Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents

Van Horn, John
JOHN VAN HORN, farming and stock, Sec. 27; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in Berrien Co., N.J., May 17, 1834. He married Miss Frane H. Elwell June 4, 1872; she was born in South Shaftsbury, Vt., Oct. 16, 1839; they have one child, viz., Merton Gates. He lived in New Jersey nine years, when, with his parents he came to Plainfield, Ill., and settled adjoining the present place, engaging in farming and remaining twelve years; they then moved to the present place, and he has lived here since; he owns 250 acres, which he has principally earned by his own labor; his parents, Cornelius G. and Mrs. Ann (Van Houten) Van Horn, were natives of New Jersey; he died April 15, 1877; she died May 8, 1872.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Van Horne, Mathew
MATHEW VAN HORNE, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; was born in New Lenox, Will Co., Aug. 18, 1839; he is the son of the late Mathew Van Horne, deceased, who was one of our first settlers and pioneers; the farm of Mr. V. consists of 120 acres, valued at $8,000. He was married Dec. 25, 1860, to Miss Viola J. White, who was born in La Porte Co., Ind.; they have had two children, viz., Carrie A. and Hattie C.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Vanolinda, Ira
IRA VANOLINDA, Police Magistrate, Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in Saratoga Co., N.Y., Sept. 1, 1823. He married Miss Louisa Craw; she was born in New York, and died Dec. 10, 1870; they had five children, viz., Mary E., Elinor D., Susan D., Clara E. and Charles W. His present wife was Mrs. Wilder, formerly Miss Catheron Burdick; they were married April 23, 1874; she was born in Orleans Co., N.Y., Feb. 12, 1835; they have one child, viz., Lotta Ruth; Mrs. Vanolinda had five children by a former marriage, four living, viz., Lilly, Lizzie, Joseph and Carrie. He lived in New York twenty-five years; he then moved to Kendall Co., Ill., and engaged in farming, remaining until 1853; he also served as Deputy Sheriff and Constable twelve years; he then went to California and engaged in stock and hotel business; remained three years; he then came to Will Co., Ill., and engaged in general merchandise at Frankfort, remaining one year, when he came to Plainfield and engaged in farming, continued three years; he then engaged in general merchandise in this village; continued until 1873; he has held the office of Justice of the Peace since 1864.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Vatter, Adam  Jr.
ADAM VATTER, JR., insurance and lightning-rod agent, and partner in the firm of Vatter & Merz, pop manufacturers, Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Germany March 11, 1852; came to the United States in 1855, and to this State, and settled in Monee with his father's family in the same year. He was married to Miss Bertha Kettering, who was born in Chicago April 9, 1853; they have had two children, one of whom is living, viz., Julia; deceased, an infant.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Varley, Thomas
THOMAS VARLEY, far.; P.O. Aurora; the subject of this sketch was born in Yorkshire, England, June 25, 1824, and is the son of William and Mary (Newsam) Varley, of England; Mr. Varley was a laborer; in 1850, he emigrated to America, and came West to Will Co., Ill.; here he worked by the day, farming; he saved a little money by hard labor, and, in 1854, sent for his wife and three children, who arrived the same year; he then settled on a small piece of land; to-day he ranks as one of the successful farmers of Wheatland Tp.; owns 280 acres of fine, improved land. He married Martha Craven, of England, who died with dropsy, May, 1878.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Voigt, August
AUGUST VOIGT, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany; came to the United States in 1858, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 120 acres, valued at $6,000. He was married to Miss Mena Sievert, who was born in Germany; they have four children - Anna, Lena, Adolph and Freda. Mr. Voigt is now holding the office of Secretary of the Greengarden Insurance Co., which is fully described in the general history of the township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wagner, Mathias
MATHIAS WAGNER, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Rhenish Prussia, Germany, in October, 1822; he lived there until he was 3 years of age, when he came to this country in 1852; he first lived in Du Page Co., Ill., three months, and then lived with Augustus Gooding about a year; in the spring of 1854, he moved where he now lives; he owns 138 acres. He married his first wife, Annie Piefer, of Rhenish Prussia, Germany, in 1852; she died in April, 1862; they had four children; two died in infancy - Martin, born May 4, 1853; Mary, born in 1854, died the same year. He married Margaret Hermon, of Rhenish Prussia, in May, 1862; they have seven children - Mary, born Dec. 29, 1866; Katie, born June 28, 1867; Maria, born March 14, 1869; Lena, born June 24, 1871; Attila, born March 24, 1873; Susanna, born Nov. 28, 1874, and Pete, born July 30, 1878; two died - Margaret, in 1864, and an infant. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wakefield, Col. Edwin
COL. EDWIN WAKEFIELD, Justice of the Peace, Braidwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Monmouthshire, Eng., in 1830, and is the son of Charles and Mary Ann (Lechie) Wakefield; his father was a professional gardener; Col. Wakefield worked with his father in the garden until he was about 13 years of age; he then entered the coal mines, and followed coal mining for over twenty-five years; in 1855-6, Col. Wakefield served as gunner in the British Royal Artillery, in the Crimean war. In 1857, he emigrated to America; he has been engaged in mining in different parts of Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Kentucky and Illinois. At the breaking-out of the war, he enlisted as Captain of Co. D, 7th Mo. V.I., June, 1861; he participated in some of the hard-fought battles; was at the siege and capture of Vicksburg, Miss.; was promoted as Major of the 7th Mo., Nov. 29, 1862; resigned Aug. 1, 1863. He then came to Illinois, and settled in Braceville, Grundy Co., nine years in mining; in 1874, came to Braidwood, and entered the mercantile business. Has held the office of Justice of the Peace in Grundy Co. Is a National Greenbacker in politics. Married in 1863, to Josephine Brumfield, of Ottawa, Ill.; have four children. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Walker, John
JOHN WALKER, saloon and boarding stable, Braidwood; born in Ayrshire, Scotland, about 1837, and is the son of Andrew and Jane (Ritchie) Walker, of Scotland. His father was an engineer in the coal mines; Mr. Walker, at the age between 8 and 9 years, commenced working in coal mines; and followed mining and sinking of shafts while in Scotland; in 1866, he emigrated to America, and came direct to Braidwood; here he was first engaged in helping sinking coal shafts; in 1868, he commenced the butcher business, and followed this business about sixteen months; he then entered the saloon business; this business he has followed principally ever since. Mr. Walker married Miss Elizabeth Steel, of Kilmarnock, Scotland, by whom they have had eight children, five living. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Walker, Jonas
JONAS WALKER, farmer; P.O. Du Page; was born in Worcester Co., Mass., April 5, 1817; he is the son of James and Sally (Brewer) Walker; he left home at the age of 13 years and engaged at farm labor at $8 per month; previous to his majority he worked two years in the city of Worcester in a wire-factory; in 1838, he came West and located in Greene (now Jersey) Co., Ill., where he engaged in farming for six years; in the fall of 1844, he came to Lockport, Will Co., and entered the employ of Hiram Norton, hauling flour to Chicago and bringing back goods; this he followed two years; he then opened up and improved the farm now owned by S. Wilson, and remained three years; he also opened up a farm on Sec. 16, Lockport Tp.; he lived in Lockport Tp., at various points, till 1855, when he moved to Du Page Tp., and bought a quarter-section about one mile south of his present residence; in March, 1859, he located on his present farm. May 6, 1840, he was married to Paulina H. Judd, a native of Indiana; nine sons and three daughters have been born to them - Henry, James, Charles, Pemelia, George, Clara, Hiram and Harley (twins), William, Walter, May and Albert; of these Henry, James and Albert are dead. Owns 250 acres in Will Co., and eighty acres in Iroquois Co. Has held the office of Road Commissioner five years, and also the office of Town Trustee.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Walter, Emil
EMIL WALTER, agricultural implements and saloon, Crete; this gentleman was born in Germany Feb. 12, 1842, and is the son of Charles and Augusta (Schmidt) Walter, of Germany; father was a minister of the Lutheran Church; in 1866, Mr. Walter came to America and landed in New York City; he came direct West to Illinois and settled in Chicago; here he was engaged as a traveling agent for the wholesale liquor house of Schmidt & Cramer for two and one-half years. He then entered the U.S. Regular Army, and served as Sergeant Major for five years in the Western and Southern states. He returned to Chicago, and entered the wine and liquor business for himself about one year; he then (in 1876) came to Crete; here he has been engaged in the saloon business; is also agent for reapers, cultivators, rakes, plows, seeders and corn-planters. Mr. Walter was elected, in 1878, to the office of Town Clerk. He married Miss Eliza Werner.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Walter, Michael

MICHAEL WALTER, grocery merchant, Lockport; was born in Kleinuelzheim, Germany, Dec. 6, 1838; in 1851, came to America, and settled in Geneva, Kane Co.; in 1853, engaged in learning the shoemaker's trade at St. Charles; in the winter of 1855, worked at his trade in Batavia; next to Dixon, Lee Co., a short time, and in August, 1856, came to Lockport, followed his trade a short time, and then entered the employ of J.S. Finch, as clerk in his grocery store; was in his employ one year, and then clerked in the clothing store of N.S. Rafferty six months; he opened out a saloon for himself, but not liking the business, sold out in 1859, and went to Pike's Peak; invested all his funds in a sluice, and after one month's labor had as a reward for capital and toil invested, a goose-quill of gold, valued at 40 cents; returned to Lockport, and worked at his trade again; April 15, 1861, enlisted in Capt. Hawley's Battery; three month's service; Aug. 31, re-enlisted in the three years' service in Capt. Dressers' Battery; was mustered out Oct. 5, 1864; participated in the battles of Forts Henry and Donelson, in the battle of Shiloh and the siege of Corinth; in the spring of 1865, he engaged in the grocery trade with his brother; in a short time his brother retired, and the firm of Walter & Bohle was formed; in 1872, he started in the dry goods business alone, and failed in October, 1873; in the spring of 1874, went to Lemont and superintended a general merchandise store for J.A. Boyer; May 22, 1875, opened out his present grocery store in Lockport. Was married Oct. 19, 1865, to Margaret Pitts, a native of Germany; has eight children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Walz, John J.
JOHN J. WALZ, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Spencer; was born in Germany Feb. 5, 1836; came to the United States in 1854, and settled in New Lenox, Will Co., Ill., in 1856; his farm contains 240 acres of land, valued at $14,000. He was married April 6, 1868, to Miss Henrietta Stricher, who was born in Germany Nov. 20, 1846; they have had three children, two of whom are living - Adeline and George A.; deceased, Herman Frank. Mr. Walz is at present Commissioner of Highways.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ward, John H.
JOHN H. WARD, insurance, Braidwood; was born in Ireland, Aug. 15, 1840; emigrated to America with his parents in 1846; his father, Hugh Ward, was a mason, by trade; was engaged in working on the Erie Canal; first settled in Pennsylvania, here about one and a half years; then to Buffalo, N.Y., and remained for three years; came West to Illinois and settled in Wilmington, Will Co., in 1851; Mr. Ward, in 1866, came to Braidwood, and has been engaged at his trade, mason, having plastered the first houses built in Braidwood; he is agent for some most reliable insurance companies of the United States: Continental, of New York; Home, of Columbus, Ohio; German-American, of New York, etc. At the breaking-out of the late war, enlisted in Co. I, 100th I.V.I.; was honorably discharged on the account of sickness. Mr. Ward has held several offices of trust in his township; Town Clerk and School Director. Democrat in politics; member of the Catholic Church. Married twice; in 1865, to Miss Lustatia Brown; second wife, 1876, to Miss Mary Keane, of Illinois; three children by first wife and one child by second wife. His parents are now living in Joliet, Ill. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Ward, Sylvester
SYLVESTER WARD, farmer; P.O. Lemont; was born in Genesee Co., N.Y., May 29, 1831; he is the son of Hannibal and Jane (Hicks) Ward; in September, 1833, his father came West, and settled on the farm where his son now lives. Hannibal Ward died Dec. 23, 1874, and was buried on the homestead; Sylvester remained at home until his majority, his early life being that common to a farmer's son; in 1854, he went to St. Charles, Kane Co., and engaged in the manufacture of wagon-hubs. Mr. Ward improved the machine invented by his uncle, Justice Ward, for their manufacture, and brought it to such perfection that three hands could take the timber from the stump and make one hundred hubs per day; in the spring of 1857, in company with two others, he purchased eighty acres of timber in Porter Co., Ind., and placed upon it a machine constructed during the winter of 1856, and again commenced the manufacture of hubs. Having sold out his interest, in the fall of 1859, in company with A.D. Shepard, he purchased a grist-mill at Leland, La Salle Co., and operated it two and a half years; in 1862, he returned to the old homestead, where he has since resided. He was married Feb. 22, 1860, to Lorina Johnson, a native of Michigan; have had two children - Ida S., born Feb. 11, 1861; she died Feb. 25, 1863; Eddie E., born Oct. 30, 1863. Owns 355 acres, valued at $21,000. Has held the office of School Treasurer for the past ten years, Mr. Ward owns and operates a large cheese-factory erected at a cost of $3,000, located about four miles north of Lockport.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Warner, A.H.
A.H. WARNER, farmer; P.O. Rockville; was born in Lima, Livingston Co., N.Y., Dec. 5, 1804, and is the son of Asahel and Sarah (Ketchum) Warner; father was a farmer; here Mr. Warner was brought up on his father's farm; in 1846 or 1847, he came West and was looking for location in Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio and Illinois; in 1848, with his wife and three children, came to Illinois and settled on a farm in the southern part of Illinois, near Shawneetown; here he rented, and in 1850 started for Will Co., with 150 head of cattle, and three head of horses; drove through, and arrived in 1850, and first settled in Wesley Tp., on what is known as the Beckwith farm; the first year he was here, he put up 150 tons of hay; here he set out in farming, and has farmed it ever since; in about 1853 or 1854, he built the present homestead. He is a Democrat in politics. Married Sophia Merrill of New York; have had eight children; six living; owns 425 acres of fine improved land, which improvements were made principally by Mr. Warner. Had two sons in the late war - Frank and Charles; participated in some of the hard-fought battles; was honorably discharged.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Warner, Alfred
ALFRED WARNER, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; was born in Lima, Livingston Co., N.Y., May 19, 1814, and is the son of Asahel and Sarah (Ketchum) Warner of New York; Mr. Warner was brought up on his father's farm, and when 19 years of age, he was farming it by the month; in 1844, he came West and settled in Ohio; engaged in farming and mercantile business; in 1849 came to Will Co., Ill., and settled in Wesley Tp.; the country was very new at that time; but few houses between him and Joliet; in 1853, he made a trip to Australia, prospecting; returned in 1875. Married in 1839 to Miss Rachel L. Curtis, born in New York May 24, 1818. Mr. Warner's political opinions are Democratic. Owns 217 acres of fine improved land. His son, Norman C., was born in New York Nov. 26, 1839; came West with his parents; received a good common-school education, and taught district school before the war. At the breaking-out of the late war, he enlisted in the 39th Ill. V.I., as 2nd Lieutenant; he took a very active part in recruiting for the regiment; participated in some of the hard-fought battles; Aug. 16, 1864, was wounded in the leg at the battle of Deep Bottom on the James River; this wound caused his leg to be amputated; for his gallant service at this battle, he was brevetted as Major; he then received a clerkship in the War Department at Washington, D.C. Here he studied law and graduated at the Columbia College in 1867; came West, and is now practicing law in Rockford, Ill.; ranks as one of the prominent attorneys of that vicinity. He has taken a very active part in politics in Will County.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Warner, Harvey
HARVEY WARNER, farmer; the subject of this sketch is one of the best known and highly respected farmers of Wesley Tp.; was born in Lima, Livingston Co., N.Y., May 9, 1807, and is the son of Asahel and Sarah (Ketchum) Warner, of Columbia Co., N.Y.; his father was a farmer. Mr. Warner was brought up on his father's farm; in 1830, he married Miss Elvira Aurther, of New York, by whom he has two children; in 1849, emigrated West to Illinois and settled in Wesley Tp.; here he has lived ever since. In 1851, he was elected Supervisor of Wesley Tp., and held this office for four years; in 1874, he was elected to same office, and holds same office to-day; this office he has filled with honor to himself and to the people of Wesley Tp. His political opinions are Democratic. When he first came here he purchased 250 acres of land for $2,700.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Watkins, Richard
RICHARD WATKINS, farming, Sec. 22; P.O. New Lenox; the subject of this sketch was born in Herefordshire, England Feb. 12, 1826. He married Miss Catherine Russell Oct. 10, 1854; she was born in Herefordshire, England Oct. 3, 1830; they had eleven children, nine living, viz., William J., Rosa, Richard, Annie I., Frank, Lillie J., Ellen K., John A. and Clara M. He lived in England twenty-one years, then came to the United States and settled in Ontario Co., N.Y., where he remained six years; he then came to Illinois and settled in Will Co.; in the spring of 1874, he settled on his present place, and has resided here since. He owns 107 acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor, having started without any capital.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Watson, William
WILLIAM WATSON, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Greengarden; one of our early settlers; was born in Scotland Aug. 2, 1828; came to the United States in 1850, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year; his farm consists of 83 acres, valued at $4,000. He was married to Miss Ann Phillipps, who was born in England; they have had ten children, eight of whom are living - Ann J., Sarah C., Mary E., William J., Robert A., John H., Emma C. and George; deceased, Louisa and Agnes E.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Webb, E.H.
E.H. WEBB, dealer in dry goods and notions (firm of Chittenden, Northrup & Co.), Joliet; was born in Columbia Co., N.Y., May 20, 1844; when he was but 2 years old his parents removed to Columbia Co., Wis.; he received his education in a select school at Poynette, Wis., and at the State University at Madison; in February, 1863, he enlisted as a private in Co. H, 36th Wis. V.I., and served eight months in the army of the Potomac, participating in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, North Anna and Cold Harbor, besides smaller battles and skirmishes; at Cold Harbor he was disabled, and while lying in the hospital he received a commission at Second Lieutenant of Co. A, 51st Wis. V.I., and was transferred to the Western army in Missouri; returning from the war, he entered the dry goods business at Portage, Wis.; he afterward spent three years in business in Dakota Territory, and, in 1871, came to Joliet and engaged in his present business. He was married May 20, 1874, to Miss Mary Chittenden, of Plainfield, Ill., daughter of George N. Chittenden, one of the early settlers of Will Co.; they have two children - Elizabeth W. and Winnifred. Mr. Webb is an active worker in the M.E. Church, of which he has been a member for the past eight years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Webb, R.D.
R.D. WEBB, wagon-maker, Plainfield. Methodist. Owns the wagon-shop where the old foundry once stood; was born in Yorkshire, England, Aug. 2, 1829; served seven years in that place, learning wagon-making; came to this country and first stopped in Milwaukee in November, 1850; remained there during the following winter and worked at joiner work; in the spring of 1851, came to this place, and worked as a carpenter and joiner until 1862; he then, in company with Jacob Hoffer, bought the old foundry known as the Dillman property, and engaged in the manufacture of wagons and doing repair work generally; Mr. W. and Mr. H. continued together about six months; at the end of that time Mr. Hoffer sold out to Mr. Webb's father; the new firm continued together until 1867; Mr. W. then bought his father out, and since that time has carried on the business alone; during the late war twelve workmen were constantly employed; the demand at that time was enormous; one year alone, during the war, Mr. W. manufactured 150 wagons; in 1854, Mr. W. returned to England on a visit, and while there, the following year in January, he married Mary Ward; she was born in Yorkshire, England; they have no children. The building that Mr. W. formerly conducted business in was destroyed by fire Jan. 28, 1877; the loss was about $3,000; no insurance; Mr. W.'s townsmen and neighbors immediately raised him $300 to purchase timber to rebuild, and in a very short space of time the lumber was bought and hauled to the ground free of charge, and the present shop was raised; no interruption of his business occurred; Mr. W. still continues at the old stand; manufactures wagons and does repairing on all kinds of farm machinery.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Weeks, G.H.
G.H. WEEKS, Foreman, lumber yard, Lockport; was born in Homer Tp., Will Co., Ill., March 10, 1836; his father was among the earliest settlers of the county, having come to Illinois in June, 1833; although a successful practitioner of the healing art, he purchased a farm, on which he remained until 1843 or 1844, when he removed to the village of Lockport, and devoted himself altogether to his profession. At the age of 16, George began the trade of painting, which he followed about four years; in 1856, he bought a boat and engaged in boating on the canal from Lockport to various points; in 1864, he left off boating, and engaged in various pursuits until June 17, 1868, when he entered the employ of Gaylord & Co., as Foreman in their lumber yard. He was married June 3, 1861, to Ellen Morgan, a native of Newark, Ill.; has three children - Arthur, Ida and George.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Weeks, John H.
JOHN H. WEEKS, carriage painting and trimming, Lockport; was born in Monroe Co., N.Y., Feb. 13, 1830; in the Spring of 1833, his father's family came West and settled in what is now Homer Tp., Will Co.; in 1843, the family moved into the town of Lockport; in 1847, John H. engaged in learning the trade of harness making with his brother, Judge C.H. Weeks, now of Joliet; in 1858, he quit the harness trade; Sept. 1, 1861, he went into the United States service as assistant leader of the military band of the 19th Regt., Ill. V.I.; he was mustered out March 18, 1862; during almost the entire term of service, he acted in the capacity of leader; in 1863, he commenced the trade of carriage painting and trimming with his present employer, H. Norton. He was married in 1852 to Maria Le Valley, a native of Lockport, Niagara Co., N.Y.; has had two sons - Frank (dead) and Edwin L., who at present is engaged in the same business with his father.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Weeks, Horace
HORACE WEEKS, attorney at law, Joliet; was born in Homer Tp., Will Co., Ill., Sept. 20, 1837; he is the fifth son of Dr. Nathaniel Weeks, one of the pioneers of Will Co., who came West in 1833 and located in what was called Yankee Settlement; his father moved to Lockport when Horace was quite a small boy; here he received his education and grew to manhood; at the age of 13, he was employed in the office of the Lockport Telegraph, edited and published by Dr. J.F. Daggett and C.D. Holcomb, and played the "devil" for about two years; in the summer of 1854, he learned the art of telegraphy and had charge of the office at Sheffield, on the C. & R.I. R.R.; here he continued about six months, and then returned to Lockport, and was engaged in the drug business in connection with his father two years; he was next employed at book-keeper in the banking house of J.S. McDonald till 1859, when he entered upon a course of legal study under the direction of E.C. Fellows; this he prosecuted two years; subsequently, he was clerk in the post office at La Salle one year, was clerk in the Canal office at Chicago one year and held the same position in the Provost Marshal's office at Joliet two years; in 1865, he was employed as ticket agent and operator on the C. & R.I. R.R. at Joliet three years; in 1868, he was admitted to the bar, and the same year was employed as Deputy Circuit Clerk, a position he held until 1872; in February, 1872, he was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue for the Sixth District, and occupied the office till January, 1876; in 1877, he was appointed Master in Chancery, and still occupies the office. He was married in 1862 to Mary Munson, a native of Illinois; has five children - Fannie E., Fred B., Kittie, Curtis M. and Henry S.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Weinmann, G.A.
G.A. WEINMANN, manufacturer of and dealer in furniture, coffins, caskets, etc., Frankfort Station; was born in Du Page Co., Ill., Dec. 3, 1846; came to Frankfort, Will Co., in 1876; he is the son of J.M. Weinmann, of Richton, Cook Co., Ill. He was married to Miss Sophia Rathje; they have one child - Frederick.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Weiss, Morris
MORRIS WEISS, druggist; P.O. Mokena; was born in Germany Jan. 10, 1830; came to the United States in 1854, and settled in Mokena, Will Co., Ill.; he is the first proprietor, and builder of the first drug store in the village. He was married to Miss Julia Schiek, who was born in Germany Oct. 18, 1834. Mr. W., since his residence in the township, has held the office of Township Clerk nine years in succession, Justice of the Peace six years and is at present Township Treasurer.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Welter, Nicholas
NICHOLAS WELTER, farmer, Sec. 13; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Moltzh, Rhenish Prussia, Germany, Nov. 16, 1841; he lived there until he was 15 years old, when he came to America (1857) and first went to Chicago, staying there three or four years; in 1864, he came to Will County and settled upon his farm; in 1872, kept store at Gooding's Grove P.O., and came to where he now lives the year after. Married Maggie Meyer, of Prussia, in Chicago, in January, 1862; she was born April 13, 1843; they had nine children - Katie, born Oct. 27, 1863; Lina, Oct. 13, 1864, died Aug. 11, 1865; Nicholas, born Nov. 15, 1866; Lizzie, Aug. 6, 1868; Mathew, Sept. 15, 1869, died in October, 1874; Cecilia, born Jan. 25, 1872; Christian, May 4, 1873; Susie, Sept. 15, 1875, and Maggie, July 3, 1877. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Werner, Charles
CHARLES WERNER, proprietor of Werner's Hall and Werner's stone quarry, Joliet; has been a resident of this city for the past twenty-seven years, having come direct from Germany in 1851; he was born at Frankfort-on-the-Main, in Hesse-Darmstadt, Sept. 14, 1828; when about 15 years old, he was apprenticed to the mason's trade, which he continued until 1851, when he came to this country, landing in New York in July, and coming direct to Joliet; he soon afterward engaged in working at his trade, and, in 1865, engaged in the stone-quarrying business, which he still continues; he, with his brother, built the Will County Jail and Sheriff's house, the Joliet Union Schoolhouse, St. Mary's Catholic Church, besides a large number of prominent buildings in different parts of the city; in 1868, Mr. Werner purchased Young's Hall, on Chicago street, which burned down in 1874, and the following year he erected Werner's Hall on the same site, at a cost of $20,000; he served as Town Collector in 1877. He was married July 17, 1853, to Miss Mary A. Goeble, of Joliet, a native of Prussia; they have one child - Bertha.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Werner, Gottlieb

Werner, Gottlieb, farmer and stock-raiser, P.O. New Bremen; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany, March 1, 1821; came to the United States in 1846, and to this State, and settled in Frankfort, Will Co., in the same year; his farm consists of 240 acres, valued at $12,000; it is situated on Sec 12, in Frankfort Tp., and on Sec. ?? in Rich Tp., Cook Co. Mr. W. was married to Miss Mary Cunz, who was born in Germany; they have eight children, viz., August, John, George, Elizabeth, Martin, Philipp, Henry and Reitz. Mr. W., since his residence in the township, has held the offices of School Director and Road Commissioner several years. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." By George H. Woodruff, H. H. Hill, 1878]

Werner, John
JOHN WERNER, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Monee; was born in Germany Nov. 25, 1825; came to the United States in 1854, and to this State, and settled in Greengarden, Will Co. in 1865; his farm consists of 160 acres, valued at $8,000. He was married to Miss Mary Schde, who was born in Germany March 15, 1823; they have had six children, five of whom are living - Dietrick, Elizabeth, William, Antoine and Mary; deceased, John.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Werner, William
WILLIAM WERNER, contractor and stone quarryman, Joliet; was born in Frankfort-on-the-Main, in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, Feb. 5, 1831; at the age of 16, he was apprenticed to the mason's trade, and, at the age of 20, came to the United States; he spent three months in Stroutsburg, Penn.; when, his brother Charles having come to Chicago, he came West and joined in the Hickory Creek Settlement, in the town of Frankfort, in October, 1851; the Rock Island Railroad had just begun building and Mr. Werner began work on it as a mason, continuing during the winter as a laborer; in the spring of 1852, he settled in Joliet and began business as a contractor, the first building he built being for the late Deacon John Beaumont; he engaged in the quarry business about twenty years ago, and has built nearly all the prominent stone buildings in Joliet, among which may be named the Will County Jail, Union Schoolhouse, West Side Presbyterian and St. Mary's Catholic Churches, etc.; in 1856, he was elected Commissioner of Highways and Treasurer, serving three years; in 1861, he was elected a member of the Board of Aldermen, and served four years; he was chosen one of the Draft Commissioners in 1863, to fill the quota of the town; he served on the Board of Supervisors seven years, from 1867 to 1874. He was married Dec. 7, 1853, to Miss Barbara Goeble, a native of Prussia; they have four sons living - Frederick Wilhelm, now a medical student at the University of Michigan; Frederick Carl, George Washington and Edwart; Mr. Warner is a leading member of the German Lutheran Church in Joliet, of which he has been President for the past fifteen years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Westmann, O.R.
O.R. WESTMANN, photograph artist, Joliet; was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, Feb. 18, 1833; his father, O.R. Westmann, Sr., was the Russian Envoy to the Court of Hesse-Darmstadt, and died when Orloff R. was but two years of age; the family remained in Darmstadt; he was educated in the Gymnasium of Darmstadt, graduating when about 15 years of age; he then entered the German army as a cadet, and, after the revolution of 1849, was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in the 1st Infantry; he served until 1853, when he came to this country; he first engaged in clerking in Chicago; in 1855, he purchased a farm in Du Page Co., and engaged in farming for two years; in 1857, he went West, and spent fifteen years in Iowa, Nebraska, Colorado and New Mexico, engaged in merchandising and mining, and, during the last few years, in photographing, making views for the Smithsonian Institution at Washington; returning in 1872, he spent two years in Ottawa, and, in 1874, came to Joliet, and purchased the gallery of Mr. John Edgworth, the oldest gallery in the city, where he does as fine work as can be found in this country or Europe; he makes all kinds of pictures, large and small, and guarantees satisfaction to his customers.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Westphal, Henry
HENRY WESTPHAL, farmer; P.O. Aurora; was born in Germany, Feb. 15, 1824, and is the son of Henry and Doris (Leapstolf) Westphal, of Germany; his father was a farmer; here Mr. Westphal was raised on his father's farm, and, in 1857, with his parents, emigrated to America; he came direct to Illinois, and settled in Du Page Co.; then to Will Co., and settled in Wheatland Tp.; his father and mother both died in Wheatland Tp.; when they came to this country they were very poor, but, with hard labor and good management, Mr. Westphal ranks to-day as one of the successful farmers of Will Co.; owns 245 acres of fine, improved land. He married Miss Sophia Wornkey, of Germany, by whom he has had six children - four living. He is a member of the German Lutheran Church, and was one of the first members of this Church in Wheatland Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

White, James
JAMES WHITE, farming and dairy; P.O. Wilmington; owns 133 acres of land, valued at $40 per acre; born Oct. 26, 1842, Lycoming Co., Penn.; came to Wilmington, Will Co., with his parents when about 2 years old. Married Sarah Hazard Dec. 26, 1865, in this county; she was born Dec. 15, 1844, in Madison Co., N.Y., and came to this county with her parents in 1853; have four children - Clarence E., Fannie E., Florence A., Charles A. His father, Adam White, and mother, Margaret Watson (White), were natives of Scotland, and emigrated to the United States in 1833; they have twelve children, five living - John M. (mentioned elsewhere), Mary, Adam, Robert and James.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

White, John
JOHN WHITE, farmer, Sec. 11; P.O. Wallingford; owns forty-nine acres; was born in Sligo, Ireland; came to this country, with his parents, at the age of 7; in September, 1861, he enlisted in the 42nd I.V.I., and served continuously with the regiment until the battle of Resaca; at that battle he lost his right arm; at that time he was First Sergeant. Mr. White's name is always mentioned with pride by his brother soldier; up to the time of receiving his wound he was always prompt to the call of duty. Mr. W. was engaged in the memorable siege of Island No. 10, Corinth, Stone River and Chickamauga. Mr. W., since the war, married Mary, a daughter of John Malone, Esq.; they have seven children - Margaret, Lizzie, John, Annie, James, Mary and Luke. Mr. W. is engaged in farming, which business he has been engaged in since the war.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

White, John M.
JOHN M. WHITE, farmer, Sec. 28; P.O. Wilmington; owns 300 acres of land in this county, and 413 acres in Kankakee, valued at $35,600. Held office of Collector two years, Supervisor one term, in 1865, and Township Trustee for eight years, which office he now holds; born Dec. 23, 1823, in Glasgow, Scotland, and came to this country with his father's family in 1833; they located in Livingston Co., N.Y.; thence to Ontario Co., two years later; thence to Williamsport, Penn. All the family, consisting of his father (Adam White), mother (Margaret Watson White), five brothers and two sisters, located within two miles of Mr. White's present residence in 1844. Mr. White married Margery McIntosh, daughter of D. McIntosh, Jan. 20, 1853; she was born in Little Falls, N.Y., Jan. 13, 1834; have six children - William W., Daniel M., Ida S., John B., Frank E., Arthur R.; William W., married Juliette Nelson April 1, 1874; Daniel M., married Sarah A. Nelson Dec. 25, 1876. Mr. White went to California across the plains in the spring of 1850; remained about two years, then returned to this Township to the farm where he now resides, and on which he has remained ever since.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

White, J.S.
J.S. WHITE, farmer and stock dealer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., Sept. 1, 1835; during the same fall, his father moved to Joliet, Will Co.; here he died as early as 1845. His mother subsequently married Capt. Harry Boardman, one of the pioneers of Du Page Tp. Young White came from the village to the farm and remained with his stepfather some seven years; at the age of 18, he left home for Chicago, where he engaged in clerking for Thompson & Wetmore in the dry goods business; here he remained two years; in 1854, he went to California, and engaged in mining and operating a train of pack-mules for carrying supplies; he remained in California four and a half years; on his return, he again engaged in farming; in 1874, he purchased where he now resides. His first marriage to Mary A. Farmer, a native of New York, was celebrated Dec. 10, 1860; she died in March, 1873. His second wife, Sabrina L. Smith, is a native of Ohio; their marriage occurred Sept. 4, 1874; three children were born from the first wedlock - Cornelia M., Willie and Carrie. Of these, only Carrie is living. Owns 313 acres, worth $20,000. In addition to his farming, Mr. White deals largely in stock, buying and shipping to the Eastern market and to Chicago.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

White, Robert
ROBERT WHITE, farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Lockport; was born in Cambridgeshire, Eng., March 19, 1833; he came to America in 1854; he farmed up to his coming to this county; he settled in Yankee Settlement, Homer Township, the same year, and worked for Robert Bentley; in 1865, he moved to Orland, Cook Co., Ill., remaining there seven years farming, when he returned to this township and settled where he now resides; has fifty-one acres. He enlisted in Co. F, 100th Regiment Ill. Inf., and served during the war, being mustered out with his regiment June 13, 1865; he was wounded through the thighs as Kenesaw Mountain, on June 27, 1864. Has been School Director seven years. He married Mrs. Francis Vandewater (widow of Daniel Vandewater) in Homer Township, March 14, 1861; they have eight children, three by Mr. Vandewater - Hannah (now Mrs. Martin O'Brien), born March 17, 1852; Sarah Jane, Sept. 3, 1855, and William D., Aug. 29, 1857; five by Mr. White - Robert J., born Dec. 31, 1861; John Thomas, Dec. 8, 1866; Elizabeth Ann, Jan. 25, 1869; Charles H., July 1, 1871, and George W.R., Nov. 29, 1873. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

White, Thomas
THOMAS WHITE, farmer and stock, Sec. 36; P.O. Wallingford; the subject of this sketch was born in Lincolnshire, England Sept. 23, 1831. He married Miss Kittie Reeson July 1, 1851; she was born in Lincolnshire, England, July 31, 1827; they had six children, three living, viz., John T., William and Fannie. He lived in England until 1853, when he moved to Canada, where he remained but a short time, and moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where he engaged in the stone quarries; he then went to Du Page Co., Ill.; remained about three years; then he went to Lee Co.; then, in 1863, he came to Will Co., and settled where he now lives; in 1868, he came to his present place, and has lived here since. He started in very poor circumstances and now owns 320 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Whited, Charles W.
CHARLES W. WHITED, Joliet; son of S.H. Whited; was born in Little Falls, N.Y., March 17, 1842, and came to Joliet with his father's family, and, at the age of 15, entered the office of the Joliet Republican to learn the printer's trade. In June, 1861, he enlisted in Capt. Danforth's company, which was first a portion of the 4th Mo. Cav., then was attached to the 53rd Ill. I.V., and finally became Co. F, 13th Ill. Cav.; he served two years, and was discharged by reason of ill health. He then entered the employ of the C., R.I. & P. R.R. Co. as fireman, and afterward on the Chicago & Galena Railroad; he then went south as a bridge carpenter with Sherman's army, returning at the close of the war; since then he has charge of the telegraph repairs on the C. & A. R.R. three years; on the C., C. & I.C. R.R. two years; five years on the U.P. R.R. from Omaha to Ogden; since 1873, he has been in the employ of the Western Union Telegraph Co. He was married June 12, 1871, to Miss E.W. Putnam, of Little Falls, N.Y., and has one child - Samuel C.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Whited, S.H.
S.H. WHITED, retired, Joliet; was born in Albany Co., N.Y., May 24, 1808; when he was 19 years old, he went to Herkimer Co., and there learned the painter's trade; he worked for three years for $30 a year, and clothed himself, and at the end of the time had $50 laid by, principally the result of extra work; this illustrates the habits of industry and economy which have been characteristic of his whole life; in 1852, he came to Chicago, settling in Joliet the following year; he worked at his trade till 1855, when he purchased a farm at Twelve-Mile Grove, and followed farming two years, at the end of which time he returned to Joliet. In October, 1861, he volunteered in Col. Wilson's Mechanics' Fusileers in Chicago, and remained until the disbanding of the regiment in February following; about three months later, he again enlisted in Capt. Ford's cavalry company, attached to Cushman's regiment, serving three years, principally engaged in scouting service; in 1865, he returned to Joliet. It should be mentioned that while living in Herkimer Co., he held successively the offices of Corporal, Sergeant, First Lieutenant and Captain in the New York State Militia, holding a commission five years. He was married in 1832 to Miss Sarah Hinchman, of Little Falls, N.Y.; they have five children living - Elias H., ticket agent of the Michigan Southern and C., R.I. & P. Railroad Companies in Chicago; Harriet A., Charles W., Jessie O., also in the office with his brother in Chicago; and Jerry H., train dispatcher and division operator on the Central Pacific Railroad at Carlin, Nevada.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Whitley, Robert
ROBERT WHITLEY, Foreman Norton & Co.'s mills, Lockport; born in the town of Wakefield, Yorkshire, Eng., in November, 1831; he immigrated to America in 1854, and first settled in Oswego, on Fox River, where he engaged in milling nine and a half years; in 1864, he went to Chicago and remained a short time; in the latter part of the same year, went to Plainfield, Will Co., where he remained until the summer of 1866, when he came to Lockport and entered the employ of Norton & Co.; in 1871, went to Chicago and remained until after the great fire, when he returned to Lockport, his present home. Owns 120 acres of land in Lockport Tp., known as the Frasier Farm. Mr. Whitley is thoroughly posted in everything pertaining to first-class milling, and is an important factor in the directing and working force of Norton & Co.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Whitten, James
JAMES WHITTEN, Cashier of the First National Bank, Wilmington; born in Canada May 2, 1829, and is a son of Andrew and Janet (McPhee) Whitten, both natives of Scotland, the former born Jan. 12, 1801, and the latter Dec. 13, 1803; they left Scotland May 21, 1821, and located to Canada the same year; the removal of the family to Illinois was in 1838, locating first in Dresden, Grundy Co., thence to Wilmington in 1841; the subject of this sketch, together with his brother, John Whitten, J.W. Stewart, and others from this place, made the overland trip to California; they were afterward joined by a company from Joliet, but became separated from both the Wilmington and Joliet companies, making the last four to six weeks of the journey alone, reaching the Pacific Slope in 1850; he spent about two years in the mining districts of California before his return; for several years he was engaged in merchandising and farming prior to the opening of the First National Bank of Wilmington, which was organized in 1863, and commenced business the following year, at which time he became Cashier, and has since held the position. Owns 680 acres of coal lands, valued at $68,000; 500 acres of farm lands, valued at $30,000, and city property valued at $20,000.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Whittier, George
GEORGE WHITTIER, manufacturer of lime, Joliet; born in Sommersworth, N.H., Nov. 27, 1830, where he lived until 6 years of age, when he removed with his parents to Philadelphia, living there one year, then to Penobscot Co., Me., where he lived until 1861, being engaged in milling, lumbering and farming; at the above date, he came to Illinois and settled in Will Co., where he has since resided; he owns one-half interest in the limekiln, which is operated under the firm name of J. Whittier & Co.; the above firm manufacture and ship large quantities of limes to points further south. He married Feb. 10, 1854, Sarah M. Lindsay; she was born in Chester, Penobscot Co., Me., Jan. 16, 1832; they are the parents of three children now living, viz., Angeline, Lucy M. and Clare.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wightman, George
GEORGE WIGHTMAN, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Rome, Oneida Co., N.Y., Sept. 15, 1821; at the age of 12 years, he came West with the family; his father settled on the Au Sable in La Salle Co. (now Kendall); here they remained two years; then moved to Plainfield Tp., and at the end of two years moved to Wheatland Tp., where they remained until 1868, when they located in Dupage Tp., where his father now resides, at the advanced age of 78 years. George remained at home till 20 years of age. He was married Sept. 18, 1850, to Susan E. Sisson, daughter of Capt. Holder Sisson, one of the pioneer settlers of Will Co.; she was born June 7, 1831; after marriage he settled on his farm in Wheatland Tp., where he remained fifteen years; in March, 1865, he moved to his present place of residence near Lockport; twelve children have blessed their union; ten - Annie B., Frank H., Josiah W., George S., Silas F., Clara S., Ella M., Mary P., Percy R., Clarence C. - are living; two - Holder J. and Hattie S. - are dead. Owns 250 acres in Lockport Tp., valued at $18,000. Has held the offices of Justice of the Peace, Constable, School Director, etc. Though bordering on threescore years, Mr. Wightman bids fair to be an active and useful member of society for many years to come.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wilcox, Edmund
EDMUND WILCOX, Justice of the Peace, Joliet; is one of the early settlers of Will Co.; he came here in 1836 from Onondaga Co., N.Y., where he was born Sept. 18, 1816. After receiving a preparatory education at Schenectady, N.Y., he entered Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., when 15 years of age, graduating in 1835; the following year, he came to Joliet, and was employed as a clerk one year, until he became of age, when he engaged in the mercantile business in company with Charles Clement, and two years later purchased the interest of Mr. Clement, and afterward changed to an exclusively dry goods business; in 1858, he sold out and became one of the originators of the Joliet Gas-Light Company; was its first President, and superintended the erection of the works; he personally superintended the gas works for five years, at the end of which time he resumed merchandising, which he continued until 1870; he was one of the gentlemen designated by the act of the Legislature incorporating the city of Joliet in 1852, to lay off the wards and organize the city government; he was chosen the first Alderman from the Third Ward (now the Fourth); served four years, and was again elected in 1870, serving two years; in 1854, the year of the cholera, he served the city as Mayor pro tem. in the absence of the Mayor; he has been repeatedly solicited to become a candidate for Mayor, but has as often declined; he was a member of the Board of Supervisors in 1856, 1857 and 1859; he was prominent in obtaining the charter of the C., R.I. & P. R.R., and was one of the committee appointed to confer with Eastern capitalists, their efforts resulting in the building of the road by the owner of the Michigan Southern Railroad. Mr. Wilcox was elected Justice of the Peace in 1877. He was married March 23, 1845, to Miss Sarah M. Green, of Washington Co., N.Y., and has three children living - William G., Fred C. and Charles C.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wilder, Almon
ALMON WILDER, farmer; P.O. Crete; the subject of this sketch is one of the old settlers in this vicinity; was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., May 21, 1806, and is the son of Rubin Wilder, a farmer, who was an officer in the war of 1812; when Mr. Wilder was about 4 years of age, he went to live with his grandfather; when he was 6 years old, with his grandfather, moved to Ohio; here he remained until 1837; while there, he learned the shoemaker's trade, and followed this business six or seven years. He was married in Ohio to Miss Annie Corey. In 1837, he came to Illinois and settled in Cook Co.; here his wife died, about one year after they arrived; he was married the second time to Mrs. Louisa Raymond, of England. In 1841, he came to Will Co. and settled on his present homestead; here he has remained ever since. While here, he has held several public offices of trust; was Supervisor of Crete Tp. in 1851, 1852, 1853 and part of the term in 1855; held office as Assessor for seventeen years, and Collector; these offices he held in a very creditable and efficient manner. Republican in politics. Two sons in the late war - Edwin A., enlisted in the 100th I.V.I., served full time and participated in some of the prominent battles during the war; George H., enlisted in the 8th I.V.C.; these gentlemen did good service, and were honorably discharged at the close of the war.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Willard, Charles M.
CHARLES M. WILLARD, Wilmington; born in Friendship, Allegany Co., N.Y., Aug. 25, 1820, where he resided until 1859, then removing to Steuben Co., Ind.; while a resident of the State of New York, he followed teaching for many years; in March, 1869, he came to this State, locating at Wilmington, engaging as clerk in the drug store of E.W. Willard for several years. Mr. W. is a member of Will Lodge, No. 301, I.O.O.F.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Willard, David
JUDGE DAVID WILLARD, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; the above named gentleman is one of the best known men of Will Co.; was born in Allegany Co., N.Y., June 13, 1818, and is the son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Sanders) Willard; father a native of Massachusetts, engaged in farming; mother, of Fort Edwards, Washington Co., N.Y. His father was a volunteer in the war of 1812; was one of the first settlers of Allegany Co., N.Y., he died in 1877, at 90 years of age; Judge Willard was raised on his father's farm; he received a high-school education, and at the age of 21, he was engaged in the winter months in teaching the district schools. In 1844, he married Miss Hodah Axtell, of Allegany Co., N.Y.; he then with his wife started for Illinois, then the Far West, in a wagon drawn by horses, taking them eighteen days in making the trip; came via Jamestown, N.Y., Erie, Penn., then following the lakeshore to Cleveland, Ohio, thence through La Porte; arrived in Illinois, and settled in Wesley Tp., Will Co., on the farm he now lives on, which was purchased before he left New York State; the country was new, but few settlers, and no improvements on his farm; he set out in farming; here he has lived ever since, with the exception of a few years he lived in Joliet; he has made all the improvements on his farm, which ranks among the many fine improved farms of Wesley Tp. Judge Willard has held various offices of public trust; was Township Treasurer of Schools about 1846, Justice of the Peace about 1848; this office he held for several years; was Supervisor of township for many years; was Chairman of the Board of Supervisors of Will Co.; he was Supervisor of township during the war, and took a very active part in the enlistment of men for the army, from Wesley Tp.; in 1865, he was elected County Judge for four years, and in 1869, he was re-elected to same office, term expiring in 1873, during all of his offices in township and county, he has proven himself a gentleman of acknowledged ability, whose duties have been performed in a faithful manner; his political opinions are Republican, which party he has taken a very active part in ever since its organization. Have two children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Willard, Edwin Ruthven
EDWIN RUTHVEN WILLARD, physician and surgeon, Wilmington; born in Aurora, Erie Co., N.Y., Aug. 29, 1829; his father, Samuel Willard, was the son of Nathaniel Willard, of Lancaster, Mass.; he received his education at Fowler's and McElvane's seminaries, in the States of New York and Michigan, and commenced the study of medicine in the office of Samuel Niles, M.D., in 1848; attended Rush Medical College, Chicago, graduating at that institution in 1852, locating at Wilmington, his present home, the same year. Served as Vice President of Will Co. Medical Society in 1861, Secretary in 1865, President in 1876 and member of the Board of Censors of the same; he is also a member of the Illinois State Medical Society and the American Medical Association; his contributions to medical literature consist of papers on "Puerperal Fever," "Inversion of the Uterus," "Extraordinary Surgical Cases," "Perineal Section," "Placenta Praevia," "Diphtheria," etc.; he has also furnished the press with frequent contributions. During the war of the rebellion he was Surgeon of the 13th I.V.C.; held also the different positions of brigade, division and post surgeon; he continued in active service in the medical department until after the close of the war, and during his term of service was at the following battles: Shiloh, siege of Vicksburg, Bayou Metre, Austin, Little Rock, Benton, Batesville, Pine Bluff, Arkadelphia, Okolona, Little Missouri River, Prairie de Ann, Camden, Jenkins' Ferry, Cross Roads, Mount Elba, Douglas Landing and Monticello. Served as Supervisor in 1866-67, School Inspector several terms and member of the City Council in 1866-67. In 1868, he engaged in the drug business, under the firm name of Willard & Fox, and, the following year, purchased his partner's interest; owns 315 acres of land, valued at $15,750, and city property valued at $10,000. Married Sept. 27, 1853, to Miss Ann McIntosh, who was born in New York; five children by this union - George E., now practicing medicine in the city of Chicago; Eugene S., Marcia G.A., Samuel and Daniel McI. The Doctor has been in the constant practice of his profession in this vicinity since 1852.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Willard, Erastus W.
ERASTUS W. WILLARD, druggist, books and stationery, Wilmington; born in Allegany Co., N.Y., Oct. 22, 1838; removed to Illinois in January, 1856, locating at Wilmington, where he engaged as clerk in the drug store of Dr. Matthew J. Johnson; this was the first store of its kind established in the city; Mr. Willard's present store contains a part of the furniture and fixtures of the former establishment, and, as a relic of former days, has in his possession a druggist's show-bottle, first owned by Dr. Bowen, and then by Henderson & Stewart, from whom he purchased it and its contents, the latter said to have been manufactured at Alden's distillery, and the age now not less than 30 years. In 1860, he returned to his native State, and enlisted in the 23rd N.Y.V.I., in April, 1861, remaining in the army till May, 1863; served as Chief Hospital Steward at Falls Church, Va., and after the army moved to other points, he was commissioned First Lieutenant in the 78th N.Y.V.I., but did not muster; in May, 1863, he was appointed Enrolling Officer, and during the following months enrolled the township of Friendship, Allegany Co.; returned to Illinois in September, 1863, and enlisted in the 138th Ill. V.I. the following April; commissioned First Lieutenant June 21, 1864. Engaged in his present business in 1865, and, two years later, built the store he now occupies. Married in 1871 to Miss Jessie R., daughter of Dr. Daniel and Jessie Duck; she was born near London, England; two children - Francis D. and Erastus J. Mr. Willard is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, Wilmington Chapter, No. 142, and Joliet Commandery No. 4.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Williams, C.B.
C.B. WILLIAMS, proprietor of Frankfort Hotel, livery and sale stable, Frankfort Station; was born in Maryland March 27, 1827; came to Illinois, and settled in Grundy Co., Norman Tp.; his present farm, which is there situated, consists of eighty acres, and is located on Sec. 36; valued at $4,000. He was married Nov. 17, 1853, to Miss Sophronia D. Misner; they have had two children, one of whom is living, viz., Cynthia F.; deceased, Lucinda. Mr. W. has held the offices in Norman Tp. of Road Commissioner and School Director five years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Williams, John

UNCLE JOHN WILLIAMS, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; the subject of this sketch is the oldest of the living settlers that first settled in Wesley Tp.; was born in Greenbrier Co., near the White Sulphur Springs, Va., April 5, 1801, and is the son of Richard and Thankful (Morrison) Williams, of Virginia; his father was a farmer; here he was raised on his father's farm. When he was about 21 years of age, he married Elizabeth Burr, daughter of Aaron Burr. His father then placed him on a farm, and he farmed in Virginia until 1831; he then, with his wife and three children, emigrated West to Illinois, and settled in Vermilion Co., and remained there until 1834; he then moved with his family to Will Co., and settled in Wesley Tp. May 5, 1834; here he has remained ever since. To tell of his reminiscences of when he settled in here, would make a history in itself; he came here when the country was wild; plenty of Indians, deer and wolves; was here in 1832 during the Black Hawk war; attended the great (powwow) Indian treaty in Chicago in 1833; has met the great Indian chiefs, Robinson and Billey Caldwell, and remembers when John Wentworth first came to Chicago. He lost his first wife, who died in April, 1845. Married second time to Miss Susan Graff, of Butler Co., Ohio, who died Aug. 27, 1860. Married his third wife, Mary Cownover, of Butler Co., Ohio. He attended Government land sale in Chicago in 1838, and purchased 420 acres of land at $1.25 per acre; states that the first sermon preached in Wesley Tp., was in 1835, by David Blackwell. Mr. Williams is a member of the Methodist Church, which church he has belonged to for the last sixty years. Had two sons in the late war - Leroy S. and John R. - in the 100th Ill. V.I.; both did good service and were honorably discharged.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Williams, Stephen J.
STEPHEN J. WILLIAMS, farmer and diary; P.O. Lockport; was born in Dupage Township, Will Co., Ill., Sept. 22, 1845; his literary attainments were so far advanced at the early age of 15 he entered Wheaton and completed the full course, graduating in the second class sent out from the Institution, in the summer of 1863; in 1864, he went with the force sent out to survey the Union Pacific R.R., and accompanied it as far west as Salt Lake City; here he left the force and returning to Omaha, spent some time prospecting with a view to speculating in property; in 1866, he returned home and engaged in farming and raising stock. He was married Feb. 14, 1866, to Mary E. Burns, a native of Grundy Co., Ill.; he lost his wife Jan. 22, 1876; has three children - James, Thomas C. and Maud C. Owns 263 acres in Lockport Township. In addition to his farming operations, he keeps on hand about eighty milch cows; at present he is milking 47 cows and ships the milk daily to Chicago; this he finds more lucrative than raising grain at present low rates.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Williams, Thomas
THOMAS WILLIAMS, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in County Cornwall, Eng., Jan. 18, 1807; he immigrated to America in March, 1825, and first settled in Schuylkill Co., Penn., when he engaged in mining and shipping coal to Philadelphia about two years; he next contracted and built a portion of the Portage Railroad across the Alleghany Mountains from Hollidaysburg to Johnstown; in 1834, he came to Illinois and settled in Chicago; in June, 1836, in conjunction with Chas. E. Boyer, he contracted four sections on the I. & M. Canal, and commenced work thereon; in 1848, he built twelve miles of the Chicago & Galena Railroad between Chicago and Elgin; in 1850, they went to California and constructed the levee in front of Sacramento City; afterward they constructed a tunnel 1,900 feet long, bringing the waters of Bear River down to the flats of Ophir; in 1854, they contracted on deepening the I. & M. Canal, and finished the work in 1857; he located on his present place of residence in 1846. He was married in 1832, to Susan Horner, a native of Pennsylvania; eight children have been born to them; of these, four are living - Julia, Stephen J., Susan and Carrie. Owns 500 acres of land, valued at $40,000; he is at present Supervisor; has held the office of School Trustee and School Director. In all his public enterprises he has met with good success.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wilmot, Samuel
SAMUEL WILMOT, Supt. Lockport Paper Co., Lockport; born in Manchester, Eng., May 10, 1831; he immigrated to America June 5, 1851, landing in New York July 12; he first settled in Fitchburg, Mass., and engaged in running the machinery in the Stone Mills, now owned by Burbanks & Crocker; here he remained six months; thence to Pepperell, Mass., two years; next to Manchester, N.H.; thence to Lawrence, Mass.; thence to Portland, Me.; thence to Windsor Locks, Conn.; thence to Rainbow, in the same State; leaving the East, his next move was to Hamilton, Ohio, and from there to Cincinnati; in the two last-mentioned places, he tarried about ten years; in May, 1872, he located in Lockport, his family following about a year later. He was married June 18, 1852, to Justina Monning, a native of Virginia; has three children - Adelaid, Vancino and Justice. His entire life so far has been spent in connection with paper manufacturing establishments.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wilson, J.F.
J.F. WILSON, Cashier Joliet Iron and Steel Works, Joliet; was born in the town of Canda, N.H., in 1846; in 1850, his father, George Wilson, came West to Illinois, and settled on a farm near the present village of Monee; in 1857, the family moved to Joliet; here, at the age of 14 years, J.F. began the work of life for himself in the capacity of clerk; he enjoyed the advantages of the city schools, and his early training in business life gave him those necessary qualifications which come to one only through the channels of personal experience, and which have so well qualified him for his position of trust and responsibility; in 1874, at the re-opening and re-organization of the Iron and Steel Works, he was chosen to the position he now occupies.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wilson, W.C.
W.C. WILSON, farmer and carpenter; P.O. Spencer; one of our early settlers; was born in Cortland Co., N.Y.; came to this State in 1835, and settled in Joliet; he removed from there to New Lenox in 1837, where he has since resided; his farm consists of eighty-five acres, valued at $4,500. He was married to Miss Eliza Ann Gougar, who was born in Indiana; they have had eight children, six of whom are living - Charles L., Catharine J., William W., John F., Lewis F. and Mary L.; deceased, George W. and Eliza A.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wight, R.B.
R.B. WIGHT, M.D., renovator, Plainfield; was born in Kinderhook, N.Y., March 27, 1825; removed with his parents to Chicago, Ill., in 1831; in 1832, his parents removed to what is now Naperville in Du Page Co.; his father, Dr. E.G. Wight, being one of the pioneers and founders of that place; Mr. W. resided with his parents until he was 30 years of age; during that time he studied medicine, and was one of nine who composed the first class in Rush Medical College; soon after graduating, he commenced the practice of medicine, during which time he also opened a drug store (in 1838, the first in Plainfield). Was married to Miss Elizabeth T. Bradley Jan. 23, 1853; she was born in Genesee Co., N.Y., Feb. 22, 1834; have had seven children, six of whom are now living - Lillie Agnes, Adelaide Harriet, Lucia, Nettie, Burtie, Willie and Mary (deceased). Dr. W. was the organizer of the Plainfield Light Artillery in 1855, which organization continued to exist until after the war, during which time they achieved memorable distinction in many hard-fought battles. Dr. W. was born in Richmond, Mass., Oct. 2, 1793; died in Plainfield Oct. 13, 1865; he graduated in New York; came to Chicago in 1831; to Naperville in 1832, and to Plainfield in 1837; he practiced medicine until the time of his death; twenty years prior to his death, he lost his sight; was obliged to have his horse led when going to visit his patients; this ride extended over a space of 120 miles, from Chicago to Mineral Point; he was the first physician that ever practiced in Northern Illinois west of Chicago.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Woerndle, Dr. Francis
DR. FRANCIS WOERNDLE, druggist and chemist, Joliet; born in Austria, April 14, 1817; he is a graduate of pharmacy and chemistry of the University of Vienna, Austria, known as one of the first in Europe, and has had many years' experience as a practical apothecary and chemist in different cities in Europe and America; he emigrated to America, landing in New York in 1849; after spending seven years in the East, a portion of which time he was engaged in business and the balance in traveling and visiting different cities, he came West, and, in 1857, he engaged in Joliet in the drug business, in which he has been very successful for a period of twenty-one years; his success may be attributed to his thorough practical knowledge of his business and the close personal attention he has always given to the same.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wood, E.J.
E.J. WOOD, farming; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in Cheshire, Mass., Dec. 21, 1809. He married Miss Hester Ann Hills July 7, 1831; she was born in Lewis Co., N.Y., Aug. 1, 1814; they had seven children, five of whom are living, viz., James D., Amelia E., Milton R., Ervin E. and Elwyn A. He lived in Massachusetts until he was 7 years old; he then went to Lewis Co., N.Y., with an uncle, where he lived until 1845, except two years in Seneca Co.; he was engaged at his trade of carpenter and builder; he served nine years as Justice of the Peace, and also engaged in general merchandise; in 1845, he came to this township, and engaged in farming; in 1849, he engaged in general merchandise in Plainfield; he was Postmaster from 1849 to 1853; he has also served as Road Commissioner and Assessor; he has been a member of the M.E. Church for just fifty years, and has been Superintendent of Sunday school for twenty-five years; all of his children are married and living out of this county; all are pleasantly situated, and take an active part in the business of their respective communities.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wood, Willard
WILLARD WOOD, P.O. Crete; the subject of this sketch is one of the oldest settlers of Crete; was born in Randolph, Vt., Aug. 28, 1808, and is the son of Thomas and Ruby (Newland) Wood; father was a native of Massachusetts; was engaged in the iron foundry business, and was a soldier in the war of 1812; died at Colchester, Vt.; Mr. Wood was raised on a farm; studying law at Hyde Park, Vt., was admitted to the bar to practice law. In May, 1836, with wife and one child, started West for Illinois, via Detroit, Mich.; here he purchased a wagon and team, and arrived in Chicago in June, 1836; thence to Will Co.; here he first settled in Crete Tp., on 160 acres of land, and commenced farming in Will Co., and followed this business until, some thirteen years ago, he retired from farming. Mr. Wood was the first Postmaster, kept the first hotel and taught the first school in the village of Crete; has also held several offices of public trust - that of Justice of the Peace about twenty years, Supervisor for two terms, in 1854 and 1856, and County Commissioner; in these offices, he has acquitted himself in a very creditable and efficient manner. Mr. Wood is a Democrat in politics. Married Miss Diantha S. Boardman, of Vermont, daughter of Alfred Boardman, by whom they have had eleven children, seven living; one son in the late war - Willard S.; enlisted in the 8th I.V.C., and participated in some of the prominent battles; was honorably discharged.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wood, William I.
WILLIAM I. WOOD, livery stable, Crete; the subject of this sketch was born in Crete, Will Co., Ill., March 4, 1846, and is the son of Willard and Diantha (Boardman) Wood, who were among the first settlers of Crete Tp.; Mr. Wood is engaged in the livery stable business. Married in 1871, to Miss Alvira Hewes, of Crete Tp., Will Co., Ill., by whom he has two children.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wood, William W.
WILLIAM W. WOOD, farming, Sec. 20; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Brasher, St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., July 11, 1835. He married Miss Esther C. Edgerton Oct. 18, 1861; she was born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., April 16, 1837; they have seven children, viz., Hattie M., Emma E., Frank W., E. Blanche, Alice M., Jessie P. and Harvey E. He lived in New York until 1865, being engaged in farming; he then came West and settled in Will Co., Ill., on his present place, and has resided here since; his parents live in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y.; he came here in fair circumstances; he owns 270 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Woodruff, George
GEORGE WOODRUFF, President of the First National Bank, Joliet; was born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., Dec. 7, 1812, and lived there until his removal to Will Co., in 1836; on his arrival in Joliet, he engaged in the grocery and provision trade, which he continued until 1841; he then spent two years in farming in Plainfield Tp.; at the end of which time he returned to Joliet and resumed trade; in 1852, he built an elevator and engaged in the grain business, in which he continued until 1864; some time after engaging in the grain business, he sold out his store, and about 1857 or 1858, associated himself with F.L. Cagwin and others in establishing the Joliet Bank; he afterward purchased the interest of his partners, and in 1864, the First National Bank was organized with Mr. Woodruff as President and his son, Frederick W. Woodruff, as Cashier; he was a partner with others in building and operating the Joliet Woolen-Mill, which was burned down after running several years; he is one of the original stockholders of the Joliet Gas-Light Co., of which he has been Treasurer for a number of years; he has served one term on the Board of Supervisors and one or two terms as Alderman. He was married May 9, 1838, to Miss Dorothy Smith, a native of Rutland, Jefferson Co., N.Y., and has two children living - Frederick W. and Mary C. (now Mrs. J.F. Wilcox, of Joliet); one daughter - Cornelia M., wife of J.E. Bush, of Joliet, died in January, 1876.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Woodruff, George H.
GEORGE H. WOODRUFF, dealer in drugs, medicines, books, stationery, etc., Joliet; was born in Clinton, Oneida Co., N.Y., Aug. 16, 1814, and resided there until 1834; he entered Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1829, at the age of 15 years, and graduated four years later; he then entered the law office of Hon. Daniel Gott, in Pompey Hill, Onondaga Co., N.Y., and remained one year, at the end of which time he came West, as the clerk of M.H. Demmond, Esq., the original proprietor of the western portion of the city of Joliet; he remained with him until the organization of the county in 1836, when he was elected County Recorder, and re-elected in 1839; on leaving the Recorder's office, in 1843, he entered upon his present business; in 1838, he was elected County Judge, but resigned the office at the end of one year; he served one term as a member of the Board of Trustees under the village organization; Mr. Woodruff is the author of "Fifteen Years Ago; or, The Patriotism of Will County," and of two very admirable lectures, entitled "Forty Years Ago," and consisting of reminiscences of early times in Joliet; he is the author of the "General History of Will County" in this work, besides which he has been an occasional lecturer and contributor to newspapers and periodicals for many years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wright, Abner
ABNER WRIGHT, stone and brick mason, Wilmington; born in Steuben Co., N.Y., Dec. 27, 1812, afterward residing in Livingston Co., that State, for several years prior to his coming West; in 1836, he came to Illinois, Wilmington being his first location, which he reached in December of that year. Mr. Wright has been engaged in his present business for the most part since his residence here, a period of forty-two years, and in a greater portion of the buildings in this city he can see his handiwork. Owns forty acres of land in Custer Tp., this county, valued at $1,000; also city property in Wilmington.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Wright, Andrew D.
ANDREW D. WRIGHT, dry goods, Wilmington; born near Edinburgh, Scotland, Aug. 6, 1833, but removed to Canada in early childhood, with his parents; in 1858, he came to Illinois, locating at Chicago, where for a time he was employed as clerk in the wholesale and retail establishment of Potter Palmer; in 1861, he removed to Elgin, Kane Co., and engaged in the dry goods business, under the firm name of Wright & Martin; some two years later, he sold his interest in the store to his partner, and afterward was engaged in business at Seneca, LaSalle Co., under the firm name of Wright & Duck; removed to Wilmington in 1868, and engaged in his present business. Married in 1863 to Miss Susanna B.H. Duck, who was born near Naperville, Ill.; four children by this union - Archibald D., Mabel J., Lottie L. and Georgie L.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Youker, Adlophus
ADLOPHUS YOUKER, dealer in agricultural implements, Lockport; was born near Ogdensburg, Canada, Oct. 20, 1832; May 24, 1857, he left Canada, going to St. Paul, Minn., where he stopped a short time; thence to Rockford, where he engaged in carpentering a short time; in the fall of the same year, came to Stony Creek, Mich., taking charge of a saw-mill one year; July 17, 1858, he came to Lockport, Ill., and entered the employ of Norton & Co.; in 1859, he engaged in the business of underground ditching, and followed it two years; in 1861, came again into the employ of Norton & Co.; in 1871, was employed in carpentering for the State in the yards at Lockport; in 1875, went to Chicago and run a meat market and vegetable store one year; in 1876, he, in company with Ira Williams, began the sale of agricultural implements. He was married Sept. 12, 1859, to Mary M. Reinhart, a native of New York State; has had two children - Eliza Elnora and George Edward, both deceased. Owns 160 acres of land in Kansas.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Young, Henry
HENRY YOUNG, dealer in cigars and tobacco, Joliet; was born in the Province of Lorraine, France, Nov. 17, 1825; he came to this country in 1847, landing in New York August 2; he resided eleven years in Buffalo and vicinity, coming to Joliet in 1858; he engaged in keeping a public house, which he continued until the fall of 1874, when he engaged in his present business. He held the office of Constable for eight years, first being elected about 1860; in 1863, he was elected Street Commissioner, and, in 1873, Alderman from the Fourth Ward (now the Second), serving two years. He was married Oct. 13, 1849, to Miss Mary Brack; she was born in Luxemburg, Germany, May 5, 1832; they have had ten children, eight of whom are now living - Margarita (Mrs. Julius Krause, of Joliet); Catherine, Henry J., Charles J., Emma, Rosa, Elizabeth and Joseph; one son, Nicholas, lost his life, with several others, by lightening while attending worship in St. John the Baptist's Church, July 31, 1864; another son, Henry, died in Buffalo, N.Y., in 1854.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Young, John
JOHN YOUNG, retired; P.O. Joliet; was born in Ulster Co., N.Y., July 18, 1798; he remained at home on his father's farm until he was 15 years of age, when he went to work at the milling business under his father, who was also a mill proprietor; he followed this business until the age of 22, and then engaged in general merchandising in the village of Esopus, Ulster Co., and afterward removed to Greene Co., N.Y., where he was married, in 1825, to Miss Caroline Thompson, daughter of Rev. James Thompson, an Episcopal clergyman of Greene Co. He continued in the mercantile business eight years, and then moved to Brooklyn and established the Brooklyn Collegiate Institute, which he continued till 1844, when he removed to New York City and opened a private select school. In 1849, he came to Will Co. and entered 560 acres of land from the Government in the present township of Manhattan, to which he added by purchase, from time to time, until at one time he owned over nineteen hundred acres, being one of the largest land owners in the township; on the organization of the township in 1850, there were but ten voters living in the township, the most of whom were from New York; Mr. Young proposed Manhattan as the name of the new township, and it was immediately adopted. He was chosen the first Supervisor, and held the office eight years; in 1851, he became President of the Will Co. Agricultural Society, serving until 1859; he has also held several subordinate offices, among which may be mentioned School Trustee, Commissioner of Highways, etc. His wife died in 1858, leaving a very promising family of three sons and one daughter - James T., now President of the New York Printing and Dyeing Company; Mansfield and Edward, now among the substantial business men of Joliet, and Caroline E., wife of Francis L. Cagwin, of Joliet. Mr. Young continued to reside in Manhattan until May, 1876, when he removed to Joliet, and now resides with his son Mansfield.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Young, John
JOHN YOUNG, merchant, Braidwood; was born in Gateside, Ayrshire Co., Scotland, Dec. 25, 1840, and is the son of John and Margaret (McCollum) Young, of Scotland. Mr. Young, when he was about 8 years of age, commenced to work in the coal mines in the Parish of Dalry, Scotland, and followed this business; in 1867, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; he came direct West to Illinois, and settled in Braidwood in 1867; here he commenced mining, and continued in this business until 1877, when he entered the mercantile business. He was nominated by the National Greenback party in 1877, for Supervisor of Reed Tp., and was elected to that office, and from the faithful manner he filled the office, he was re-elected to the same office in 1878, by a large majority; he has held other offices of public trust in which he has acquitted himself in an efficient manner. Mr. Young was married in 1859 to Miss Mary Colquhoun of Scotland, by whom they have had eleven children, five living. Is a National Greenbacker in politics, and is a strong worker in the ranks; member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Young's father died in 1849, at 58 years of age; his mother is now living in Scotland, and is a descendant of the poet, Robert Burns. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Young, Mansfield
MANSFIELD YOUNG, tea merchant, Joliet; was born in the city of New York, Dec. 26, 1830; at the age of 18, he came West with his parents, who settled in Manhattan Tp., in this county, in 1849, where he assisted his parents in farming up to 1854, when he came to Joliet and engaged in the grain trade for a year, when he returned to New York, remaining there until 1864, engaged in the manufacture and sale of hats; in January of the same year, he went to California by way of the Isthmus, and was engaged in the hat business in San Francisco up to September, 1865, when he returned to New York; in June, 1868, he came to Joliet, where he has since resided; he is at present engaged in the tea business. Was Town Clerk and Road Commissioner at different times during his residence in Manhattan Tp., and also one of the Supervisors. He married Miss Sarah Walker, daughter of Joseph Walker, of New York City, May 6, 1863; she died in Joliet on Ascension Day, May 25, 1876, and now sleeps in Oakwood Cemetery; she was a lady universally beloved, and her early death was greatly deplored by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. Young was a member of the famous 7th Regiment N.Y.N.G., and, in 1861, went with that regiment to the seat of war, being the first regiment to march.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Young, Sheldon
SHELDON YOUNG, farming, Sec. 9; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Montgomery Co., N.Y., Dec. 3, 1820. He married Miss Elizabeth Hougham Dec. 1, 1842; she was born Aug. 18, 1822, in Fayette Co., Ind.; they had thirteen children, eight living, viz., Ara B., Lena Ann, Albert L., Mary Ella, Emma, Julia E., Martha E. and Walter H. He lived in New York eighteen years, and, in 1838, he came West and settled in this township; in 1844, he settled on his present place; Mrs. Young lived two years in Fayette Co., Ind.; moved to Butler Co., Ohio, where she remained three years; moved to Parke Co., Ind., lived there twelve years, when she came to this county on horseback, over a hundred and fifty miles, to visit a sister, where she lived until she was married. Mr. Young has been Supervisor, Road Commissioner, School Trustee and Director. He came here without any means, in fact, was in debt; he now owns 112 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Yung, William
WILLIAM YUNG, photographer, Peotone; born in Wasungen, Saxe-Meiningen, Germany, Oct. 26, 1854, where he lived until 1871, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York June 1, 1871, coming directly West; he located in Milwaukee, Wis., where he lived one year, working at his trade as mason; then to Chicago two years, where he worked at his trade until 1874, when he came to Peotone, Will Co., and engaged at his trade, which he has since followed; in 1876, he purchased his present residence, and, 1877, he purchased a photograph gallery, which he has since run, and also continued the business of masonry. He married Dec. 1, 1876, Miss Maggie Conrad, daughter of Peter Conrad; she was born in Cook Co., Ill., Sept. 10, 1857; they have one child by this union - August Louis, born Dec. 10, 1877. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Zarley, Calneh
CALNEH ZARLEY, of the firm of Zarley & Co., publishers of the Joliet Signal, Joliet; among the very earliest settlers of Will Co., was the family of Reason Zarley, who emigrated from Pike Co., Ohio, in 1829, and, after spending two years in Vermilion Co., Ill., settled in Joliet Tp., Will Co., in 1831, where he resided until his death, in 1859; his widow still lives on the original farm, being the oldest living inhabitant of the township; of the eight children living at the time of their father's decease, three have since died, and the remaining five are all residents of Will Co.; the subject of this sketch was born in Pike Co., Ohio, April 21, 1825, and came to Illinois with the family, as above stated; he remained at home on the farm until he attained his majority, in 1846; he then entered upon his editorial career as one of the editors and proprietors of the Joliet Signal, in which capacity he has continued for the past thirty-two years, during which time the Signal has continued to increase in circulation, popularity and influence; in politics, it has always been Democratic; it now has a bona-fide circulation of 1,200 copies weekly; Mr. Zarley held the office of Postmaster of Joliet during the administration of Presidents Pierce and Buchanan, and has served for the past nine years on the Board of School Inspectors. He was married in 1862, to Miss Annie Keegan, of Joliet, and has five children - Katie, Edwin C., Sarah, Frank W. and Thomas K.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Zarley, Sarah
SARAH ZARLEY, Joliet. The subject of this memoir, Sarah Zarley, was born in Pike Co., Ohio, Oct. 25, 1794; her maiden name was Sarah Mustard, being the daughter of Rev. William Mustard, one of the pioneer Methodists of that State, and is of the same faith still; in 1814, she was married to Reason Zarley, and in 1828, with her husband and family, she came to Illinois and settled near Danville, where she resided until 1831, when the family moved to Joliet and settled on what is known as the Zarley farm, two miles south of the city, where she is residing at present, and has resided for the last forty-seven years. Mrs. Zarley is the oldest resident of Joliet, as well as the oldest living resident of Will Co.; when she came here, Northern Illinois was a wilderness, inhabited only by Indians and wild beasts; with her husband, she bravely withstood the dangers and hardships of frontier life, and aided in rearing a large family of children; though 84 years of age, she is yet in the full possession of her mental faculties, and has a vivid remembrance of the past; her husband died in 1859, leaving her in charge of the farm and property, which she yet possesses; she is the mother of twelve children, to wit, W.M., Lydia, John W., Susan, Calneh, Calvin, Linton, Sarah, Elizabeth D., James C. and William H.; of whom Susan, Calneh, Elizabeth, James C. and William H. are living, and reside in Will Co. Indeed, few live to so ripe an age and have filled all the duties of life so well.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Zarley, W.H.
W.H. ZARLEY, Clerk of the County Court, Joliet; a son of Reason and Sarah Zarley; was born on the Zarley homestead, in the town of Joliet, on the 21st of February, 1837; he remained at home until he was 17 years old, when he entered the Joliet Postoffice as Deputy Postmaster, under his brother, Calneh Zarley, serving under him seven years, and, on the appointment of J.L. Braden as Postmaster, in 1861, he was retained as deputy for two years, until his election as City Clerk, in 1863; he held that office for fourteen years, until 1877, when he was elected County Clerk. He was married Jan. 30, 1860, to Miss Helen M. Patrick, daughter of Jacob Patrick, of Joliet, and has three children - Charles H., George P. and Ida.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Zimmer, Mathias
MATHIAS ZIMMER, farmer, Sec. 12; P.O. Gooding's Grove; was born in Rhenish Prussia, Germany, July 16, 1832; he lived there twenty-five years farming; came to America in 1857, and first went to Chicago, and from there to Lake Tp., Cook Co., remaining fifteen years, and came from there to this county, and purchased the farm he now resides on; farms 190 acres. He married Catharine Yeager, of Rhenish Prussia, Jan. 7, 1853; they had thirteen children - Nicholas, born Jan. 6, 1851; John, March 4, 1856; Anthony, July 17, 1858; Matthias, Sept. 26, 1860; Mary, Oct. 26, 1862; Pete, Jan. 25, 1866; Kate, March 19, 1868; Clara, June 29, 1872; Christoph, Jan. 25, 1875; Susanna, Jan. 20, 1876, and three dead - Matthias, died Jan. 1, 1849; Angeline, Oct. 19, 1865; Cecilia, Feb. 26, 1870. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]




 

BACK -- HOME

Genealogy Trails