Old Settlers Bio page 2
ABRAHAM LAMASTER II
  Abraham Lamaster was born in Scott county, Indiana, June 18th, 1818.  His father, Abraham Lamaster, Sr., was born May 11th, 1777, in the state of Maryland.  At the age of nineteen he removed, with his father, to Kentucky, and there married Miss Orphala Lamaster, of Henry county, Kentucky.   In 1812 they removed to Scott county, Indiana, and in 1826 removed to Schuyler county, Ill., where he was among the earliest settlers.  His wife died May 6th, 1846; he survived her until April 11th, 1848.  Abraham, Jr., received his early education in Schuyler county.  At the age of thirty-two he married Miss Maria, daughter of Peter F. Sarott.  Mr. Lamaster's family consisted of eight children, one of whom is deceased.  Politically, he is an unflinching supporter of the republican party.  During the war he was assistant provost marshal on Schuyler county.  His grandfather, Hugh Lamaster, served in the war of the revolution.

WILLIAM J. LAMBERT II
  William Lambert was born in Mercer county, Kentucky, January 21st, 1832.  His father, William Lambert, was a native of the same state, and was married, in 1830, to Miss Catherine, daughter of Isaac Dennis.  In 1839 Mr. Lambert emigrated to Schuyler county, and settled in Rushville, where he died in the spring of 1844; his wife survived him until 1857.  They had a family of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest.  William received his early training and education in the common schools of Schuyler county, and at the age of twenty was married to Miss Josephine, daughter of Randolph Rose, Esq., of this county.  The fruits of their marriage was a family of ten children, only six of whom are now living.  Mr. Lambert now resides on his farm east of Littleton.  Much of his time is devoted to stock raising and feeding.  Politically,  he is a democrat.

ALFRED LANE
  Alfred Lane was born in Monroe county, Kentucky, April 13th, 1810; he is a son of the late Adrian and Susan Lane. Mr. Lane was a native of Tennessee, and his wife a native of Virginia. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the wilds of Kentucky, and came, with his parents, to this county and state, in 1829. When Mr. Lane came here the wild deer and Indians were abundant, roaming in the forest. He says he has frequently been without bread for weeks, subsisting on hominy, wild honey, and deer flesh. At the age of twenty-nine he married Miss Lydia, daughter of Jacob Stambaugh. They have a family of ten children, one of whom is married, the others remaining single. Mr. Lane is at present residing on his farm in Hickory, hale and hearty, His grandfather was a soldier in the revolution. Politically, he is a democrat.

ALBERT BROWN LAWLER
  Mr. Albert Brown Lawler was born in Bainbridge township, Schuyler county, Ill. June 10, 1840. His father, James Lawler, Sr., was born March 4, 1796, in Fauquir county, Virginia. He received his early education in the schools of that state. He is descended from the pure Virginia blood, and of' course, inherited the principles of the old Jefferson doctrine. His vocation was that of a farmer. At about the age of twenty-five he was married to Miss Nancy, daughter of a Mr. Harris, of Fauquir county, Virginia, who bore him six children, only four of whom are now living. Mr. Lawler was engaged in the revolutionary war. About the year 1835 he removed from Virginia to Schuyler county, Illinois. After remaining here he engaged in farming and the coopering business. His wife, the mother of Albert B., died at her residence in Bainbridge township, January, 1862. Mr. Lawler is at present residing at his home, in rather feeble health.
  Albert B. received most of his early education in the common schools of Schuyler county. He studied for a while under the instruction of Judge Johnston, soon after which he attended Davis & Tipton's commercial college, Peoria, and graduated from the same. On his return he studied law with Judge Johnston, in 1860, and an remained with him about a year and a half. He finished his law reading with Mr. Morgan, of Macomb. In the spring of 1865 he went to Brownville, Nebraska, and there entered into a law partnership with E. W. Thomas, formerly of Charleston, South Carolina. He remained there about it year, when he returned to Schuyler county, remaining here neatly a year; then he visited Virginia and Washington City, the old home of his father, and there spent several months. He was married, March 4, 1869, to Miss Josephine A. Lawler. They have a family of two children. At present he is residing on his farm in Bainbridge township. Politically, he is a supporter of the principles of the democratic party.

JAMES LAWLER II
  James Lawler, Jr., was born in Fauquir county, Virginia, March 14th, 1796. His father, James Lawler, Sr. was born Jan 8th, 1749, in the state of Pennsylvania. At about the age of twenty he married Miss Ruth Mathew. They had a family of four children. His wife died about the year 1782. He was again married in 1783; that time to Miss Anna, daughter of David Thomas, esq., of Fauquir county, Virginia. They had a family of six children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fifth, and the only one now living. Mr. Lawler served during the whole of the revolutionary war; he was secretary to General Washington a part of the time; he was engaged in many of the principal battles of the war. On his return home he engaged in farming and surveying. He was one of the leading men of that day, and for those early times, was considered a polished scholar. Politically, he was a Jeffersonian democrat. He died at his residence in Fauquir county, Va., March 4th, 1813; his wife survived him until December 5th, 1815. His son James, the subject of this sketch, received most of his early education in the schools of Fauquir county, and part of the time was spent under the tuition of his father. Much of his early life was spent in the usual work of the farm. At the age of twenty-five he married Miss Nancy, daughter of George Harris, Esq., of Fauquir county. After his marriage he engaged in farming and coopering, and continued the business in that state until 1835, when he removed to Schuyler county, Ill., landing in Beardstown Nov. 10th, 1835. In this country he carried on his former business. His family consisted of six children; only four are now living - three sons and one daughter, all residing in Schuyler county and doing well. His wife died January 28th, 1862. Mr. Lawler served seven years as justice of the peace. He is, and always has been, a strong supporter of the democratic party. His son, John Hugh, has filled the honorable office of sheriff of the county. Mr. Lawler is at present residing on his farm in rather feeble health.

JOHN HUGH LAWLER
  John Hugh Lawler, ex sheriff of Schuyler County, was born in Fauquir county, Virginia, June 26, 1823, and in the schools of that state and Illinois he received his early education. He was twelve years of age when he came with his father to this state, where he worked for his father at coopering and farming. He is the son of James Lawler, Sr. of Schuyler county, Illinois. At the age of twenty-two he was married to Miss Elvira, the daughter of Enoch Edminston {Edmonston}, Esq. They had a family of two children, both now deceased. His wife died April 8, 1848. At that time he was residing in the city of Rushville, and was deputy sheriff of Schuyler county. He was married to his second wife, Miss Almira Elizabeth, daughter of William and Mary Perry, on the 15th of February, 1854, and in the fall of 1856 he was elected to the office of sheriff of the county. With his last wife he had a family of five children; one now deceased. Mrs. Lawler died May 9, 1871. Mr. Lawler held the office of justice of the peace for four years, having been elected thereto by the democratic party, his term expiring in 1869. At present he is residing on his farm, in the enjoyment of excellent health.

Dr. David C. LINN
  Dr. D. C. Linn was born in Franklin county, Indiana, March 29th, 1831. His father, John Linn, was born in Ohio in 1804. He received his early education in Ohio; his vocation was that of a carpenter. At the age of twenty-two he married Miss Nancy, daughter of John Gant, Esq. The fruits of this marriage was a family of eleven children; the subject of this sketch is the fourth child. In 1839 Mr. Linn moved from Franklin county, Indiana, to Adams county, Illinois, and in 1840 purchased the farm on which he now resides. The Doctor received his early education at McKendree College, St. Clair county, Illinois, and is also a graduate of the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati. He commenced the practice of medicine in Plymouth, Hancock county, Illinois. In 1858 he moved to Frederick, Schuyler county. In March, 1861, he was married to Miss Adda, daughter of James Folsom; she died August 22d, 1862. He was married to his second wife, Mrs. Della Hodson, February 2d, 1863. The Doctor has an extensive practice. He is spoken of by his friends as a radical republican. In the spring of 1864 he enlisted in the army as surgeon, and remained there during the war.
 
1861 Militia Roll  Another bio
GEORGE LITTLE
  Mr. George Little was born in Columbia, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1808. His father, James Little, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1780; May, 1805 he immigrated to America, landing in New York; then proceeded to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, where he settled. At the age of twenty he married Miss Rebecca, daughter of Martin Greer, Esquire. They had a family of six children; five now living. He immigrated to Schuyler County in 1837, and died at his residence in Rushville in September of 1851. His wife, the mother of George, survived him until 1864.
  The subject of this sketch, received his education in the schools of Pennsylvania, and very early took charge of a shoe manufactory for his father, and continued the same until 1836. He then came to Rushville, where he engaged in mercantile pursuits. In September, 1840, he married Miss Mary J., daughter of Thomas Lloyd, Esquire. In 1848 she died, leaving a child {Mary Rebecca}, who is now the wife of William H. Scripps. In 1852 Mr. Little was married to Miss Lydia E. daughter of the late George H. Scripps. They have a family of five children; one deceased. Since 1844 he has been a member of the firm of Little & Ray. Said firm is large owners of the First National Bank in Rushville.

DANIEL LOUDERBACK
  Daniel Louderback was born in the state of Indiana, December 1st, 1827. His father, Abraham Louderback, was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, in the year 1786, and at about the age of thirty, was married to Miss Barbara Long. They had a family of eight children, of whom the subject is sketch is the seventh. Soon after his marriage Mr. Louderback removed to Indiana, and from that state he came to Schuyler county in 1829, and purchased a farm near Rushville. About the year 1839 he purchased a farm in Hickory township. Mr. Louderback laid out Bluff City. His wife, the mother of Daniel, died in 1845 or 46, soon after which he was married to his second wife. Mr. Louderback died at his residence in July, 1871. Daniel received his early education in Schuyler county, and in 1847 was married to Miss Elsie Ann, daughter of David Shaw, Esq. The fruits of this union was a family of four children, of which all are now deceased. His wife died in the fall of 1851. The next July he was married to Miss Sophia Souverins. They had a family of three children, of which only one is living at the present time. His second wife died about three years after marriage, and on the 15th of January, 1859, he was married to Miss Francis Stronsnider. With his last wife he has six children, of whom one is now deceased. Mr. Louderback's vocation is that of a farmer, and we can justly say that he has one of the best improved farms in the valley of the Illinois river. Politically, he is a supporter of the democratic party.
 
1861 Militia Roll
MICHAEL McCABE
  Michael McCabe, the subject if this sketch, was born in County Arma, Ireland, August 19, 1819.  His father, Francis McCabe, was also born in Ireland.  He carried on the business of blacksmithing and farming.  About the age of twenty-two he married Miss Mary Charter.  They had a family of four children, of whom Michael is the youngest.  His wife, the mother of Michael, died in 1819.  Her husband survived her until 1812 {this is wrong}, when he died at his residence.
  Michael received most of his education in Ireland, at pay schools.  He immigrated to the United States, landing in New York April 1, 1845.  He has followed the business of railroading for fourteen years.  In 1851 he married Miss Mary Weldon.  They have a family of four children, all living.  He is at present farming, and occasionally takes railroad contracts.  He has been quite successful in his business enterprises.  He is of that class of citizens who are in favor of railroads for the reason that they develop the best resources of the country, and enable the people to achieve greater results in commerce.
  Mr. McCabe has been a life long democrat, and still adheres to the staunch principles of that party that carried our country through so many years of peace, prosperity, and tranquility, and which rendered such efficient assistance in our late troubles; holding that there never flourished as during the many years previous to the war.
  Mr. McCabe is still residing on his farm, hale and hearty.


JAMES G. McCREARY
  Hugh McCreary, the father of James G., was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1780. He received his early education in the schools of Ireland, and at the age of twenty-one married Miss Sarah, daughter of Matthew Gray, Esquire. His vocation was that of a farmer. He came to the United States in 1827, landing at Philadelphia, where he resided about a year. From Pennsylvania he removed to Schuyler County, Illinois, where he purchased a farm, and engaged in stock raising and agricultural pursuits until the summer of 1834, when they both died of cholera.
  James G. McCreary was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, July 14, 1815, being the youngest of eight children. He received his early education in Ireland, and finished it in the schools of Pennsylvania and Illinois. At the age of eighteen years he entered a drug store in Jacksonville, Illinois, to learn the business, with Daniel B. Ayers, Esquire, formerly of Philadelphia. At the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Ann Maria, daughter of John V. Putnam, Esquire, of Montgomery County, New York. Mrs McCreary's father having died when she was quite young, she came west with her mother and step-father.
  Soon after his marriage Mr. McCreary engaged in the drug business, and continued the same for a period of thirty years. He is now a leading member of the banking firm of J. G. McCreary & Company, of Rushville. He is also carrying on, in company with Mr. J. C. Bell, a large dry goods and general mercantile establishment.
  Mr. McCreary has had a family of twelve children, of whom six are now living -- three sons and three daughters. Those married are as follows: Oldest son, William, was married to Miss Margrett Jane Baker. He is now deceased, having left a wife and two children. Miss Anna M. was married to Mr. Charles H. Munger. They now reside in Kimmundy, Marion County, Illinois. Miss Josephine to Mr. George B. Allen. They are living at Mt. Sterling, Brown County, in this state. Robert married Miss Anna M., daughter of Dr. Worthington, of Rushville. They now reside in the city of Rushville. John P. enlisted in the army at the age of twenty-one, in the 119th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers. He was with Sherman's army on the march to the sea; was taken prisoner, and soon after transferred to Andersonville Prison, where he died. Miss Helen, Charles, and Walter are all single, and living with their parents.
  Mr. McCreary's political principles are identified with those of the republican party.


SAMUEL McCREARY
  Samuel McCreary was born January 10th, 1816, in Trumbull county, Ohio. His father, Thomas McCreary, was born 1768, on the eastern shore of Maryland; his vocation was that of a farmer. At the age of twenty-seven he married Miss Mary, daughter of Robert McLoughlin. In 1798 he removed to Ohio county, Virginia; in 1804 he removed to Trumbull county, Ohio, and in 1822 he located in Knox county, where he died in 1834; his wife survived him twelve years. Samuel received his early education in Ohio; he also attended Kenyon College. After leaving school he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits. In September 1840, he was married to Miss Eliza Ann, daughter of Thomas Witt, and in the fall of that year he removed to Schuyler county, where he engaged in the cooper business for several years. In 1846 he was elected to the office of justice of the peace, and, by re-election, has held that office ever since. His family consisted of nine children, four of whom are deceased. He has held many responsible positions, among them that of postmaster, for four years under Johnson's administration; was deputy collector six years, and for a time acting collector for the ninth internal revenue district. During the war he was a staunch Union man, and acted with the republican party until the negro was made a voter, since which time he has identified himself and his interests with the democratic party. He is a man who is highly esteemed by his fellow citizens. He is now residing in Rushville in the enjoyment of good health.


GEORGE W. METZ
  George W. Metz, the youngest son of Jacob and Phoebe Metz, was born in Shenandoah County, Virginia, June 16, 1815. In 1818 he moved, with his father, to Harrison County, Virginia. In 1826 his father moved to Newport, Kentucky, where he died. His mother removed to Greenup County, Kentucky. At the age of fifteen he went to Portsmouth, Ohio, where he learned the saddler's trade, and remained there until the fall of 1836. In October of that he landed in Rushville, where he has remained ever since. In 1837 he married Miss Louisa Jane Snyder, by whom he raised four children, two daughters and two sons, Henry and John. In 1861 he married the second time; this time to Mrs. Margrett M. Wright. He has always been a staunch democrat, and as such has often been elected to fill different offices in his county. In 1867 he represented Schuyler County in the legislature of Illinois, and now ranks among the oldest settlers of his county and town.


HENRY S. METZ
  Henry S. Metz, the subject of this sketch, was born in Rushville, September 1st, 1845. He is the son of Hon. G. W. Metz, who is engaged in mercantile pursuits in this city. Henry received his early education in the common schools of St. Louis. After graduating, he read law with Hon. Pinkney H. Walker then supreme judge of the state of Illinois. After read one year, he was admitted to the bar, and is now practicing in Rushville. He is a young man of extraordinary energy and ability, and bids fair to succeed in his profession.


TICE MISENHIMER
  Tice Misenhimer was born in Clay County, Illinois, September 27th, 1837. His father, Jacob Misenhimer, was born in Illinois in 1815, and received his early training and education in this state; his vocation was that of a farmer. In 1836 he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob McGrew, Esquire. They raised a family of five children, all living, of whom the subject of this sketch is the oldest. Mr. Misenhimer died at his residence in Clay County, Illinois, in the fall of 1844; his wife survived him until 1863. The subject of this sketch received his early education in the common schools of Schuyler County, Illinois, and at an early age he commenced clerking in the store of Farwell & Company, where he remained several years. At the age of twenty-three he married Miss Eliza M., daughter of W. A. J. Black, Esquire, who was among the oldest pioneers of Schuyler County. During the late rebellion Mr. Misenhimer was engaged in speculating in stock. He has a family of two children living, and one deceased. At present he is engaged in keeping hotel in the town of Frederick, and by his urbane and courteous manner deserves a fair share of the patronage of the traveling public. Any one stopping at his hotel will be finely treated. Mr. M. is also agent for the St. Louis and Peoria Packet Company.


JAMES MONTGOMERY II
  James Montogomery, Jr., was born in the state of Kentucky, April 4th, 1829. His father, James Montgomery, Sr., was born in North Carolina about the year 1791, and at the age of twenty-five he married Miss Polly, daughter of William Champ, Esquire, of Kentucky. The fruits of that marriage was a family of twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the sixth, and of whom nine are now living; four served in the Union Army during the late war of the rebellion, one of whom was killed on Sherman's celebrated march to the sea. Mr. Montgomery emigrated to Illinois in the fall of 1849, and settled in McDonough County, and there engaged in farming. In 1855 he moved to Oquawka, Henderson County, this state, and there died at his residence in 1864; his wife, the mother of James, survived her husband only about a year. James, Jr., received his education in the common schools of Indiana, and in August, 1849, he came to Schuyler County, Illinois, where he has resided ever since. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, 2d Illinois Cavalry, commanded by Colonel Noble, and participated in many hard-fought battles, such as Holly Springs, Champion Hills, Vicksburg, and at Jackson, Mississippi. August 12th, 1864, he was mustered out at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and immediately repaired to his home in Frederick, where he now resides.
  2nd Cavalry page 
1861 Militia Roll
GIBSON W. MOORE
  Gibson W. Moore, Esq., was born in Knox county, city of Mount Vernon, November 7th, 1828. His father was born in the state of New York, in 1788. He enlisted in the war of 1812, as a private, and soon after was promoted to and received a captain's commission. He was surrendered a prisoner of war at Hull's surrender, and was afterwards exchanged, and the he re-enlisted, and was present and wounded at the battle of Plattsburg. He was also in the battle of Lundy's Lane, and many other hard fought battles of that war. He served five years in the regular army, and after the expiration of that time, received an honorable discharge, and returned home. In 1820 he was married to Mrs. Matilda Cooper, daughter of Gipson Worrell, of New Jersey. The fruits of that marriage was a family of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third. In 1843 he moved to Schuyler county, and here engaged in agricultural pursuits. He died at his residence in Woodland township, Fulton county, in 1851. His wife survived him until 1863. Gispon received his education principally in this state. He came to Illinois in 1842, and in 1858 was married to Miss Mary, daughter of James Osburn, Esq., of Fulton county. They have a family of four children, all of whom are now living. Mr. Moore was the first settler in the town of Bluff City, where he has resided for the last thirteen years, engaged in milling, during which time he has held many local offices, and is at present justice of the peace. Politically, he is a supporter of the democratic party.


JAMES MOORE
  James Moore, Esq., was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, August 30th, 1828. His father, the late Thomas Moore, was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, September 19th, 1863 {typo - 1803}, and was a son of David and Lucretia Moore, who were natives of North Carolina. At a very early day he moved to Kentucky, where his vocation was that of a farmer. The subject of this sketch received his early education and training in the common schools of the state of Kentucky. His boyhood days were principally spent on the farm with his parents. On the 29th day of December, 1823, he {Thomas} was married to Miss Mary, daughter of John and Nancy Elmore, of Lincoln, Kentucky. The fruits of that union was a family of thirteen children, of whom twelve reached mature age. There were six sons and six daughters. Ten are now living. At the age of twenty-two, Mr. Moore was appointed drill master of the Kentucky militia, for that section, with the rank of captain; he served as such for a period of eight years. In the fall of 1836, he moved to Schuyler county, and settled on the farm where his son, John D., now resides. His occupation was always that of a farmer. In 1847 he purchased the farm which is the old homestead, of Jack Tullis, who was one of the old settlers of the county, and it is said that on that farm was built the first frame house in the county. Mr. Moore died at his residence on the 22d day of January, 1867. His wife is still living at the old homestead, hale and hearty. In politics, he was republican. Mr. Moore, when he landed with his family in Schuyler county, had only about fifteen dollars in money, but by dint of hard work and energy, he accumulated for himself and family a competence, and now six of his sons own fine farms, all in sight of each other on the level prairies in Buena Vista. They all have splendid improvements, and well cultivated farms, worth at least on hundred thousand dollars. This shows what may be accomplished by steady industry, perseverance energy. The Moore settlement embraces some of the most fertile soil in the county, and is one of the most beautiful locations in that section.
  James Moore, the subject of this sketch, received his early education in this county. He was only eight years of age when his parents moved from Kentucky to Illinois. Most of his time was spent at home on the farm until 1853, when he made an overland trip to California on a gold hunting expedition. He met with reasonable success in finding the glittering metal. Was absent two years, when he returned home by way of the Isthmus and New York. After his return he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and on the 5th day of October, 1859, was married to Margaret Isabella, daughter of James and Nancy Ellis, of Schuyler county. The fruits of their marriage was a family of five children, of whom only three are now living. Mr. Moore is residing on his farm in Buena Vista township. Politically, he is a republican.


JOHN D. MOORE
  John D. Moore was born in Lincoln county, Kentucky, Dec. 7th, 1852 {Transcriber's Note: should be 1825}. He is a son of the late Thomas Moore. He received most of his early education in the district schools of Schuyler county. In the spring of 1849 he made an overland trip to California, on a gold hunting expedition, meeting with reasonable success. In the spring of 1851 he returned by the way of the isthmus and New Orleans to his home. At the age of twenty-six he was married to Miss Mary A., daughter of Samuel and Rachel Turner. The fruits of that union was a family of ten children, eight of whom are now living. At present Mr. Moore is residing on his farm in Buena Vista township, which is well improved, and one of the best in that section of country.
 
1861 Militia Roll  Another bio
JOHN L. MOORE II
  John L. Moore, Jr., was born in Springfield, Ill., July 5, 1824. He was the first male child born in Springfield. He is a son of John and Elizabeth Moore. His vocation was that of farmer. He received his early education in the common schools of Illinois. At the age of twenty-eight, on January 3, 1855, he was married to Miss Jemima J., daughter of the late Edward and Jane Doyle. Mrs. Moore was born September 7, 1828. The fruits of that union was a family of five children, all of whom are now living. Mr. Moore died at his residence - the old homestead in Buena Vista {Schuyler County, Illinois} - March 14, 1864. Politically, he was an earliest supporter of the principles of the republican party. He was a man highly respected by his neighbors and fellow citizens. Mrs. Moore and family are still living on the old homestead.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JONATHAN R. NEILL
  Jonathan R. Neill is the youngest son of James Neill, who was born in Ireland, A. D. 1785.  He immigrated to the United States in 1815, and was married to Miss Mary W. Stewart in 1817, and settled on a farm in Weathersfield Township, Trumbull County, Ohio, where Jonathan R. was born, January 25, A. D. 1837.  He came with his father, in 1852, to Illinois, and settled near Rushville.  His early education was such as was afforded by the district schools.  In 1869 he was married to Miss Felicia H. Richmond, daughter of Reverend John P. Richmond, M. D.  In 1860 he removed to Hannibal, Missouri, where he engaged in the manufacturing business.  In 1865 he returned to Rushville, where he now resides.  In 1869 he was unanimously nominated, by the democratic party, as their candidate for the county superintendent of public schools, and was elected, by a large majority, to that honorable position, which he stills holds.  He is virtually a self-made man, and is worthy of the confidence reposed in him by the people.


ABNER LEGRAND NOBLE
  Abner Legrand Noble was born in Madison County, Kentucky, January 12, 1822. His grandfather, Ignatius Ranson, emigrated to Kentucky from Virginia at a very early day. Abner's father, William Noble, was born in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1794. His vocation was that of a painter. On the breaking out of the War of 1812 he joined the army of Richmond, Kentucky, and served in the department commanded by General Harrison. After peace was declared and hostilities at an end, he received an honorable discharge. Soon After returning to his home he married Miss Elender, daughter of Ignatius Ranson. She was born in the state of Virginia. After their marriage they removed to Schuyler County, Illinois, October 20, 1835, where he purchased a farm. He died at his residence, October 13, 1844. His wife, the mother of Abner, is still living at the advanced age of seventy-eight years. They had a family of six children, only four of whom are now living.
  Abner had but limited advantages for obtaining an education, and hence he is ostensibly a self-made man. He occupied his time on the farm until about the age of twenty-one. In 1845 he married Miss Catherine, daughter of Peter F. Serrott, Esquire. the fruits of this marriage was a family of four children, three daughter and one son. The latter W. H. H. is deceased. Mr. Noble has served the county as constable for twenty-two years without cessaton, during which time he was deputy-sheriff under two sheriffs. He also served a term as county clerk; was appointed supervisor to fill a vacancy, and also served one regular term. He has been collecting, for various parties, for twenty-nine years, and by his genial and courteous manner generally makes collections without process of law. He is highly respected by his fellow citizens as a man of honesty and integrity, and we commend him to the patronage of all who have business to be attended to in his line - that of general collector. Mr. Noble is residence in the city of Rushville, surrounded by a happy and interesting family.
 
1861 Militia Roll
GEORGE F. OWEN
  Lieutenant George F. Owen was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, January 31, 1831, and is now the oldest man residing in Buena Vista Township, who was born in said Township. He is a son of William Owens, Esquire, also a resident of Schuyler County, residing on his farm, near his son. Mr. Owen received his early education in the district schools of Schuyler County, and at the age of twenty-three was married to Miss Caroline U., the daughter of William and Ruth Brower, formerly of Ohio, but at that time residents of Illinois. In the fall of 1862 Mr. Owen enlisted in Company B, 119th Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, commanded by Colonel T. J. Kinney. He participated in many hard fought battles. He entered the service as a private, was raised to the rank of sergeant and orderly sergeant, and was afterwards given the rank of first lieutenant, and as such was mustered out at the expiration of his term of service, in September, 1865, at Mobile, Alabama, and then returned home to his family and engaged, as before, in agricultural pursuits. At present he is residing on his farm, in Buena Vista Township. Politically, he is a supporter of the principles of the republican party. His first vote was cast for General Scott, for President.
   119th page 
1861 Militia Roll
WILLIAM OWEN
  William Owen was born is Gallatin County, Kentucky (since formed into Trimble and Carroll Counties), on the 3d day of February, 1813. His father, Honorable David Owen, was born in Virginia in the year 1772, and received his early education in the district schools of that state and Kentucky. At the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Mary, daughter of John Wilson, formerly of New Jersey. Mr. Owen had a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fifth. At the age of fourteen he emigrated, with his parents to Kentucky, which was then a wilderness abounding in wild deer, wolves, and other animals peculiar to that region, with the wild Indian roaming through the forests, having to undergo all the perils and hardships incident to a pioneer life. Mr. Owen served in the war of 1812, under General Harrison, holding the position of adjutant. He participated in several battles, and at the expiration of the war he received an honorable discharge, and returned home to his family. His wife, the mother of William, died in August, 1821; soon after he married Miss Ann Buckley; they had a family of six children. Mr. Owen represented his district for two years in the legislature of Kentucky; his vocation was that of a farmer; he died at his residence in Kentucky on the 8th of November, 1833. William received his early education in Kentucky, and spent his early days at home on the farm with his parents. At the age of twenty-five he was married to Miss Helen, daughter of George and Mary Swan. They had a family of seven children, of whom only four are now living; three are married and settled near the old homestead. In the fall of 1829 he removed to Schuyler County, Illinois, and soon after purchased the farm on which he now resides, located about three miles west of Rushville, and there engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising. When Mr. Owen came to this state the country was very new, and at that time abounded in plenty of deer, wolves, and other wild animals. With his wife and daughter he still resides at the old homestead in reasonable health. In politics, Mr. Owen was a whig, and, since the organization of the republican party, has adhered to it's principles.


HONORABLE EPHRAIM J. PEMBERTON
  Hon. Ephraim J. Pemberton was born April 13th, 1834, in Knox County, Kentucky. Thomas Pemberton, his father, was a farmer, and was born November 17th, 1800, in Sullivan County, Tennessee; removed, when young, with his father, to Kentucky, and received his education in the schools of that state. Was there married, September 7th, 1826, to Miss Deborah Moore, daughter of Ephraim Moore, a farmer of the state of Kentucky, and resided in Knox County, Kentucky, until 1835, when he removed to Illinois, and in the fall of 1836 settled in Oakland Township, in Schuyler County, where he continued to reside until his decease, December 3d, 1870.
  Ephraim J. Pemberton received his education in the common schools of Oakland Township, and continued to work on the farm with his father until January, 1862, when he removed to and settled in Rushville, where he now resides. He commenced the study of the law in November, 1859, with the Honorable Dewitt C. Johnson, but did his reading principally at home, - at his father's. Was licensed "Attorney at Law" in December, 1861, and was married April 3d, 1862, to Miss Tennessee J. Hills, daughter of Henry O. Hills, also a resident farmer of Oakland Township. He was elected and commissioned Justice of the Peace in November, 1864, and was elected and commissioned county judge of Schuyler County in September, 1865, to fill a vacancy in that office, and was in November following, elected to the general term of that office, and again, in November, 1869. He is also engaged in the practice of the law.


JAMES M. PETTIGREW
  James M. Pettigrew was born in Christian County, Kentucky, May 1st, 1831. His father, James Pettigrew, was born in the same county and state, on the 26th of May, 1805, and received his early education in the district schools of that state. In 1826 he was married to Miss Sarah Lancaster, daughter of Henry Lancaster, Esquire, of Kentucky. The fruits of this marriage was a family of eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the third. Mr. Pettigrew immigrated to Schuyler County, Illinois, in 1833, and engaged in farming and stock raising, which occupation he has followed ever since. He is now residing at his residence, hale and hearty.
  James M., received his early training and education in the schools of Schuyler County, and at the age of twenty-one was married to Miss Mary Ann, daughter of Michael Thornton, Esquire. The fruits of this marriage was a family of nine children, of whom three are now deceased. Mr. Pettigrew's vocation is that of a farmer. Politically, he is a supporter of the old Jeffersonian and Jackson principles.
 
1861 Militia Roll
WILLIAM C. RENO
  William C. Reno was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, September 9, 1838.  His father, Jonathan Reno, was born in Middle Tennessee, November 3, 1811, and in that state he received his early education, in the district schools.  In 1828 he immigrated to Schuyler County, Illinois, and settled in the section which is now embraces in Browning Township, where he has resided ever since.  At about the age of twenty-two he was married to Miss Eliza Thornton, the daughter of Felix H. Thornton, Esquire, of Schuyler County, Illinois.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of eleven children, of whom only eight are now living.   The subject of this sketch is the third child.  Mr. Reno's vocation is that of a farmer.  He and his wife are still residing at their residence, hale and hearty.  He has held many local offices of the county, and is highly respected citizen.
  William C. received his early education in the common schools of Schuyler County, Illinois, and spent his early times on the farm, with his father.  On arriving at the age of twenty-three he was married to Miss Rebecca A. Wallace, daughter of A. C. Wallace, Esquire.  They have a family of four children.  Mr. Reno is now holding the office of county supervisor from Browning Township.  His vocation is that of a farmer and stock raiser.  Politically, he ever stands ready to support the principles of the old Jeffersonian and Jackson democracy.  At present he is residing on his farm in Browning Township.
 
1861 Militia Roll
GEORGE WASHINGTON SCRIPPS
  George W. Scripps was born December 20, 1825, in Cape Girardeau County, Missouri. His father, George H. Scripps, was born in England, in 1791; came with his parents, when but a few weeks old, to the United States, and settled in Virginia; subsequently removed to Missouri; in 1814 was married to Mary Hiler; in 1836 came to Rushville, Illinois. Mrs. Scripps died in August, 1851; G. H. Scripps died December, 1859. George W. came to this country with his parents; labored in early life in his father's tannery and grist mill. He subsequently taught school for a term of years, and in July, 1856, established the "Schuyler Citizen", a weekly newspaper, of which he is still editor and proprietor.
 
1861 Militia Roll
WILLIAM HENRY BAKER SCRIPPS
  William H. Scripps was born March 31st, 1838, in Rushville, Schuyler County, Illinois. His father, the late Reverend John Scripps, was born in England in 1784. His parents emigrated to America when he was only five years of age. They settled in the state of Virginia. Mr. Scripps engaged, early in life, in the tannery business in Cape Girareau, Missouri. He left that business in charge of his brother, George, and engaged in preaching for the Methodist denomination. At one time his circuit was the whole state of Illinois. Mr. Scripps was a self-made man. After preaching for a long time his health failed him. He then engaged in mercantile pursuits in Rushville, landing at the old Erie landing the first stock of goods ever brought to Schuyler County. He was married in Wabash County to Miss Agnes Corril. They had a family of seven children; six are now living; the subject of this sketch is the youngest child. Mr. Scripps died at his residence in August, 1865; his wife survived him about nine months. Wm. H. received his early education in the schools of Schuyler County. At eleven years of age he entered his father's printing office and continued at that business until twenty years of age. He then engaged in clerking in Beardstown, and remained there two years. he afterward received the responsible position of cashier of the Chicago post office, under the late John L. Scripps, editor of the Chicago Tribune. He held that position until 1866. On the 14th of June, 1865, he was married to Miss Mary R., daughter of Mr. George Little. They have a family of two children. After leaving the post office he went into the banking firm of Scripps, Preston, & Kean, Chicago, as a government clerk. In September, 1869, he opened a clothing house in Rushville, in the company with E. P. Chase. At present he is carrying, on the business alone. Mr. Scripps is united, by marriage and otherwise, to many of the oldest and most respectable families in that section of the state. As could easily be observed, he is a staunch supporter and defender of the cardinal principles of the republican party.


LEONARD SHERRILL
  Leonard Sherrill was born in Shelby County, Illinois, November 4, 1831. His father, Alexander Sherrill, Sr., was born in South Carolina, about 1796. He was mustered into the United States service in the War of 1812, but was not required to go to the front, as hostilities soon after ended. He was married to his second wife, Miss Elizabeth Ridings, formerly of South Carolina, about the year 1820. The fruits of that union was a family of eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the tenth. Eight are still living. Mr. Sherrill moved with his family to Tennessee, at an early day, and from there to Illinois, in 1825, settling in Shelby County, and from there he moved to Schuyler County, Illinois, in 1836, and purchased a farm and engaged in stock raising. He died at the residence of his son, Wilson, in June, 1862. His wife, the mother of Leonard, is still living, at an advanced age.
  Leonard received his early training in the schools of Schuyler County, and at the age of twenty-four he married Miss Ethaline Peninah, daughter of Jonathan Reno, Esquire, of this county. The fruits of that union was a family of two children. Mrs. Sherrill died on the 14th day of June, 1862; and in 1863 the subject of this sketch was married to Miss Elizabeth Lancaster, daughter of T. T. Lancaster. With her he had a family of three children, one of whom is deceased.
  Mr. Sherrill's principal vocation is the of engineer. At present he is residing in the village of Browning. Politically, he is a Douglas democrat.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JOHN M. SPANGLER
  John M. Spangler was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, May 4th, 1834. His great grandfather Spangler was born in Germany, and at an early age settled in Pennsylvania. His grandfather, David Spangler, emigrated from Pennsylvania to Bourbon County, Kentucky; his vocation was that of a farmer. He removed to Indiana and settled in Clark county, where he died. William Spangler, Sr., father of John M., was in Bourbon County, Kentucky, as early as September, 1799, in what was then known as the dark and bloody grounds, and there, in the wilds of Kentucky, he received the rudiments of his education. He removed with his father to Indiana, and there married Miss Nancy Swartz. On the 16th day of March, 1826, he came to Schuyler County, Illinois, and hence is spoken of as being one of it's early settlers. He has a family of five children; all are at present living. His wife, the mother of John M., died November 6th, 1845; Mr. Spangler survived her until February 3d, 1863. John M. received his early education in the common schools of Illinois, and at the age of nineteen he entered a mercantile house as clerk, and continued that business until he was elected by the democratic party, in November, 1869, to the office of clerk of the county court. He was married April 24th, 1860, to Miss Emma J. Tomer, daughter of Nathan Tomer, Esquire. They have a family of four children, one deceased. Mr. Spangler is a young man of more than ordinary ability, and undoubtedly he will attain higher position in the political field.


JOSHUA N. SPEED, DR.
  Dr. Joshua N. Speed was born in Boyle County, Kentucky, February 1st, 1834. His father, Judge William Speed, was born in Casey County, Kentucky, June 8th, 1811. He received his early education in Kentucky, and at the age of seventeen learned the cabinet making trade. In 1833 he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Joshua Nichols, Esquire. He carried on the cabinet making business at Danville, Kentucky. While residing in that state he served as police judge for several years in that city. In 1854 he removed to Schuyler County, Illinois, and is at present residing in the city of Rushville, in the enjoyment of good health. He has a family of four children, of which three are now living. Joshua graduated at Centre Collage, Kentucky, in 1852, at the early age of eighteen years. In 1852 he received the honorary degree of Bachelor of Arts, and in 1860 that of Master of Arts. After leaving school he turned his attention to teaching for a few years. He graduated from the Iowa State University in the winter of 1859-60, there receiving the degree of M. D. In 1861 he was married to Miss Ann Virginia Ellen, daughter of the late Reverend John Scripps. The Doctor has an interesting family of three children. He is now engaged in an extensive practice in Rushville, and by his genial, friendly, and courteous manners, wins hosts of friends. He is a young man of good attainments and plenty of energy to make life a success. By marriage he is connected with some of the finest families and oldest residents of Schuyler County, Illinois, who, by their energy and perseverance, helped to make the county what it is.


WARRINGTON SPILLER
  Warrington Spiller was born July 9th, 1821. His father, John Spiller, was born on Old Virginia, Loudon County. His residence was on the banks of the world reowned Potomac. In the year 1747 {this isn't right}, at the early age of seventeen years, he entered the Continental army of the revolution, and served seven years under the command of General Marion. After the expiration of the war, and the Independence of the colonies was acknowledged by the mother county, he received an honorable discharge and returned home to his parents, soon after settling on Wheeling Island, in the Ohio River, which beautiful and luxuriant retreat is now know as Zane's Island. At about the age of twenty-six, Mr. Spiller was married to Miss Margaret Jackson, of Pennsylvania. The fruits of that union was a family of nine children. His wife died in 1808, and about a year afterwards he moved to Jefferson County, Ohio, where he became acquainted with, and married, in 1820, Miss Catherine Marker, formerly of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. They has a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second. Mr. Spiller died at his residence in Ohio, on the 24th day of March, 1831; his vocation was that of a farmer; his wife died August 25th, 1866, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Boyd, of Schuyler County, Illinois. All, except one, of the children by his last wife are now living; the youngest child is now forty-six years of age. Warrington received his early education in the common schools of Ohio, and at the age of twenty-four was married to Miss Eliza, daughter of David Boyd, Esquire, of Ohio. In 1840 he removed, with his family, to Fulton County, Illinois, there engaging in agricultural pursuits. In 1860 he removed to the beautiful valley of the Illinois River, in Schuyler County, and purchased a farm, the same on which he now resides. Mr. Spiller's family consisted of nine children, three of whom are deceased; three of the children are married and settled in Schuyler County. He and his wife are still hale and hearty. Politically, he always has, and expects always to, support the principles of the democratic party.
  Note: I know there is transcribing errors.  I'm trying to find the original to fix them.  Sara Hemp


JEREMIAH STUMM
  Jeremiah Stumm, county surveyor of Schuyler County, Illinois, was born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, on the 13th of April, 1827, and received the rudiments of an English education from his mother, who now resides in Hardin County, Ohio. In 1855 he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter trade, and during his apprenticeship, by dint of hard labor, at leisure hours, acquired sufficient education to place him, as he now stands, first among practical mechanics and surveyors in Illinois. After apprenticeship, and some years spent as a "tramping jour.", he came to Illinois and landed in Rushville, December 24th, 1856, and in a few days thereafter took the contract to build the present county jail. In 1863, he was first elected county surveyor, and has not since regularly followed any other business. His first vote was for Zach. Taylor, since which time he has been a radical democrat, and those who know him best think that, politically, he won't be anything else.
  Transcriber's Note: The county jail is now the Schuyler County Jail Museum and Historical Society's building.


JOHN SUTTON, CAPTAIN
  Capt. John Sutton was born in Bude, England, December 11th, 1836. He is a son of Thomas Sutton. In 1843 he emigrated to America with his parents, soon after locating in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, from which place he moved to Kansas in 1855, and in 1856 he came to Schuyler County, Illinois, locating at Pleasant View. In May, 1859, he was married to Miss Isabella, daughter of Lewis B. and Nancy Woodward, formerly St. Louis. The fruits of their marriage is a family of five children. Soon after his marriage he moved to Rushville, where, for a short period, he carried on blacksmithing, and on the 14th of June, 1862, he enlisted in Company G, 73d Regiment, Illinois Volunteers, and was elected second lieutenant of that company. On the 21st of August of the same year he was commissioned captain. After the organization of the regiment they were immediately ordered to the front. Capt. Sutton participated in several battles, the principle one being that of Stone River. In 1863 he received an honorable discharge in consequence of sickness, and returned home to his family. In 1864 he re-enlisted, and was mustered in as captain of Company K, 151st Regiment, Illinois Volunteers; he received his commission February 24th, 1865, and remained in the service until February, 1866, when he was mustered out at Columbus, Georgia, from which place he proceeded in his home and family. At present he is residing at Littleton, where he is carrying on the business of wagon making and general blacksmithing. Since the war, he has adhered to the principles of the republican party, and has voted that ticket.


HENRY W. TAYLOR
  Mr. Henry W. Taylor was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, February 11th, 1824.  His grandfather, Mathew Taylor, emigrated to America during the revolutionary war, and settled in Huntington County, Pennsylvania.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  He died in 1835, at the advanced age of eighty seven years.  His wife died in 1834.  His son, Alexander, and father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Huntington County, Pennsylvania, in the year 1788.  At an early age he learned the trade of clothier, and afterward carried on that business for a number of years.  In 1810 he moved to Youngstown, Ohio, and there married Miss Betsey, the daughter of Nehamiah Scott, Esquire.  The fruits of this marriage was a family of eight children, the subject of this sketch being the fourth child: all are now living except one.  Mr. Taylor died at his residence in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1843.  His wife is still living, and at present residing in Burlington, Iowa.  Henry W. received his early education in the common schools of Ohio; he also attended an academy at Warren, Ohio, for a period of two years, after which he was engaged in teaching about three years.  In 1849 he made an overland trip to California;  It required six and two-thirds months to enable him to reach his destination.  He remained there four years, having reasonable success in finding glittering gold.  On the trip, what to many would seem hardships, to him was a pleasure.  On his return home he married Miss Cornella, daughter of J. D. Manlove, Esquire, of Rushville.  The fruits of this union was a family of four children, one now deceased.  Mr. Taylor was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace in 1858, and has held that position ever since, excepting one term.  At present he os one of the supervisors of Schuyler County.  He is now engaged in mercantile pursuits in the village of Brooklyn.  Politically, he is a supporter of the principles of the republican party, and during the dark days of the rebellion Mr. Taylor stood firm for the course of the Union.
 
1861 Militia Roll
WILLIAM THOMPSON
  William Thompson was born in Monongalia County, Virginia, May 29th, 1820.  His father, Samuel Thompson, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, about the year 1772; his vocation was that of a farmer.  At an early day, he emigrated to America, landing in Baltimore.  There he became acquainted with, and married, Miss Elizabeth Henthorne, of Devorshire, England.  From thence he removed to western Virginia, and there purchased a farm.  He died at his residence in 1824; his wife survived him only five year.  William received his early education in the common schools of Virginia.  He then went to Pittsburg and Monongahela City, and there learned the art and science of window glass blowing.  On the 9th of May, 1845, he removed to Durhamville, Oneida County, New York; there he followed his trade for six years, and became acquainted with, and married Miss Mary Sophia, daughter of Eber Durham, Esquire, the founder of the village which bears his name.  On the 18th day of August, 1851, Mr. Thompson's wife died while they were on a visit to her relatives in the state of New York.  In 1857 he moved to Rushville {Illinois}.  He has two children - Virginia and Eber Wilson, both single, and residing in Onieda County, New York.  Mr. Thompson was elected to the office of city marshal of Rushville in the spring of 1871, which position he now fills.  His political interests are, and always have been, identified with the republican party, believing that the pricipals premugated by that party are those best calculated to preserve the libertice of this nation.


ALLEN R. TURNER
  Allen R. Turner was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, April 22d, 1832.  His father, Samuel Turner, was born in Green Brier County, Virginia, October 10th, 1785, and, with his mother, moved to Ohio when only six months old.  When about the age of twenty-two, he moved to the American bottom in Illinois, south of St. Louis, and in the fall of 1823, to Schuyler County.  He was married, May 24th, 1830, to Miss Rachael Robertson, by whom he had three children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the second.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  In 1843 his wife died, leaving him to mourn her loss until 1855, when he, too, was called to the better world.  Allen R. received his early education in the common schools of Illinois, and in 1850 made an overland trip to California, where he remained a little more than a year, meeting with reasonable success.  On the 9th of March, 1852, he was married to Miss Isabella A., daughter of Lemuel and Nancy Sparks, of this county {Schuyler County, Illinois}.  The fruits of their union was a family of four children.  Mr. Turner is now residing on his farm in Buena Vista Township.  Politically, he is a republican.
 
1861 Militia Roll
SAMUEL P. VAIL
  Samuel P. Vail was born in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, October 8th, 1803.  His father Samuel Vail, was born in Pennsylvania in 1780; his vocation was that of a boot and shoe manufacturer.  At the age of twenty-five he married Miss Hannah Potter; four of her brothers were in the army of Independence.  They were engages in several of the principal battles of the revolution.  The British soldiers destroyed most all of her father's property, such as the personal effects belonging to a farmer.  The father of Samuel P. had a family of five children, of which he is the second.  His father emigrated to Ohio on 1803, settling in Coshocton County, where he carried on his trade in the village of Coshocton.  He died at his residence in that place in 1836; his wife, the mother of Samuel P., survived him until 1854.  Samuel P. received most of his early education in the subscription schools of Ohio.  On becoming a man, he was principally engaged in mercantile pursuits, and at the age of thirty-four years he married Miss Wealthy F., daughter of Robert and Polly Farwell.  They have has six children, only four now living.  On June 13th, 1853, he removed to Frederick, Schuyler County, Illinois.  There he engaged in farming and stock raising, which has been his principal business ever since.  Himself and wife are at present residing in the town of Frederick, in ordinary health.  He has a son who is practicing law in the city of Rushville.  Politically, he is a strong supporter of the principles of the republican party, and has been since the organization of the same.


WILLIAM CYRUS VENTERS
  W. C. Venters was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, October 27th, 1837.  He is the oldest son of Mr. Henry Venters, who is now residing on his farm in the northern part of Browning Township.  Mr. Venters received his early training in the schools of this county, and until the age of twenty-one his time was spent on his father's farm.  In the spring of 1861 he made a trip to Pike's Peak and the Rocky Mountains, on a gold hunt.  On his return he engaged in mercantile pursuits amd milling, which business he has followed ever since.  At the age of twenty-seven he was married to Miss Sarah L., daughter of the late Joseph Marshall, of Fulton County, Illinois.  The fruits of this union is a family of two interesting children.  At present they are residing in Browning.  Mr. Venters is a member of the enterprising firms of Walton, Venters, & Co., which last firm is engaged in mercantile pursuits in all it's various branches.  They are the grain and stock merchants of this locality.  Poltically, he adheres to the old prinicples of the Jeffersonian democracy.
 
1861 Militia Roll
JOHN SMITH WALKER
  John Smith Walker was born in Adams County, Pennsylvania, November 28, 1826.  He is a son of the late Andrew Walker, formerly a resident of this county, and also quite an early settler.  John S. received his early education in the common schools of Schuyler County.  He has always followed farming and stock raising, and his farm, near Littleton, is now under a good state of cultivation.  In April, 1868, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Huckley, daughter of Thomas Huckley, Esquire, late of Schuyler County.  Mr. Walker has one child named Anna. Politically, his interests are identified with those of the republican party.
 
1861 Militia Roll
MAJOR JOSEPH WALKER
  Major Joseph Walker was born in Adams County, Pennsylvania, September 23, 1824.  His father, Andrew Walker, was born in the same county and state in the year 1783.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  At about the age of twenty-five he was married to Miss Ann, daughter of Charles Wilson, Esquire, of Adams County, Pennsylvania.  The fruits of that marriage was a family of ten children, of which the subject of this sketch is the eighth.  In 1840 Mr. Walker removed with his family to Schuyler County, Illinois, where he purchased a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising.  He died at his residence, in 1843.  His wife, mother of Major Walker, survived her husband until October, 1870, when she died in McDonough County.
  The Major received his early education in the common schools of the state of Pennsylvania, and came to Illinois with his parents, in the year above stated, where most of his early days were spent, on the farm with his father.  At about the age of twenty-one he made a trip to New Orleans, and not meeting with the success he anticipated, and as the war with Mexico was then going on, in 1846 he enlisted in the quartermaster's department, and was out in the service about seven months; after which, he returned to his house, and in 1850 he was married to Miss Sarah T. daughter of the late David and Cassander Snyder, of Schuyler County.  After his marriage he purchased a farm, and was engaged in farming until the breaking out of the late rebellion, when, in August of 1861, he enlisted, and was elected first lieutenant of Company A, 10th regiment, Missouri Infantry.  The company was commanded by Captain, now Colonel, Leonidas Horney.  The regiment was commanded by Colonel Harding.  After being in the service a year and a half he was promoted and received a captain's commission, and about five months afterwards he was promoted to the rank of Major.  He participated in several hard fought battles, such as Corinth, Iuke, Jackson, Mississippi, Champion Hills, and Vicksburg.  He was also at the battle of Chattanooga, where he received a slight flesh wound.  He was mustered out at St. Louis, receiving an honorable discharge.  He then returned home to his family, and is now residing on his farm near the village of Littleton.  Politically he is a supporter of those principles as promulgated by the republican party - the late saviors and preservers of the Union.  The Major showed his patriotism and love of country in the recent contest for the life of our Union.  He has always supported the republican principles since the organization of the party.
 
1861 Militia Roll
PINKNEY H. WALKER
  Honorable Pinkney H. Walker - Alexander Walker, the grandfather of Honorable Pinkney H. Walker, emigrated from Rockbridge County, Virginia, to Adair County, Kentucky, in the year 1795 or 1796.  At that time, his son, Joseph G. Walker, father of the subject of the sketch, was quite young.  After the latter became a men, he studied law, and was admitted to practice.  After pursuing his profession for a number of years, he emigrated, in the spring of 1833, to McDonough County, in this state, where he engaged in farming and the practice of his profession until his death, which occurred in October, 1841.
  Pinkney H. Walker was born in Adair County, Kentucky, on the 18th day of June, 1815.  On the 28th of April, 1834, he came to Rushville, in this county, where he remained until March, 1838, when he removed to Macomb {McDonough County, Illinois},where he studied law in the years 1838 and 1839, with his uncle, Cyrus Walker, an able and distinguished lawyer.  He was admitted to the bar in the year 1839, and practiced in McDonough and adjoining counties until October, 1848, when he removed to Schuyler County.  He continued the practice as before until March, 1853, when he was elected Judge of the Fifth Judical Circuit of the state, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the death of Judge Minchall, who had long resided in this county.  Judge Walker was re-elected in June, 1855, for the full term, and held office until April, 1858, when he was appointed by Governor Bissell to the bench of the Supreme Court for the second grand division of the state, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the resignation of O. C. Skinner.  He was, afterwards, in June of the same year, elected to the full term, and was re-elected to the same office in June, 1867, which he still holds.


AMOS WALTON
  Amos Walton was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, August 8, 1834.  He is a son of Dr. Benjamin Walton, who, at present, is residing in Schuyler County, on his farm, in Browning Township.  He emigrated from Ohio and settled there in the fall of 1833, and hence is justly classed among the old settlers.
  The object of this sketch received some of his early training in the schools of Ohio, and finished in Schuyler County.  His vocation, previous to his marriage, was that of farming; he was also, for a period of time, a student of physic* under the tuition of his father, though he never practiced.  At the age of twenty-eight he was married to Miss Lucy Ann, daughter of Henry McCombs, Esquire, of Schuyler County.  He had a family of three children, one of them is deceased.  At present he is residing in the town of Browning, where he is senior member of the firm of Walton, Venters, & Co.  He is also a strict adherent to the cause of temperance.  Politically, he is a democrat.
  *Transcriber's Note:  they mean physician.
 
1861 Militia Roll
BENJAMIN WALTON, DR.
  Dr. Benjamin Walton was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, May 31, 1810.  His father, John Walton, was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, in 1785, and was married, at the age of twenty-three, to Miss Lydia, the daughter of Elias Marsh, Esquire.  The results of their marriage was a family of twelve children.  Mr. Walton died at his residence in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1860.  His wife is still living at the advanced age of eighty-one years.
  The subject of this sketch received his early training in the schools of Ohio.  He commenced reading medicine at the age of twenty-three; soon after was married to Miss Mary, daughter of Able John, of Washington County, Pennsylvania.  The doctor had a family of eleven children.  In the fall of 1843 he removed with his family to Schuyler County, Illinois and in 1844 entered the land land where he now resides.  The doctor, besides practicing medicine, has been preaching for a number of years.  At present he is residing at the old homestead, hale and hearty.


JOSEPH NAYLOR WARD
  Joseph N. Ward was born October 24th, 1814, in Harrison County, Kentucky.  His grandfather, Joseph Ward (I), was born in Ireland, and at an early day emigrated to Virginia.  He served in the war of the revolution.  He emigrated to Kentucky, near where Lexington now stands, in 1785.  He died in Harrison County, Kentucky, in 1820.  Joseph Ward (II), father of the subject of this sketch, was born near the Blue Ridge, in Virginia, in 1770.  At age thirty he married Miss Catherine Coulter.  They raised a family of four boys; Joseph N. is the youngest child, and the only one living.  His wife died in 1814.  Mr. Ward survived her until 1824.  Joseph N. Ward, at the age of twenty-two, emigrated to Schuyler County, and at twenty-three he married Miss Mary B., daughter of James McHatton, Esquire.  They had a family of four children, only one of which is now living.  His wife died May 15th, 1855; he was married November 25th of the same year to Mrs. Matilda Pinckley.  They have a family of two children living.  Mr. Ward served a term of four years as county commissioner, and filled the office of justice of the peace from 1843 to 1861 inclusive.  In 1867 he was elected county treasure.  He is now residing in the village of Camden.


B. P. WATTS, DR.
  Dr. B. P. Watts was born in Madison County, Kentucky, near Lexington, May 10, 1845.  He is a son of Willis Watts, Esquire, of Camden, Schuyler County, whose history appears in this work.  The doctor received his literary education at the academy of Mt. Sterling, Brown County, Illinois.  He also graduated from the college of physicians and surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa, in the year 1870.  Mr. Watts has been practicing his profession for about eight years.  On the 30th day of April, 1868, he was married to Miss Sarah E., the daughter of William P. Andrus, Esquire, of Warsaw, Illinois.  The doctor practiced medicine at Birmingham, in this county, where he gained many friends, and was favored with a good practice.  He remained there for five years, then charged his location to that of Camden, at which place he is at present residing.  His is young man of culture and ability, and undoubtedly will soon rank high in the medical profession.  Politically, he delights to breathe the pure, old atmosphere of democracy.


WILLIS WATTS
  Mr. Willis Watts was born in Clark County, Kentucky, September 5, 1808.  His father, Julius Watts, was born in Culpepper County, Virginia, in 1765.  His vocation was that of a farmer.   At the age of twenty-one he married Miss Mary Eve.  They raised a family of twelve children, all reaching maturity; nine now living.  Soon after his marriage he emigrated to Kentucky.  Mr. Watts and wife both died in Kentucky.
  The subject of this sketch was married to Miss Louisa G., daughter of John and Jane Simons, of Madison County, Illinois.  His vocation has alternately been teaching and farming, except the last fifteen years, he has been engaged in merchandising.  In 1847 he came to Brown County, Illinois and in 1858 he moved to Schuyler County, Illinois.  At present he is selling goods in Camden.  He has served five years as Justice of the Peace.


EDWARD D. WELLS
  Edward D. Wells was born in Lorraine County, Ohio, November 14th, 1820.  His father, Charles Wells was born in Connecticut in November, 1799.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  At about the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Elizabeth, the daughter of Simeon Durand, Esquire, of Ohio.  They had a family of seven children, of which the subject of this sketch is the eldest.  In the fall of 1837 he moved with his family to Schuyler County, Illinois, and engaged in agricultural pursuits.  His wife, the mother of Edward, died in September 1845.  Mr. Wells survived her until February, 1868, when he died at his residence in Rushville.  Edward D. received his early education in the common schools of Ohio, and came to this county with his parents, as above stated.  At the age of twenty-one he was married to Miss Margrette, the daughter of the late David Snyder.  They has a family of seven children, of which only five are now living.  His wife died at their residence in December, 1860, and in September, 1862, he was married to Miss Mary J. Prather, daughter of James and Barbara Prather.  The fruits of that union was a family of five children.  Politically, he is democratic; he has held several local offices; was elected Justice of the Peace in 1847, served one term, was re-elected in 1862, and has held the office ever since, except one year.  At present he is residing on his farm in Littleton Township.
 
1861 Militia Roll
RANSLAIR WELLS
  Ranslair Wells was born in Huntingdon, Fairfield County, Connecticut, on the 20th day of November, 1790.  His father, Robert Wells, was born about 1762, in the same county and state.  He entered the army of the revolution when only sixteen years of age.  He held the rank of sergeant.  He was stationed at Fort Putnam, on the Hudson River.  He was engaged in several battles.  At the age of twenty-four he was married to Miss Anna, the daughter of Gideon Wheeler.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  He died in the state of Ohio, at the age of eighty-five.  His wife, the mother of Ranslair, died previous to his death.  They had a family of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the fourth.  Only two are now living.
  Mr. Wells moved from Connecticut to Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, in 1817, and there he married Miss Esther Perkins, the daughter of David Perkins, Esquire.  He remained there ten years.  He then removed to Winchester, Franklin County, Tennessee, and from there to Schuyler County, Illinois, in the fall of 1833.  On arriving here he turned his attention to mercantile pursuits.  For the last three or four years he has been engaged in the lumber trade.  Mr. Wells has a family of three children living; two are deceased.  At present he is residing in the city of Rushville, enjoying good health.  Mr. Wells is one of the early settlers of the county, and is looked upon by his fellow citizens as having been one of its best business men.  Mr. Wells came to Rushville with a small capital, but by dint of steady perseverance has accumulated a handsome competence.
 
1861 Militia Roll
SOLOMON WEST
  Solomon West was born in Burlington, Hartford County, Connecticut, April 7, 1821.  His grandfather, Hezekiah West, was born in Connecticut previous to the revolution.  He was deacon of the Baptist Church.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  He was very suddenly killed by the falling of a tree.
  Elisha West, the father of Solomon, was born in Hartford County, Connecticut, July 6, 1782.  He received his early education in the schools of Connecticut.  Was married, October 1, 1803, to Miss Eleanor, daughter of the Reverend A. Stillman.  She war born March 13, 1784.  His vocation was principally farming, though considerable of his time was spent in selling clocks.  He traveled in most every state and territory then in the Union.  He and his wife raised a family of six children, all of whom are married and have families.  Solomon is the youngest.  Mr. West died in Cincinnati, Ohio, in the fall of 1829.  His wife survived him about ten years.
  Solomon received his early education in the common schools of the state of Connecticut.  In the spring of 1837 he went to Utica, New York, and was clerk in a store there for about three years.  There he became acquainted with Miss Harriet F., daughter of Baxter Bicknell, Esquire, and three years after he married her.  She was born January 20, 1821.  In 1840 he moved to Wayne County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the manufacture of umbrella and parasol handles.  In 1857 he came to Camden, Schuyler County, Illinois, Where he now resides, carrying on a saw mill and farm.
  Mr. West's ancestors reach back to the original Puritan stock, six generations.  His first relative that came from Europe was a sea captain, and from him sprang the family of Wests in America.  He had three sons; one settled in Massachusetts, one on Rhode Island, and one in New Jersey.
  Mr. West has a family of four children; two sons are married, a son and daughter yet single.  He and family are at present residing in the village of Camden, hale and hearty.  Politically, he is a staunch supporter of the principles of the republican party.
 
1861 Militia Roll
BURTON O. WILLARD
pages 970 - 971  History Of Schuyler  County
  Willard, Burton O. - A practical demonstration of the results obtainable by a union of singleness of purpose, good judgment and large capacity for Industry is found in the career of Burton O. Willard, a legal practitioner of RushvilIe, Illinois, since March, 1895, Chairman of the Republican County Committee since 1900, member of the State Board of Education since 1902, and Ex-City Attorney.  Mr. Willard is a product of the farming contingent of Littleton Township, Schuyler County, Illinois, where he was born June 14, 1868.   His remote paternal ancestors pursued their avocations in England, and the family was first represented in America by his paternal great-grandfather. Samuel Willard, who settled in Massachusetts. George Willard, the paternal  grandfather, was born in Boston, Massachusett and married Rachel Garrett, a native of the Hoosier State {Indiana}.  Patrick Willard, father of Burton O., was born in Browning, Schuyler County, Illinois, and married Anna (Susanna) G. Garrett, a native of Kicknpoo, Illinois.  Mrs. Anna Willard was a daughter of John Garrett born in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1820, and Sarah E. (Williamson) Garrett, born in Wheeling, West Virginia.  Her grandparents, Thomas J. and Susan (Weigart) Garrett were from Lexington, Kentucky.  Educated primarily in the public schools of Illinois, Burton  O. Willard next entered the Rushville Normal College from which he was graduated in 1801.  From the age of twenty-one to twenty-four, he both taught and attended school, at the same time taking up the study of law, which resulted in his admission to the bar November 22, 1894.  Since attaining maturity he has been increasingly enthusiastic over Republican politics and locally has proved one of the staunchest and most popular supporters of his party.  In I896 he was the unsuccessful candidate for State's Attorney, and in 1897 was elected City Attorney, serving two terms.  In 1900 he became Chairman of the Republican County Committee, in which capacity he now is serving his third term.  He was appointed to the State Board of Education in 1892 by Governor Yates.  In 1900 he represented the Fifteenth Congressional  District in the Electoral College August 31, 1892. Mr. Willard was united in marriage to Ida Barton, a native of Cooperstown, Illinois, and of the union there is a son, Paul B. Willard.
  Mr. Willard is fraternally a Mason, and in religion, is a Presbyterian.  During the eleven years of his residence in Rushville, Mr. Willard has maintained the highest tenets of his profession, and has proved himself a judicious and faithful counselor, and a genial companion, considerate friend and high-minded gentleman.
  (this is quite a glowing report for this fellow) Submitted by Carol Britton <grandpabert@i2k.net>


THOMAS WILSON III
  Thomas Wilson, Jr. {III} the subject of this sketch, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1813(?).  His father, Thomas Wilson {II}, was born in Ireland, in 1768, and there received his early education.  He was also one of the first to become a member of the Methodist Church in that part of Ireland.  At the age of thirty-three he married Miss Jane Greer, daughter of George Greer, Esquire, of Tyrone County, Ireland.  In 1824 he immigrated to the United States with his family, coming immediately to Schuyler County, Illinois.  His wife, the mother of Thomas, Jr. {III} died on the way, at Liverpool, England.  After arriving at his destination, he spent the remainder of his days with his children, and died in December, 1854, at the residence of his son, Joseph Wilson, in Hancock County, Illinois.  Mr. Wilson was a true and devout Christian.  He raised a family of six children, of whom only four are now living.  Thomas received his early education in Ireland, and came to this country previous to his father, arriving in 1832, landing in Philadelphia, from which place he soon moved to Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, from there to Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.  His vocation was that of a farmer.  In 1834 he was married to Miss Susan Clark, daughter of John Clark, Esquire, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.  In 1837 he removed to Rushville, where he has since resided.  Soon after arriving here he engaged in mercantile pursuits, continuing the same up to 1868, soon after which he became a partner in the Merchants' and Farmers' Bank; said firm consisting of James G. McCreary and Thomas Wilson.  Mr. Wilson has a family of five children; one deceased.  Those living are: Anna J., now the wife of James P. Clark, Esquire.  They were married March 11, 1863, and now reside in Lawrence, Kansas.  Amelia Lorinda was married February 20, 1867, to Mr. John L. Sweeney, who is engaged in merchandising in Rushville.  Mr. Sweeney served in the late rebellion in the 119th Regiment of Illinois Volunteers.  Sarah E., yet single, and John C., on the farm near town, also single.  The one deceased, Miss Elenor, after completing her education at Monticello, Illinois, and remaining home with her parents about a year, was taken sick with a disease which baffled all medical skill.  Elenor was a devoted daughter and affectionate sister.  She died in the prime of life, at the age of twenty-two, beloved by all.  She possessed a bright and pure intellect, and an unselfish nature, which made her the center of the family circle.  At Monticello she took the first honors of the Institution.  It is seldom death lays low one so much beloved, and whose life seemed so valuable, with a mind superior by nature and polished by culture, with manners refined and winning.  She was one whom no one could know but to love, and possessing gifts of mind and heart adapted to adorn the sphere in which Providence had placed her.

We loved her for her stainless truth,
Her thirst for higher things;
For all that to our common lot
A better nature brings.


THOMAS J. WINDOW
  Lieutenant Thomas J. Window was born in Schuyler County, Illinois, January 12, 1837.  His father, Dr. {William H.} Window, was born in Abergavenny, England, January 7, 1814.  He is the youngest son of Thomas and Winifred Window.  The doctor received his early culture in England, and his medical training under the supervision of his uncle, Dr. Thomas Powell.  After completing his studies he was married to Miss Elenor, the daughter of James and Johanna Saunders.  The fruits of that union was a family of two children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the youngest, and the only one living.  In 1832 he immigrated to America, and soon after located at Marthasville, Missouri, where he engaged in the practice of medicine.  Soon after, he joined the Illinois Conference of the M. E. Church, and preached in different sections of the state for a number of years.  In August, 1837, his wife, mother of the subject of this sketch, died, and in 1838 he married his present wife, Miss Rebecca, daughter of James Little, of Rushville.  The doctor had a family of six children with his last wife, five of whom are now living.  At present he is residing in Wisconsin.
  Thomas J., previous to his marriage, spent his time alternately in his father's store and on the farm.  At the age of eighteen he was married to Miss Mary J., daughter of Samuel and Sidney Stacker.  They had a family of four children, of whom only two are now living.  In July, 1862, he enlisted in the 73d Illinois Infantry.  He was promoted to the rank of quartermaster's sergeant.  Immediately after the regimental organization they were ordered to the army of the Cumberland.  About two months {?}, he was commissioned lieutenant.  After being out a short time he became quartermaster of the regiment.  Soon after he became one of General Sheridan's military family, and acted as commissary on his staff.  After the Battle of Chickamauga, as is known to all, the transportation of the army was cut off.  There the subject of this sketch was sent out, escorted by Sheridan's body guard, to bring in provisions.  He met with such decided success that on his return he was highly complimented by the general, who said, that the timely supply of food saved his army from starvation; and for this meritorious conduct he was promoted to General Thomas' staff, and with his body guard made another detour of the country, bringing in additional supplies, which saved the army from evacuating Chattanooga.  He participated in many hard fought battles, such as Perryville, Stone River, Spring Hill, Chattanooga, and various others.  In June of 1865 he received an honorable discharge, since which time he has been engaged in stock dealing and agricultural pursuits.  He is a member of the M. E. Church, and an active Sabbath School worker.  Politically he is a supporter of the principles of the republican party.
 
1861 Militia Roll



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