., about 1818, and when eight years old went with his parents to Ohio, being reared amid the wild scenes of the frontier. He spent his life on the old homestead and died in 1874. He was a successful business man, prominent in local politics, and supporting the Democratic party, although he was never an office-seeker. He married Elizabeth Ebie, a native of Virginia, and unto them were born five children: John; Peter, a farmer of Stark County, Ohio, where Christina, George and Mrs. Susan Stichler also live. The mother died when our subject was twelve years old, and Mr. Fausnacht then married Catherine Ebie, a sister of his first wife, by whom he had six children: lira. Lydia Wastler, Uriah, Washington, Daniel, Lizzie and Amanda.
On the 24th of February, 1828, in Stark County, Ohio, our subject's birth occurred. On the homestead farm he was reared to manhood, and when quite young he began work in the fields. He could attend school but irregularly, yet acquired a good education, and is now a well-informed man. At the age of sixteen he began to earn his own livelihood by working as a fireman on the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad. When eighteen years of age he returned to the farm and offered his services to the Government for the late war, but was rejected on account of his breastbone being broken.
On attaining his majority, Mr. Fausnacht began farming for himself on rented land. As a companion and helpmate on life's journey, he chose Miss Mary Cordier, and their wedding was celebrated March 25, 1858. She is a native of Stark County, and a daughter of Charles and Frances (France) Cordier, the former born in Germany, and the latter in France. Our subject rented his grandfather's farm until the spring of 1866, when he started for Missouri, but, stopping in Richland County to visit relatives, he bought land in Olney Township, and has since lived in this locality. In 1874 he purchased his present farm, on which was a log stable and a log cabin, 16x16 feet, while about twenty acres had been cleared. He at once began to plow and plant the land, and now has one of the best farms in the county, comprising one hundred and sixty-seven acres of valuable land. For twenty-one years he has engaged Hi threshing.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fausnacht were born nine children. Elijah, born in Stark County, Ohio, March 5, 1859, is section foreman on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad at Flora, and married Sarah Lewis; Phoebe, born September 1, 1861, is the wife of Lawrence Fishel, a farmer of Olney Township; Clara, born January 18, 1864, is the wife of Joseph Newman, a farmer and ranchman of Garfield County, Colo.; Ann Amelia and Ann Augusta are both deceased; Maggie, born in 1870, is the wife of Frank Newman, of Garfield County, Colo.; Josie, born in 1875, Lewis, born March 23, 1877, and Israel, born January 3, 1881, are at home. The children have been provided with good educational advantages and the family is one of which the parents may well be proud.
Mr. Fausnacht is a supporter of the Republican party. He cast his first vote for Gen. Garfield, the two having both been reared in the same neighborhood. When young men they were well acquainted. Our subject has been a great reader along the line of political questions, history and church work. Himself and wife are members of the Dunkard Church and are zealous workers in its interest. For eight consecutive years he has served as School Director. He has lived an upright, honorable life, at peace with all men and has never had a law suit. He has many friends and no enemies, and the high regard in which he is held is well merited.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.318 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



FRANKLIN PERRY WOODEN, who carries on general farming on section 23, Bonpas Township, Richland County, and who is one of the honored veterans of the late war, was born on the 16th of January, 1829, near Bloomington, Ind. His father, Solomon Wooden, was a native of Baltimore, Md. After attaining to man's estate, he was united in marriage with Miss Ellen Hill, who was born in Kentucky. Her parents, however, came from Old Salem, N. C. In a very early day Solomon Wooden and his wife took up their residence in Monroe County, Ind., and upon the farm where they first located they made their home until their deaths, which occurred at very advanced ages.
Franklin Wooden lived on the old homestead farm until about twenty years of age, and at intervals attended the subscription schools. In 1849 he left the parental roof to seek a home and fortune in Richland County, Ill. He located first on section 4, Bonpas Township, a farm which had been partly improved, and continued its cultivation until 1860, when he sold out and bought his present farm on section 23 of the same township. Only about six acres of the land had been cleared at that time, and a log cabin was the only improvement upon the place, but with characteristic energy he began the work of development. He labored early and late, and in course of time the land which he plowed and planted yielded to him a golden tribute in return for the care and labor he bestowed upon it. He now owns one hundred and sixty acres, one hundred and twenty of which are under a high state of cultivation. It is one of the test farms in the county, being improved with excellent buildings, good fences and all the accessories of a model farm.
On the 17th of January, 1850, Mr. Wooden was united in marriage with Martha J., daughter of David Gaddy, one of the early settlers of Lawrence County, Ill. Six children graced their union, namely: Mrs. Elizabeth Richards; Francis M.; Winnie, who died in infancy; Mrs. Susan Joseph; David, a physician of Grayville, Ill.; and George, who completes the family.
Mr. Wooden manifested his loyalty to the Union during the late war by enlisting in October, 1861, as one of the boys in blue of Company E, Sixth Illinois Cavalry. He was mostly engaged in scouting duty, and on the 5th of January, 1865, he received an honorable discharge. He took part in Gen. Grayson's expedition from La Grange, Tenn., to Baton Rouge, La., during which they were in the saddle most of the time for seventeen days and nights. This raid was made by about seven hundred men, detachments from the Sixth and Seventh Regiments of Illinois Cavalry. Many interesting incidents occurred during that expedition. From Baton Rouge the troops went to Port Hudson, where Mr. Wooden was taken prisoner, June 21, 1863. For eighteen days he was in Libby Prison, and then was exchanged and rejoined his regiment in Tennessee. For fifty-two days he was in front of Hood's army about Nashville. Though he saw much arduous service he escaped without wounds. He is now a member of New Calhoun Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. Mr. Wooden was a faithful soldier, ever found at his post of duty, and has been alike true as a citizen in times of peace. He cast his first Presidential vote for Franklin Pierce, and has since been a supporter of the Democracy.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.320 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



JOHN HAWKINS, a prominent young farmer residing on section 5, Decker Township, Richland County, has spent nearly his entire life in this locality, and is widely and favorably known. His birth, however, occurred in Gibson County, Ind., in 1851, and in the home of Samuel and Margaret (Montgomery) Hawkins, his parents, his boyhood days were passed. In the summer months he aided in the labors of the farm, and for about three months during the winter season he attended the subscription and public schools, in which way he gained a fair knowledge of the English brandies. When a youth of fourteen summers the family came to Illinois and located upon a farm, which has since been the home of our subject. The place was then wild and unimproved, but it is now one of the richest tracts of land in the community. At the age of twenty our subject assumed the management of the old homestead.

In September, 1872, in Bon pas Township, Mr. Hawkins married Miss Lillie Dole, who was born in New York, but when a child went to Hamilton, Ind., with her parents, Edward and Elizabeth (Acker) Dole. Her father was a native of England, but her mother was born in Virginia. After four years' residence in the Hoosier State, they removed with their family to Frankfort, Ky. Since his marriage Mr. Hawkins has resided upon the home farm, where he now owns one hundred acres of valuable land. Of this, ten acres is an orchard, and it is but one of the many excellent improvements upon the place.

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Hawkins has been blessed with three sons, Wilbur, Harry and Freddie, and the family circle yet remains unbroken, the children being still under the parental roof. The parents hold membership with the United Brethren Church. They give of their time and means to church work and the cause of Christianity finds in them able advocates. Mr. Hawkins is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Noble, and his wife is connected with the Rebecca Lodge. For six years he has served as Commissioner of Highways, and his repeated reelections are excellent evidence of the faithfulness and fidelity with which he discharged his official duties. In politics, he manifests considerable interest. His first Presidential vote was cast for Samuel J. Tilden, and he has since affiliated with the Democracy. He has served as Central Committeeman of this township. For twenty-eight years his home has been in Richland County, and he is well and favorably known as one of her early settlers.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.231 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



HON. EDWARD S. WILSON, late Treasurer of the State of Illinois, and one of the most prominent men of this commonwealth, is a lawyer by profession. To many will this record of his life prove interesting, and with pleasure we record it in the history of his adopted county. He was born in Palestine, Crawford County, Ill., on the 25th of June, 1839. His parents, Isaac N. and Hannah H. (Decker) Wilson, were natives of Virginia. The father was born in Hardy County in 1804, and the mother in Rockbridge. Both are now deceased. Emigrating Westward, they became pioneers of Illinois, for they settled in Crawford County in 1814. The father died in April, 1888, at the age of eighty-three years, and the mother passed away in 1876. Of their family, there are now living five sons and a daughter. James A. resides in Missouri; Isaac D. in Kansas City, Kan.; Luke F. makes his home in Kansas City, Mo., in the winter and in Archer County, Tex., in the summer; Medford B. resides in Indianapolis, Ind., being President of the Capital National Bank of that city; Sarah M. is the wife of Allen Tindolph, of Vincennes, Ind., where her husband is Postmaster; and Edward S., our subject, completes the family. He is its only representative in Illinois.
Mr. Wilson whose name heads this record was educated in Palestine, and began the study of law under the preceptorship of Judge J. C. Allen, with whom he studied two years, finishing with MCClernard & Broadwell, a well-known law firm of Springfield, Ill. He was admitted to the Bar in 1861, and entered upon the practice of the legal profession in Robinson, the county seat of Crawford County, where he continued three years. The year 1864 witnessed his arrival in Richland County.
In February of that year he located in Olney, where he has since made his home. In 1865, he formed a law partnership with Judge R. S. Canby, of Olney, under the firm name of Canby & Wilson, which connection was continued until 1867, when Judge Canby was elected to the Circuit Bench. He then formed a partnership with T. W. Hutchinson, under the firm name of Wilson & Hutchinson, which connection continued until 1890, when Mr. Wilson was elected State Treasurer of Illinois, which office he filled for two years.
Mr. Wilson is a Democrat in politics and an ardent supporter of the principles of that party. He was the first one of his party elected to the office of State Treasurer for a period of thirty years. He proved a competent and faithful Stale officer, discharging Ins duties to the entire satisfaction of his constituents. For twenty years he has served as Master in Chancery for Richland County, and has also filled the office of Alderman in the Olney City Council.
On the 16th of June, 1867, Mr. Wilson was married in Olney to Miss Ann Rowland, a daughter of Townsend H. Rowland, and a native of Richland County, where her parents settled at a very early day. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, three sons and a daughter. Rowland Lee, the eldest, has been employed in banking and is now engaged in the real-estate business; June, the only daughter, is the wife of Rev. Dr. William A. Colledge, a Congregational clergyman of Cadillac, Mich.; Glenn is employed in the Capital National Bank, of Indianapolis, Ind.; and Isaac N. is a student in the Western Military Academy, of Upper Alton, Ill.
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the Presbyterian Church. Agriculture, horticulture and stock-raising have occupied Mr. Wilson's attention for a number of years. He has about a thousand acres of land in Richland County. Sixty acres of this is an orchard. A portion of the land lies within the corporate limits of Olney, where he has a fine residence and extensive and beautiful grounds. For the past ten years, Mr. Wilson has devoted considerable attention to the breeding of Clydesdale horses and Shetland ponies, and has daring that time produced some very fine specimens of each variety, that have taken prizes at the State fairs. His interest in horses led him to take a warm interest in securing the State Fair for Olney, and he was largely instrumental in accomplishing that end and fitting up suitable grounds. The State Fair was held here two years, in 1887-88. The fair grounds are owned by the city and constitute a fine wooded park, of which the citizens of Olney are justly proud.
Mr. Wilson has been prominently identified with all important public enterprises of Olney City and Richland County for the past thirty years, and has always been a liberal contributor to the same. He is a man of great energy and enterprise and his progressive spirit has won him success in the various works he has undertaken. His public and private career has gained for him many acquaintances and friends, who for his worth esteem him highly. It is but just to say that he is one of the representative, prominent men of this State.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.323 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



THOMAS GARDNER, who is engaged in general farming on section 19, Olney Township, has the honor of being a native of Richland County, his birth having occurred on the 16th of December, 1849, within a quarter of a mile of his present home. He was the youngest in a family of four sons born unto Lorenzo and Eliza (Gratehouse) Gardner. His parents were both natives of Illinois. The father was born in Wabash County, July 16, 1817, and when a small child came to Richland County with his parents. He here spent the remainder of his life, following the occupation of farming. He died on the old homestead on the 15th of January, 1880. His wife was born in Edwards County, Ill., and was called from this life December 16, 1851. Both were of English extraction and were prominent and well-known people. The family is numbered among the pioneer settlers of this locality.
Our subject was only two years old when his mother died. As his father was in poor health, he remained upon the old homestead and aided in the cultivation of the farm until twenty-nine years of age. No event of special importance occurred during his youth. His father was again married, his second union being with Ann E. Combs, who was born in Ohio March 19, 1834. They became parents of nine children, six of whom are yet living, as follows: William J., a farmer, who now operates the old homestead; Fannie, wife of Jacob Ernest, who follows farming in Crawford County, Ill.; Lorenzo D., who operates a farm in Olney Township; Charles T., who is still living on the old homestead; Sarah A., wife of Joseph Harmon, an agriculturist of this county; and Henry C., who is also on the old homestead. The mother of this family died September 9, 1876, and like her husband was buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. Our subject has but one own brother now living, Joel, a prosperous farmer of Edwards County, Ill.
On the 14th of June, 1883, Thomas Gardner was united in marriage with Miss Joseph Ferris, a native of Ohio, born February 11, 1854. Two children grace this union: Isa and David N. O. The parents have a wide acquaintance in this community and are estimable people, well deserving of representation in this volume.
In his political affiliations, Mr. Gardner is a Democrat, and warmly advocates the principles of that party, although he has never been an office seeker. He has served as School Director in his district. He is a member of no religious organization, but gives of his means to the support of the Christian Church, to which his wife belongs. His farm comprises sixty acres of good land, all under a high state of cultivation. Born in this county, Mr. Gardner has here spent his entire life, and has been an eye-witness of much of the growth and development of the community.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.327- Submitted by Judy Edwards



JOHN NEGELEY resides on section 6, Denver Township, and is acknowledged to be one of the prominent and influential farmers of Richland County. He has a wide acquaintance and is held in high regard by a large circle of friends. Born in Vanderburg County, Ind., in October, 1840, he is a son of George and Kate (Wolf) Negeley. His father was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1812, and was a farmer and teamster. In 1836 he crossed the briny deep to the New World and located in Evansville, Ind., where he bought wild land and cleared and opened up a farm. He and his wife both spent the remainder of their lives in that State. Although Mr. Negeley came to this country empty-handed, he left at his death a good property. He was a man of great resolution and force of character. In the family were four sons and three daughters, the eldest of whom is John; George died in Evansville, Ind.; Jo is a farmer of Clay County, Ill.; Pete is the next younger; Kate is the wife of Paul Hildebrand, of Indiana; Mary is the wife of John Bacon, of Gallatin County, Ill.; and Lena is the wife of Casper Hildebrand, of Indiana.
Mr. Negeley whose name heads this record remained upon his father's farm until twenty years of age, and in his youth attended the parochial and public schools, but though his advantages were then limited his extensive reading in later years has made him a well-informed man. He is now giving much of his time to the study of the Bible and the works written by well-known infidels and agnostics.
On the 15th of February, 1861, Mr. Negeley was united in marriage in Indiana with Margaret Weidner, of that State, daughter of Adam Weidner, who is numbered among the early settlers of Richland County. The young couple began their domestic life upon the farm which is still their home. It comprised one hundred and sixty acres of land and the improvements upon it were a log cabin and log stable. Together they labored, and as the result of their united efforts have acquired a fortune. Mr. Negeley has not only been a successful farmer, but has also carried on stock-raising with profit. He now owns six hundred and twenty acres of valuable land, which yields to him a golden tribute.
Unto our subject and his wife have been born five children: Sarah became the wife of Jo Morgan and died leaving two children; Josephine is the wife of John Hemrich, a farmer of Clay County; George, Adam and Daniel are at home.
Mr. Negeley was formerly a Knight-Templar Mason, but is now connected with no fraternal society , church or political organization. He is a deep thinker, a logical reasoner, and holds himself free from all alliances which would prevent freedom of thought. For a third of a century he has resided in the county, and is recognized as one of its valued citizens, as well as one of its substantial farmers.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.328 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



RUSSELL HARRISON, who owns and operates two hundred and four acres of good land in Richland County, has spent his entire life in Illinois. He was born near Lancaster, March 3, 1834, and is a son of John and Nancy (Higgins) Harrison, who were natives of the Empire State. They were among the earliest settlers of Wabash County, Ill., locating there in 1815, at a time when Indians were still very numerous. The father died March 18, 1838. His wife, who survived him many years, was called to her final rest March 25, 1875.
Our subject was only a lad of four years at the time of his father's death. At the age of eight he left home and came to Richland County to live with his sister, Mrs. Ridgely, with whom he remained until he had attained his majority. After arriving at man's estate he attended the seminary in Mt. Carmel for a few months, and then embarked in teaching school, which profession he followed each winter from that time until 1880. The long years of his service in that line well indicate his efficiency as an instructor.
On the 23d of March, 1856, Mr. Harrison was united in marriage with Miss Sarah M., daughter of Thomas Price, of Lancaster, Ill. Five children graced their union: Lee W.; Eri; Lucy L., wife of D. O. Dodds; Mary I., wife of T. Hendrick, and Anna D., who died in infancy. The mother of his family was called to her final rest April 27, 1867, and on the 25th of November, 1868, Mr. Harrison married Sarah E. Rose, of Parkersburg. Three children have been born of this marriage, namely: Delbert C., Alva E. and Edith R.
Mr. Harrison has followed farming throughout his entire life, to a greater or less extent. In 1865 he purchased his present farm, now comprising two hundred and four acres. It was then but partially improved, but he has added much to it in the way of comfortable buildings, etc. The fields are well tilled, and in all its appointments the place seems complete. It's neat appearance indicates the owner to be a man of thrift and enterprise, and such he is known to be by his fellow townsmen.
In his political views, Mr. Harrison is a Republican. He also takes a warm interest in the temperance cause. The family are members of the United Brethren Church. The members of the Harrison household are highly respected citizens and hold an enviable position in social circles where true worth and intelligence are received as the passports into good society. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.330 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



JOSEPH B. WALDEN, one of the honored pioneers of Richland County, and a representative agriculturist of Olney Township, residing on section 7, is a native of Kentucky. The place of his birth is in Hardin County, and the date is August 26, 1838. His father, Henry Walden, was born in Kentucky on the 1st of October, 1801, and throughout his life followed the occupation of farming. The family is of Irish extraction. He was married in his native State to Sarah Ritchison, who was born in Kentucky November 4, 1801, and came of an old family of English lineage. They had a family of five children, the youngest of whom is our subject. The mother died June 26, 1848, and the death of the father occurred on the 6th of May, 1849.
Joseph B. Walden was a lad of only ten summers when his mother died. He then went to live with his brother-in-law, with whom he remained until he had attained his majority. The public schools afforded him his educational privileges. When a youth of fourteen he came with his sister and her husband to Richland County. and has here since made his home, with the exception of the time which he spent in the late war. Responding to the country's call for troops, in December, 1861, he donned the blue and joined Company I, Sixty-third Illinois Infantry, in which he served until the cessation of hostilities, after the preservation of the Union was an assured fact. He participated in a number of important engagements, but escaped without injury, and as a faithful soldier was honorably discharged in 1865.
Returning to his home,  Mr. Walden purchased forty acres of timberland, a part of his present farm, and began its development. As a companion and helpmate on life's journey, he chose Miss Lavina E. Redman, who was born June 27, 1842, in Kentucky. Their union was celebrated in 1867, and her death occurred January 4, 1877. She left two children: Sarah J. and John William H. In 1879 Mr. Walden was again married, his second union being with Miss Mary E. Ferrell, of this county, who died in January, 1880.

The farm which is now the property of our subject is conveniently located four and a-half miles southwest of Olney. It comprises eighty acres of rich land, all of which are under a high state of cultivation. It has not only been improved but was cleared by the owner, and everything on the place represents his labor and efforts, while its buildings stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. Mr. Walden is a Republican, and is a member of the New Light Church.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.332 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



JOHN H. RIGGS, who follows farming on section 30, Preston Township, wore the blue and gray in the late war, and as one of the defenders of his country in her hour of peril, he well deserves mention in this volume. A native of Orange County, Ind., he was born on the 6th of January, 1842, and is one of thirteen children whose parents were Aaron and Jerusha (Sutton) Riggs. The father was a native of Kentucky, and was of English descent. Of the children, six died in infancy. The others were Polly A., Reddin, Lucy A., Samuel G., Uriah R., Mahala, Harvey and John H., but only Samuel, Harvey and our subject are now living.
John Riggs spent his boyhood days quietly upon his father's farm. His educational privileges were quite limited, and were afforded by the district schools. He came with his parents to Richland County in 1843, when only a year old, and was here reared to manhood. He was still under the parental roof at the breaking out of the late war, and on the 8th of August, 1863, he responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a private of Company G, Ninety-eighth Illinois Infantry, which was mounted about nine months later. He was mustered into service at Centralia, and the first active engagement in which he participated was at Hoover's Gap. He was under fire at the battles of Ringgold, Buzzard's Roost, Selma, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Resaca, Mission Ridge, Kennesaw Mountain, Florence, Cross Keys, and many others. He was always faithful to his duty in the defense of the Old Flag, and when the war was over, he was honorably discharged from the service, on the 6th of July, 1865.
Returning to his home, Mr. Riggs located on a tract of land given him by his father, and there resided until 1874, when he went to Madison Township and purchased a farm, to the cultivation and improvement of which he devoted his energies until 1879. In that year he bought eighty acres of land in. Preston Township, which he operated for a year, when he removed to his present farm. He now owns ninety-six acres of land on section 30, and in addition to general farming he carries on stock-raising. His land is under a high state of cultivation and well improved.
In 1866, Mr. Riggs married Miss Martha Allen, and unto them was born a daughter, Jane, but she is now deceased. The mother died in 1868, and the following year our subject was joined in marriage with Miss Cornelia Williamson. Five children graced this union, but Belle, the eldest, and Oscar, the third child, are now deceased. Those still living are Zina. Ida F. and Raymond.
In his political affiliations Mr. Riggs is a Democrat, but has never been an office-seeker. Almost his entire life has been passed in this county, and those who have known him from boyhood and have witnessed his honorable, upright career are his stanchest friends. He was a valiant soldier during the late war, and is alike true in times of peace. He and his wife have a wide acquaintance throughout this community, and hold an enviable position in the circles of society in which they move.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.333 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



THE OLNEY BANK, of Olney, Ill., was organized as a private banking house March 11, 1887, being the successor of the Olney National Bank, which was incorporated February 14, 1882, by Messrs. John N. Homer, Henry Spring and others, with a paid-up capital of $60,000. The bank enjoyed a prosperous career for five years, when by the retirement by the Government of the national bonds, on which it was based, it was forced to surrender its charter and discontinue business as a national bank. Henry Spring was President of the Olney National Bank; John N. Homer Vice-President, and J. H. Senseman Cashier.
On the opening of the Olney Bank, the officers of the National Bank retained their relative positions in the new one. In June, 1888, on the death of Mr. Spring, J. N. Horner succeeded to the presidency of the bank and has since held that position. L. McLean then became Vice-President and Mr. Senseman is still serving as Cashier. The following-named gentlemen constitute the Board of Directors: J. N. Horner, E. Murray, L. McLean, John Kuster and David Horner.
This banking house occupies its own building, a two-story brick structure, 65x22 feet, which the company built in 1888. The proprietors of the Olney Bank are men of well-known financial responsibility and unquestioned integrity. The history of the bank is one of conservative and judicious management, and its success and constantly increasing business are a marked assurance of popular favor with its patrons and the general public.  Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.337 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



MARTIN TOTTEN, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 18, Olney Township, has for forty-five years been a resident of Richland County, and well deserves mention among its early settlers, for it is to those who came here in an early day and bore the hardships and difficulties of frontier life that the county owes its present prosperity and high standing. The life record of our subject is as follows: He was born July 4, 1826, near Cumberland, Md., and is a son of .Samuel and Rachel (Poland) Totten. The father was also a native of Maryland, and in that State during his youth learned the shoemaker's trade. When about twenty-five years of age, he went to Ohio, where he purchased a farm and reared a family. Unto the parents of our subject were born nine sons and three daughters, but only six are now living, namely: Mary, wife of John Shriver, a well-known farmer of Indiana; William A., a prominent farmer of Wayne County, Ill.; Martin, the subject of this notice; James, now living in Ohio; Catherine, wife of Edward Pettit, who carries on agricultural pursuits in the Buckeye State; and Jonathan, a farmer of this county. The father of this family died on the old homestead in Oneida, Carroll County, Ohio, at the age of seventy-seven years and left to his family quite an estate. His wife survived him two years and passed away at the age of seventy-eight. They were laid to rest side by side in Liberty Cemetery, near Oneida, where a monument has been erected to their memory.
Our subject was only about six years of age when his parents emigrated to the Buckeye State. He remained upon the home farm until he had arrived at years of maturity, and in the common schools acquired his education. On the 4th of July, 1847, he reached his majority, and in October following married Miss Catherine Gladhart, of Carroll County, Ohio. Her death occurred in this county in 1854. She became the mother of four children, but only one is now living: Catherine, the wife of Martin Poland, a farmer of Columbiana County, Ohio. In November, 1856, Mr. Totten married Susan Gladhart, a sister of his first wife, and she died in January, 1890, leaving six children. On the 14th of January, 1891, Mr. Totten was joined in wedlock with Mrs. Elizabeth F. Hunt, widow of George Hunt, and a daughter of William and Mildred (Ratcliff) Knight. She was born in this county September 27, 1858, her parents being numbered among the pioneers.
Soon after his first marriage, Mr. Totten cast his lot with the early settlers of Richland County, and from the Government entered the land upon which he now resides. It was a tract of heavy timber, but he began clearing away the trees, and in the midst of the forest he built a log cabin. The work of improvement he has since continued, until he now owns one of the best farms in the locality, comprising two hundred and forty acres of valuable land, which yields to him a golden tribute in return for his care and cultivation. He is ably assisted by his sons in this work.
Of the four sons and five daughters born unto Mr. Totten by his second marriage only six are now living. Monroe follows farming in this county; Marion resides in Missouri; Madison is a prosperous farmer of Olney Township; Millie, twin sister of Madison, is the wife of David Raney, an agriculturist of Macon County, Ill.; Melissa is a successful school teacher of Macon County; and Freeman aids in the cultivation of the home farm. For eight years Mr. Totten acceptably served as Justice of the Peace and then resigned his position. He exercises his right of franchise in support of the Republican party but has never been an office seeker, preferring to devote his time to his business interests. Throughout his life he has followed the Golden Rule, doing unto others as he would have them do unto him. He is widely known throughout Richland and adjoining counties as an honorable, upright man, and his word is as good as his bond. He is also numbered among the substantial citizens of the community and well deserves representation in the history of his adopted County.   Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.337 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



MATTHEW LOVEL TIPPIT, deceased, was a pioneer of southern Illinois of 1820, and came to what is now Richland County about 1830. He was therefore one of its earliest settlers. He was born in Murfreesboro, Tenn., February 22, 1817, and was a son of Luke and Nancy (Adamson) Tippit, both of whom were natives of the same State. In 1820, when our subject was only three years of age, his parents emigrated to Illinois and took up their residence in Edwards County. The father was a farmer by occupation and died when Matthew L. was about nine years of age. A short time afterward our subject, accompanied by his mother, removed to what is now the city of Olney, then in Lawrence County, and settled upon a farm. This farm afterward became his property and is now the home of Mrs. Matthew L. Tippit.
Our subject enjoyed but limited opportunities for education, as the old log schoolhouses of pioneer days were the only institutions of learning known to the frontier people. Matthew L. was reared to agricultural pursuits and adopted that for a vocation. As a companion and helpmate on life's journey he chose Mrs. Grimes, widow of Stephen Grimes, who was a native of Indiana. The marriage of Mr. Tippit to Mrs. Grimes was celebrated on the 29th of January, 1839, in what is now Richland County, Ill. Mrs. Tippit, whose maiden name was Sarah Ellingsworth, was born in Butler County, Ohio, December 8, 1815, and is a daughter of Stephen and Sarah (Verden) Ellingsworth. Her parents were from Delaware, from which State they removed Westward to Indiana, and later became residents of Butler County, Ohio, whence they came to what is now Richland County, Ill., in 1837, settling on the present site of Olney. By her former marriage Mrs. Tippit had one son, Jasper Grimes, who married Jane Cunningham and is living in Missouri. Of the family born to Mr. and Mrs. Tippit three are living at this writing, in the spring of 1893. William was united in marriage with Nancy Youngman and is a farmer of Preston, Richland County. Luke was married, and died in 1888. Henry Clay was married, and died in 1883. Julia is the wife of Christian Giesler and resides on the old -homestead. Albert was married, and died April 14, 1879. Thomas married Miss Eva Leaf and is a farmer of Olney. Flora, the youngest of the family, died at the age of eighteen years.
Mr. Tippit was an industrious, upright man, and by his energy and well-directed efforts he accumulated a large landed property. At one time he owned about one thousand acres of land, and at the time of his death had some seven hundred acres in improved farms, the most of which he bequeathed to his children. His widow still owns about seventy acres and the old homestead, in which she is now living. Mr. Tippit passed away September 13, 1871, and in his death the county lost one of its honored pioneers and a valued citizen.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.344 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



JOHN GLATHART, a well-known farmer of Olney Township, residing on section 19, is a representative of one of the honored pioneer families of Richland County, where for almost fifty years he has made his home. In this half-century he has witnessed the greater part of the growth and development of the county, has seen its wild lands transformed into beautiful homes and farms, its log cabins replaced by substantial modern residences, and the work of progress carried forward to such an extent that the county of to-day bears little resemblance to that of fifty years ago, few of the old landmarks yet remaining.
Our subject was born near Berne, Switzerland, March 30, 1828, and is a son of John and Catherine Glathart, who were also natives of that country, and were there married. The father followed farming in the land of his birth until 1829, when he emigrated with his family to the New World and located on a farm in Carroll County, Ohio. In 1845 he came to Richland County, and upon land which he entered from the Government made his home until called to his final rest at the age of sixty-three years. A few years later his wife was laid by his side in the German graveyard, where a substantial monument has been erected to their memory.
In a family of thirteen children, seven sons and six daughters, John Glathart was the third in order of birth. He was only about a year old when his parents crossed the water. He was reared upon the old farm in Ohio until seventeen, when he accompanied the family to Illinois. He gave his father the benefit of his services until he had attained his majority, when he started out to make his own way in the world without capital or other aid save an industrious disposition and a determination to succeed. He worked by the month as a farm hand for about four years, at the end of which time he had saved enough to enter eighty acres of Government land. This tract was covered with heavy timber, but soon his axe awakened the echoes of the forest as one after another he felled the trees and made the ground ready for planting. His labors have wrought a wonderful change in the appearance of his property. He now owns a valuable farm of one hundred and twenty acres, improved with all modern accessories and conveniences, with a good house and barn and well-tilled fields. He has also given to each of his sons an eighty-acre tract of land. In his political views Mr. Glathart is a Republican, and warmly advocates the principles of that party. He has served as Township Commissioner of Highways for three years, and has filled the office of School Director for about ten years. The cause of education finds in him a warm friend, and he has done effective service in its interest. A public-spirited and progressive citizen, he ever labors for the advancement of the public welfare.
In 1852 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Glathart and Miss Anna Stahley. She was born July 25, 1828, in the canton of Berne, Switzerland, and is a daughter of John and Catherine (Cebaugh) Stahley, who were also natives of that country. They crossed the briny deep in 1842, and, making their way to Richland County, Ill., purchased an improved farm, upon which they spent the remainder of their lives. The father died August 3, 1865, aged sixty-two years, and the death of his wife occurred September 21, 1872. Six children graced the union of Mr. and Mrs. Glathart, three sons and three daughters. John F., the eldest, is a farmer of this county; Catherine V. is the wife of R. T. Fry, the present efficient Postmaster of Olney, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Lucinda is the wife of Wickliff Higgins, a prominent citizen of Richland County; William E. is a prosperous farmer of this community; Mary E. is the wife of Milton Graves, an agriculturist of this county; and Thomas died in early childhood. The parents are members of the German Reformed Church. Their home is the abode of hospitality, and they are numbered among the highly respected citizens of Olney Township. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.346 - Submitted by Judy Edwards

HON. JAMES E. WHARF, a prominent citizen of Olney, is at this writing serving his third term as Mayor of the city. He was first elected to the office in 1887, to succeed David Scott; again in 1891, after an intervening term, to succeed Frank Powers, and again in 1893 to succeed himself. Mr. Wharf belongs to one of the earlier families of Richland County and has been a resident of Olney since 1857. He was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, in 1854, and is a son of James W. Wharf. The father was a native of England, but when a small lad of only five years his father, William Wharf, emigrated with his family to the United States and settled in Fayette County, Pa. During their residence there they were neighbors of the family of the late James G. Blaine, who was then but a boy.
There James W. Wharf grew to manhood and married Mary Willis; later he settled in Coshocton County, Ohio, removing from there to Olney in 1857. The family consisted of the parents and four children, and another was added to the number after the removal to Richland County. A daughter, Emma, died in Olney, at the age of three years. The other children of the family were James E., whose name heads this record; Mrs. Lizzie Allison and William and Edward L. Wharf; all are still residents of Olney. The father, James W. Wharf, engaged in the insurance business in this city as early as 1865. When but seventeen years of age, James E., our subject, began assisting his father in business and later was associated with him as a partner. That work he has followed throughout his entire life, being still engaged in general insurance, representing most of the leading companies of the country. The father also still continues in the business, being now engaged as traveling solicitor.
In 1875, our subject was united in marriage with Miss Adelia Allison, daughter of Clinton J. Allison, an early and well-known citizen. Their union has been blessed with a family of three children, two sons and a daughter, namely: Allison J., Eugene C. and Edna T. The parents hold an enviable position in social circles and their home is the abode of hospitality.
In his political views, Mr. Wharf is a Republican, having affiliated with that party since he became a voter. During his Mayoralty many important public improvements have been made. During his first term preparations were made for the holding of the State Fair in Olney, and the success attending the same was due in no small degree to his labors in the capacity of Mayor. In 1892, during his second term, the public improvements of the city cost about $40,000, the chief of which is the water works, which has proved a most important acquisition to the city.
In his social relations, Mr. Wharf is a member of the Masonic fraternity and also of the Knights of Pythias. He is recognized as an enterprising citizen, public-spirited and progressive, and overtakes a commendable interest in the growth and progress of his town and county. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.349 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



ELDER GEORGE WASHINGTON MORRELL, a minister of the Christian Church residing in Olney, was born in Richland County, near Parkersburgh, June 15, 1831, and is a son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Long) Morrell, the former a native of Maine, and the latter of Tennessee. The father was three times married. He first wedded a Maine lady, who died in 1812, leaving a daughter. In 1813 Mr. Morrell left the Pine Tree State and emigrated to New Haven, Ill., locating at the mouth of the Big Wabash River, above Cairo, where he lived for about a year. He then moved to Bolton House Prairie, in Edwards County, south of Albion, and aided Joel Churchill in the erection of the first house built by him at Albion. In 1814 Mr. Morrell was again married, and five children were born of the second union, two sons and three daughters. Winthrop went to California in search of gold, and is supposed to have been murdered, as nothing has since been heard of him; John was drowned at the age of eighteen years; Elizabeth and Susan are also deceased. Jane is the only surviving child of the second marriage. She became the wife of Peter M. Webb, and after his death married a Mr. Haynes, and is again a widow.
The second wife of Abraham Morrell died about 1818; the following year he came to Richland County, and here married Miss Elizabeth Long in 1819, who came from her native State to Illinois. Their four children were Abraham, George W., Eliza and Sarah. The first was a soldier in the late war and died from fever in the hospital at Mound City, Ill. Eliza became the wife of Buddington Kenyon, and after their arrival in Woodstock, Wis., she died, leaving six children: Nathaniel, George, Mary, Eugene, Zedadiah and Buddington. The first-named was a soldier in the late war, and is supposed to have died in Salisbury Prison. The others are still living. Sarah is the wife of William Miller, by whom she had six children, four of whom are living. The Morrell family is noted for longevity. The grandfather, a native of Maine, died at an advanced age, and his brother reached the age of one hundred and five years.
George Morrell, whose name heads this record, is one of the oldest settlers of Richland County, having here made his home since 1831. a period of sixty-two years. He has seen the county in its primitive condition, when it was full of wolves and bears, deer and other wild game. The settlers were widely scattered and one could ride for miles over the prairies without a fence or building to impede his progress. The first barn built on Sugar Creek Prairie was erected on his father's farm.
On the 9th of November, 1853, Elder Morrell was united in marriage with Miss Mary J., daughter of Marvin P. and Martha (Cabbot) Blood, who were natives of the Empire State. Four children graced their union, two sons and two daughters, but John M., the eldest, died in his nineteenth year. Sarah Alice became the wife of Charles Britton, who died in October, 1884, leaving four children: Matthew B., John L., George A. and Charles H. Winthrop wedded Miss Mary A. Combs, and with their two children, Harry and Ben ton, now reside in Hoboken, N. J. Martha Lillie is the wife of Alvin E. Jenner, an operator for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad at Carmi, Ill.
At the age of eighteen years, Elder Morrell united with the Christian Church, and on attaining to man's estate began preaching. Since that time he has followed the ministry, and, in addition, he also engaged in farming to some extent for a few years. For the past twenty years he has been a resident of Olney, and was pastor of the Christian Church in this city for seven years. He is now engaged in evangelistic work. Mr. Morrell has been an earnest laborer in the Master's vineyard, and in the cause to which he has devoted his life he has accomplished much good, adding nearly two thousand to the church. In politics he was long a supporter of the Republican party, but is now identified with the Prohibition party. He owns a good residence in Olney, and in the city where he has long made his home he has the respect and high regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.583 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



ANDREW JACKSON WYATT, one of the pioneers of Richland County, is now a prosperous farmer of Madison Township, residing on section 29, where he owns and operates about three hundred acres of choice farming land, well stocked and improved. The neat appearance of his place, with its rich and fertile fields and good buildings, indicates the thrift and enterprise of the owner.
On the 7th of May, 1841, near Salem, Edwards County, Ill., Mr. Wyatt was born. His parents, Joseph D. and Mary (Lough) Wyatt, were both natives of Virginia. The former was of Irish, and the latter of German, descent. They located in Edwards County, Ill., about three years before the birth of our subject, and after a long residence there of about twenty years, came to Richland County in 1857. The family located upon a farm on section 29, Madison Township, where Andrew now resides. Later in life Joseph Wyatt became a resident of Wayne County, where his death occurred on Christmas Day of 1882. His wife passed away a few years previous, dying in the same county in February, 1878.
The subject of this sketch received but limited school privileges in his youth. During his boyhood he aided in the labors of his father's farm, and also assisted the neighboring farmers. His time was thus passed until April, 1865, when he left home and went to Burning Springs, W. Va., where he worked as an engineer in the oil mines. Two years were thus passed, after which he returned to Richland County, and bought the homestead farm where he now resides. He also owns fifty-one acres of real estate in Pike County, Ohio. It was on the 18th of February, 1869, that the marriage ceremony was performed which united the destinies of Mr. Wyatt and Miss Elizabeth Carlton. Mrs. Wyatt was born in Wabash County, Ill. Her parents were Robert and Mary (Compton) Carlton, the former a native of Gibson County, Ind., and the latter of Kentucky. They were among the pioneers of Wabash County, having located there upwards of half a century ago, removing to Edwards County, in the same State, about twenty years later. They were both twice married. By his first wife Mr. Carlton had one daughter, who died several years ago; and Mrs. Carlton by her first husband had a daughter, who is Mrs. Vashti Aldridge, now living in Richland County, Ill. Mr. and Mrs. Carlton reared a family of six, one son and five daughters, who grew to maturity, only three of whom are living at this writing. Hiram is a resident farmer of Wayne County; Mrs. Wyatt is next in order of birth; Maria, who married D. Briener, is now deceased; Sarah Jane is the wife of Charles Marshall, of Edwards County; Hannah wedded Harvey McDowell, and is also deceased; and Julia Ann, who became the wife of Henry Knouse, died some years ago. Mr. Carlton died in Wabash County in December, 1869, at the age of sixty-three years; and Mrs. Carlton passed away April 5, 1877, at the home of her son in Wayne County, at the age of sixty years. Mr. Carlton served as a soldier in the Mexican War, and for many years was a Justice of the Peace. He was a Democrat in politics, and was an active and influential member of his party. He and his wife were members of the Christian Church. Mr. and Mrs. Wyatt have been blessed with six sons, and the family circle yet remains unbroken by the hand of Death. In order of birth they are as follows: Walter M., Arthur L., Wilbur S., Robert H., William H. and Harvey J. The family are all members of the Christian Church, and in politics Mr. Wyatt is an enthusiastic Democrat, warmly advocating the principles of his party.
Our subject has watched the growth and development of Richland County with increasing interest and satisfaction. When he was a boy the people in this locality dressed in homespun, and they did their farming with very crude machinery as compared with the improved implements of today. Deer and other wild game supplied the settlers with meat, and bee trees were frequently found, so there was no dearth of food, although the nearest gristmill was twenty-five miles distant. The principal articles taken to market were pork and tobacco, and the hogs were usually driven long distances to a place where sales could be made. In the work of upbuilding and developing the country, Mr. Wyatt has ever done his part as a faithful citizen and well deserves representation in this volume.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.577 - Submitted by Judy Edwards



MOSES JOHNSON, a retired farmer and prominent citizen residing in Olney, is a native of Richland County. He was born on the 24th of May, 1839, in Decker Township, and is a son of Moses and Sarah (Mason 1 ) Johnson, the former born in Kentucky in 1799, and the latter in Pennsylvania in 1805. When young people they came to Richland County, where their marriage was celebrated. Mr. Johnson was one of the earliest pioneers, locating here in 1815. For many years he engaged in farming and stockraising upon a farm which he developed and improved. His death occurred August 13, 1849. His wife long survived him and died at the home of her son Andy in 1887. Mr. Johnson started out in life poor, but became the possessor of a handsome property as the result of his diligence and industry. He took quite a prominent part in public affairs and was a leading citizen of the community. In politics, he was a Democrat, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The Johnson family numbered eight children. Thomas, who served as a Captain in the Ninety-eighth Illinois Infantry, is now deceased; Jane died in this county; Polly and Elizabeth are both deceased; A. V. is a prominent farmer of Decker Township; Permelia has also passed away; Moses is the next younger; and Celia, deceased, completes the family.
The boyhood days of our subject were spent upon a new farm, and he was early inured to the arduous labors of developing the raw prairie. He conned his lessons in a log schoolhouse, which was four miles distant from his home. When ten years of age he began plowing with oxen. He early learned to swing the scythe and cradle, and in all departments of farm work he became proficient. He remained at home until 1862, when he enlisted in Olney as a member of Company H, Ninety-eighth Illinois Infantry, of which his brother was Captain. The regiment was assembled at Centralia and started for Louisville, Ky. The train was wrecked at Bridgeport by rebel sympathizers, and seven men were killed and seventy-five wounded. Mr. Johnson afterward went to Nashville and from there to Murfreesboro. He participated in the battles of Chickamauga, Atlanta, Lookout Mountain and Resaca, and was for one hundred days under fire while on the way to Atlanta. He started to the sea with Sherman, but returned to Louisville, where he was put in a cavalry corps and took part in the famous raid under Gen. Wilson. With his regiment he charged the works at Selma, Ala., and after the capture of that place went to Macon, Ga. In 1865 he was honorably discharged, and on the 7th of July of that year reached his home. The regiment lost heavily, about two-thirds never returning. Mr. Johnson was wounded in the service, but he proved himself a faithful soldier and was always found at his post of duty.
In 1869 our subject married Miss Margaret Porterfield, a native of Pennsylvania, and unto them have been born the following children: Mary P., James Allen, Sarah A., Idella, William Herbert and Laura. After his marriage, Mr. Johnson began farming and stock-feeding. He owned one hundred and twenty acres of land, a part of the old homestead, and for many years he successfully carried on business, but in 1892 he laid aside all cares and removed to Olney, where he is now living a retired life.
Socially, Mr. Johnson is a member of the Grand Army Post of Olney, the Masonic lodge of Mt. Erie, and the Independent Order of Mutual Aid. With the Methodist Episcopal Church he holds membership, and to its support he contributes liberally. The duties of citizenship are by him faithfully discharged, and every trust reposed in him is performed with the same fidelity which he manifested when in his country's hour of peril he aided in the defense of the Stars and Stripes.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Effingham, Jasper and Richland Counties Illinois, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent and Representative Citizens, Governors of the State, and the Presidents of the United States. (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1887), p.576 - Submitted by Judy Edwards

 

 



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