Finding Illinois Ancestors at Genealogy Trails

White County
Illinois

Genealogy and History



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Biographies
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George L. Allen was born in White County, Ill., July 20, 1829. His father was a native of Kentucky, and came from Logan County, Ky., to what is now White County, over sixty years ago when quite young. He married Mrs. Elizabeth (Clark) McHenry, widow of George McHenry. George L. is next to the youngest of their seven children. He was reared and educated in this county. Feb. 9, 1853, he married Susan Clark, a native of White County, born June 20, 1835. They have two children - James Franklin, born Jan. 7, 1856, and Albert R., born Oct. 22, 1862. They are members of the Methodist church. He has held the office of Steward in that church. Politically he is a Republican; has held the office of Township Supervisor. He owns 120 acres of good land on section 29, Hawthorne Township. His father, W. B. Allen, was the first man in White County to have a corn-husking without a jug of whisky. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Thomas J. Aud
Herald's Prairie Township:  For many years a Baptist preacher of Herald's Prairie church, was born in Breckenridge County, Ky., Aug 27, 1818, and was a son of James and Nancy A. (Moore) Aud, natives of Maryland, whose family consisted of nine children. He married Caroline Johnson , May 10, 1837. To them one child was born- Elizabeth. His second wife was Sarah R. (Pettypool) Barnett, daughter of Thomas Pettypool. Ten children was born to them- John S., Thomas, Milton, William, Sarah F., Joel R., Mary M., Nancy J., Daniel, and Amy M. His third wife was Susan ( Wilson) Scott, daughter of Samuel Wilson. Their children were- Lorenda C., and Gilbert B. Mr. Aud, though quite feeble, is yet preaching. Eight of his children are deceased. His last wife is living. [Source: History of White County, Illinois Page: 825 transcribed by: Debbie Oberst]


Alexander Austin
Herald's Prairie Township
Born in Warren County, Tenn., Dec. 24, 1823, was a son of Wm Austin. He came to this county when a boy and has continued to reside here for the past forty-nine years, never leaving been over fifty miles from his present residence. Sept 11, 1842 he married Mary Ann, daughter of Richard and Malinda (Kearney) Fryer, of Herald's Prairie, who was born Oct. 25, 1825. Her father was a native of North Carolina and her mother of Kentucky. The family was one of the earliest settlers of this county. Mr Fryer being one of the band of rangers to protect the settler from the Indians. He helped to build the first log house in Carmi. He had a family of five sons and thirteen daughters. To Mr. And Mrs. Austin have been born nine children- Catherine, born Feb. 2, 1844 is married and has three children, Thomas, Frances, and Otis; Richard, born Dec. 4, 1846, married Melissa Aud and has four children, Lear, Sampson M., Alvah E., and Messer J.: Melinda, born April 15, 1848, (deceased); Ben F., Jan. 17, 1851 (deceased); Julia, born Jan 17, 1855, married Augustus Willis; Mary A., born Dec. 4, 1856, married James Summers and has three children- Viola, Rose M., and Nora; Elisha, born Oct 14, 1858, married Eliza J. Austin and has one child- Cornelius; Ellen J., born Oct. 14, 1860, and Hardy, born March 24, 1865. [Source: History of White County, Illinois Page: 825  transcribed by: Debbie Oberst]


Charles Austin
Herald's Prairie Township
Born July 20, 1836, is a son of William and Catherine (Foster) Austin, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Virginia. Their family consisted of nine children, six of whom are living. Charles lived at home till his nineteenth year, when Feb. 17, 1855, he was married to Mary Hoskins, a daughter of Coleman Hoskins, a preacher in the Regular Baptist church. After their marriage they moved onto section 29. The first land he owned was a tract of eighty acres, upon which he lived two years. He then sold and bought 120 acres on section 27, and lived there eleven years. He sold that and bought 264 acres on section 22 and 27, upon which he has fine buildings equal to any in the township, and where he still resides. Upon this land we find traces of the Mound Builders. There are mounds fifteen feet in diameter at the base, and twelve at the top, and several feet high. Mr. And Mrs. Austin's children are -- Rebecca Ellen, born Jan. 2, 1856, died Oct. 16, 1864, William Washington, born Oct. 5, 1859, Margaret Jane, born Nov. 15, 1862, Sylvester, April 30, 1865, Charles Smith, April 29, 1867, Hugh Young, born Aug. 3,1870, died July 28, 1876, Ada, born Feb. 19, 1876, died Oct. 22, 1877. Mr. and Mrs. Austin are members of the Regular Baptist church. Mr. Austin was Clerk for ten years, resigning in favor of John Wease. They have a family of bright, intelligent children. The eldest son is fitted for a teacher, and is now teaching in Sub-district No. 3. The two next sons are at home. Their daughter Margaret J., has taught four terms, and is now attending the Normal at Carmi. [Source: History of Whiye County, Illinois Page: 826  transcribed by: Debbie Oberst]


Elisha Barnett, section 12, Indian Creek Township, was born in Gallatin County, Ill., Oct. 27, 1824.His father, Joseph Barnett, was a native of Kentucky, but came to Gallatin County with his father when a boy, and settled on Eagle Creek.Elisha was reared in the woods and educated in the subscription schools.He has shot two bears and one panther, when a boy, besides numerous deer and wolves.He ground corn with a horse mill, turned by oxen, and bolted flour by band.He cameto White County in January, 1848, and has been engaged in farming.He has cleared two farms, both times from the stump, and had to cut the trees to get the stumps.He has also improved two other farms; has always been a hard worker.Jan. 16, 1845, he married Mahala Walts.Of their five children three are living - George W., Mary A. and Elvey.Mrs. Barnett died in 1851.Mr. Barnett married again Mrs. Annie Berry.They had one son - John, deceased.Mrs. Barnett had four children by her first husband, onlyone living - William Berry.Mrs. Barnett died in 1853, and he married Mrs. Lucinda Atkinson.They were the parents of four children, three living - Joseph, Susanna and Lauretta.His wife died in 1861, and be again married Mrs. Mary J. Grubbs.They have one child, deceased.Mrs. Barnett has two children by her first marriage ­ Abigail (Mrs. Chrisman) and David W. Grubbs.Mr. Barnett is a prominent and successful veterinary surgeon. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


James M. Black, born in South Carolina, March 22, 1855, was a son of Alexander Black, a native of Ireland. He was reared a farmer's boy on the Catawba River, fifteen miles east of Yorkville, York District, S. C. He came to this county and settled in Indian Creek Township in 1838, where he still resides. He was married in 1838 to Mary E. Giles. Of their thirteen children, only five are Jiving - Mary P., Elizabeth J., Andrew G., Mabella S. A. and John W. An orphan grandson, Christopher C., son of Robert T. Black, resides with the family. Mrs. Black died in 1873. He is a member of the Presbyterian church. He has always been a hard working man, and has cleared many acres of land. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Leonard Blagg was born in White County, Ill., May 16, 1817. He is the third of six children. His father was a native of Virginia. He has lived in this township all his life, within four miles of where he was born. He was married in 1837 to Mary Kulbrath, who died in 1842, leaving two children - David and Elizabeth, now the wife of W. H. Brown. In 1844 Mr. Blagg married Winnie Young, a native of Wayne County, Ill., born in 1823. They are the parents of five children - Nancy, Solomon, George, Newton and Leonard. Mr. Blagg resides on section 31, Hawthorne Township, and owns 200 acres of finely improved land. He never belonged to any political party or secret order.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]

John B. Brill, born in Livingston County, Ky., March 26,1813, is a son of Solomon F. Brill (deceased). He came to this county with his parents in 1816. His educational advantages were very limited. His father died when he was only thirteen or fourteen years of age, and as he was the oldest one then at home he had to work hard to assist the others. He was married in 1833 to Esther Moore. She died, and he married his second wife, Sina Trout, Feb. 1, 1844. They had one child-Eliza, who married Geo. P. Phelps and died at the age of twenty-one, leaving one child, Anna B. Phelps, now sixteen years of age.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


William L. Bruce, section 5, Indian Creek Township, was born in Carmi Township, June 29, 1831. His father, John Bruce, was a native of North Carolina. William L. has been a life-long farmer. He has always lived in this county with the exception of three or four years spent in Gallatin County. He was married in Gallatin County in 1851, to Jane Givan, a native of Hardin County, Ill., and a daughter of John Hardin. They are the parents of ten children, five living - Harriet (Mrs. Witcher), George N., Annie (Mrs. Maxfield), William S., and Sarah E. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church in Ebenezer. He has been a Steward and Class-Leader several years, and is now Sunday-school Superintendent. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Abram Buckles
Abram Buckles was born June 28, 1800, in Allston County, Virginia. He was one of eleven children, having seven brothers and three sisters. His father was raised in Virginia. They moved to White County, Illinois, in about the year 1810. When they started on their journey, they went first to the Clinch River fifty or sixty miles distant, and there took a keel-boat, Mr. Buckles, sr., who was an old boatman, acting as his own pilot. They came down the Tennessee, into which the Clinch River flows, and over the Muscle Shoals. It was the custom to employ the Indians as pilots over these shoals, but Mr. Buckles employed himself. They came up the Ohio River and the Wabash to what is now White County. Here they found a pretty good country for farming; but the fever and ague lurked behind every stump, and it required three years to become seasoned to the climate. Mr. Buckles was so discouraged that he sold out everything and started to return to Virginia, but after going fifteen miles through Indiana he stopped, changed his mind, went to work for a man named Livingston, raised a crop, and in the fall returned to White County, Illinois.
During the war of 1812, the settlers felt themselves in a dangerous situation on the frontier, and much of the time were collected in forts. Abram Buckles helped to build a fort in White County, and the family sometimes lived in it when signs of Indians became alarming. Mr. Buckles, Sr., belonged to the rangers. From sixty to a hundred scouts were kept out all the time. Abram Buckles, then a lad, clearly remembers the gathering of the Indians as they passed by on their way to Tippecanoe. They then professed warm friendship for the whites, and did not attempt to molest the settlers. One of the squaws cured Mr. Buckles, Sr., of rheumatism in the arm, and it was, indeed, a very remarkable cure, though it required six days to bring it about. The Indians passed on to Tippecanoe, and there their professions of friendship were changed into active hostilities. The battle began at daybreak, and was fought with the greatest fury; but the Indians were at last defeated, and this broke their power during the remainder of the contest.' It was the successful management of the forces of the whites in this battle, which made General Harrison president of the United States.
In 1819, Mr. Buckles married Miss Mary Williams. He has five sons and five daughters living.
In 1832 he came with his family to Buckles' Grove. His experience in the West has been somewhat varied. He has occasionally done a little hunting, as all the old settlers have. He has had some fun while chasing wolves and running them down. This sport is not at all dangerous on account of the wolves, but in the excitement the horses were sometimes liable to stumble and fall. The wolves, when caught, were usually killed with a stirrup. He chased one wolf fifteen miles before catching it. Abram Buckles may almost be said to have inherited a love for hunting wolves. His father hunted them in Virginia. At one time the old gentleman caught a wolf in a peu and put a bell around its neck, in order that people might know when wolves were around. The wolf cautiously kept still, in the daytime, but at night his bell was often heard. Nevertheless, this did not prevent the ravages of the wolves among the sheep and pigs; the latter disappeared quite as often as before, and the next time the wolf fell into the trap he was killed.
Mr. Buckles has often had trouble with prairie fires which burned stacks and fences. His brother Peter once had a lively time while crossing the prairie with an ox-team and wagon, in which was his wife. He saw the blaze coming at a great distance, and immediately jumped from his wagon and fired his gun through the dry grass. It blazed up quickly and soon a burnt place was made upon which he drove his oxen, and he managed to hold them until the fire passed on. The heat was terrible, and seemed almost unbearable, for the hot air passes ahead of the fire for some distance. His wife covered herself up in the blankets and suffered little. Abram Buckles tells of a party of bee-hunters who came up from Sangamon County in search of honey. They were quite successful and started on their return. When they had gone a few miles south of where Bloomington now stands, one of the hunters started a fire for the fun of seeing it burn. It came on them closer and closer, until they started up their team; then it went faster and faster, until they jumped from the wagon into the creek to save themselves. Their wagon and load of honey were burnt; and this was the result of building a fire "for the fun of it."
Mr. Buckles' experience with the sudden change in the weather in December, 1836, is this. He was husking corn about a mile from the house on that mild winter's day, when the ground was covered with water and snow. The west wind came, and he hastened home, but long before he arrived there the frozen slush bore his weight. He tells of a terrible event connected with this sudden change. A man, whose name, he thinks, was McHildreth, and his companion, were returning on horseback from the East, where they had been selling cattle, and were within a few miles of the Little Vermilion Creek, when the west wind struck them. They hastened to the creek, but it was high and filled with moving ice. The nearest dwelling on their side of the creek was twelve miles distant, and they had their choice to wait for the creek to freeze over or ride twelve miles. On the opposite side they asked a man to cut down a tree to let them across, but he refused, because of the cold, or in order to get their money when they should freeze, he directed them to a grove about four miles distant, where he said they would find a house, but no house was there. At last they determined to kill their horses, cut them open, crawl into them and keep warm. Mr. McHildreth struck at his horse's throat with his knife, but the animal drew up quickly, jerked away and disappeared. His companion killed the other horse, cut it open and crawled in, but instead of keeping warm was frozen to death. Mr. McHildreth remained by the creek until it was frozen over, when he crossed it and found assistance, but his hands and feet were frozen, and his fingers and toes afterwards dropped off'. We have heard this incident related by several other settlers.
The stories and incidents related of this sudden change are never ending, and are more curious and strange even than those of the deep snow.
Mr. Buckles attended the land sales in 1835, at Vandalia. At these sales no speculator was allowed to come near, until the settlers had attended to their claims and bid oft' their lands.
The first, camp-meeting in Empire township was held in 1835 or '36, on Dickerson's farm, about a mile from where Leroy now is. Mr. Buckles was absent at the time, but his recollection of the matter is made lively by the fact that his oxen were taken to haul wood, and in felling a tree one of them was killed.
Mr. Buckles has taken some interest in politics, has always been a Democrat, and kept himself informed on the current topics of the day. He says that one of the most exciting questions of old days was the one relating to the Mormons. The excitement was highest in 1841, '42 and '43. The Mormons sent out preachers to make converts, and the people could examine into the beauties of the Mormon faith. Mr. Buckles listened to one preacher, who told of a terrible contest which would one day come, but was very indefinite as to the nature of the grand affair, or who the parties to it were; nevertheless, he was successful in making an impression on some ignorant people.
Abram Buckles is rather a tall man and quite fleshy. He always wears a smile, and is ever ready with an old-fashioned welcome. He is a very quiet man, but decided in his views. His disposition is pretty well shown by a circumstance which happened during the late campaign, when Horace Greeley and General Grant were candidates for the presidency. Mr. Buckles' friends wished him to go for Mr. Greeley, and reasoned the matter again and again. At one time two gentlemen, who were particularly enthusiastic, talked to Mr. Buckles for an hour or more, and explained to him the whole situation. He listened to them without a word of opposition, and with a kind smile on his countenance, and finally they asked him if the matter was not plain. "Yes," said Mr. Buckles, " it is plain that he is the same old Horace!"
("The Good Old Times in McLean County, Illinois..." - Page 564 E. Duis - History - 1874)


Judge Orlando Burrell
Was born in Bradford county Pennsylvania, July 16, 1826, where he spent his early childhood. In the fall of 1833, the family left Pennsylvania, and located in Mt. Vernon, Indiana, and in February 1834 came to White County, Illinois. In the early 60’s Judge Burrell led a company of the best men of White County to the defense of the Union. He served and helped to organize White County first board of supervisors in 1872. Later he was county judge, sheriff, mayor of the city, and in 1894 was elected on the republican ticket to represent his district in Congress. For the last few years the Judge has led a quiet home life, having served is country, his district, his county, his city and his township with honor and credit to himself and the entire satisfaction of the people whom he served. Judge Burrell is still hale and hearty. [Source: The broad ax. (Salt Lake City, Utah) Date: August 19, 1916, Page: 5 Image: 5  transcribed by: Debbie Oberst]



Gillison Price Calvin, farmer; postoffice, Calvin Station; is a son of Alfred and Esther (Green) Calvin, natives of Kentucky and Tennessee respectively. They came to Illinois about 1820, and raised a family of eight children. His mother died in Wayne County. His father married again, and had four children born to him. Gillison P. was born in Illinois, Oct. 7, 1835, on the banks of the Wabash. He was educated in his native State, and has followed farming, and now owns 1,400 acres of fine land, mostly on the rich Wabash bottoms. On Oct. 4, 1855, he married Nancy Jane, daughter of W. D. and Hannah (Hodkins) Driggers, natives of Tennessee. Nancy Jane was born March 21, 1838. By this union there are four children - Alfred Wasdon, born Aug. 3, 1857; Rosann, March 3, 1860; Matilda, Dec. 21, 1862, wife of John C. Hon, of Phillips Township; Esther, born Feb. 28, 1865. Mr. Calvin votes the Republican ticket. He is a heavy stock-dealer and deals in fine cattle, horses and hogs largely.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]

Daniel Charles, farmer; postoffice, Phillipstown; was born in White County, Ill, Jan. 28, 1840: son of Solomon and Ann S. (Higdon) Charles, natives of North Carolina and Illinois respectively. They came to Illinois in 1816, and raised a large family, he marrying three times – cousins - having five children by his first marriage, and four by the last. His wives are all dead. He is a hearty old gentleman of seventy-two years. Daniel was educated at the Indiana State University; which he attended two years. He has followed farming, and now owns 150 acres of fine land on section 30. In March, 1864, he married Maria A., daughter of George and Sarah Ann (Davis) Clark, natives of Vermont and Tennessee respectively. They came to Illinois some years ago, and Mr. Clark died here. By this union there are seven children, six living - Arthur Walter, born Feb. 14, 1865; Belle, born Feb. 10, 1861; Vane V., born May 22, 1872; Nellie, April 28, 1874; Kate, April 16, 1876; Alice, April 2!, 1879; Emor, born Nov. 28, 1868, is dead. Mr. Charles has held several of the township offices, and has faithfully discharged his duty to the public. He votes the Democratic ticket.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


George H. Conner, shoemaker; postoffice, Phillipstown; son of William P. and Lucinda (Ellingsworth) Conner, natives of Indiana. They carne to Illinois at an early day and raised a large family and died here. George H. was born in Richland County, Ill., Jan. 31, 1844. He was educated in Illinois; he followed farming for several years, then learned the trade of shoe-making in the shop he now owns. He cut one leg while young and the injury therefrom led him to learn the trade he has since followed. In 1871 he married Sitha Ann, daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Chism) Graham, natives of Illinois. Elizabeth died here. By this union there are three children - Oscar, born July 29,1872; David Owen, born Aug. 23, 1875; Chester Ellison, born Nov. 17, 1877. Mr. Conner votes the Republican ticket.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


John Montgomery Crebs
A Representative from Illinois; born in Middleburg, Loudoun county, Va., April 9, 1830; moved with his parents in 1837 to Illinois, where he worked on a farm; attended the public schools; studied law; in 1852 admitted to the bar; commenced practice in White county, Ill.; entered the Union Army as lieutenant colonel in 1862; took part in the Mississippi, Vicksburg, and Arkansas campaigns; commanded a brigade of cavalry in the Department of the Gulf, and after the close of the war resumed law practice; elected as a Democrat to the Forty-first and Forty-second Congresses (March 4, 1869-March 3, 1873); died in Carmi, Ill. June 26, 1890. [A Biographical Congressional Directory of the 1st 1774 to the 62nd 1911 Congress; By United States Congress; Publ. 1918; Tr. by A. Pack]


Louisa J. Ellis, section 21; P. O. Springerton; widow of William Ellis, a native of Illinois. He was born, 1832, and died in 1863. Mrs. Ellis is a daughter of James and Mary Ann (Reynolds) Lee, natives of Kentucky. They came to Illinois in 1834, and ,James died in this State. Louisa was born August, 1830, in Butler County, Ky. She came to Illinois when about four years of age. In 1852 she married and is the mother of five children - Warner M.; Caleb and Daniel, born 1853 (twins); the latter is married and living in Hamilton County; Josephine Rebecca, born 1855, wife of Jacob .Meni, of Hamilton County; Henry Franklin, born 1857, married, living at home; James Virgil, born 1859. Mrs. E. and family are members of the Latter Day Saints church. She owns a house and lot in Springerton.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Daniel P. Eubanks, section 14, Indian Creek Township, was born in this township, March 6, 1830. His father, John Eubanks, was a native of Virginia, and came to this county in 1818. He was in the Black Hawk war and the war of 1812. He was in the battle of New Orleans; was then only sixteen years old. Daniel P. was reared on a farm and educated in the subscription school of the early days. He was married May 7, 1858, to Jane E., daughter of Samuel Porter (deceased). They are the parents of four children - Laura J., Mary L. and Ida J. One daughter, Sarah E. (Mrs. Cross), died Aug. 16, 1881, at the age of seventeen. Mr. Eubanks was elected Sheriff in 1868, and again in 1878. He has made several important arrests.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Rev. John W. Field, pastor of the Big Prairie Methodist Episcopal church, was born Nov. 8, 1839, in Massac County, Ill. His parents were John H. and Prithena (Stewart) Field, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of Tennessee. Mr. Field was a farmer, and John W. was brought up on the farm, attending the common schools until the age of eighteen. At this time he commenced teaching, an occupation which he followed, principally in Massac County, for nine years. In 1862 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-first lllinois Infantry, and served one year. In 1869 he entered the Methodist ministry, and since 1872 has been a member of the Southern Illinois Conference. His charges have been as follows: 1872-'4, Golconda and Eddyville; 1874-'5, ElDorado; 1875-'6, Elizabethtown; 1876-'8, Vienna; 1878-'9, New Haven; Opdyke, 1879-'80; Hawthorn, 1880-'82. Mr. Field was married in August, 1859, to Sarah A. Tiley, of Cincinnati. They have been blessed with two children - John Logan and Mary.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Benjamin Files, teacher; P. O., Mill Shoals. He was born in White County, Ill., Aug. 1, 1846, and is a son of William F. and Maria (Tyler) Files, natives of White County, Ill., where they both died, the former being murdered in Mill Shoals village, in 1854. Benjamin was educated in Illinois and has taught school for seventeen years. In 1870 he married Mahala, daughter of Oliver P. and Margaret (Cummins) Scudder, natives of Indiana. Mahala was born in Indiana, June 13, 1855. By this marriage there are eight children, six living - Gordon B, born Dec. 24, 1870; William O., born May 14, 1873; Annie M., born April 27, 1876; Frank, born Sept. 11, 1877; Verdie B., April 3, 1879; Gertie M., Nov. 3, 1881. Bertha B. and Charles R. are dead. Mrs. Files is a member of the M. E. church. Mr. Files has held several of the township offices. He votes the Republican ticket.  [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Elijah Foster, M. D., Norris City, was born in Clermont County, O., Nov. 22, 1824. He is a son of Francis Foster, of Virginia, who settled in Ohio in an early day. He was reared on a farm. He graduated from the Eclectic Medical School of Cincinnati in 1855, and settled in Gallatin County, Ill., the same year. He began practice in New Market, and remained there seven years. In 1862 he came to this county, going first to Roland, and in 1875 came to Norris City, where he has built up a good practice. He was married in 1856, to Minnie Ware, who died in a few months. In 1862 he married Mollie J., daughter of William McGill, of this township. He is a Master Mason.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Thomas B. Garrison, farmer and stock-raiser, section 4, Indian Creek Township, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., June 27, 1834. He is a son of Gomer Garrison, of North Carolina, who moved to this county in 1837. He was reared and educated in this county. In 1854 he married Martha A. Davis. They were the parents of three children-James, Monroe, and Susan P. The latter died at the age of twenty. Mrs. Garrison died, and Mr. Garrison married Jane West. Two children were born to them - Cyrus P. (deceased), and Lula. Mr. Garrison owns 173 acres of fine land. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


William O. Gentry was born in Enfield Township, White Co., Ill., Dec. 22, 1859. His father, G. C. Gentry, is a native of Virginia, and came to Illinois in the early part of 1857, settling in Enfield Township, White County. He lived in Decatur County Ind., a number of years previous to coming to Illinois. While in Indiana he married Sarah I. Draper, a native of that State. Their children are Julia, William C. and Frances A. Both the girls are living at home. William C. is teaching the Big Prairie district school. He commenced teaching at the age of seventeen, and is now teaching his sixth session. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically he is a Republican.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Abram Gossett (deceased) was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1791. His father, John Gossett, a native of South Carolina, of German descent, was a minister of the Methodist church for seventy-five years, and was killed by being thrown from his horse when on his way to an appointment, at the age of 104 years. He was the father of eighteen sons and four daughters, all the children of one wife. Abram is the youngest son and twentieth child. He came to this county in 1835, and located in Indian Creek Township. Twenty acres were cleared. He always worked hard, and cleared a large amount of land. He married Rebecca Batz They had five children Mary A., Caroline, William J., Martha A. and one deceased. Mrs. Gossett died in 1828. In 1832 he married Martha Walters. Of their six children five are living-John D., Lucy E., Thomas, Abram and Eliza. Mr. Gossett died in April, 1844.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


James R. Graham was born in Union County, Ky., Dec. 12, 1810. He came to White County in 1818, but only remained a short time, and returned to Kentucky. He attended school part of the time for two years, and then returned to Illinois, where he has since resided. He is a tanner by trade, and worked at that business four or five years. He owns forty acres of good land in Phillips Township and is now farming. He was married Jan. 19, 1837, to Susanna Davenport, a native of White County, born Nov. 2, 1822, and died July 21, 1860, leaving four children - James T., Nathaniel P., David M. and Mary A. In 1861 Mr. Graham married Arvazena Cherry, widow of H. Cherry. They have no children. Politically Mr. Graham is a Democrat. He has served fourteen years as School Trustee, and three years as School Director.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


William Hanks, farmer; postoffice, Crossville; son of David and Sarah (Fraser) Hanks, natives of Tennessee. David died in Illinois, in 1870. William was born in White County, Ill., Sept. 11, 1841, and educated here. He has followed farming, and now owns 120 acres of land on section 3, Phillips Township, mostly well improved. In 1868 he married Mary Ann, daughter of Obadiah and Telitha (Bailey) Hogue, natives of Tennessee and Kentucky. They were married in Illinois, and raised a family of eight children. Mrs. Hogue died in Illinois. Mary Ann was born in Illinois, Aug. 27, 1838; she was the widow of Andrew Hanks when she was married to William. She had two children by her first husband ­ Frances, born July 27, 1863, wife of Joseph Spencer, of Phillips Township; Andrew David, born April 10, 1867. By the last marriage there are four children - Sarah, born Nov. 20, 1869; William, born March 1, 1873; Mary Ann, born Nov. 18, 1875; Oliver, born Feb. 18, 1880. Mr. Hanks votes the Democratic ticket.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Benjamin F. Howell
Was born in Adams County, Penn., June 27, 1826, and resided ther till the fall of 1861, when he came to Carmi, White Co., Ill. He lived in Carmi two years and then rented a farm for six years. Afterward bought eighty acres on section 21, and eighty on section 22. He was married in 1848 to Mary jacobs, a native of Germany. They have nine children- Mary, Anna, Alice, Hetta, Benjamin, Charles, Elmer, Willie, and Franklin. Mr. Howell votes as Democratic ticket. [Source: History of White County, Illinois Page: 590 transcribed by: Debbie Oberst]


John Hubele
Was born in White County, Ill., Aug 26, 1855. His father, Philip Hubele, is a native of Baden, Germany, and came to America in 1852. He landed in New Orleans, and came at once to Grayville, this county, from there to Carmi, where he lived a year and then bought a farm northwest of Carmi John was reared.  he received his education in the old Graham school house. In 1881 he came to Carmi, and clerked for his father in a grocery store, and in April, 1882, he bought his father out, and is now doing a good business in the grocery line. He keeps a full line of staple and fancy groceries. He was married April 27, 1882, to Kate Rhienwald, daughter of John and Sophie Rhienwald, who came to America from Germany in 1853. She was born in Burnt Prairie Township, May 14, 1860. Mr. Hubele is a Republican in his political views. He is a member of Lodge No. 189, I. O. O. F., Carmi, Ill. Mrs. Hubele is a member of the German Albright church in Carmi. Source: History of White County, Illinois Page: 590 transcribed by: Debbie Oberst


Henry H. Hust
Was born in White County, Ill., Feb 8, 1851. His father, Isaac Hust, was born in Virginia in 1798, and came to White County when twelve years of age. He made this his home with the exception of three years spent in Tennessee, till his death. He died in this county Oct. 29, 1879. His mother was a native of Kentucky, born Feb. 6, 1812 and died in this county in May, 1865. They had a family of four children, Henry H, being the only one living. He lived at home till he was fifteen years of age, when he went to work as a farm hand summers and attended school in Carmi winters, paying his board by assisting a man in his store nights and morning and Saturdays. This continued two years, and he accepted a position as salesman  in a store, which  he filled two years. He was then employed as salesman for James Fackney six years . He then engaged in the confectionery  business alone a year, when he sold out  and bought the ground  and built the large livery stable where he is at the present time.  He keeps heavy teams for doing heavy hauling, employing one hand. He also has feed for sale.  His partner is John Griffin. He was married Dec. 4, 1873, to Susie, daughter of Nathaniel Graham, formerly of White County. They have three children- Clara, aged eight years, Maude, six years, and Viola, eleven months. He is a member of the Royal Templars of Temperance and the Knights of Honor. [Source: History of White County, Illinois Page: 592 transcribed by: Debbie Oberst]


Henry Maricle, farmer; postoffice, Mill Shoals; son of Jacob and Sarah (Arbaugh) Maricle, natives of Western Virginia.They moved to Illinois in 1837, where Jacob died.Henry was born in Tennessee, Oct. 22, 1835.He was the tenth child of a family of eleven.He was educated in Illinois, and has followed farming, and now owns 180 acres of fine land on section 22, Mill Shoals Township.In 1857 he married Mary Ann, daughter of John and Harriet (Hoover) Sherer.She was born in WhiteCounty, Ill., Oct. 2, 1841.This union has been blessed with nine children - William Anderson, born April 4, 1859, married; Lucinda, Nov. 14, 1860; Sylvester, Jan. 26, 1862; Farizana, Aug. 20, 1865; Jasper, July 7, 1868; Mason, Aug. 6, 1869; Jesse, Oct. 19, 1871; Clara, June 7, 1874; Adelbart, Jan. 14, 1876.Mr. Maricle and wife are members of the General Baptist church.Hevotes the Republican ticket,
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Michael Miller section 18, Indian Creek Township, was born in Bavaria, Germany, Aug. 8, 1832. His father, George A. came to America with his family in 1846 and located in Evansville, Ind. Michael learned the trade of a millwright and followed it in Indiana till 1876, when he came to this county. Jan. 7, 1852, he married Anna Krapf. They are the parents of six children, five living - Michael, Joseph and Christina (twins), Katie and John. The deceased was a twin of Katie. The family are members of the Catholic church of Ridgeway. During the late war he served three years and a half in the Sixth Indiana Battery. He was appointed Captain for his bravery at Shiloh. He was in the battles of Shiloh, Holly Springs, Corinth, Vicksburg, Sturges's raid, Gun-Town raid, Tupelo and others.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Michael Millspaugh, born in Hamilton County, Ill., April 17, 1841, is a son of William Millspaugh, who carne to White County with his parents in 1830, and several years later went to Hamilton County, returning to this county in 1848. Michael received a common-school education and lived on the farm till the war, when he enlisted in Company G, Twenty-ninth Illinois Infantry. He was in the battle of Fort Donelson; was on detached service over a year, and in the postal service at Vicksburg. After the war he learned the blacksmith's trade, at which he is still working in Sacramento. He was married March 16, 1865, to Mary P., daughter of James Black, of this township. Of their four children only three are living - William J., Laura R. and Abby L.  [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


William Oliver, attorney, Norris City, was born in Jackson County, O., Sept. 12, 1836. His father, Charles Oliver, was a native of Mason County, Va., and moved to Ohio in 1832. He was reared on a farm and educated himself by studying at home. He attended school only thirty-two days. He worked in the day and studied at night. He came to this county in 1854, where he has since lived. He resides on section 27, Indian Creek Township, where he has 135 acres. He read law and has practiced for the last ten years. He has a good practice; is also Notary Public. He was Justice of the Peace fourteen years. He is a member of the A. O. U. W. He was married Nov. 19, 1859, to Sarah A., daughter of Thomas M. Vineyard, an old settler of this county. They are the parents of ten children, eight living - Arnold P., Angelo P., Clement E., Ida S., William R., Ella C., Darwin C. and Frenchie. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


V. H. Parker, M. D., was born in White County, Feb. 19, 1853. His father, J. T. Parker, was a native of Kentucky, and came to this county in 1832, and settled on section 27, Hawthorne Township, where he resided till 1875, when he removed to the village of Hawthorn, where he died March 22, 1880. His mother died in 1873. V. H. is next to the youngest of their five children. He commenced the study of medicine in 1873. In the years 1874-'76 he attended the Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. He has been practicing medicine in Hawthorne Township since April 15, 1876. He was married Jan. 8, 187 to Luella Eyler, who was born in Richland County, Ill., May 4, 1861. They have no children. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, Big Prairie Circuit. In his political views he is a Republican. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Capt. Alfred Pearce, of Middlepoint, Indian Creek Township was born in Middlepoint, June 18, 1818. His father, James Pearce, came to Middlepoint from North Carolina in 1817, and cleared the farm where Alfred now lives. He died in 1836. Captain Alfred Pearce owns 160 acres of good land, and is engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married in 1845 to Mary A., daughter of Richard Langford (deceased). They are the parents of ten children, seven living - Rebecca E. Mexico, Mary C., Martha W., Louisa K., James C., Alfred P., and Laura A. One daughter, Julia A., died in July, 1822, aged twenty-six years. Mrs. Pearce died in March, 1865. Mr. Pearce is Township Super­ visor, but is not an office-seeker. He was Captain of a military company when a young man, hence his title. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


W. F. Price was born in Posey County, Ind., April 21, 1853. In 1860 he came to White County and settled on the farm in Hawthorne Township; remained there till 1868, when he bought the old Stewart farm, on section 19, where he now owns 190 acres of fine, well-improved land, and is engaged in farming and stock-raising. He was married Jan. 20, 1875, to Martha E. Randolph, a native of White County, born April 6, 1875 [This year must be a typo in the book]. They have no children living. Mr. Price was the youngest child and only son of a family of four children. His mother died in 1878. His father is still living. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his wife of the Christian church. In his political views he is a Democrat. He has held the office of Township Trustee.
[Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


George R. Pumroy was born in White County, Ill., Jan. 25, 1843, and has always lived in Hawthorne Township. His father, J. M. Pumroy, was born in Kentucky, and came to Illinois when four years old. He has lived on the place where he still resides since 1814. George R. received his education in this county. Jan. 31, 1864, he married Hannah Hodkin, who was born near Phillipstown, White County, July 22, 1844. They are the parents of five children - Estella, born Dec. 1, 1866; Ernest, Sept. 18, 1871; Crat, Jan. 5, 1875; Paul Percy and Mary Jane (twins), Oct. 11, 1879. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and has held the office of Steward for ten years. In his political view he is a Republican. He has been Township Collector three terms, Justice of the Peace five years, and School Director a number of years. He owns eighty acres of fine land on section 28, Hawthorne Township. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


W. A. Raglin was born in Gallatin County, Ill., Oct. 6, 1854. His father, George Raglin, was born in Kentucky, and came to Illinois with his father when quite young. He died in 1856, in Cape Girardeau, Mo., and his mother in 1855. W. A. is their only child. He came to White County in 1856, where he has since resided. He was married Oct. 12, 1879, to N. E. Harsha, who was born in White County, April 1, 1854. They have one child ­ George A., born Sept. 19, 1881. Mr. Raglin has eighty acres of good land on section 7, Hawthorne Township. Politically he is a Democrat. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Samuel N. Ramsey, born in Columbiana County, O., Nov. 5, 1839, is a son of Samuel Ramsey, a native of Pennsylvania. He lived on a farm till he was twenty-four years old, when he learned the carpenter's trade. He came to this county in 1865. He was married April 14, 1854, to Mrs. Emily Douglass, daughter of William Vaughn, and a native of Columbiana County, O. They are the parents of three children, two living - Eli W. and Jacob E.; Uzzial W. died in July, 1880, at the age of eighteen years. The sons work with their father at the carpenter's trade. Mrs. Ramsey had two children by her former marriage - Jasper N. and John Douglas. The family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian church of Norris City. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Walter Reed was born in Nashville, Tenn., in December, 1852, and came to White County. Ill., in 1868, settling near Carmi, where he is engaged in farming. He was married Oct. 19, 1879, to Pheba Cleveland, a native of Illinois, born Dec. 25, 1859, and a daughter of Charles Cleveland. She is the fifth of nine children. Mr. and Mrs. Reed have two children - Harry Orlando, born Sept. 19, 1880, and James Harvey, born July 7, 1882. Mrs. Reed is a member of the Baptist church. Mr. Reed is a member of Lodge No. 198, I. O. O. F. Politically he is a Democrat.  [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Hon. Thomas Ridgway
The man whose life is here briefly sketched was for many years a prominent figure in the business and political life of the State of Illinois, and was known and respected far beyond the immediate locality where his life was spent. He was a successful merchant, banker, railway president, and was honored with one of the most responsible offices within the gift of the people of a great State. In all the obligations of citizenship and in his private life he was a type of the best American manhood.
Mr. Ridgway was born in White county, Illinois, August 30, 1826. His father, John Ridgway, was a descendant of the early New Jersey and Pennsylvania Quakers, and his mother was of Scotch Presbyterian antecedents.
When only six years of age his father, with his family, moved to Shawneetown, Ill., where for more than sixty-five years Mr. Ridgway was an honored citizen, adding honor to the town and city and receiving honor from it because of his merits.
In early life he entered the mercantile business, for which he was peculiarly fitted and in which he was successful. First in the employment of E. H. Gatewood; next, as a member of the firm of O. Pool & Co. (Orval Pool, John McKee Peeples and T. S. Ridgway), and then of Peepjes & Ridgway.
The First National Bank of Shawneetown was organized in 1865 by Thos. S. Ridgway and J. McKee Peeples, his former partner in the mercantile business—Mr. Peeples being chosen President and Mr. Ridgway Cashier. Although holding such a post of responsibility and labor, Mr. Ridgway spent a large portion of his time and means in the development of his town and State, and his indomitable energy was mainly instrumental hi building the Springfield & Illinois Southeastern Railroad (now part of the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad) from Shawneetown to Beardstown, of which road he was president for six years.
In 1874 he was elected State Treasurer of Illinois, administering the affairs of the office with signal ability.
On the death of Mr. Peeples in 1879 he was elected President of the bank, which position he filled to the time of his death.
From its organization to the present time there have been but five stockholders. Formerly the capital of the bank was $200,000, but on account of excessive taxation this was reduced to $50,000. This reduction of capital has not prevented the bank from having ample funds to meet the needs of its customers. Mr. Ridgway's business ability, character, and the confidence inspired by his uprightness throughout an almost lifelong residence at Shawneetown, have been leading elements hi establishing the First National Bank upon a solid basis.
Mr. Ridgway was a firm friend of public education, and was for many years a member of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Illinois Normal University, and during a goodly portion of the time the respected and useful president of the board. He was rarely absent from the meetings of the
board, and took a keen personal interest in this important educational institution.
In early life Mr. Ridgway was a Whig in politics, but identified himself with the Republican party at or soon after its formation and has been a consistent, devoted adherent of that organization ever since. He was a man of strong convictions, heart and soul a Republican and a stern partisan. He believed in his party and its principles. Prank, fearless and outspoken, he possessed in an eminent degree the courage that springs from sincere convictions, and he had the ability to defend these convictions. While doing this he dealt heavy blows, but they were dealt in an open, straightforward manner. He asked only an open field and an open fight. Possessing many rare and generous attributes, he found warm friends even among his political opponents, and was a tower of strength to his own party. His services and talents commanded the position of a leader, and he filled that position ably, having for at least twenty-five years been a dominant leader of his party hi his Congressional district. During this period he has been in attendance upon and a controlling spirit in nearly every county, district, State and National Republican convention which has been held.
He was dignified in bearing, yet gentle in his manners and courteous to all in business, in politics and socially. No one who desired from any cause to approach him ever hesitated a moment to do so. His affability was one of his chief characteristics and was a leading cause of his popularity among his acquaintances. He was candid and bold hi his opinions, yet invited the confidence and friendship of all with whom he was associated. He was well fitted, both by education secured in the school of experience and in natural ability, for the exercise of high and important trusts, and it was his laudable ambition to write his name among the prominent men of his State.
Mr. Ridgway took an active part in organizing the State Bankers' Association of Illinois, of which body he was first president, and was also interested in the work of the American Bankers' Association, and was a member of the executive council at the time of his death.
He had been a member of the Presbyterian church since 1858 and was for more than thirty years Superintendent of the Sunday-school.
His married life, extending over nearly half a century, was exceedingly pleasant, and he was strongly devoted to his wife and children.
His death, which occurred on November 17, 1897, took from the activities of the world a man whose business career and private character may well be taken as a model by those ambitious of winning success and the approval of their fellow men.


John McCracken Robinson
(1794 - 1843)
ROBINSON, John McCracken, a Senator from Illinois; born near Georgetown, Scott County, Ky., April 10, 1794; attended the common schools and graduated from Transylvania University at Lexington, Ky.; studied law; admitted to the bar and began practice in Carmi, Ill., in 1818; judge of the State supreme court; served as general in the State militia; elected in 1830 as a Jacksonian (later Democrat) to the United States Senate to fill the vacancy caused by the death of John McLean; reelected in 1835 and served from December 11, 1830, to March 3, 1841; was not a candidate for reelection; chairman, Committee on Engrossed Bills (Twenty-second Congress), Committee on Militia (Twenty-second through Twenty-fourth Congresses), Committee on Post Office and Post Roads (Twenty-fourth through Twenty-sixth Congresses); elected an associate justice of the Illinois State supreme court in 1843 and served until his death two months later in Ottawa, Ill., April 25, 1843; interment in the Old Graveyard, Carmi, Ill.  ["Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress" - Submitted by Terry Winchester]



Delilah Ann Shull
The feature regarding Delilah Ann Shull is written as part of the David Shull family in Hopewell community, Ohio County, Kentucky. Delilah Ann was born March 20, 1838, second child of David and Margarand (Chenoweth) Shull -- nee Reid. Until her thirteenth year, the young and growing family occupied the log cabin at the base of Miles Hill built by Peter Shull -- the child's paternal grandfather.  Although named for her two grandmothers; Delilah Clutter Reid. Ann Hetzell Shull, she was called Sis, by everyone. She was thoroughly educated in religious matters and took her public schooling at Julilee. The early death of her father, in 1847, must have placed some load of family-management upon her young shoulders. The family, had nevertheless, occupied a new house much larger and modern than David had completed.
At the marriage, in 1851, of her eldest sister Sarah, to Elias Guess Hunley, placed further responsibility upon her as now eldest child in the household. The marriage of her sisters, Louisa K and Mag, in April 1859 left her sole manager more or less of the family now that the mother was in declining health. On Feb. 4, 1861 she was married in Ohio County to William Alexander Langford of Warren County.
Until the mid-1870's the Langfords lived in Ohio County near the upper reaches of Green River. There they had eight children; Lulie Davis Langford, born Nov. 20, 1861; Euclid Benjamin Langford, born Jan. 19, 1864; Mary Belle Langford, born June 5, 1865; Dempsey Hunley Langford born Jan. 27, 1867; William Durwood Langford born 1868; John David Langford, born 1873. Twins were born also but data as to when born or sex or names escaped recording their memory. They were buried in the Shull family grave site on the farm. Their graves were never marked although the Langfords returned from Illinois to the little cemetery to locate them. Being unmarked, the graves were perished with the land by coal-stripping.
The Langfords settled in White County Illinois from Ohio County, Kentucky circa 1875. Where on Sept. 17, 1879 their eldest child Lulie died, and where, on November 16, 1879, Delilah Ann Langford - nee Shull, died. With burial in the Kuykendall Cemetery. It was always been said among our family that Aunt Sis Langford had eight children and died in 1879. On the other hand the Langfords know little about the early Shull family but say there were but six children. Her early death, and other traumatic events hid records from her descendants for a long time. Her son; William Durwood died in 1883.
On Feb. 28, 1882, her husband; William Alexander Langford married Mrs. Elizabeth Dixon in White County. On August 18, 1886, Euclid Benjamin Langford married Mollie Catherine Farmer in White County. Followed by the County marriages of her other offspring; Mary Belle Langford on Jan. 13, 1887 to George Newton Armstrong; Dempsey Hunley Langford on July 26, 1893 to Lena Ward; Mary Belle Langford Armstrong M. II Dec. 4, 1894, D. Edward Hon; and John David Langford on March 9, 1903, to Nellie Frances Hon. William Alexander Langford died Feb. 16, 1905 and was buried in Kuykendall Cemetery, White County Illinois. Mary Belle Langford had; Corrie and Carrie Armstrong (twins, born 1888-1889).
Carrie married Clifton Edmonds and had children. Corrie married Hazel Davis, had issue M. II Leda Stanley had: Ronald, Robert, Emily, Richard, Jean, James, Ray, Rebecca. Corrie Armstrong died in 1971. Mary Belle's daughter Jessie Armstrong married William Renshaw by D. Edward Hon. Mary Belle Feb. 20, 1899, married Wheeler Thomas; Pearl Edna Langford, born Jan. 12, 1901 married Raymond Haupman; Harry Kemball Langford, Oct. 30, 1905 married Mary J. Nelson; Hazel Ann Langford, born Feb. 18, 1909 married --- Sigler. John David Langford, son of William Alexander and Delilah Ann Shull Langford, in 1894 became brother-in-law of D. Edward Hon by his marriage on March 9, 1903, became his son-in-law, D. Edward Hon was son of Lewis and Lucinda (Hart) Hon. Nellie Frances Langford was daughter of D. Edward and Mary (Bernwich) Hon. John David Langford had; Vonda Langford born April 16, 1905 married Aug. 9, 1922 Frank King had issue; and John Hon Langford, born Dec. 26, 1909 married Irene Frazier had issue. John David Langford died in White Co., Ill. on Feb. 2, 1965. Euclid Benjamin Langford eldest son of William and Delilah Shull Langford, had; George Everett Langford born July 11, 1886 died Jan. 13, 1887; Alsey Victor Langford born Feb. 20, 1888; and Nellie Fay Langford, born July 6, 1892 died Sept. 8, 1892. Mollie Catherine Farmer was daughter of Samuel and Caroline (Brown) Farmer born Dec. 17, 1867 in White County Ill. died May 9, 1944 -- her husband; Euclid Langford died Jan. 2, 1907, both buried Kuykendall Cemetery. Alsey Victor Langford married April 1, 1909, Icey Ella daughter of Milo J. and Lucy (Graves) Hart, b. Jan. 1, 1889 White Co. died June 30, 1969, bur. Kuykendall. Lucy Elizabeth, dau. of Thomas and Lucy (Greer) Graves, b. Feb. 24, 1886 White Co. Ill. died in Evansville Ind. Aug. 19, 1936 buried in West Union Cem. White Co., Ill. Thomas Graves born circa 1825 in Illinois son of Richard Graves (born circa 1773 in Virginia - died Jan. 11, 1849) and Cassandra Riggs (born circa 1786 in Virginia.) Thomas Graves married June 22, 1862, Lucy Elizabeth Greer, born May 15, 1833 in Illinois dau. of Asa Greer (born July 15, 1801 in Virginia, married July 17, 1823 Levina F. Napier born 1804 in Tenn) Lucy Greer Graves died circa 1913 in Oklahoma.

Issue of Alsey Victor and Icey Ella (Hart) Langford; Blanche Murriel Langford born April 24, 1910; Darrell Edwin Langford, born Sept. 27, 1911; Doris Eloise, born April 25, 1915; Norman Langford born March 18, 1918, and Iris Gladys Langford, born Sept. 18, 1926, Darrell E. Langford married Gladys Louise Hargraves has descendants; Doris E. Langford married (first) Frank Miller (divorced) married (second) Ole Odegaard (he died 1970) Norman Langford married Mildred Foster has descendants; Iris G. Langford married (first) Dan Engstrom (had one son) married (second) Dec. 19, 1964) Fred Sielaff (had one son), Blanche Murriel Langford married Sept 5, 1931 in Cook County Ill. to Herman Russell Smith -- Born Nov. 11, 1906, in Woodford County Ill. To Frederick J. and Melissa Mary (Battershell) Smith - died Feb. 9, 1967 buried Memory Gardens Arlington Hts., Illinois. Her offspring (all born in Cook County) Elizabeth Ann Smith, Dec. 30, 1935; Sue Ellen Smith, Dec. 19, 1937; Melissa Mae Smith Nov. 6, 1941; and Laurel Louise Smith, July 5, 1946. The marriages of her daughters; Elizabeth Ann, Aug. 10, 1957 to Thomas Eugene Wick; Melissa M. April 17, 1965 in Brunswick Maine to William Wilfred Mercier (now divorced), Sue E., Sept. 1, 1968 to Thomas Clanton Courington; and Laurel L. Oct. 5, 1969 to David Michael Nicol. These girls live from Oregon to Maine.

William Alexander Langford had several brothers and sisters. His brother, John D. Langford was married to Elizabeth, daughter of John and Mary (Shull) Hunsaker. Thus the wives of Wm. A. and John D. Langford were first cousins. Also the brother-in-law of Delilah Shull (John Calvin Hunsaker) and sister-in-law (Elizabeth Langford) were brother and sister. William B. Langford, son of J. D. and Elizabeth Hunsaker Langford married Florence Farmer and was brother-in-law of Euclid B. Langford. [From the Ohio County Times, Hartford Kentucky November 10, 1977 -- Transcribed by Christine Walters]

William A. Vineyard, farmer and stock-raiser, Indian Creek Township, was born in Norris City, Jan. 18, 1838. His father, Thomas M. Vineyard, a native of Kentucky, carne to this county about sixty-five years ago, when a boy. He was a soldier in the Black Hawk war. He cleared a great deal of land in this county. He died in June, 1874. Wm. A. was reared on a farm and educated in this county. Nov. 14, 1861, he married Patsey Caroline Garrison. Of their seven children five are living - Lewis M., Ophelia L., Mattie M., Thomas E. and George C. Mr. Vineyard is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian church of Mt. Oval. He owns 138 acres of fine land. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]

John S. Walker, M. D., born in Allegheny County, Penn., April 21, 1837, is a son of William Walker, a native of Ireland, who came to this country in 1832. He carne to this county in 1856. He read medicine with Dr. Ingram one year, and then attended Rush Medical College, in Chicago. He began practice in 1864, in Sacramento, and has since remained in this vicinity, where he has built up a good practice. He married Nancy Anderson. They had six children, four of whom are living - Minnie, Howard, Harry and Frank. Mrs. Walker died, and he married Ann E., daughter of William McClellan. They have one child - Charles. Dr. Walker has been Highway Commissioner two years. He owns eighty acres of land, and is also engaged in farming. [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


Andrew C. Warren, son of Bryant Warren, a native of Lincoln County, Ky., was born April 22, 1829, when his parents were on the way to this county. His grandfather owned a farm in the "Crab Orchard," Kentucky. His father settled in Indian Creek, where Andrew was reared and educated in the log-cabin subscription schools. His father died in 1863. He was married in 1864, to Susan L. Fields. They are the parents of eight children - Sherman, Burris, Clifford, Charles V., Rufus G., Alma., Berry and Ethel. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.  [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]


George Winkler was born in Pennsylvania, and removed to Ohio County, Ky., when he was seven years old. In 1834 he came to this county and settled in Indian Creek Township where he cleared up a farm. He married Sarah Willis. They had thirteen children, seven living - John, Henry, G. W., Thomas, Vincent M., Elizabeth, Eliza A. Mr. Winkler died Nov. 22, 1877.  [Source: History of White County Illinois, Inter-State Publishing Company, Chicago, Illinois. 1883; Transcribed by Fred Coleman]




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