Old Settlers Bio page 1
EDWIN M. ANDERSON
   Edwin M. Anderson, was born in Rockbridge County, Virginia, April 1st, 1837.  His father, James L. Anderson, was born in 1809, in Edinburg, Scotland.  He received his education in the schools of Scotland, and at the early age of nineteen, he emigrated to Virginia, locating at Louisburg.  His vocation was that of a silversmith.  At about the age of twenty-five, he married Miss Maria W., the daughter of Samuel Moore, Esquire of Louisburg.  They had a family of five children, four of whom are now living.  The subject of this sketch is the second child.  In May, 1838, he removed to Rushville, Illinois, and was soon after elected County Judge of Schuyler County, serving in that capacity for several terms.  In June, 1865, he died at his residence in Rushville.  His wife, mother of Edwin, is still living and residing in Rushville, at the old residence.  Edwin received his education in the schools of Schuyler.  On leaving school, he clerked for the firm of W. W. Wells & Co. for eight years.  In 1862, he entered the army to assist in putting down the rebellion, and soon rose from a private to the rank of first Lieutenant, receiving an honorable discharge at the expiration of three years.  In 1869, he was elected by the democratic party to the officer of County Treasurer, which position he filled with honesty, ability, and integrity.  -author unknown--

From "History Of Schuyler And Brown Counties, Illinois 1686-1882"
  page 82: ... and Edwin M. Anderson, were appointed to a building committee {December, 1880 for the new courthouse}.
  page 97: 'Twenty-Sixth Board of Supervisors, 1879-1880' ... September, 1879, Edwin M. Anderson became a member of the board from Rushville Township to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Edgar Anderson.  A resolution offered by Supervisor Anderson, September, 1879, that the board take steps toward building a court-house, not to exceed in cost $40,000, and that one-third of this amount be provided for in the tax levy for 1879 was rejected.

'Twenty-Seventh Board of Supervisors, 1880-1881' Rushville Township, Edwin M. Anderson.
'Twenty-Eighth Board of Supervisors, 1881-1882' Rushville Township, Edwin M. Anderson.

page 112: ... County Treasurers: Edwin M. Anderson 1869-71.
page 234: ... The following named persons are those who have represented the township {Rushville} in the County Board since township organization: ... Edwin M. Anderson, elected in 1880, served two terms.
page 237: First National Bank of Rushville ... a joint enterprise conducted by several of the leading citizens, among whom were .... E. M. Anderson ...

Present Business - Drugs, Books, Etc: ... E. M. Anderson ...

  119th page2nd one3rd one4th one,  1861 Militia Roll

CHARLES E. S. ARNOLD
  Charles E. S. Arnold was born in Scott County, Illinois, January 9, 1839.  His father, Dr. Orange S. Arnold, was born in the state of Vermont, in the year 1804.  He received most of his early education in the schools of Ohio, at the age of twenty was married to Miss Nancy Smith.  They had a family of two children, both of whom are now living.  She lived but a few years after their marriage.  He afterwards married Miss Susan Stewart.  The fruits of this union was one child, a daughter, who is now the wife of L. D. Green.  His second wife survived but a short time after marriage.  About the year 1835 he was married to his third wife, Miss Catherine Ebaugh, daughter of Charles Ebaugh, Esquire, of Maryland, and with his last wife he had a family of ten children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second.  The doctor moved to Schuyler County in 1851, locating near Browning, and a few years after he moved to Astoria, Fulton County, Illinois, where he died at his residence in 1854.  His wife, the mother of Charles, survived him one year.
  Charles received his early training and education in the common schools of Schuyler County, and at the age of eighteen he commenced learning the cooper's trade, which business he is now carrying on in the town of Browning.  On the breaking out of the late rebellion he enlisted, on the 2d of August, 1862, in Company B, 119th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, commanded by Colonel T. J. Kinney.  Mr. Arnold participated in many hard fought battles, coming out of the service without receiving a scratch.  He received an honorable discharge at the end of his service, and was mustered out in August, 1865.  After returning home he was married to Miss Caroline, daughter of John Saffer, Esquire, of Fulton County, Illinois.  The fruits of this union was a family of two children.
  Mr. Arnold is a supporter of those principles which carried our flag safely through the late rebellion, and when an attempted was made to resist the draft, he, like a true patriot, shouldered his musket and marched to the front.
  119th page

HENRY OSCAR BADER
  Henry Oscar Bader was born in Preble county, Ohio, August 1st, 1844.  He is a son of the late Jeremiah Bader, late resident of Schuyler county.  Henry received his earliest education in the common schools of Schuyler county, and then attended Morning Sun Academy, Ohio, and also the Bryant & Stratton commercial school at St. Louis.  After leaving school he taught in Missouri for a short time;  the returned home and engaged in farming, and soon after became acquainted with, and married, Miss Lucetta, daughter of William Saucer, Esq., of Fort Madison, Iowa; They were married January 23d, 1868.  The fruits of this union is a family of two children.  Mr. Bader is now engaged in farming and stock raising.  Politically, he is a strong supported of the principles of the republican party.
  Note: Written about 1876


WILLIAM WHITEHEAD BADER
  William Bader was born in Preble County, Ohio, September 26, 1826.   His father, Jeremiah Bader, was born in Germany, and there received his early education.  At an early age, he emigrated to America, settling in Pennsylvania, and there married Miss Sarah, daughter of Elijah Thompson.  His vocation was that of a wagon maker.  He left Pennsylvania and moved to Ohio, and from there to Schuyler County, Illinois, in 1846.  He died at his residence, in 1856.  His wife, the mother of William, is still living.  They have a family of thirteen children; ten of whom are still living.  The subject of this sketch is the fourth child.  William received his early education in Ohio.  In November 1856, he married Miss Mary Ann, daughter of Reverend William Hunt, of Randolph County, Indiana.  In the fall of 1857 he removed to Schuyler County and purchased the farm on which he now resides.  During the war he was a strong war democrat.
  1861 Militia Roll

JOHN C. BAGBY
  John C. Bagby was born in Glasgo, Baron County, Kentucky, January 24th, 1819.  He received his early education at Glasgo, and afterwards attended Bacon College, Kentucky, graduating as civil engineer at the age of twenty-one.  He then taught school five years and in the meantime read law with Judge Christopher Tompkins, of Glasgow, Kentucky.  In the spring of 1846, he came to Rushville, and has practiced law there ever since.  Politically, he is a republican, and has been since the organization of the party.


JESSE ORLANDO BEAL
  Jesse Orlando Beal was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, July 28th, 1832.  His father Jesse Beal, was born in Keene, New Hampshire, in 1795; his vocation was that of a carpenter.  At the age of twenty-three he was married to Miss Sarah, daughter of Samuel Vail, Esq.  They had a family of ten children, of whom seven are now living; the subject of this sketch is the eighth child.  Mr. Beal died at his residence in Ohio, in the winter of 1836; his wife survived him until 1866; she died at her residence in Frederick, Schuyler county.  Jesse received his education in the common schools of Ohio; his vocation, until he was twenty-two years of age, was that of a farmer; he then commenced clerking, which business he has followed almost ever since.  In August, 1861, he enlisted in the 2d Illinois cavalry, and participated in many hard-fought battles; at the siege of Vicksburg he was in the saddle for forty days; was then transferred to New Orleans; from there to Bayou Fourdoshie, Louisiana, where he was taken prisoner Sept. 28th, 1863.  During the first four days of his capture, in company with four hundred and sixty fellow prisoners, he was marched, without eating anything, undergoing hardships and privations that few could have endured.  He was finally hampered up in a litter stockade, or pen, at Camp Ford, Texas, at which place he remained six months.  In July, 1864, he was exchanged at the mouth of Red river.  He then repaired to his regiment, when he was discharge and sent home.  He married January 29th, 1865, to Miss Eva Wampler, daughter of the late Peter Wampler.  They have a family of two children.  At present he is residing in the village of Frederick, in the enjoyment of good health.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JOHN C. BELL
  Capt. John C. Bell was born in Cook county, Illinois, May 24, 1838.  His father, the late Rev. Henry D. Bell, was born in the state of Kentucky, in the year 1798, and received his early education in that state.  At the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Baker, Esq., of Flemmingsburg, Kentucky.  Mrs. Bell was born in 1798.  The fruits of their union was a family of eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the tenth.  Seven are living at the present time.  Mr. Bell came to Schuyler county with his family in 1838, and settled in what is now Birmingham township.  He was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  His mother, wife of John C. {Henry D}, died at her residence in 1851.  Mr. Bell survived her until 1852.
  John C. can with his parents to the county when only one year old, and here he received his early training and education.  At an early age he became a clerk in George M. Well's store, in Brooklyn, and continued in mercantile pursuits until the breaking out of the late rebellion, when, on the 20th of April, 1861, he enlisted in company A, sixteenth regiment Illinois volunteers, commanded by Colonel R. F. Smith.  He served in that regiment until 1864, when he received an honorable discharge.  In December, 1864 he raised a company for the reorganization of the fourteenth regiment Illinois infantry, and was the commissioned first lieutenant, and soon after promoted to captain.  He participated in many hard-fought battles, and in December, 1865, was mustered out at Leavenworth, Kansas, receiving as honorable discharge; after which he engage in the wholesale grocery business at Springfield.  He was married March 9th, 1865, to Miss Nannie E. Matthews, of Springfield.  In 1867 he moved to Rushville, where he became a partner in the mercantile house of McCreery & Bell.  Mr. Bell has a family of two children.  Politically, he is a supporter of the principles of the republican party. 

JOHN R. BENNETT
  John R. Bennett was born in Wood county, Virginia, January 10th, 1816.  His father, Elias Bennett, was also a native of Virginia; he was born in 1791, and at the age of twenty was married to Miss Margaret, daughter of George Rerns, Esq. of Pennsylvania.  The fruits of that marriage was a family of six children, of whom John R. is the third.  Mr. Bennett moved, at an early day, to Washington county, Ohio, and there purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits.  He died at his residence in 1828; his wife survived him until 1861, when she died at her residence in Schuyler county.  John R. received his early education in the schools of Ohio, and at the age of twenty-two he was married to Miss Eliza, daughter of the late James Madison, of Lewistown, Fulton county, Ill.., nephew of ex-president James Madison.  The fruits of their marriage is a family of six children, three of whom are married and settled in this county, and are doing well.  Mr. Bennett came to Schuyler county in the fall of 1838, and immediately engaged in farming and stock raising.  At present he is residing at his residence in Bainbridge, and is postmaster at Centre.  Politically, he is a strong supporter of the principles of the republican party, and was among those who stood firm for the Union during the late rebellion.


EDWARD BERTHOLF
  Edward Bertholf was born in Warwick, Orange county, New York, April 9, 1816.  His father, John Bertholf, was also born in Orange county, about the year 1771, and at the age of twenty-three he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of William Perry, of Sussex county, New Jersey.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  He had a family of thirteen children, of whom nine sons reached middle age.  The subject of this sketch is the ninth.  The mother died at her residence in 1838.  Her husband survived her until 1845.
  Edward received his education in the common schools of the state of New York, and in 1836 he removed to Rushville, Schuyler county, where he has since resided.  On arriving here he turned his attention to teaching.  In 1838 he married Miss Mary E., daughter of Levi Jackson.  They have a family of nine children, two deceased.  Mr. Bertholf continued teaching, clerking, and attending to the office of justice of the peace until the fall of 1860, when he was elected by the democratic party to the office of sheriff of Schuyler county, filling that position to the satisfaction of his constituents.  After serving his term, he devoted his attention principally to his private affairs, until 1868, when he was elected to the office of clerk of circuit court of Schuyler county, which position he still retains.


ISAAC BLACK
  Isaac Black was born in Dubois county, Indiana, February 24, 1824.  His father, Richard Black, was born in Macklenburg county, South Carolina, March 1st, 1783.  He received his early education in the common schools of South Carolina.  His vocation, while residing there, was principally teaching and farming.  At the age of twenty-two years he was married to Miss Elizabeth Partlow.  They had a family of four children, only two of whom are now living.  About 1813, he moved to Breckridge county, Kentucky, and there his wife died.  He then removed to Dubois county, Indiana, where he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob Fowler, Esq.  They had a family of ten children, only four of whom are now living.  The subject of this sketch is the third child.  In 1826 Mr. Black moved to Schuyler county, and settled on the land where Rushville now stands.  His vocation was principally farming and stock raising.  He died at his residence on the 7th of December, 1853.  His wife, the mother of Isaac, is still living.
  Isaac received his early education in the common schools of Schuyler county.  At the age of twenty-four he married Miss Cynthia A., daughter of Enoch Edmonston, Esq.  They had a family of eight children, one deceased.  Two of their daughters are married - Susan E. to Mr. James W. Lawler, Jr., and Sarah E. to Mr. E. W. Dace.  Both are now living in this county.  Mr. Black served a term of seven years as justice of the peace and seven years as county supervisor.  His attention has principally been devoted to farming and stock raising, and he is now residing on his farm in the quiet enjoyment of health and happiness.


WILLIAM T. BLACK
  Wm. T. Black, the subject of this sketch, was born in Dubois county, Indiana, March 18th, 1821, he is a son of the late Richard Black, who was a native of South Carolina, and also one of the early settlers of Schuyler county.  William T. received his early training and education in the common schools of Schuyler county.  His early boyhood days were spent on the farm of his father.  On the 30th of October, 1742 {I think it should be 1842}, he was married to Miss Matilda, daughter of Andrew Matheny, Esq., of this county.  The fruits of that union was a family of eight children, of whom only six are now living.  Soon after his marriage he purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising, in Littleton township.  At present he is residing at his residence, hale and hearty.  Politically, he always had, and says he always expects to support the democratic party.


R. S. BLACKBURN
  Major R. S. Blackburn was born in Butler County, Ohio, January 9th, 1827.  His father, James Blackburn, was born in Butler County, Ohio in 1804.  At the age of twenty-one he married Miss Penelope Sparks.  They had a family of eleven children, eight now living; the subject of this sketch is the oldest child.  In 1831 he moved to Rushville, where he died in 1852.  He wife is still living.  R. S. Blackburn received his education in the schools of Schuyler County, Illinois.  At the age of twenty-seven he married Mary A., daughter of Nathan Compton, Esquire.  They had a family of three children, two now living.  Mrs. Blackburn died in 1861.  In July, 1862 Mr. Blackburn entered the army as Captain of Company A, 78th regiment, Illinois Volunteers.  In February, 1865, he was commissioned major, and was mustered as such.  In May, 1866, he married Miss T. C. Harmon.  At present he is engaged in mercantile pursuits in Brooklyn.  Politically, he is a republican.
 
1861 Militia Roll
O. M. BOSWORTH
  O. M. Bosworth was born in Summit county, Ohio, April 19th, 1825.  His father, J. B. Bosworth, was born in Rhode Island, March 6th, 1790; his vocation was that of a millwright.  At the age of twenty he was married to Miss Lucinda Hopkins.  She was born in Connecticut October 14th, 1792.  The fruits of that marriage was a family of eleven children, of whom only five are now living.  Mr. Bosworth served as musician in the army during the war of 1812.  After the war he returned home.  Soon after his marriage he settled in Otsego county, New York; from there he moved to Summit county, Ohio, where he resided for a few years, and then moved to Pittsburg, Pa.  While on a visit to Peoria in September, 1850, he was taken ill with the cholera, and died; his wife is still living.  O. M. Bosworth received his early education in the common schools of Ohio.  In 1850 he made a trip to Texas, and in January, 1851, he started from New Orleans, by steamer, for California, where he remained two years, and then returned by way of New York, where he attended the World’s Fair.  On February 5th, 1853, he married Miss Ann Applegate.  They have a family of two children.  In 1846 he enlisted in the ordnance department for during the Mexican war, when, peace being declared, he received an honorable discharge and returned home.  At present he is residing on his farm near Littleton, engaged in agricultural pursuits.  Politically, he is a staunch republican.
 
1861 Militia Roll
SQUIRE H. BUTLER
  S. H. Butler was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, Nov. 9, 1818.  His father, Jonathan Butler, was born in Old Virginia, in 1790; he received his early education in the district schools of that state.  At the age off twenty-one he was married to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Ezra Horton, Esq., formerly of Ohio, Mr. Butler having removed from Virginia to that state.  His business was that of a farmer.  He had a family of eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fourth, and the only one now living.  In 1839 Jonathan Butler moved to Schuyler county, and in August of the same year he moved to Fulton county, Illinois.  There he purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising; he died at his residence in March, 1867; his wife is still living at the old homestead.  Squire H. Butler received his early schooling in Coshocton county, Ohio, and his boyhood days were spent on the farm with his father.  He came, with his parents, to Illinois, in 1839, and, on arriving at the age of twenty-one, he was married to Miss Mary J. Rose, daughter of Samuel Rose, Esq., of Coshocton county, Ohio.  The fruits of this union was a family of two children, a son and a daughter.  In the year 1851 he purchased a farm in Hickory township, Schuyler county, where he is now residing.  His son is married and settled on a farm near the old homestead.  His daughter is deceased.  Mr. Butler’s vocation is that of a farmer, stock raiser, and honey producer.  Few, if any, surpass him in the production of  "bees and honey", in the county, as by his genius and long experience he seems to have reduced the business to a science.  His farm is located in the fertile and beautiful valley of the Illinois River, near Bluff City.  Politically, he was a war democrat, and is now an adherent to the policy of the Jefferson and Jackson democracy.
  1861 Militia Roll

JOHN LOGAN CALLISON
  John L. Callison was born in Schuyler county, Illinois, August 23d, 1836.  His father, William Callison, was in Lincoln county, Kentucky, Jan. 15th, 1802, and there, in common schools of Kentucky, he received his early education.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  At the age of twenty-four he was married to Miss Martha Davis.  The fruits of their marriage was a family of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest and only one now living.  Mr. Callison came to Schuyler county in 1836, and here carried on the coopering business at Rushville.  He afterwards engaged in mercantile pursuits.  He died at his residence in Camden township on the 8th day of March, 1866.  His wife is still living.  Mr. Callison is descended from pure Virginia and Kentucky blood.  He received his early education in the schools of Schuyler county, and at the age of nineteen he married Miss Elizabeth Smith.  They had a family of eight children, of whom two are deceased.  Mr. Callison's vocation is that of a farmer, and in agricultural pursuits and stock raising he is entirely at home.  Politically, he is a republican.
  Death Certificate


GEORGE WASHINGTON CAMPBELL
  George W. Campbell was born in Richland county, Ohio, Oct. 30, 1827.  His father, Peter F. Campbell, was born in 1799, and moved with his father to Ohio when not a year old.  He received his education in Ohio.  At the age of twenty-two, he married Miss Agnes Jones. In or about the fall of 1844 he removed to Schuyler county.  He served as county assessor for two years, and as treasurer of the county for six years.  Geo. W. received his early education in the schools of Ohio and Illinois.  In January 1853, he married Miss Laura A., daughter of Jas. Neill, Esq., of Rushville.  They have a family of eleven children, one deceased.  Mr. Campbell has filled several local offices.  For three years lie has served as supervisor.  At present he is engaged in farming and stock raising.  He is a prominent democrat in his township.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JAMES P. CAMPBELL
  James P. Campbell, the subject of this sketch, was born in Fulton county, Illinois, April 16th, 1845. His father, Lloyd Campbell. was born in Hancock county, Virginia, February 27th, 1814. His vocation was that of a ship carpenter. At about the age of twenty-two he was married to Miss Harriet, daughter of Joseph Longstrength. As the result of that union, they had a family of twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the sixth. Mr. Campbell emigrated to Fulton county, Illinois, and from there to Schuyler county, where he is now residing on his farm hale and hearty.
  James P. received his early education in the common schools of Schuyler county. On the 16th of October, 1867, he was married to Miss Sarah E., daughter of Lewis Garrison, Esq., of this county. They have one child. Mr. Campbell is at present residing in Browning township. His vocation is that of house carpenter. Politically, he is a republican.


BENJAMIN CHADSEY II
  Benjamin Chadsey was born on Vermont, near Burlington, August 16th, 1796.  His great-grandfather came, in an early day, from Wales, and settled on Narragansett Bay, on the present site of the town of Warwick.  He was a Quaker, and settled there in the time of Roger Williams.  His son - Benjamin's father - was born and raised in Rhode Island.  Benjamin Chadsey, Sr., father of the subject of the sketch, was born in Rhode Island in the year 1755. At the age of twenty-three he married Miss Jerusha Nicholds.  Soon after his marriage he removed to the territory which was soon after formed into the state of Vermont.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of nine children - four girls and five boys - of which Benjamin, Jr. is the fourth child.  Mr. Chadsey moved to Essex County, New York;  from there to Ohio, and soon after to Indiana.  He died near Vincennes, August 12th, 1812.  His wife survived him until February 13th, 1813.  Benjamin, Jr. received his early education in Essex County, New York.  At the age of seventeen he enlisted in the army of the War of 1812, and served two years and two months, when he was mustered out at Fort Knox.  He learned the carpenter trade, and followed that business until 1825, when he removed to Schuyler County, and settled on land in the military tract which he drew as bounty land, where he still resides.  Mr. Chadsey is one of the oldest settlers in the county, and built the present courthouse.  He was married, December 1st, 1822, to Miss Rachael Johnson, of Vermillion County, Illinois.  They have a family of eight children, one deceased.  He and his wife are still residing at their old homestead near Rushville.


GEORGE GREER CLARK/E
  George G. Clark was born in West Middleton, Pennsylvania, July 18, 1832.  He is a son of Rev. John Clark, of Schuyler county.  He received his early education in the common schools of Pennsylvania and Illinois.  His time was spent in farming previous to his marriage.  In May 1843, he removed to Schuyler county, Illinois.  At the age of twenty-one he married Miss Maria L., daughter of William Owen, Esq., who was one of the early settlers of Schuyler county.  Mr. Clark has a family of five children, of whom two are deceased.  In 1856 he built the sawmill at what is known as Clark's cross-roads, and in 1859 he built a gristmill at the same place, which was the first one built in Buena Vista township.  At present he is engaged in milling and hog-raising.  Mr. Clark has filled many of the local offices of his township.


REVEREND JOHN CLARKE
  Rev. John Clarke was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, September 24th, 1806.  His parents, John and Eleanor Clarke, were natives of Tyrone, Ireland, and, with their parents, were early ardent adherents to the religious reformation, under Mr. Wesley, and trained their family under its Influences.  In 1814 they removed to the vicinity of Pittsburg, then called the " backwoods," where the subject of this sketch received most of his education, under his father's tuition, who for several years was a professional teacher.  On the 16th of November, 1826, he was married to Miss Ann Ohern, their united ages at the time being thirty-six years, and the year following entered the traveling ministry of the Protestant Methodist Church, in which he filled some of the most important stations, and was chosen delegate to each of the general conferences of the body while he remained in its connection.  After coming to Illinois in 1843, he united with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and continued in the traveling connection until 1862, when the demands of the country upon the loyalty of his family induced him to locale, but very little diminished his public gratuitous labors.  They have raised nine sons and two daughters to man and womanhood.  The second son, John S., was instantly killed by a falling tree on the 20th of April 1853.  The fourth son, Thomas W., was brought home to them a corpse from the army.  He was a member of company C, one hundred and nineteenth regiment Illinois volunteers; his death occurred July 30th, 1864.  The fifth son, Francis W., died at home, August 20th, 1871.  The youngest, Charles Avery, remains at home.  The rest are pleasantly settled and prospering in business.
  Mr. C. early espoused the cause of anti-slavery, and, with J. 0. Birney, Dr. Daily, and others, aided in the formation of the Indiana State Anti-Slavery Society, said for settle time acted as its corresponding secretary, and now rejoices in the triumph of the principles once so flagrantly proscribed.  Mrs. C., with him, administers the hospitalities of a pleasant home, where "the latch string is always out."
  Note:  For doorknobs, the latches for doors has a string, rope, or cord that was put through a small hole in the door to the outside.  You pulled the string to the inside to lock the door allowing no one entry to your home while you were there unless you let them in.  The statement "We'll leave the latch string out for you", meant you were welcome to visit.


GROVE CONINGHAM
  Grove Coningham was born December 27, 1816, in the city of New York.  His father, Grove Coningham, Sr., was born in the city of Londonderry, Ireland, about the year of 1766.  He emigrated to New York at an early age, and was soon after married to Miss Betsy Baldwin, of Putnam county, New York.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eighth.  Mr. Coningham, Sr., died in December, 1831, in New York city; his wife survived him thirty-eight years.  Grove, Jr., received most of his early education in the common schools of New York, and at the age of sixteen he came to Schuyler county.  In 1843, he returned to his native city (New York), and lived there until 1846; then returned to Schuyler county in 1851.  He made a trip to California, and s'aid {stayed?} there until 1853, when he returned to his old home in Frederick, Schuyler county, and has resided there ever since.  In 1856 he married Miss Sarah H. Beal.  They had a family of seven children, two of whom are deceased.  He is a member of the enterprising firm of Farwell & Co., on of the largest firms in Schuyler county, and has been a member since 1855.  Mr. Coningham is a staunch supporter of the principles of the republican party.  While at Industry, McDonough county, in 1861, when political feeling was running high, being importuned by a crowd for his options on the war and the political parties of the day, he made the remarks that he thanked God he never was a modern democrat, for he might have been a traitor.  His youngest son, fourteen months old, is named after General U. S. Grant.  Mr. C. is postmaster of Frederick, and has been since Aug. 1, 1863.  He is a fine, jovial man, and has secured a host of personal friends, regardless of political opinions.  In business ha has been successful, and is considered one of the fathers of Frederick.  He is noted for his benevolence, generosity, and honesty.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JAMES HODGE COX
  James H. Cox, the subject of this sketch, was born in Randolph County, North Carolina, July 11th, 1836.  His father, Isaac Cox, was also born in the state of North Carolina, and after his marriage moved to Indiana, and from there to Crawford County, Illinois, when the subject of this sketch was only four years of age.  James H. moved to Schuyler County, in 1839, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits.  On the 26th of September, 1862, he was married to Miss Mary A., daughter of Doctor Benjamin Walton, of Schuyler County.  They have a family of four children, of whom only two are now living.  At present he is residing on his farm near the town of Browning.
  Note: written as copied from 1872 plat biography


BYRON CRANDALL
  Mr. Byron Crandall was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, August 12, 1831.  His father, Thomas Foster Crandall, was born in Rochester, New York, April 6th, 1794.  He received his early culture and education in the district schools of that state, and early learned the trade of ship-carpenter, and followed that business for a few years.  He served as a soldier in the war of 1812 and was on the field after Hull's surrender.  At the age of twenty-eight, he was married to Miss Roxy Ann, daughter of Joseph and Sereptia Dudley.  Mrs. Crandall was born in 1804.  The fruits of that union was a family of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third.  Mr. Crandall and family moved from New York to Michigan, and from there to Canada, thence to Ohio, where he died at his residence at Circleville, Ohio, December 5th, 1843.  His wife survived him nine years.  During it short period of his life he was engaged in mercantile pursuits.  Byron received his early education principally in Ohio, and at quite an early age learned the shoemaker's trade, and carried on the business for several years after.  In 1851 he moved to Illinois, stopping in Fulton county, where he became acquainted with, and married Miss Margaret Ann, daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Cramer, of Astoria, Fulton county, Illinois.  They have four children.  The eldest son is now attending commercial college at Galesburg.  After several years of married happiness, Mrs. Crandall died on the 5th day of August, 1868.  Mr. Crandall was married to his present wife, Miss Rebecca L., daughter of Joseph and Jane Greer, of Littletown, March 30, 1870.  Mrs. Crandall was born December 30, 1845.  They have one child.  Mr. Crandall is residing on his farm, one and a half miles north of Rushville.  His time is largely employed in stock dealing, making a specialty of that horse and mule trade.  Politically, he is a republican.

WILLIAM A. CROSIER
  Wm. A. Crosier was born June 2, 1831, in Juniatia county, Pa.  His father was born in the same county in 1792; his vocation was that of a carpenter.  At the age of twenty-three he married Miss Sarah Wilson, daughter of Robert Wilson.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of ten children, of whom William is the seventh; at present only three are living, two daughters and the subject of this sketch.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  He died at McAllister in 1856; his wife survived him until 1867.  William received his early education in the common schools of Pennsylvania.  At the age of sixteen years he learned the trade of marble cutting at New Berlin, Union county, Pa.  On December 25th, 1856, he married Miss Susan, daughter of Daniel Bolleau, Esq.  About a years after he moved to Nora, Jo Daviess county, Ill., remaining there a year.  In the fall of 1858 he moved to Rushville.  In February, 1859, he commenced business.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JESSE DARNELL
  Honorable Jesse Darnell was born in Wayne County, Ohio, October 4th, 1813.  His father, Henry Darnell, was born in Virginia, near the Potomac River, in the year 1767.  He was a volunteer in the Colonial army at the age of fourteen years; was in the battle of Yorktown and at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.  At the age of twenty-five he was married to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. Lee, a resident of Virginia.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of nine children, of which the subject of this sketch is the youngest.  In 1797, Mr. Darnell emigrated to Ohio, where his wife died, in the year 1822.  Mr. Darnell was married the second time.  He died at his residence in Wayne County, Ohio, in 1849.  Jesse Darnell removed to Warren County, Illinois, in 1833, and in 1834 settled in Schuyler County, Illinois, where he has since resided.  Soon after his arrival he became a manufacturer of fanning mills, and continued the same business up to 1841.  In April, 1841, he married Miss Louisa, daughter of Lyman Utter, Esquire.  They have a family of four children, one deceased.  Those living are all single, -- one daughter and two sons.  Mr. Darnell represented his district in the state legislature in 1848 and 1849, being elected to that position by the democratic party.  He was served the township of Frederick for four terms, which position he still retains.  Mr. Darnell has been reasonably successful in the pursuits of life, and his history is identified with that of the early days of Schuyler County.

DR. HOSEA DAVIS
  Dr. Hosea Davis was born in Royalston, Worcester county, Mass., June 21, 1816.  He is a son of Ashael Davis.  His mother’s maiden name was Deborah Mason.  They gave all their children good common school education.  The subject of this sketch graduated at Dartmouth College in 1842; after graduating he taught school several years.  In 1844-45 he had charge of the seminary at Rushville, Indiana; in 1847 he commenced the practice of his profession; in the fall of 1850 he moved to Littleton, in this county.  He graduated at Rush Medical College in 1853.  On the 18th of October, 1854, he married Miss Maria C., daughter of A. and T. Marks, of Wayne county, Illinois.  She died Sept. 23d, 1856, leaving two daughters.  April 1st, 1860 he married Miss S. Abby Bridgeman, of Petersham, Mass.  Four children have been born to them, only two of whom are now living.  In politics, the Doctor is a republican.
 
1861 Militia Roll
WILLIAM DEAN
  William Dean was born in county Dennygaul, Ireland, May 3d, 1825, and is a son of John Dean.  He received his early education in the district schools of Ireland.  At about the age of twenty-two he emigrated to America, landing in New York.  From there he went to western part of Pennsylvania, where he resided two years.  He then moved to Schuyler county, Illinois, in the spring of 1850, where he engaged in farming.  In March, 1857, he was married to Mrs. Maria Pain, daughter of George and Jame {Jane} Umphreys {Humphreys}; she was born July 10th, 1830.  The fruits of their marriage is a family of four children, one of whom is now deceased.  Mr. Dean is at present residing on his farm in Littleton township, enjoying good health. {clarifications by Sara Hemp}
 
1861 Militia Roll
JAMES M. DENNIS
  James M. Dennis was born January 22, 1845, in Schuyler county.  His grandfather, Isaiah Dennis, Esq., was a sea captain, of English descent.  He located, with his family, in the city of Philadelphia, Pa.  He was lost at sea.  His grandmother was twice married; her first husband's name was White.  His father's name was John Dennis, who was born at Germantown, Pa., and was three years old at the time of the battle of Germantown.  He was married in Pennsylvania, in 1799, to Miss Rachel Bishop, of Cape May, New Jersey, a lady of Welsh descent.  Mrs. Dennis is now living with her son, J. Dennis, in Schuyler county, at the advanced age of ninety-one years.  Joseph Dennis, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Butler county, Ohio, in 1811.  At about the age of twenty-two he married Miss Mary Kirkland, who is of Scotch and Irish descent.  They has a family of eight children, of whom James is the fifth.  His father emigrated to Illinois with his wife in 1830, and purchased a farm, on which he still resides, hale and hearty.  James M. spent most of his early days on the farm, attending the common schools during the winter months.  He attended the Cottage Seminary of Rushville for two years, and from thence to Macomb Academy, and finished his course of studies at Abington College.  He then turned his attention to teaching, occupying the position of principal in several of the foremost schools of the country.  At the age of twenty-four he commenced reading law in the office of Bagby & Anderson, and was admitted to the bar May 29th, 1871.  He is a man of more than ordinary attainments, and undoubtedly will make his mark in either the legal or political field.

EBENEZER DIMMICK
  Ebenezer Dimmick was born in Genessee county, New York, on the 24th of January, 1803.  His is a son of Matthew and Huldah Dimmick, who had a family of six children, of whom, Ebenezer is the second.  The father died at his residence in Ohio in 1827; his wife survived him until 1862.  Ebenezer was married December 28, 1828, to Miss Margaret, daughter of Enoch Phillips, Esq.  Mr. Phillips was a soldier in the war of 1812.  The fruits of the above union was a family of ten children, nine of whom are now living.  In 1838 Mr. Dimmick came to Schuyler county, and on the 21st of July, 1843, laid out the town of Pleasant View, which is now a thriving little village.  He was the first postmaster and first merchant of the place.   At present he is filling the offices of postmaster and justice of the peace.  In politics, he is republican.  He is now residing at his residence in Pleasant View.

EDWIN DYSON
  Edwin Dyson was born July 28, 1838, in England.  His father, James Dyson, was a native of that country, and married Miss Hannah Wilson.  The fruits of their marriage was a family of five children, of whom Edwin is the fifth.  In 1841 he immigrated to America and came to Rushville, Illinois, where he resided until his death, which occurred about two years after his arrival.  At an early age Edwin learned to printing business, which he has followed up to the present time.  In his tweny-third year he married Miss Mary F. Irvin.  They have a family of three children.  He is now editor and proprietor of "The Rushville Times", which he purchased in 1868.
 
1861 Militia Roll
GEORGE W. ERVIN/ERWIN
  George W. Ervin was born in Franklin county, New York, December 1st, 1818.  He is the youngest son of the late Cornelius M. Erwin.  The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of the state of New York.  At the age of nineteen he came to Schuyler county, and there engaged in agricultural pursuits.  In 1847 he enlisted and went to the Mexican war.  He remained in the service a year and a half, after which he received an honorable discharge.  January 1st, 1850, he was married to Miss Agnes E., daughter of John Corrie, Esq., of Schuyler county.  She was born February 4th, 1830.  The fruits of their union was a family of ten children, of whom only six are now living.  Politically, Mr. Erwin is a supporter of the democratic principles.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JOHN ERVING
  Hon. John Erving was born in Mt. Pleasant, Jefferson county, Ohio, December 12th, 1818, and is the fourth child of the late Thomas Erving.  Mr. Erving received his early education in the common schools of Ohio.  In January, 1845, he was married to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Emanuel and Rachel Mallernee, of Jefferson county, Ohio.  The fruits of that union was a family of six children, of whom only three are now living.  On the 9th of April, 1853, he landed, with his family, in Rushville, and immediately after engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising in Littleton township.
  Mr. Erving was elected by the democratic party to a seat in the legislature of 1869, as representative from Schuyler county.  He served with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents.  The principal feature of that winter's work was the adoption of the fifteenth amendment to the national constitution, upon which Mr. Erving cast a dissenting vote.  While in the legislature, attempts were made by some officials to induce him to vote for an increase of fees, but, as is well known to all, he manfully resisted all overtures.  His constituents, irrespective of party principles, applauded his honorable and honest course, and, even though he incurred the displeasure of a few office-holders, yet the people sustained him.  Mr. Erving has in his possession facts to substantiate him.  At present he is residing in the city of Rushville with his family, in reasonable health.

LEWIS D. ERWIN
 Honorable Lewis D. Erwin was born in (P)lattsburg, Clinton County, New York, July 1st, 1815.  His grandfather, General David Erwin, was one of the early pioneers of northern New York, where he was largely engaged in the iron business.  His father, Cornelius M. Erwin, was also engaged in the same business.  He was born in Rutland County, Vermont, and at the age of twenty married Miss Lucinda Furman.  They had a family of seven children; the subject of this sketch is the fourth child.  In 1831 he moved to Ohio; his wife died at Birmingham, Ohio, in August, 1833; he survived her until 1837; the place of his death was Toledo, Ohio.  Lewis D. moved to Schuyler County in May 1839, settling in Littleton Township, and there engaged in farming.  In November of 1843 he married Miss Elvira, daughter of Charles Wells, Esquire.  Mr. Erwin has filled many of the local offices of his county.  In 1846 he was elected to a seat in the legislature, beating Judge Minchell, one of the ablest men of the state, who was afterwards elected a member of the constitutional convention.  Mr. Erwin was subsequently elected sheriff of the county, and, upon the expiration of his term of office, was chosen clerk of the circuit court.  In 1856 he was again elected a member of the house of representatives, was re-elected in 1858, and again in 1860.  In 1860 he was a candidate for the nomination of secretary of state before the democratic state convention.  Mr. Erwin is emphatically a self-made man.  He has a family of eleven children, one deceased.  At present he is residing in the city of Rushville.


CHARLES FARWELL
  Charles Farwell was born in Nelson, New Hampshire, July 1st, 1809.  His Grandfather Farwell moved from Massachusetts previous to the revolution, and took part in the war, leaving his family at Nelson.  He hastened to the battle of Bennington, where he fought bravely for the cause of Independence.  Mr. Farwell was of English extraction.  His son, Robert Farwell, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Nelson, New Hampshire, in August, 1786.  In 1808 he married Miss Polly Bassett.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of ten children, of which Charles is the oldest.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  The subject of this sketch received his education in New Hampshire.  At the age of sixteen his father moved to Kane, Coshocton County, Ohio.  At the age of twenty-five he married Miss Grace Ann Vail, daughter of Samuel Vail, Esquire.  In 1842 he removed to Schuyler County, Illinois.  Here he engaged in the grain and mercantile business.  The firm of Farwell & Co. is one of the most reliable firms in the county.  He carried on pork packing for twenty-three years.  Mr. Farwell is a large landholder.  During the dark days of the rebellion, when Union men's lives were hardly safe, it was then that Mr. Charles Farwell stood forth boldly against the cohorts of treason.  He has only one son, who is married and resides with him at his beautiful residences on the hill, above Frederick, which is overlooking the Illinois River.


MARO FARWELL
  Mr. Maro Farwell was born on Nelson, New Hampshire, January 6, 1815.  His father, Robert Farwell, was born in August, 1786, in Nelson, New Hampshire.  The grandfather of Maro, Richard Farwell, was born at Marblehead, Massachusetts, about the year 1747.  He was in the army of the revolution, and was at the battle of Bennington and several other engagements of that war.  Maro's grandfather Bassett was also engaged in the War of Independence.  He was wounded at the battle of Bunker Hill.  His wife was born at Swansey, in a fort surrounded by the wild aborigines of the soil.  Such were the thrilling scenes that the ancestors of Mr. Farwell had to undergo.
  Richard Farwell was plowing in his field with a yoke of oxen, during the revolutionary war, when the messenger came arousing the people to prepare to defend their firesides.  He left the oxen standing in the field, and hastened to the house, and kissing his brave wife and children good-bye, he started and traveled all night and the next day a distance of seventy miles, and was at his destination in time to participate in the battle of Bennington.
  Robert Farwell was married in the year 1808, to Miss Polly Bassett.  The fruits of that marriage was a family of ten children, one deceased.  There are six boys and three girls yet living.  In 1825 he moved to Cashocton County, Ohio.  In 1863 he removed to Illinois, and died at his residence, in August of 1866.  His wife, the mother of Maro, is still living.
  Maro received his early education in the common schools of Coshocton County, Ohio.  He was engaged there in mercantile business and farming until 1848, when he came to Schuyler County, Illinois and settled in the town of Frederick, where he has since resided.  In December of 1851 he was married to Miss Ann, daughter of Hart Fellows, Esquire.  They have one child deceased and one living, which is a son named Hart.  Mr. Farwell is a member of the firm of Farwell & Company, and is considered one of the best business men in that section of the country.  He came there in limited circumstances, and now ranks as one of Schuyler County's wealthy men.  His is another of those instances of the results achieved by perseverance and energy.  Mr. Farwell adheres to the principles of the republican party, and was a strong and energetic Union man during the war, and still believes that the party that carried the country through the war to a successful termination, is the one in whose hands to repose the reins of government in the future.

LAWRENCE W. FRISBY
  Lawrence W. Frisby was born December 25th, 1848, in Schuyler county, near Rushville.  His grandfather Frisby was born in the state of New York, and in 1839 he removed to Schuyler county, about one mile from Rushville, where he and his wife are still residing, hale and hearty.  Charles Frisby, father of Lawrence W., was born in the state of New York, October 31st, 1818, and resided there until 1830, when he removed with his father to Illinois, and carried on the shoe business in Rushville, occasionally attending to other branch of business.  June 24th, 1843, he married Miss Abba, daughter of Levi Jackson, Esq., who came from Ohio to Illinois.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of seven children, of whom Lawrence is the third.  The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Schuyler county.  He learned the trade of marble cutter, and is now a member of the firm of Crosier & Frisby, marble dealers, of Rushville, Illinois.

JOSEPH B. GARDNER II
  Joseph B. Gardner was born in Burlington county, New Jersey, September 13, 1829.  His father, Joseph Gardner, Sr., was born in the same state in 1796, and there received his early education in the district schools.  At the age of twenty-five he married Miss Hannah Piper, daughter of John and Hannah Piper.  The fruits of that marriage was a family of six children, three of whom are now deceased.  The subject of this sketch is the eldest child.  Mr. Gardner moved from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, and from the latter state to Illinois in 1864, and is at present residing on his farm in Schuyler county.  Joseph, Jr., received his early education in the common schools of Pennsylvania, and at the age of twenty-four was married to Miss Louvina, daughter of Jacob Paup, Esq., of Pennsylvania.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of ten children, of whom only six are now living - all single.  Mr. Gardner moved to this state at the same time his father did.  His vocation is that of a farmer and carpenter.  At present he is residing in Hickory township.

DeWITT CLINTON GARRISON
  DeWitt Clinton Garrison was born in Schuyler county, Ill., October 31, 1844.  He father,  Lewis Garrison, was born in Butler county, Ohio, October 10, 1804.  At the age of twenty-two he was married to Miss Patsy Vanhorn, daughter of Joseph Vanhorn, Esq., of Ohio.  By that marriage they had a family of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest.  The mother of De Witt Clinton died when he was but little over two and half years old.  Mr. Garrison married, for his second wife, Miss Jemina Phelps.  They have a family of five children.  At present he is residing on his farm in Schuyler county.  De Witt C. received his early training and education in the schools of this county.  He served for a few months in the late war.  His vocation is that of a wagon maker.  His residence is with his father in Browning township.  Politically, he is a supporter of the republican party.

MARTIN A. GARRISON
  Martin A. Garrison was born in Butler county, Ohio, Jan. 30, 1826.  His father, Lewis Garrison, was born in Ohio in 1806 {1804}, and received his early education in that state.  At an early age he learned the wagon making trade, and at the age of twenty-one he married Miss Martha, daughter of Mr. Vanhorn.  In 1839 he moved to Schuyler county, and there soon after purchased the farm on which he now resides.  His wife, mother of Martin, died in April, 1846.  He had a family of eight children, seven of whom are now living, and of whom Martin is the oldest.  The subject of this sketch received his early education in Ohio, and was fourteen years old when he came, with his father, to this county.  In 1845 he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Elijah Pope, Esq.  They had one child.  His wife died in August, 1849.  He was again married, in March, 1850, to Miss Elizabeth H., daughter of James Parrish, Esq.  They has a family of six children, one deceased.  In August, 1862, he enlisted in the 119th Illinois volunteers, and participated in many hard-fought engagements.  He remained in the service for three years, when he received an honorable discharge and returned home, and engaged in farming, which business he has followed ever since.  Mr. Garrison is a supporter and advocate of the republican party.
  119th page  1861 Militia Roll

MAJOR BARCLAY C. GILLAM
  Major Barclay C. Gillam was born March 6th, 1820, in Youngstown, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania.  His father, Simon Gillam, was born in 1793, in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  He received his early education in the common schools of that city.  He learned to art of nail making, and it was his vocation through life.  In the year 1819 he married Miss Ann A., daughter of John M. Clayton, Esq., of the state of Delaware.  He then removed to Youngstown, Pennsylvania.  They had a family of seven children, four of whom reached mature age - three now living, of whom the subject of this sketch is the oldest.  Mr. Gillman’s wife died at their residence in Youngstown, Pennsylvania, in 1838.  The Major’s father removed to Schuyler county, Illinois, in 1851, and located as a farmer.  Here he married Miss Jane Harbison.  They raised a family of two children.  Mr. Gillam died at his residence in this county, October 13, 1857.  Barclay C. received his education in the common schools of Pennsylvania.  After leaving school, he learned the blacksmith trade.  At the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Mary A., daughter of William Beatty, Esq.  In the spring of 1844, he moved to the city of Rushville, Ill.  Here he has carried on blacksmithing ever since.  They had six children, only two of whom are now living - both sons.  On the break out of the late rebellion he recruited a company of eighty-six men, of which he was elected captain, and immediately repaired to the seat of war.  After being in the service four months, he was promoted to the rank of major.  He was engaged in several battles, among which were Fort Donaldson, Fort Henry, Little Bethel, Shiloh, Hatchey, and others.  At the battle of Shiloh he lost a horse and was badly wounded.  He was appointed census marshal in 1870, to take the census of Schuyler county.  He is now residing in Rushville, and since the organization of the Republican party he has firmly adhered to its principles.
  Note:  both the spelling of Gillam and Gillman was use in this.
  28th page

DAVID GRAHAM
  Major David Graham was born in Monroe County, West Virginia, October 6th, 1810.  His father was born in the same county in the year 1772.  He served several terms in the legislature of Virginia; was also sheriff of his county; he was a surveyor, and surveyed some of the largest tracts of land in Kentucky and Virginia.  In 1800 he was married to Miss Mary Stodghill.  They had a family of seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fourth.  Mr. Graham died in 1818; his wife, mother of David, survived him until 1851.  David received his early education in the common schools of Virginia, and at the age of twenty-three he removed to Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois.  In the fall of 1834 he moved to Birmingham, and there built a grist and saw mill.  Mr. Graham has done more to develop the resources of Birmingham Township than any other man in it; and here he accumulated a fortune, and in the vicissitudes of trade lost a good portion of it.  He was married in January, 1835, to Mrs. Frances Maria Stout, who was formerly of Kentucky.  They had a family of five children.  His wife died November 14th, 1852.  He married his second wife, a Mrs. Lucinda Miller, April 4th, 1855. They have a family of two children.  At present he is residing in Birmingham, hale and hearty.  Politically, he is a supporter of the democratic party.
 
1861 Militia Roll
CHARLES M. GRIMWOOD II
  Charles M. Grimwood was born in Saxmundham, England, Feb. 28, 1816.  His father Charles Grimwood, Sr., was also born in  England, and there received his education.  He married Miss Maria, daughter of Daniel Capps, Esq., and started for America with his family in June, 1830; was wrecked off the coast of Prince Edward’s Island, and, with his family, resided on that island for two years.  He then moved, in 1833, to Providence, Rhode Island, and in 1858 moved to Akron, Ohio, where he died in 1864.  His wife, the mother of Charles M., is still living, and at present residing with her son in Ohio.  They had a family of eight children, of whom Charles M. is the third.  Mr. Grimwood received his early education in England, and came to America, with his parents, in the summer of 1833; was aboard the steamship Royal William, when on her trial trip in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and in that fall she made the first successful voyage across the Atlantic by steam, thus demonstrating the feasibility of steam navigation.  In the fall of 1837 Mr. Grimwood removed from Rhode Island, with a colony, in Tazewell county, Ill., and there married Miss Anna Eliza Bremigam.  They had a family of four children, of whom two, both sons, are now living, and residing in the village of Frederick.  In 1859 he removed to Schuyler county; his wife died in October, 1868.  Mr. Grimwood has always been a staunch abolitionist, having voted with the liberty party for years and is now a supported of the republican party.  On the day previous to the murdering of Lovejoy at Alton, Ill., he was struck on the head with a club and almost killed, by a member of the same mob who afterwards killed that noble and honorable patriot, Lovejoy.  Mr. Grimwood has held the office of justice of the peace in Frederick since 1866.  He is now residing at his residence, hale and hearty.

JACOB HARSHEY
  Jacob Harshey was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 6th, 1819.  His father, Joseph Harshey, was born Aug. 18th, 17--, in Pennsylvania, near where Harrisburg now stands.  At about the age of twenty-five he was married to Miss Francis Weaver.  They have a family of twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third.  Mrs. Harshey died at her residence, in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, August 16th, 1862.  Her husband, Joseph Harshey, survived her until April 29th, 1868.
  Jacob received his early education in the common schools of Pennsylvania, and at the age to twenty-seven he was married to Miss Bithia C., daughter of John and Rebecca Barnes, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania.  Mrs. Harshey was born March 28th, 1824.  The fruits of their union is one child - Amos Hardy, now residing at home.  After their marriage, Mr. Harshey engaged in agricultural pursuits, and in 1853 he moved with his family to Wayne county, Ohio, and there purchased a farm.  After remaining there a little over two years, they moved to Schuyler county, and purchased a farm in Rushville township.  Seven years after, he bought the old homestead in Littleton township, where the family are now residing.  Mr. Harshey died at his residence October 2d, 1867.  Politically, he was always a supporter of the republican party, and during the late war he was a staunch Union man.

THOMAS HERRON
  Thomas Herron was born in the county of Down, Ireland, on the 16th of March, 1824.  His father, Robert Herron, was also a native of Ireland, and on arriving at manhood he was married to Miss Mary Clelland.  The fruits of that union was a family of eight children, six boys and two girls.  The subject of this sketch is the third child.  In 1850 Mr. Herron died at his residence in Ireland.  His wife and family soon after emigrated to Mahoning county, Ohio, and in 1852 they removed to Schuyler county.  Mrs. Herron died at her residence in the county in 1860.  Thomas received his early education in Ireland, and came to America as above stated.  In 1852, in the company with several others, he took the "gold fever", and soon after started for California.  He embarked on a steamboat at Beaver, Ohio, and went by water to New Orleans; then took a brig across the Gulf of Mexico to the ancient city of Vera Cruz. Landing in due time at the latter place, which he found to be quite a beautiful city, girded around with a heavy, substantial wall, with entrances guarded by massive iron gates and watchful sentinels.  Many breaches in the wall can be seen, as the result of the bombardment during the Mexican war.  From Vera Cruz the party proceeded to the city of Mexico, perched on top of a load  of cotton bales, drawn by sixteen mules.  Now "you bet" our American boys cut a fine figure while traveling amongst those gaping and jabbering Spaniards.  On arriving at the city the gates were thrown open, and they were marched off to the custom house, where they had to undergo the ordeal of being searched.  They remained but a few days in the city, and then started the balance of the way on a pedestrian tour across the country to Acapulco, on the Pacific, a distance of three hundred and thirty miles, with their cooking utensils and baggage strapped on a mule.  On arriving at the last mentioned place, they went aboard of a mail steamer for San Francisco.  The voyage was performed in about eight days.  Passing in at the Golden Gate and reaching the city, he found everything life and bustle, and the next day went to work at  twenty dollars per week in gold.
  He remained but a few months in California, and from there went to Oregon, where he engaged in farming and stock raising, at which business he made considerable money.  He raised his first crop of wheat on the open prairie, without a fence.  His farm was located in the fertile valley of the Willamette.  That region of country at that time abounded in plenty of deer, bear, and other wild animals natural to that locality.  He remained in Oregon six years, keeping bachelor’s hall, in company with his brother, Robert, and others.  In 1855 he volunteered, and went to help drive back the encroaching bands of Indians.  He says he has seen many a red man's "hair raised."  In 1859 he came back, by way of the Isthmus, to New York, thence to Schuyler, and soon after purchased the farm on which he now resides.  On the 26th of March, 1861, he was married to Miss Mahala Ann, daughter of Valentine Saylor, Esq., formerly of Stark county, Ohio.  Politically, he is a full-blooded democrat.  His first vote was cast for Joe Lane, of Oregon.

CAPTAIN C. W. HITE
  Captain C. W. Hite was born in Licking county, Ohio, January 22d, 1838.  His great grandfather, Hughes, was a soldier in the revolutionary war, and lived until about the year 1840.  His grandfather, Abraham Hite was born in Virginia, and served his country as a soldier in the war of 1812.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  He died at his residence in Licking county, Ohio.  His son, the father of the Captain, was born in Licking county, Ohio, in 1813, and at an early age he learned the blacksmith trade, following that business 1846.  In 1836 he married Miss Mary M., daughter of Christian Stout, Esq.  They had a family of thirteen children, nine of whom are now living, the subject of this sketch being the oldest.  In 1850, Mr. Hite moved to Schuyler County, Illinois, and now resides on his farm in Brooklyn township.  The Captain received most of his early education in the common schools of Illinois.  On the breaking out of the late rebellion he enlisted in August, 1862, as a private, and was soon raised to the rank of second lieutenant, and from that position to a first lieutenant, soon after which he was promoted to and received the commission lost of captain, and was mustered out at the close of the war as captain of company A., 78th regiment Illinois volunteers.  On the sixth of September, 1865, he was married to Miss Catharine E., daughter of' the late Felix Walker, Esq.  They have one child.  The Captain is at present a member of the firm of Taylor & Hite, Brooklyn, Schuyler county, Illinois.
 
1861 Militia Roll
LEONIDAS HORNEY
  Colonel Leonidas Horney was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, September 4, 1817. His parents moved, when he was only a year old, to St. Clair County, Illinois. He is a son of the Honorable Samuel Horney, whose history appears in this work.
  In the spring of 1825 his parents removed with him to Schuyler County, Illinois. Leonidas received most of his early education in the common schools of this county. After leaving school he engaged in teaching for a few years. On the 2d of September, 1841, at the age of twenty-four, he was married to Miss Jane, the daughter of William H. Crawford, Esquire, of Schuyler County. Soon after his marriage he purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising. On the breaking out of the war with Mexico, Mr. Horney enlisted as a private in Company (?), commanded by Captain W. A. Richardson; regiment commanded by Colonel John J. Hardin. They were very soon ordered to the seat of war, after their organization. He served in that division of the army commanded by General Taylor, and while bravely fighting, he was wounded at the battle of Buena Vista. It being a flesh wound, did not disable him. At the close of the war he was mustered out and returned home, where he again engaged in farming. Soon after his return he was elected to the offices of county surveyor of Schuyler County, and retained that position until the breaking out of the war of the rebellion, when, with the same patriotic devotion to the cause of the Union as evinced in the war with Mexico, he laid aside the pursuits of peace and the endearments of a happy family, and again drew forth his sword in defense of the flag of his country. In August of 1861, he volunteered, and was elected captain of Company A, 10th regiment, Missouri Infantry, and soon after he was promoted to the rank of major, and soon after to the rank of colonel. He participated in many hard fought battles, and at the battle of Corinth, October 4, 1862, received a flesh wound, which did not disable him from active service. At the siege of Vicksburg, near Champion Hill, while bravely leading his gallant regiment into the fight, he was shot and killed, and fell into the arms of his men. He was buried on the field, within a few paces of where he fell. After the war he was brought home, and buried on the 15th of February, 1865, in what is known as the Thompson graveyard, near Littleton, being buried with the honors of war. The colonel left a wife and family of seven children, who are residing on their farm, near Littleton. The three oldest children are married; the remainder living at home and single. The colonel was a man highly respected for his many virtues, and in losing him, not only his family, but the people of the county, lost a noble and valuable citizen.
 
1861 Militia Roll
SAMUEL HORNEY
  Honorable Samuel Horney was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, October 18th, 1788.  His father, Phillip Horney, was born in Maryland about the year 1758; his vocation was that of a farmer.  On the 12th of March, 1782, he was married to Miss Sarah Manlove, the daughter of William Manlove, Esquire, of Maryland.  Soon after his marriage he moved to Guilford County, North Carolina, and there engages in agricultural pursuits.  As the fruits of this union, they had a family of four sons, of which the subject of this sketch is the fourth.  His wife died in the year 1795, and in 1801 Mr. Horney married Miss Anne Carter.  They had a family of five children.  The father died at his residence in North Carolina in the year 1821.  His second wife survived him until May 6th, 1844.  Samuel Horney received his early education in the schools of Guilford County, North Carolina.  After leaving school he turned his attention to teaching, and previous to his marriage he held the positions of constable and deputy sheriff of his native county, and on the breaking out of the war of 1812.  He enlisted, in 1813, in the army at Richmond, Virginia, for during the war.  He was placed in command of a rendezvous, and was recruiting sergeant until the next spring.  He then marched the men to Fredericksburg, Virginia, and was there formed into a company, commanded by Captain John P. Duvall.  They were then ordered to retrace their steps to Richmond, where they took a boat and immediately sailed for Norfolk, at which point the British army was collecting.  In 1815 he was mustered out, and returned to his home, and on the 11th of August, 1816, he was married to Miss Emilia Charles, daughter of Elijah Charles, Esquire.  The fruit of this marriage was his only child, the late Colonel Leonides Horney, who was born near the old family homestead in North Carolina.  After his marriage, Mr. Horney was engaged in teaching until July, 1818, when, with his family, he moved to St. Clair County, Illinois, which state was then a territory.  In the spring of 1825 he removed to Schuyler County, and settled near Rushville, where he resided until 1832.  In the Black Hawk war he served as quartermaster of the 4th Illinois regiment.  The division was commanded by General Whitesides.  Soon after the war he purchased the farm near Littleton, on which he now resides.
  Mr. Horney was one of the first three commissioners who assisted in the organization of Schuyler County, and hence he is properly classed among the old settlers.  In 1836 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and held that office, by re-election, until 1866.  In 1843 and 1843 he served in the legislature as representative from Schuyler County.  Mr. Horney and wife are both residing at their residence, hale and hearty, considering their advanced age.  Mr. Horney is a man who is highly beloved and respected by his fellow citizens, and the people speak of him with a just pride, as being one of the honored fathers of the county.  He is among the few who are surviving who figured in the first organization of the county.  Politically, he says he is a supporter of the old Jeffersonian principles.

LOUIS HORTON
  Louis Horton was born in Forty Fort, Wyoming Valley, Luzern county, Pennsylvania, March 20, 1799.  His father, John Horton, was born on Long Island, in 1747.  He is of English extraction.  He was married to Miss Mary Matawney, who was of German descent.  Soon after his marriage he enlisted in the army of the Revolution and served as lieutenant until peace was declared.  He participated in several hard-fought battles, and received a wound which disabled him during life.  He had a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest.  Mr. Horton died at his residence in 1808.  His wife, the mother of Lewis, survived him several years.  Lewis received his early education in Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania.  At the age of twenty-eight he married Miss Priscilla L., daughter of Frederick Cressman.  The fruits of that union was a family of eleven children, of whom only five are now living.  During the time he resided in Pennsylvania, he was engaged in hotel-keeping, farming, and canal contracting.  He also owned a stage-line sixty miles long.  He was present at Harrisburg, during the anti-masonic trouble in Pennsylvania.  In 1840, he moved to Schuyler county, where he has since resided.  He has a fine farm adjoining, on the west, to the village of Littleton.  In 1821 he went to Tennessee and resided there for three years.  He there become personally acquainted with Gen. Jackson, who at that time was residing twelve miles from Nashville.  In 1852, he made an overland trip to California, in company with seven others.  He remained there four years and seven months, and then returned by way of Panama and New York, to his home.  He brought the first broom-corn seed to Schuyler county which he brought from Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania.  He also made the first brooms that were manufactured in Rushville.  Mr. Horton is a full-blooded Schuyler county democrat.

MASON W. HOWARD
  Mason W. Howard, was born in Knox County, Ohio, January 8, 1843.  His father, Joseph Howard, was born in Ohio in 1814.  His occupation was that of a farmer.  At the age of twenty-four he married Miss Emeline Baker.  They had six children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second.  In 1854 he moved to Iowa, and now resides there, on his farm.
  Mason W. received his education at Cornell College, Iowa, and after leaving Cornell, he graduated at Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College, in Chicago, being the first student who finished the telegraphic course in that institution.  On quitting school, he received a position on the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy railroad, and is still in the employ of that company.  August 1st, 1867, he married Miss Mary, daughter of Honorable Joseph M. Holyoke, of Wataga, Knox County, Illinois.  He has one child living and one deceased.  At present he is residing in the city of Rushville.

DR. JOHN D. HUBBARD
  Dr. John D. Hubbard was born Feb. 13, 1801, In the town of Marblehead, state of Massachusetts.  His father, Ebenezer Hubbard, was born at Concord, Massachusetts, in the year 1763.  He was a graduate of Harvard University, and was present at and witnessed the battle of Concord.  After finishing his course at college he studied divinity, and was afterwards a minister at Marblehead for twenty years.  At about the age of twenty-three, he married Miss Abigail, the daughter of Col. Johnathan Glover.  The fruits of that union was a family of ten children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest.  Mr. Hubbard died in November, 1800.  His wife, the mother of the Doctor, survived him twenty-two years.  The Doctor received most of his early education in Massachusetts, and finished his course of studies in Tennessee, to which latter state he had emigrated when only seventeen years of age.  His first practice of medicine was at Trenton, Tennessee.  In 1829 he was married to Miss Frankie, daughter of Col. R. H. Dyer, who was an old associate and intimate friend of the great Andrew Jackson.  In January, 1836, he removed to Hickman, Kentucky.  He left the latter place in 1849, and came to Rushville in 1855.  He then went to Clayton, residing there eight years; then he returned to Rushville where he has since resided.  He has two children who are both married.  The Doctor is now a hale and hearty old man, beloved and respected by all who know him, for his many virtues; and connected as he is with many of the old and patriotic families of the revolutionary period, whose names are to be found on the college rolls of the best colleges in the land, conduces to make his history more interesting and entertaining.

DANIEL IVINS
  Daniel Ivins was born near Princeton, New Jersey, Sept. 20th, 1816.  His father Theodore H. Ivins, was born on Burlington county, New Jersey, in 1794; his vocation was that of a farmer.  At the age of twenty-one he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Benjamin Inman, Esq.  They had a family of six children, only two of whom are now living, and of whom the subject of this sketch is the oldest.  Mrs. Ivins died in October, 1831; her husband survived her until September, 1832.  Daniel Ivins, grandfather of the subject of this sketch , served in the war of the revolution, and was judge of the court of Burlington county, New Jersey, for about thirty years.  He died at the advanced age of eighty-six years.  Daniel received his early education in the schools of New Jersey.  In 1839 he migrated to Preble county, Ohio, where, in the spring of 1843, he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Samuel Fowler, Esq.  In 1850 he removed to Schuyler county, and there purchased the farm on which he now resides.  He has a family of eight children, of whom the three oldest are deceased.  Politically, he is a supporter of the principles of the republican party, and during the war was one of those who stood firm, in Schuyler county, for the cause of the union.  Mr. Ivins has a good farm, which he has made from the primitive forest.  He is looked upon by his neighbors as a good men and genial neighbor.

EZRA JACKSON
  Mr. Ezra Jackson was born Feb. 26th, 1823, in Scott county, Indiana.  His father, Samuel Jackson, was born in North Carolina, and resided in that state until about the age of thirty years, when he removed to Scott county, Indiana.  His general vocation was that of farming, and in addition to that, he carried on the tanning business.  In 1820, he was married to Miss Esther, daughter of John Close, Esq.  The fruits of that marriage was a family of fifteen children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third.  In 1829, removed from Indiana to Schuyler county, Illinois, where he purchased a farm and engaged in farming and stock raising.  He died at his residence about the year 1835.  He wife survived he until 1869.  Ezra received most of his early education in the common schools of this county.  He worked on the farm until about the age of fifteen years, after which he learned the cooper’s trade, and followed that business until his marriage, which occured in February, 1846, to Miss Emily, daughter of Jesse Brunk, Esq.  They had a family of eight children, of whom seven are now living.  Mr. Jackson is now engaged in keeping hotel in Rushville, where, by his genial manner and gentlemanly deportment, he has gained many friends; and persons stopping at his house have the benefit of a good home.  Mr. Jackson has been successful in business.  His grandfather, Solomon Jackson, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war.  He fought bravely in many battles, and was at the battle of Guilford and Gates’s defeat.  Ezra’s son, Felix, served as a soldier in the late civil war, thus showing that the blood of the revolution hero yet runs in his veins.

MOSES L. JUSTUS
  Moses L. Justus was born in Hancock county, Illinois, Dec. 12, 1831.  His father, George W. Justus, was born in Middle Tennessee, about the year 1795, and in that state received his early education.  His vocation in the early part of his life was that of a teacher.  In 1828 he was married to Miss Susan Bates, daughter of William Bates, Esq., of Kentucky.  As the results of this marriage they had a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second.  Mr. Justus died at the residence of his son, F. M. Justus, in Schuyler county, at the age of sixty-six.  His wife, the mother of Moses L., was deceased about about one year previous to his death.  Moses L. spent most of his early days in the county, and here received his education.  At the age of twenty-six he was married to Miss Martha A., daughter of John L. Sepp, Esq., formerly of Tennessee.  The fruits of their marriage, is a family of five children, of whom three are deceased.  Mr. Justus's vocation has been that of milling for the last eight or ten years.  At present he is residing in Browning, where he is a member of the firm of Walton, Venters, & Co.  He is filling his second term of the office of justice of the peace.  He was never in a grocery or saloon to take strong drink in his life, and hence he is a strong advocate of the temperance cause.  Politically, he is a democrat.
 
1861 Militia Roll
HENRY KIRKHAM II
  Henry Kirkham was born in Preble county, Ohio, July 18, 1812.  His father, Henry Kirkham, Sr., was born in Wythe county, Virginia, September 2d, 1769.  His parents moved with him when he was quite young to Kentucky, and in that state he received his early education.  At about the age of twenty-three he was married to Miss Mary, daughter of John Gay, Esq., of Bourbon county, Kentucky.  They had a family of ten children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the ninth.  Mr. Kirkham participated in the war of 1812, as one of the commissaries to Gen. Wayne's army.  He served for seven years during the Indian wars, as a ranger.  About the year of 1810, he moved to Ohio and from there to Indiana.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  His wife died February 9, 1820.  He survived her until April 12, 1845.  Henry, Jr., received his early education in the common schools of Indiana, and on the 4th day of January, 1835, was married to Miss Elizabeth Hinkle.  The fruits of that union was a family of six children, all of whom are yet living.  Mrs. Kirkham died Sept. 26, 1847.  Mr. Kirkham was married to his present wife, Mrs. Francis Swan, March 26th, 1848.  At the time she had a family of six children.  She was the daughter of William and Margaret Wilson, formerly of Center county, Pennsylvania.  Mr. Kirkham, by his last wife has one child.  The subject of this sketch moved to Schuyler county in January, 1835, and has since been engaged in farming and stock raising.  At present he is residing on his farm in Buena Vista township.  During the late rebellion, two of his sons served in the army, and also two of his step-sons.  Politically, he was a supporter of the whig party, and since the organization of the republican party he has been a faithful worker in its ranks.





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