Genealogy Trails History Group

Biographies of
Will County Residents


Mackey, Thompson
THOMPSON MACKEY, farming, Sec. 7; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Columbiana Co., Ohio, June 14, 1824. He married Miss Sarah Sproule Aug. 31, 1852; she was born in Hancock Co., West Va.; they had eight children, five living, viz., Edgar S., Flora J., James E., Adam W. and Bellella. He lived in Ohio about nineteen years on the farm; he then followed steamboating on the Ohio and Mississippi for about nineteen years; he then came to Illinois and settled on his present place. He has been Assessor and Road Commissioner a number of years each.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mackie, John
JOHN MACKIE, miller, Lockport; was born in Perthshire, Scotland, March 7, 1842; he immigrated to America in May, 1865, and first settled in Gallipolis, Ohio; here he entered the employ of W.H. Langley, remaining about fifteen months, at which time Langley failed for a large amount; he next came to Chicago, and worked for a short time in the City Mills; in the latter part of 1867, he came to Lockport and entered the employ of Norton & Co.; he next located in Pittsburgh, Penn., and worked in the City Mills; in 1871, he returned to Lockport, and again entered the employ of Norton & Co., until the great fire in Chicago; a portion of the time was spent in their mills here and the remainder in their mills at Chicago. He was married in November, 1868, to Elizabeth Doran, of Canada; has three children - Ella, Rachel and Thomas.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mackin, Peter
PETER MACKIN, groceries and provisions, flour and feed, Joliet; born in Armagh Co., Ireland, June 24, 1849, where he lived until 22 years of age, attending school in his youth; then engaged in farming until the above age, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York March 17, 1871; coming directly West, he visited his brother at Peoria, Ill., for a short time, when he came to Will Co. and engaged with Patrick Fitzpatrick in Lockport Tp. for one year, when he came to Joliet and engaged in business with Thomas Delaney, purchasing the lot and erecting a store at No. 33 South Chicago st., where they engaged in the groceries and provisions, flour and feed business for three years, when their store was destroyed by fire; Mr. Mackin then purchased his partner's interest and rebuilt his present store in 1876, since which time he has been doing a very successful and profitable business, which may be attributed to his strict integrity and honest dealing.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mack, Uziah
UZIAH MACK, manufacturer and wholesale and retail dealer in boots and shoes, Joliet; was born in Northampton Co., Penn., Jan. 14, 1835; in early childhood, he accompanied his parents to Northumberland Co., and several years later, to Montour Co., in the same State, where he lived until he came to Joliet, in 1858. In July, 1862, he enlisted in Co. H, 100th Ill. Vols.; was appointed Sergeant, and afterward appointed to Sergeant Major, and finally to First Lieutenant of Co. K, in which position he served till the close of war; he served under Gen. Thomas in the Army of the Cumberland, and with Sherman in his march through Georgia, as far as Jonesboro and Lovejoy; he was with the command from the time it left home until its return, in 1865. After the war, he went to St. Joseph, Mo., and engaged in business, remaining there two years, when he sold out and returned to Joliet, where he entered into partnership with his uncle, Firman Mack, in the wholesale and retail boot and shoe business, the firm being F. & U. Mack, which continued until the death of his partner, Aug. 10, 1872, since which time he has continued the business alone. He was married April 19, 1867, to Miss Jennie Flemming, of Truro, Nova Scotia; she died Oct. 15, 1876, leaving three children - Robert L., Mary and Willie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Maltby, William
WILLIAM MALTBY, Superintendent of the Eureka Coal Co., Braidwood. The above-named gentleman is one of the prominent men of Braidwood; was born in Selston, England, March 7, 1840, and is the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Clark) Maltby, of England; his father was engaged in taking care of the stock of a large coal and iron company in England; Mr. Maltby, when 7 years of age, commenced to work on his father's farm by straddling a mule and driving them tandem to the plow; he came in contact with the miners here; he was induced to enter the mine, driving coal-cart and mining; in 1862, he emigrated to Canada and landed in Quebec; then to Lake Superior; from there he went to Jackson, Mich.; in 1863, he came to Illinois, to Peoria and Fairbury; then East to Pennsylvania; entered the coal business for two years; then to Nova Scotia, prospecting for coal, for Charles S. Richardson; not finding coal, he returned to New York City; then to Michigan; from there he came to Chicago, Ill., and in Dec., 1866, was appointed Superintendent of the Rhodes Coal Co., now known as the Eureka Coal Co. of Chicago; this company employs between 400 and 450 men; capacity of seventy cars per day, twelve tons to a car. Mr. Maltby came to America financially a poor boy; to-day he has risen from the lad that was engaged in driving the mule to the plow to a Superintendent of one of the largest coal companies in the West; is the President and one of the founders of the Braidwood Library, with 1,300 volumes. Mr. M. has been married twice; to his first wife, in 1858, Miss Dorinda Green, of England, and to his second wife, in 1873, Addie Varley, of England; has six children.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mapps, R.H.
R.H. MAPPS, farmer and auctioneer, Sec. 24; P.O. Joliet; born in Cumberland Co., Penn., July 12, 1819, where he worked at the cooper's trade for several years, when he moved to Ohio, and worked at his trade until he moved to Joliet in 1846, where he followed his trade until he purchased the farm where he now resides; owns 136 acres of land, valued at $55 to $60 per acre. He married Miss Susanna Shoffner, a native of Ohio; they have six children - Albert, born March 1, 1849; Levi, June 16, 1852; Jesse, Sept. 9, 1856, died Nov. 5, 1857; John W., born March 16, 1859; Armina, Oct. 2, 1863; Lillie A., Feb. 11, 1867. Mr. Mapps has filled the offices of School Director and Trustee in his township several terms.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Marsh, Frank E.
FRANK E. MARSH, of the firm of Carpenter & Marsh, grain merchants and proprietors of the Union Transfer Elevator, Joliet; was born in Joliet June 27, 1849; he is the son of H.N. Marsh, an early settler of Will Co., and for many years past the agent of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company in this city. He was educated in the public schools of Joliet, and at the Chicago Academy; in 1868, he became ticket agent and telegraph operator of the C., R.I. & P. R.R., and continued till the spring of 1874, when he entered into partnership with H.S. Carpenter in the grain and elevator business; they are now the heaviest dealers in Northern Illinois outside of Chicago; they do an extensive export business, about three-fourths of their grain being purchased for foreign shipment. Mr. Marsh was Superintendent of the Will County Historical Society in 1871 and 1872, previously to its being merged into the Joliet Public Library. He was married Feb. 4, 1873, to Miss Kate Richmond, of Joliet, and has two children - Horatio Richmond and Loren William.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Marsh, H.N.
H.N. MARSH, freight and ticket agent of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Company; has been a resident of Joliet since 1835; he is a native of Franklin Co., Mass., and was born Nov. 15, 1812; about 1828, his parents emigrated to Western New York, where they resided until 1835, when they came to Will Co., and settled in what is now Crete Tp., Mr. Marsh at the same time locating in Joliet; he followed his previous business of cabinet-making until the spring of 1847, when he purchased the True Democrat, which, on the organization of the Republican party, was changed to the Joliet Republican; previous to this, he had served two years as School Commissioner of the county; he continued to publish the True Democrat until July, 1852, and in October of the same year, on the completion of the C., R.I. & P. Railroad to this point, he took charge of the office in this city, and has remained in charge ever since, with the exception of an interval of three years, from 1864 to 1867, during which period he served as Postmaster of Joliet; in 1850, he was appointed Asst. U.S. Marshal, to take the census of Will Co.; he was elected a member of the City Council in 1876, and again in 1878. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Marsh, Ira R.
IRA R. MARSH, merchant, Braidwood; was born in Attica, N.Y., June 22, 1843, and is the son of J. Wells and Laura (Smith) Marsh; his father was engaged in the mercantile business, and died when Mr. Marsh was but one year old. Mr. Marsh's first business in life was working at bookbinding; then in the dentistry one and a half years; he then set out in learning photography, and was engaged at this business about one and a half years in Buffalo, N.Y. In 1862, he enlisted as private in Co. B, 112th N.Y. V.I. for three years or during the war; was with the Army of the James; participated in some of the hard-fought battles during the war - Cold Harbor, Fort Fisher and in the battle of New Market Heights; he received a wound in the side which disabled him for about four months; he rejoined his regiment and served until the close of the war; mustered out June, 1865; in 1866, he came West to Illinois and settled at Keifersville; here he commenced the grocery business, this being the first store at the mines; he remained there about two years; returned East one year, and in 1869, came to Braidwood; here he commenced to clerk for Lawrence & Tinceler; he purchased an interest, and then the firm was L. Tinceler & Co.; to-day he is in business alone; owns one of the best boot and shoe stores in Braidwood, and ranks as one of the leading merchants of this vicinity. Married in 1876, to Miss Annie White; one child. Has held several offices of trust, City Clerk and Supervisor of Reed Township. Republican in politics.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Martin, James W.
JAMES W. MARTIN, farmer, Sec. 23; P.O. Wilmington; owns 240 acres, valued at $40 per acre. Was elected County Treasurer in November, 1873, and re-elected in November, 1875, and served until Dec. 5, 1877. Was born in Wilmington, this county, Feb. 22, 1846. Married Viola M. Linton Jan. 13, 1875; she was born Jan. 23, 1846, in Montezuma, Ind., and came to Illinois with her parents in 1862. One child - Charles H.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Marti, Nicholas
NICHOLAS MARTI, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Mokena; was born in Switzerland Sept. 26, 1824; came to the United States in 1851, and to this State, and settled in this county the same year. His farm consists of 155 acres, valued at $10,000. He was married to Miss Mary Baumgartner, who was born in Switzerland; they have nine children, viz., Nicholas, Caroline, Charlotte, Albert, Frederick, Frank, Mary, John and Emma. The farm of Mr. Marti is situated on Secs. 9 and 16. He is at present Commissioner of Highways.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Martin, William
WILLIAM MARTIN, dairying; P.O. Wilmington; owns 240 acres, valued at $40 per acre; born April 30, 1849, where he now resides. His father, James Martin, mother, Catherine Graham (Martin), both born in Ireland; emigrated to the United States at different periods. Were married in Rochester, N.Y., in 1836, and emigrated to Will Co., in 1837, locating in Wilmington, where he lived for about ten years; thence to the farm now owned by William in 1847. There were eight children, three living - Mary (now Mrs. T. Baskerville); James W. and William. Mr. Martin, Sr., went to California, the overland route, in the spring of 1850, where he died the succeeding fall. Thomas enlisted July, 1862, in Co. A, 100th Ill. V.I., and died of disease contracted by exposure June, 1863, at Murfreesboro, Tenn. Two died in infancy - Edward died here in 1864; John died January, 1870.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Marvin, G.N.
G.N. MARVIN, keeper, weighmaster, shipper and receiver, State Prison, Joliet; was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., in 1818; his early life was that of a farmer's son; he followed agricultural pursuits during his residence at the East; in 1858, he came West and located in Plainfield, Will Co., where he was employed as foreman on the farm of A. McAllister for one year; he then purchased a farm on the Plainfield road two miles west of Joliet, which he farmed two or three years; he next returned East and spent one or two years; after traveling some months, he again returned West to Joliet, and was engaged as foreman on the farm of William P. Caton for three seasons; he had charge of 1,500 acres, harvesting about 400 acres of meadow each season; Jan. 9, 1868, he connected himself with the prison and has remained here ever since. His first marriage to Marietta Hammond occurred in 1838; his second marriage to Laura C. Barber, a native of Pennsylvania, was celebrated in 1873; has three children - Emma A., George W. and William A., all married.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mason, E.B.
E.B. MASON, real estate and loans, Joliet; was born in Ontario Co., N.Y., Nov. 20, 1826; in 1834, his father, Hale S. Mason, came with his family to Will Co., and settled in Gooding's Grove, in what is now Homer Tp.; he was for a good many years Canal Collector of Lockport; for a number of years Justice of the Peace, and is now an honored resident of the town of Lockport. Mr. Mason continued farming until the spring of 1854; in the fall of that year, he came to Joliet and spent the winter, removing the following spring of LaSalle, Ill., where he resided for fourteen years, during eight of which he served as Postmaster of that city; returning to Joliet in 1870, he entered the abstract office of George H. Ward, and, in 1875, engaged in his present business; he is Secretary of the Peoples' Loan and Homestead Association of Joliet, which was organized in 1874, having a capital stock of 5,000 shares of $100 each. He was married in the spring of 1850 to Miss Elizabeth C. Olney, daughter of Hiram Olney, an early settler of Homer Tp.; she died in 1858, leaving two children, one of whom, Ella B., wife of Leonard G. Wilson, is now living. Mr. Mason was married again in 1864 to Miss Lizzie L. Miner, of Aurora, Ill.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mason, Hale S.
HALE S. MASON, farmer, P.O. Lockport; born in Attleboro, Bristol Co., Mass., March 30, 1804; when he was 12 years of age, his father moved to Ontario Co., N.Y.; in 1833, young Mason came West to Illinois, to prospect the country, returning home on the 6th of May, 1834; he took up his line of march in a two horse covered wagon to the far West, his family consisting of himself, his wife, and three little boys, the oldest about 7 years of age; June 6, one month from the date of starting they landed at Gooding's Grove, Will Co.; here he remained engaged in farming till 1846, when he removed to the village of Lockport, and in company with his brother, engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes; in 1849, he moved to the farm upon which he now resides, and engaged in the nursery business. He was married Jan. 5, 1826, to Sabrina A. Codding, a native of Bristol, Ontario Co., N.Y.; has had seven sons - Edwin B., William T., Stephen C., John Q., Charles T., living; Hale S. and George H., deceased; the latter was killed while in the United States' service, Dec. 13, 1863; he was a member of the 14th I.V.C., and was Color Bearer of the regiment. Mr. Mason owns 180 acres of land in Lockport Township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mason, T.A.
T.A. MASON, dealer in lumber, manufacturer of sash, doors and blinds, proprietor of the Stone City Planing-Mill, Joliet; was born in New Hartford, Oneida Co., N.Y., March 14, 1846; he is a son of Daniel C. Mason, an extensive railroad contractor; his grandfather, Arnold Mason, was one of the original contractors of the Croton Water Works in New York City; Mr. Mason first came to Illinois in the spring of 1867; after spending a few months in Chicago, he returned East, and engaged in the blank-book and stationery business in Utica; in 1870, he came to Joliet, and, with F.W. and H.B. Plant, erected the Stone City Planing-Mill, and engaged in the lumber business; he was educated at the Utica High School and at Whitestown Seminary, N.Y. He was married Sept. 25, 1872, to Miss Elizabeth E. Caton, of Joliet, and has three children - Cornelia Louise, William Caton and Kittie Marie. Mr. Mason is at present a member of the Board of Aldermen from the Fourth Ward, being elected in April, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mason, William
WILLIAM MASON, farmer (deceased), Sec. 25; P.O. Peotone; born in Northamptonshire, England, Dec. 14, 1815; was raised a farmer; at the age of 20, he entered the British army; he joined the 11th Hussars (Prince Albert's own regiment); he served nearly five years. Was married twice - first, to Fanny Farrer in 1843; she was born in England Nov. 17, 1818, and died Sept. 4, 1862; by this union they had nine children - Denny, Sarah, Joseph, Mary (the latter two deceased), William, Joseph and Mary (twins, named after the two deceased), Esther and Fanny. Came to this State in 1849; stopped near Oswego one year; in 1850 came here and settled where he resided at the time of his death, which sad event occurred Nov. 29, 1875; his second marriage was with Jane Temple April 25, 1864; she was born July 3, 1826, in Bennington, Vt. Denny was in the U.S. Navy, and served three years under Commodore Porter; during the greater portion of his time he was on the gunboat Blackhawk; was with her when she burned; he was then sent to the Eastern Department and remained there until his muster-out at the end of the war. Mrs. Mason had three brothers in the Union army during the late war; one died in Andersonville; his name was Ira.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Matter, Jacob
JACOB MATTER, farmer; P.O. Naperville; was born in Dauphin Co., Penn., Feb. 1, 1818, and is a son of Christian Matter (was a soldier of the war of 1812), was a shoemaker by trade and was engaged in farming the latter years of his life. Mr. Matter learned the shoemaker trade, but, on account of his health, turned his attention to farming; moved to Jefferson Co., Penn., with his parents; here his father died, leaving a wife and five children. In 1844, he came West to Illinois; first settled in Naperville; his first purchase was eighty acres of Government land, at $1.25 per acre, the present farm now farmed by his son Abraham; Mr. Matter was a resident of Aurora eight years. Married Miss Nancy Milliren, of Jefferson Co., Penn., by whom he has had ten children - five boys and five girls. Abraham was a soldier in the late war; was taken sick at Vicksburg, Miss.; was honorably discharged.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mayhew, Benjamin L.
BENJAMIN L. MAYHEW, Deputy Warden of Illinois State Prison, Joliet; born in Dennysville, Wash. Co., Me., June 16, 1822; his ancestors came from England in 1642, landing at Martha's Vineyard, Mass.; Mr. M. came to Boston in 1842, where he lived and worked at the trade of machinist until 1845, making one voyage at sea during this period, when he went to Cambridge, Mass., and was connected with the Cambridge Prison as guard for two years; in 1847, he was appointed Deputy Keeper, which position he held for eleven years. On Dec. 15, 1856, Deputy Warden Galen C. Walker, of the Charlestown State Prison, was murdered in the chapel by convict James Magee, and upon the 29th inst. of the same month, Warden Solon H. Tenny was murdered by convict Charles D. Decatur; the two chief officers having been murdered, Mr. Mayhew was selected to take full charge of the Charlestown State Prison, which he did with great credit for twenty-one days, till new officers were appointed, Mr. Mayhew meanwhile retaining his old position at Cambridge; in 1858, he was appointed Deputy Warden of the Charlestown, Mass., State Prison, which office he held for ten years; he then emigrated to Illinois, and in the year 1870, was appointed Deputy Warden of the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet, which position he has since held, with the exception of four years' absence. Mr. Mayhew married Oct. 31, 1847, to Miss Frances J. Nickerson; she was born in Westminster, Vt., May 23, 1821; they are the parents of two children now living, viz.: William B., born in Cambridge, Mass., Nov. 1, 1848, now serving his fifth year as Engineer in the U.S. Navy; Maria F., born in Cambridge, Mass., Jan. 11, 1857; Edmund L., born in Charlestown, Mass., Nov. 8, 1860, deceased.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McCann, D.
D. McCANN, deceased, farmer; P.O. Joliet; born in Fayette Co., Ind., Nov. 3, 1823, where he lived and followed farming until 1864, when he removed to Will Co., and purchased the farm where the family now live, consisting of 250 acres of land, now valued at upward of $50 per acre; he died here Oct. 2, 1873. He married Miss Elizabeth Honnymon, of Union Co., Ind., Sept. 13, 1850; they were the parents of six children - William W., Lycurgus C., Charlie W., Irene (died Feb. 28, 1862), Ada and Lillie B.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McClaughry, Robert W.
MAJ. ROBERT W. MC CLAUGHRY, Warden of the Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet; was born in Fountain Green, Hancock Co., Ill., July 22, 1839; he remained at home on the farm until 1856, when he entered Monmouth College, graduating in 1860, after which he remained in the college one year as Professor of Latin; returning to Hancock Co. in 1861, he settled at Carthage, and engaged in editing the Carthage Republican. In response to President Lincoln's call for 300,000 men, he enlisted in August, 1862, as a private in the 118th Ill. V.I.; was chosen Captain of Co. B, and in November following, was elected Major of the regiment; he participated in all the campaigns which resulted in the capture of Vicksburg in the Gulf Department in the fall of 1863, and in all the campaigns in Western Louisiana until June, 1864, when he was transferred to the Pay Department as Pay-Master, and assigned to duty at Springfield, Ill.; he remained there until Oct. 13, 1865, when he was mustered out to accept the office of County Clerk of Hancock Co., to which he had been elected; he held this office until 1869; the next two years he was engaged in the stone-quarry business in Sonora, Hancock Co., and furnished the stone for the railroad bridge over the Mississippi River at Keokuk, and for the foundation of the new State Capitol at Springfield; in 1871, he went to St. Louis in charge of the St. Genevieve quarries, but the following year, his health failing, he returned to Monmouth, Ill., and entered the office of Judge Glenn to attend to a portion of his business, where he remained till Aug. 1, 1874, when he was appointed to his present important and responsible position. He was married in 1862 to Miss Elizabeth C. Madden, of Monmouth, Ill., and has five children living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McCowan, Charles
CHARLES McCOWAN, farmer, Sec. 7; P.O. Channahon; the subject of this sketch was born in New York, Sept. 28, 1832; he married Miss Myra Newton, Jan. 1, 1854; she died in 1861; they had two children, one living, viz., Carrie; his present wife was Miss Lenna Curtis; they were married March 17, 1865; they had four children, one living, viz., Roy; he lived in New York about three years, then came to this county, with his parents, who settled in this township; he came to his present place about 1857, and has lived on same since; he has been Poormaster and School Trustee; he was considerably in debt on starting, and now owns sixty-five acres in this township. His father, Peter McCowan (deceased), was born in Edinburgh, Scotland; he married Miss Isabelle Tarrant; she was born in England; they were among the first settlers of this township; both have since died.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McCreery, Joseph
JOSEPH MCCREERY, retired; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born in Benton, Ontario Co., N.Y., July 1, 1810. He married Miss Abigail Ann Van Riper in November, 1830; she was born in New Jersey; they had twelve children, eight living, viz., John, Joseph, Charles, Alfred, Lewis, Mary, Lucy and Isabell. He lived in New York until 1833, when he went to Canada and engaged in the lumber business continuing four years; he then returned to New York and engaged in the lumber business at Rochester, where he remained until 1845; he then came to Will Co., and settled in Plainfield, where he engaged in farming; continued until 1875, when he came to his present place. He is no office-seeker, his only offices being connected with the school and road. He started in very poor circumstances, and now owns 250 acres in this township. He has been connected with the Universalist Church for the past twenty-five years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McCreery, L.W.
L.W. MCCREERY, farming and stock, Secs. 33 and 34; P.O. Plainfield; the subject of this sketch was born on the present place May 10, 1857. He married Miss Annie Bristol Feb. 18, 1877; she was born in Ohio Nov. 7, 1855; they have one child, namely, Lena. He has always lived on the present place. In 1875, he began farming on his own account on the present farm, belonging to his father.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McCumber, Porter J.

HON. PORTER J. McCUMBER is one of the most distinguished and honored citizens of Wahpeton and is now serving as United States senator from North Dakota. He is a prominent lawyer and belongs to that class whose ability and character are making a deep impression upon the public life of this rapidly developing community in which he resides. In this broad state, with its abundant room for individual enterprise, with its hearty appreciation of personal worth and its splendid opportunities for individual achievement, the man of ability finds the very largest sphere for usefulness and gratification for personal ambition. His abilities will be discovered; his integrity will find appreciation; his public spirit will meet with recognition, and he will be forced into prominence. Senator McCumber is an illustration of this fact.
He was born in Crete, Will County, Illinois, February 3, 1856, and spent his boyhood upon a farm near Rochester, Minnesota. After attending the district schools for some time, he entered the high school of that city, where he completed his literary education. He then taught school for a few years, and while thus employed took up the study of law. He graduated from the law department of the University of Michigan in 1880, and the following year opened an office at Wahpeton, North Dakota, where he has since successfully engaged in practice. In January, 1882, he formed a partnership with B. L. Bogart, and under the firm name of McCumber & Bogart they are still carrying on business.
On the 29th of May, 1889, at Wahpeton, Mr. McCumber was united in marriage with Miss Jennie Schorning, a native of Minnesota, and to them have been born two children, Helen and Donald. Socially Mr. McCumber is a member of Wahpeton Lodge, No. 56, F. & A, M., and politically is a sta nch Republican. While in the line of his profession he has won distinction and success, he has always been ready to respond to any call for public duty, for years working on political lines for the advancement of the interests for the city, state and country. In 1884 he was elected to the lower house of the territorial legislature, and after serving in that body for one term was elected to the upper house in 1886 for the same length of time. He also filled the office of state's attorney for Richland county for one term, and in the winter of 1899 was chosen United States senator for a term of six years. With the broad spirit of Americanism shaping his view and prompting his actions, he has won the respect of all classes and the confidence of the great public. Men with minds that are as alert and broad as his, are never narrow; and men who, like him, view public questions, the social organization, politics and all the relations of life comprehensively and philosophically are magnificent supporters of the best interests of humanity. [Source: Compendium of History and Biography of North Dakota, Publ. 1900. Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]

McCune, George W.
GEORGE W. MC CUNE, farming, Sec. 26; P.O. Elwood; was born in Will Co., Ill., Feb. 25, 1841. He married Miss Clara E. Houghton Jan. 28, 1869; she was born at Columbus, Ohio, April 6, 1849; they have four children, viz., James B., Etta, Emma and William G. He has always resided in this county; he is no office-seeker, his only office being connected with the schools; he began farming on his own account on becoming of age, and owns 325 acres in this township, which he has earned principally by his own labor; his parents settled here prior to the Black Hawk war, and fled to Chicago during the same.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McDonald, John
JOHN MC DONALD, dealer in grain, salt, coal, flour and hay, Frankfort Station; one of our early and prominent settlers; was born in Queens Co., Ireland, Dec. 11, 1823; came to the United States in 1841, and to this State in 1849; his first permanent residence in this State was in Frankfort, where he has since resided. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Doty, who was born in New Lenox, Will Co., Ill.; they have three children, all of whom are living, viz., Herbert J., Edward E. and Charles H. He has been a successful dealer in grain for the past nineteen years; he is also serving his third term of office as Supervisor of Frankfort Tp.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McDonald, Jonathan S.
JONATHAN S. MC DONALD, editor, Phoenix, Lockport; born April 17, 1829, in the town of Salina, Onondaga Co., N.Y.; his father, Asa McDonald, Esq., settled, with his family, in Joliet in 1838, and, the following year, rented the farm under the bluff, east of the Penitentiary, of Dr. A.W. Bowen (now a resident of Wilmington), and, soon after, became a tenant, at Five-Mile Grove, on land belonging to Edward, Ephraim and Pliny Perkins; he afterward purchased a farm on Maple st., in New Lenox, on which he died, Dec. 4, 1857; at the age of 20, J.S. McDonald started from home, and crossed the plains, in search of California gold; he returned in 1854, and attempted to acquire a college education by entering the University of Oberlin in 1855; within a couple of weeks, he found the undertaking altogether too irksome, and left that institution, to eventually establish a banking-house in Lockport; in this new, and to him strange, business of banking he prospered indifferently well, and found himself involved in the general suspension of 1858-59; after a trip to the gold-mines of Colorado, he returned to Lockport, raised a company for the war, with Dr. Charles H. Baeon, and entered the service in the 100th I.V. Regiment, as a Second Lieutenant; while in the service, he took an active part in all the campaigns and battles in which the regiment was engaged, except the fight at Missionary Ridge, and resigned at the opening of the Atlanta campaign, having been promoted to the rank of Captain. In 1854, Capt. McDonald bought a controlling interest in the Will County Courier, and sold out after a brilliant career of six months; he then, in the following year, started the Lockport Phoenix, and, soon after, enlarged the enterprise to what is termed "The Family of Phoenixes" in Joliet, Wilmington, Lockport and Lemont. In 1857, he married Louisa, daughter of Col. George Snoad.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McFarlin, James H.

JAMES H. MC FARLIN, butcher and general stock dealer, Joliet; born in Troy, Will Co., Ill., July 25, 1854, living there seven years, when he removed with his parents to Manhattan Tp., where, after obtaining a common-school education, he engaged in farming until he removed to Joliet, in May, 1869, when he commenced work with J. Adler at butchering, remaining in his employ until October, 1878, a period of nine years; at the above date he engaged in the above business upon his own account on Chicago st., corner of Wallace st.; he is also engaged in the stock business, buying and selling largely; having had an experience of upward of ten years in the business, his judgment in stock is considered sound and reliable.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McGinnis, William
WILLIAM MCGINNIS, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; owns 270 acres here, valued at $50 per acre, and 400 acres in Livingston Co., valued at $35 per acre; born in Rochester, N.Y., in 1826; they moved to Boston when he was very young; thence to this county with his mother in 1837, his father having died in New York; they located at Joliet, where they resided until 1849, at which date he went to California, and returned to Joliet in 1851; he left Joliet in 1852, and settled in Reed Tp., where he lived until 1870; thence to Livingston Co., four years; thence to his present residence in 1874. Married Eliza Palmer Nov. 11, 1855, in this county; she was born in Orange Co., Vt., Feb. 29, 1840, and came to this county with her parents in 1850; have four children living - Margaret, died Sept. 15, 1872; John, Frank, Mary and Gertrude; William, died Nov. 30, 1872.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McGlashan, Alexander
ALEXANDER McGLASHAN, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our first settlers and pioneers; was born in Scotland May 10, 1822; came to the United States in 1836, and to this State in the same year, when he settled in Chicago; he removed from there to Frankfort in 1843. His farm consists of 320 acres, valued at $16,000. He was married to Miss Leah Stone, who was born in England; they have seven children, viz., Annie, William, Charlotte, Sue, Laura, Jessie and Edith.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McGovney, Ozias
OZIAS MCGOVNEY, general merchant; P.O. Mokena; one of our first settlers and pioneers; was born in Adams Co., Ohio, Dec. 4, 1824; came to this State with his father's family, and settled in the township of Frankfort, Will Co., in 1831. He received a liberal education in boyhood, and at the age of 25, was admitted as attorney and solicitor in the courts of this State. Since his residence in the township, he has acted as Justice of the Peace twenty-one years, and post office official three years. He was married Jan. 20, 1846, to Miss Matilda J. Ellsworth, who was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., Feb. 23, 1829; they have had eight children, six of whom are living, viz., Nancy, O.E., Emily M., Hattie, Arthur W. and Jessie; deceased, Mary E., William W.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McIntosh, Alexander
CAPT. ALEXANDER MC INTOSH, political editor of the Joliet Sun, Joliet; was born in Fulton Co., N.Y., of Scotch parentage in 1822; he was raised on a farm; when he was 19 years of age, he entered the academy at Galway Center, Saratoga Co., N.Y., as a student, and acquired a liberal education, spending three years in that institution; he came to Joliet, Ill., in 1845, and, in 1847, started in Joliet the True Democrat, now the Joliet Republican; he sold out in 1848, and, in 1849, went to California, where he remained three years; returning to Joliet in 1852, he repurchased the True Democrat, which he published and edited until 1857; in 1856, he was elected on the Republican ticket Circuit Clerk and Recorder of Will Co., for a term of four years; in 1863, he was appointed by President Lincoln, Captain and Quartermaster in the United States Army was with Sherman's army in 1864; was on the famous march to the sea, and up through the Carolinas and Virginia to Washington; he was retained in the service after the disbanding of the volunteers, being assigned to Mobile as Post Quartermaster; in 1866, he resigned this position and returning to Will Co., embarked in mercantile business in Wilmington; in 1869, he purchased the Wilmington Independent, which he published until 1873; in the spring of 1874, he returned to Joliet, and in the fall of the same year became the political editor of the Joliet Republican, which position he retained till January, 1877; in the fall of that year, he entered upon the editorial management of the Joliet Phoenix, from which he withdrew in July, 1878, to assume the position of political editor of the Joliet Sun; Capt. McIntosh joined the Republican party upon its organization in 1856, and has ever remained true to its principles, and, although a man of pronounced views on all political and moral questions, and participating in many exciting political campaigns, he retains the entire respect and confidence of his fellow-citizens of all parties.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McIntosh, Thomas S.
THOMAS S. McINTOSH, dealer in paints, oils, varnish, glass, brushes, wall paper, etc., Wilmington, Ill.; born in Wilmington, Will Co., Ill., Aug. 25, 1841; his father, Daniel McIntosh, who was a native of Scotland, was among the first settlers of Wilmington, locating here in the winter of 1836 and 1837. Thomas S. followed farming till 1864, and then engaged in his present business, which he has followed since. Married in 1866 to Miss Emma E., daughter of Charles Cottel; she was born in Washington Co., Me.; four children by this union, three living - Alice, Nellie and Emma. Laura died Aug. 8, 1878. Mr. McIntosh enlisted in the 138th I.V.I. in 1864, and served until the close of the war. Member of Will Lodge, No. 301, I.O.O.F.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McIntosh, William
WILLIAM McINTOSH, manufacturer of farm-wagons, Wilmington; was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., July 12, 1825, but resided in different parts of the State, his father being engaged on public works for many years; removed to Illinois with his father's family in the winter of 1836-37, making the journey by land, in wagons and sleighs, locating first, in Florence Tp., this county, two miles east of the present city of Wilmington; he removed to Wilmington in 1843, and learned blacksmithing, and, in 1856, engaged in the manufacturing business. Married in 1847, to Miss Sarah, daughter of John Fisher; she was born in Pennsylvania; five children by this union - Elizabeth, (wife of I. Barker), Margrie, (wife of D. Hart), Mary, Fannie and William.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McIntyre, Archibald J.
ARCHIBALD J. McINTYRE, (deceased), Wilmington Tp.; born in Fulton Co., N.Y., in 1814; removed to Illinois in 1837, locating in Wilmington, where he first engaged in farming; afterward, in mercantile pursuits for several years; at the organization of the First National Bank of Wilmington, he became President, which position he held up to the time of his death, which occurred on the 2nd day of March, 1877. In 1865, he was elected to the State Legislature on the Republican ticket, serving during the session of 1865-66. Married in July, 1845, to Miss Jane Whitten, who was born in Darling, Canada; by this union there were ten children, seven of whom are living - Annie (wife of M.N.M. Stewart), Nettie, Mary, Maggie, Archibald J., Lottie, and Nellie; three deceased - John, Andrew and George.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McIntyre, Daniel
Daniel McIntyre, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Wilmington; owns 248 acres, valued at $45 per acre. Been Highway Commissioner three years and School Director three terms. Born Sept. 26, 1841, in this township, on what is now the Selah Morey farm, Sec. 28. Married Roselma Thornburg Feb. 19, 1862; she was born March 15, 1843, in Channahon Tp., this county; her father, Robert Thornburg, and mother, Clorinda Wright, were among the earliest settlers of Channahon Tp., as will be seen in the general history. Mr. McIntyre's father was one of the earliest settlers of Wesley Tp., and subsequently into Florence in 1837. Have six children living and one dead - Clorinda L., William, Daniel J., Margaret E., John R. (deceased), Martha A. and Jessa.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McIntyre, Lucinda
MRS. LUCINDA MC INTYRE, farmer, Sec. 5; P.O. Wilmington; widow of the late Duncan McIntyre; owns 172 acres, valued at $60 per acre; she was born in Orleans Co., N.Y., Nov. 2, 1827, and came to Wesley Tp., this county, with her father, Joseph Hadsall, and family, as will be seen in the general history, at a very early date; her husband D. McIntyre, was born Dec. 13, 1807, in Perth, N.Y.; he settled in Wesley Tp., also at a very early date, but subsequently moved to Florence Tp., in 1837, where he purchased a farm on Sec. 28; had the family of Nelson Wright, formerly of Ohio, keep house for him; and one Lutz also lived with him some time. Was married Sept. 8, 1840, in Wesley Tp., at her father's, J. Hadsall; had seven children, four living - Daniel, John, Annie E., deceased, Thomas R., deceased, Archibald D., James W. and Margaret E., deceased. Mr. McIntyre, wife and two children, went to Perth, Fulton Co., N.Y., in 1844; they purchased the farm which they now own, and returned in 1855. Mr. McIntyre died here Nov. 3, 1858.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McKeown, Alexander
ALEXANDER MCKEOWN, rail inspector, Joliet Iron and Steel Works, Joliet; was born in Antrim Co., Ireland, Feb. 2, 1851; he attended the common schools and besides was a student in Kennedy College, Dublin, nine months; he immigrated to America May 1, 1872, and first settled in Joliet, where he engaged in learning core-making in the Joliet Foundry; at this he spent eleven months and then engaged in the steel-rail mill as laborer; here he worked two months, when he was promoted to the position of rail inspector, night turn; he served two years and at the shutting-down of the mills in 1873, he went to Springfield and labored at general work in the mills there four months; subsequently, he labored at Bridgeport mills seven months, and on the re-opening of the Joliet mills, returned and was for three years and four months rail inspector on the night turn; in 1877, he went to Vulcan Mills, in St. Louis, and remained seven months; he then went to Mississippi and was engaged at various points in State work till March, 1878, when he returned to Joliet and was promoted May 1 following, on the re-opening of the mills, to the position of rail inspector, day turn; thus, by close attention to business and strict uprightness with his employers, he has secured for himself a position of responsibility and trust which he richly merits.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McKeown, Hugh
HUGH McKEOWN, blacksmith, Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in the city of Belfast, Ireland, Feb. 2, 1834. He is the son of the late Hugh McKeown (deceased), who did an extensive business in the city of Belfast as millwright. Mr. M. came to the United States in 1856, and to this State, and settled in Will Co. in the same year. He was one of our early settlers; was born in the city of Belfast, Ireland, Feb. 2, 1834; came to the United States in 1856, and to Illinois, and settled in Will Co. in the same year. He was married to Miss Margaret Magee, who was born in Whitehouse, Ireland, March 21, 1836; they have had six children, four of whom are living, viz., William C., Albert W., Laura A. and Edith E.; deceased, Edward C. and Hugh Thomas. Mr. McKeown is the oldest blacksmith in the village of Frankfort. His residence and shop are situated on Block 10, and are valued at $3,500.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McLaughlin, Daniel

DANIEL MC LAUGHLIN, Mayor of Braidwood, Braidwood. The subject of this sketch is one of the most prominent men of Braidwood; was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, Aug. 9, 1831, and is the son of John and Catherine (Hutton) McLaughlin, natives of Ireland; his father was engaged in stone-cutting; Mr. McLaughlin, when he was but 10 years of age, set out in working in the coal mines at Woodsides, Scotland, in the mining of coal and iron; he has followed this business principally throughout life; in 1869, he emigrated to America, and landed in New York City; from here he went to Boston, Mass.; then he came West to Chicago, Ill.; thence in Sept., 1869, to Braidwood, Will Co., Ill.; here he commenced working in the coal mines, and followed this business until 1877; in April, this year, he was elected by the National Greenback party as Mayor of Braidwood by a large majority; in this office Mr. McLaughlin is giving entire satisfaction to the people he represents, proving himself a gentleman of acknowledged ability. Mr. McLaughlin is in politics a National Greenbacker; a member of the Catholic Church. He married in 1851 to Miss Bridget Dougherty, by whom he had ten children, six living.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McLaughry, Richard S.
RICHARD S. MC LAUGHRY, farmer, Sec. 9; P.O. Lockport; was born in Onondaga Co., N.Y., Feb. 13, 1822; he lived there until he was 12 years of age, when he came West with his parents, who first settled in Paddock's Settlement, in Cook Co., where his parents died; in 1850, he crossed the plains to California, prospecting and mining one year, when he returned to Cook Co.; in 1860, he lived upon his farm near Gooding's Grove. In the fall of 1862, he enlisted in Co. F, 100th Ill. V.I., and was elected as Captain of the same company, serving up to 1864; he was wounded at Mission Ridge, Georgia. He married his first wife, Mary Fitzsimmons, in Cook Co., Ill., Oct. 10, 1844; she died Dec. 8, 1845; they had one child - Thomas J., born Dec. 8, 1845, died in Andersonville prison, Georgia, in 1864; he married his second wife, Jane Pettyjohn, in Cook Co., in 1847; she died in April, 1853; they had two children - William L., born in June, 1848, and Hannah M., born Sept. 21, 1850, died Oct. 20, 1869; married his present wife, Elizabeth Benton, of Geauga Co., Ohio, Jan. 3, 1854; they have seven children - Richard M., born Nov. 23, 1853; Helen E., Jan. 17, 1858; Alice G., Feb. 26, 1860; Jessie P., Nov. 19, 1862; Herman T., July 15, 1865; Bernice, Jan. 28, 1868, and Florence M., July 10, 1870. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McMicken, John
JOHN MC MICKEN, farmer; P.O. Aurora; the subject of this sketch was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, January, 1815, and is the son of William McMicken, a shoemaker by trade; he, with wife and four children, emigrated to America in 1843; came West same year to Milwaukee, Wis., then to Chicago, thence to Aurora, Ill.; he purchased 160 acres of Government land, at $1.25 per acre, situated on Sec. 6, Wheatland Tp., Will Co., in 1843; this is supposed to be the first entry of Government land in that part of Wheatland Tp. William McMicken married Grace McCracken, of Ayrshire, Scotland; both were members of the Union Presbyterian Church of Scotland, he being an Elder of the Church for a number of years; he died August, 1848, aged 65 years; she died in 1857, aged 73 years. Mr. John McMicken is, perhaps, one of the best know farmers of Wheaton (sic) Tp.; has held several offices of public trust; in 1857, he was elected Assessor of Wheatland Tp.; this office he filled until 1877; this year he was elected Supervisor of Wheatland Tp., which office he still holds; also, has been Justice of the Peace for the last twelve years; in all of these offices he has given entire satisfaction, having proved himself a gentleman of acknowledge ability, whose duties have been performed in a faithful manner. He is a Republican in politics. Mr. McMicken was married in 1852 to Miss J. Harvey, of Scotland, daughter of James Harvey. Owns 130 acres of fine, improved land.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

McQueen, Thomas
THOMAS MC QUEEN (McQueen & Morris), grocery and bakery, Wilmington; was born in the city of Paisley, Scotland, Sept. 12, 1841, but removed to this country in early childhood with his father's family; they settled in Fulton Co., N.Y., in 1842, where the subject of this sketch resided until 1861, then removed to Illinois, locating in Florence Tp., this county, and engaged in farming; served as Collector, Postmaster and School Director, one term each. On the 7th of August, 1862, he enlisted in Co. A, 100th Regt. I.V.I.; wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, Sept. 19, 1863, and discharged the following June, on account of gunshot wounds. Removed to Wilmington in 1872, and engaged in his present business. Married in 1870 to Miss Helen Corbett, who was born in Florence Tp., this county. Mr. McQueen is a member of Bowen Post, No. 17, G.A.R.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mead, John
JOHN MEAD, retired, Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in Saratoga Co., N.Y., Aug. 15, 1798; he married Mrs. Betsy Cagwell, formerly Miss Luce; she died April 11, 1866; they had two children - not living; his present wife was Miss Nancy Cox; they were married April 23, 1867; no children. He lived in New York seventeen years, and then went to Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1855, when he came West to Illinois, and settled in Will Co., and engaged in farming; in 1875, he sold his farm, and removed to the village of Elwood, and has lived here since.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Melville, Andrew
ANDREW MELVILLE, physician and surgeon, Peotone; born in Glasgow, Scotland, Jan. 2, 1840; when 5 years of age, he emigrated with his parents to Canada, where he lived until 17 years of age, engaged in his studies, when, in 1854, he commenced the study of medicine, which he pursued for three years in Canada; in 1857, he went to New York and finished his studies; in March, 1862, he engaged with the Allan line of steamers as Emigrant Surgeon, running between Glasgow, Scotland and New York, after which he went as Assistant Surgeon in the 79th Regt. of Highlanders from New York, remaining with the regiment eighteen months; on account of ill health he then resigned, returning to Canada; he graduated in June, 1864; then purchased in Prescott, Can., the drug jobbing business of his old preceptor, which he run for three years; then practiced medicine for three years in Traverse City, Mich., when he came to Peotone in 1870, where he has since followed his profession. He married June 13, 1866, Catherine Melville; they are the parents of three children - Frederick W.W., Andrew H. and Anna Bella. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Merrill, John W.
JOHN W. MERRILL, attorney, Wilmington; is the son of Moses Merrill, and was born in Rumney, N.H., Aug. 30, 1829; he received his education chiefly at Brooklyn Academy, Ohio, pursuing his classical studies, however, under his father's private tuition; concluding to make law his profession, he entered Judge Norton's office at Joliet in 1856, and after reading the usual length of time he was admitted to practice; his diploma, signed by Sidney Breese, Chief Justice of the State, is dated April 19, 1859; after spending a year or more in a real estate office in Chicago as an examiner of titles, etc., he returned to Wilmington, in this county, and opened an office, where he has continued to practice as an attorney up to the present time.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Merrill, Moses
MOSES MERRILL, farmer and local preacher; P.O. Wilmington; Mr. Merrill is a native of New Hampshire; he was born at Warren, in that State. Married his wife at Haverhill, and removed to Ohio in 1838, settling near Cleveland, at the village of Brooklyn; in early life, his plan was to enter the ministry; he commenced his course of education to that end; he fitted for Dartmouth College at Newbury, Vt., but a severe illness, long protracted, hindered his carrying out this idea; nevertheless, he pursued his classical studies, of which he was very fond, until he had read the whole college course; he has kept up his Greek to the present day, and now, at the age of 78, he reads it with as much ease and correctness as a college professor; at Brooklyn he established a school - Brooklyn Academy - of which he was Principal for several years, but his health failing him, he made up his mind to remove West and engage in farming; he came to this State in 1849, and settled at Riverside, his present place of residence, one mile below Wilmington.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Messenger, Horace
HORACE MESSENGER, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 33; P.O. Lockport; was born in Chenango Co., N.Y., April 26, 1807; he lived with his parents to the age of 20, farming, then farmed six years in Onondaga Co., N.Y., by the month; in 1834, he came to this county (then Cook) and made his claim; then returning to Onondaga County, married and returned with his wife in 1835, and worked and improved the farm upon which he has ever since resided, containing over four hundred acres; Mr. Messenger is one of the earliest settlers in the county. Has been Highway Commissioner, but, although repeatedly requested, steadily has refused to hold any other office. Married Miss Fanny Shead (daughter of Stephen Shead, Onondaga Co., N.Y.) in Onondaga Co., N.Y., in April, 1835; she was born in Vernon, N.Y., June 13, 1810; they had seven children, six living - Horace, born April 26, 1807 (sic); Fanny S., June 13, 1810 (sic); Mary Jane, Nov. 4, 1838; Francis Ann, March 18, 1840; Horace Isaac, Feb. 5, 1844, and Helen Louisa, April 18, 1847; one dead - William H., born Feb. 20, 1836, died April 4, 1839. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Metcalf, Frank H.
FRANK H. METCALF, farming and teaching; P.O. Plainfield; the above gentleman is a native of Ohio; he was born in Lake Co. Nov. 23, 1840. He married Miss Augusta Metcalf Nov. 20, 1864; she was born in Troy Tp., Will Co., Ill., June 21, 1837; they have two adopted children, viz., Frank W. and Flora Nillson. He lived in Ohio twenty-three years, and then came to his present place, engaging in farming and teaching; his early days were spent in the district school; at 18, he attended the Western Reserve Academy and Willoughby Collegiate Institute, and later he attended the Oberlin College. While at the latter place, he enlisted in the 100-day service, but was not in active service. He has eighty acres here which he has principally earned by his own labor. He has been principal of the Channahon and Oswego schools; for the past five years he has taught the district school near by.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Metcalf, S.W.
S.W. METCALF, farming and stock, Sec. 34; P.O. Plainfield; this gentleman was born in the village of Plainfield Sept. 16, 1835. He married Miss Sarah Billing July 4, 1869; she was born in England April 1, 1845. He lived but a short time in the village, when, with his parents, he moved out on the farm, and, in 1865, he came to his present place and has lived here since. His parents, Hardy and Mrs. Judith B. Russell Metcalf, were natives of New Hampshire and New York; they were married in New York Nov. 24, 1826; they came to Will Co. in 1835, and settled in Plainfield, engaged in farming; he died June 29, 1860; Mrs. Metcalf is living here on the old homestead with her daughter.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Metterhausen, Louis
LOUIS METTERHAUSEN, teacher, Beecher; proprietor of the Metterhausen Hotel; was born in Gilten, State of Hanover, Germany, Jan. 21, 1840; taught school in the above State and in the city of Bremen; came to the United States in 1865, landing at New York; followed his profession in the States till at last he located in Washington Tp. in 1869, at what is now known as Beecher; was its first Postmaster, conducting a general store at the same time, till 1875; since then he has followed his present vocation. Married Miss Mina Klusmeyer May 6, 1871; Carl, their oldest, was born April 6, 1872; Charlotte was born Feb. 9, 1876.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Miller, Capt. James
CAPT. JAMES MILLER, chief engineer of Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet; born in Glasgow, Scotland, March 11, 1826, where he learned and worked at the trade of machinist until 25 years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in Quebec in 1852, coming directly to Morris, Grundy Co., Ill., where he engaged in the foundry and machinist business during a period of ten years; in 1862, he raised a full company of 102 men for the war, which he took to Chicago, and after remaining the Camp Douglas three months, the regiment was mustered out of service, the several companies joining other regiments; Mr. Miller then enlisted in the U.S. navy as fireman, which position he held for three days, when he was appointed to Asst. Engineer, which office he held seven months, when he received his commission as Chief Engineer, and held this position for three years until the close of the war; Mr. M. then returned to Morris, and again engaged in the foundry and machinist business for a period of two years, when he was appointed, in 1867, as chief engineer of the Illinois State Penitentiary at Joliet, which office he still holds. He married in Scotland in 1852, to Miss Elizabeth A. Miller; she was born in Scotland in 1825; they are the parents of five children - James W., John Edwin, Frank, Margaret and Lillie.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Miller, John H.
JOHN H. MILLER, tonsorial artist, Lockport; was born in Norderdeich, Germany, Nov. 1, 1854; till he was 14 years of age he attended school most of the time in his native country; about the first of June, 1868, he immigrated with the family to America, his father settling in Lockport, Will Co., Ill.; immediately after coming, John entered the employ of Louis Braum to learn the trade of barbering; he remained with him about three and four years; he next worked for Henry Falkenhagen, of Lockport, and subsequently followed his trade in Joliet for some months; in February, 1874, he formed a copartnership with Louis Braum, and carried on the business in Lockport until the following September or October, when he bought out his partner's interest, and has since conducted the business alone; his shop is well located in the business part of town, complete in all its appointments; he is polite and obliging, always at his post, and for an easy shave or anything in his line of business, we commend you to John.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Miller, Simon
SIMON MILLER, general merchant and grain dealer, Monee; one of the early settlers; was born in Germany Oct. 9, 1834; came to the United States in 1849, and to this State in the same year; he has been a resident of Monee, Will Co., for the past thirteen years; his pursuits since his residence in the township have been that of a grain dealer and general merchant. He was married Jan. 19, 1856, to Miss Elizabeth Bepperling, who was born in New York Feb. 19, 1840; they have had five children, three of whom are living, viz., Mary, George S. and August C.; deceased, John and Charley. Mr. Miller is now holding the office of President of the Board of Trustees of the incorporated village of Monee.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Miller, Timothy L.
TIMOTHY L. MILLER, cattle-breeder; P.O. Beecher; Mr. Timothy L. Miller, Hereford cattle-breeder, was born in Middletown, Conn., April 7, 1817; moved to Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, in 1842, and engaged in the manufacture of paper; moved to Chicago in 1856, and engaged in the insurance business till 1870, when he moved to Washington Tp., where he now resides upon his stock-farm of about eight hundred acres and pursues the breeding of fine stock. The town of Beecher was laid out by him in the spring of 1870. He married Miss Abigail Starr Elliott March 2, 1842, in Middletown, Conn.; she was born at Gilead, Conn., Sept. 29, 1819, and died in Chicago, Feb. 14, 1858; they had five children, four living - Catharine E., born Oct. 6, 1843 (now Mrs. G.B. Woodward, of St. Paul, Minn.); Abby E. (now Mrs. Frank Gould, of Chicago) born April 12, 1846; Mary P., born Jan. 3, 1848 (now Mrs. A.C. Reed, of Evanston); Timothy E., born Sept. 23, 1850; one deceased - Henry Charles, born Feb. 7, 1858, died Jan. 3, 1861. Married second wife, Miss Anna E. Hodges, at Rockford, Ill., June 6, 1861; she was born at Clarendon, Vt., July 22, 1828; one child by her - Abby Hodges, born here July 16, 1865, died Aug. 2, 1865.[Source: The History of Will County, Illinois …Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Millspaugh, Isaac T.
ISAAC T. MILLSPAUGH, Police Magistrate, Joliet; was born in Orange Co., N.Y., Feb. 26, 1820; his parents died when he was about 15 years old, and he then went "out West" to Tompkins Co., N.Y.; he made his home there and in Cortland Co. until 1844, when he removed to Joliet; he followed his trade of a blacksmith for a year or more, and made the first steel plow in Joliet; he then went to Chicago and engaged as fireman on the old Chicago & Galena Union R.R. (now a branch of the Chicago & Northwestern), which extended at that time but eight miles west of Chicago; he fired the first locomotive on that road; about a year later, he returned to Joliet, and run one season on the packet from Chicago to Peru; he then became a fireman on the Chicago & Rock Island R.R., and run the first engine into Joliet, in 1852; he was the first blacksmith in the Chicago & Alton roundhouse, where he worked half a dozen years of more. He served for fourteen years as Assessor for Joliet Tp.; he was elected Police Magistrate in May, 1878. He was married in March, 1842, to Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Noyes, of Cortland Co., N.Y.; she died in 1846, leaving one son, Charles H., who served through the war as Drum Major of the 100th Ill. Vols., and is now a musician in Joliet. Mr. Millspaugh was married again, in July, 1852, to Miss Mary L. Roberts, of Joliet, formerly of Lockport, N.Y.; they have one son - Frank D., a fireman on the Michigan Central R.R.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Milne, Robert
ROBERT MILNE, farmer; P.O. Lockport; was born in Banffshire, Scotland, Feb. 14, 1805; in August, 1836, he immigrated to America and settled in Chicago, engaging in the lumber trade, buying out the first lumber merchant in Chicago; in the fall of 1839, he returned to Scotland, and came again to America in 1840; soon after his return, sold out his business in Chicago, and took contracts on the Illinois & Michigan Canal, building five of the locks; in 1846, settled in Lockport; here he remained till 1849, when he returned to Chicago, and engaged again in the lumber trade, a full partner in the firm of Milne, Fergueson & Co.; this firm established an agency at Lockport for the sale of lumber, buying the saw-mills formerly erected, and established a planing-mill in connection with them; in 1850, he returned to Lockport, and has resided here ever since; in 1854, he sold out his interest in the mills and lumber trade and purchased the farm on which he now resides. Was married in December, 1846, to Isabell Maitland, a native of Scotland; has nine children. In 1869, was appointed Canal Commissioner by Gov. Palmer and served four years; in 1874, revisited Scotland, and while there purchased some thoroughbred cattle, in the rearing of which he has since engaged. Owns 242 acres in Lockport Tp. and 100 acres in Homer Tp. Republican; Congregationalist. Mr. Milne is a very influential and deservedly popular citizen.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Minard, G.W.
G.W. MINARD, M.D., physician, Crete; this gentleman was born in Prattsville, Greene Co., N.Y., Aug. 16, 1825, and is the son of E.B. Minard, a farmer, who participated in the war of 1812. In 1841, Dr. Minard, with his parents, emigrated West to Illinois, and settled in Cook Co.; he first commenced the study of medicine in Crete under Dr. H. Hitchcock, now of Chicago, Ill.; he then entered the Indiana Medical College at La Porte, Ind.; here he received sufficient knowledge to commence the practice of medicine; he first located in Lake Co., Ind.; then, in 1849, he commenced the practice of medicine in Crete; here he has remained ever since; to-day is the oldest physician of Crete. He married Miss Melicent G. Brownell, of New York. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mitchell, Franklin
FRANKLIN MITCHELL, market gardener, Wilmington; was born in what is now Sullivan, then a part of Chester Co., N.H., Feb. 8, 1812, but removed when quite young to Windsor Co., Vt., where he resided until 1833; thence to Jefferson Co., N.Y.; in April, 1836, he removed to Illinois, locating at Joliet, where he engaged in the mercantile business, and, four years later, to Wilmington, continuing in the same business for one year, under the firm name of Mitchell & Rolfe; in 1841, he opened the Eagle Hotel, in a building on the corner where A.D. Wright's store now stands, and, in 1844, he erected a brick building for that purpose, which was the first hotel built in the city; this he occupied until 1862; owns sixty acres of land, valued at $1,800, and city property valued at $12,000; member of the Board of Town Trustees, in 1857; also served as County Commissioner some twelve years. Married in 1838, to Miss Hannah Poor, who was born in Jefferson Co., N.Y.; she died Jan. 15, 1847; four children by this union - William C., Mary A. (wife of Wm. H. Vaughn), and Carrie P. (wife of Thos. C. Linton), and Charles F., who enlisted in Co. A, 100th Regt. I.V.I., in August, 1862; commissioned Second Lieutenant Aug. 30, 1862, wounded at the battle of Stone River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862; died of wounds, Jan. 4, 1863. His second marriage was in 1850, to Miss Ann Van De Car, who was born in Canada; four children - Josephine (wife of John R. Getty), Louisa (wife of Frank Burnham), Fran D. and Georgiana. Mr. Mitchell is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, Wilmington Chapter, No. 142, and Joliet Commandery, No. 4.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moiller, John
JOHN MOILLER, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Germany Sept. 7, 1825; came to the United States in 1845, and to this State, and settled in Will Co.  in 1865; his farm consists of eighty acres valued at $4,000. He was married to Miss Anna Zentgrbe, who was born in Germany Sept. 7, 1829; they have had seven children, five of whom are living - William, John, George, Mary and Sophia; deceased, Jacob and Charles. Since his residence in the township, he has held the office of Road Commissioner three years.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Monroe, G. & Son
G. MONROE & SON, wholesale and retail grocers, Joliet; this is the largest grocery house in Will Co., doing a business of at least a quarter of a million dollars per annum; it was established in 1865; George Monroe, the senior member, was born in Jefferson Co., N.Y., April 4, 1821; he came to Will Co. in 1849, and spent thirteen years in farming in Florence Tp.; previously to this he had been engaged in the foundry business. He was elected Sheriff of Will Co. in 1862, and served two years; has also served one term as School Trustee, and one term on the Board of Aldermen. George H. Monroe, son of George Monroe, is also a native of Jefferson Co., N.Y., where he was born Sept. 24, 1844, and accompanied his parents to Will Co. in 1849. On the election of his father as Sheriff, in 1862, he entered the office as Deputy Sheriff, remaining two years. In 1865, he became a partner in the firm of G. Monroe & Son. He was married in May, 1869, to Miss Eva Weeks, of Joliet. In 1875, the Joliet Stone Company was organized, and Mr. Monroe, being one of the three equal stock-holders, was made President, which position he still holds; he is also Treasurer of the Joliet Opera House Company.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Monroe, George B.
, State Senator, was born in Jefferson County, N. Y., Sept. 24, 1844, and came with his parents to Illinois in 1849. His father having been elected Sheriff of Will County in 1864, he became a resident of Joliet, serving as a deputy in his father's office. In 1865 he engaged in merchandising as the partner of his father, which was exchanged, some fifteen years later, for the wholesale grocery trade, and, finally, for the real-estate and mortgage-loan business, in which he is still employed. He has also been extensively engaged in the stone business some twenty years, being a large stockholder in the Western Stone Company and Vice-President of the concern. In 1894 Mr. Monroe was elected, as a Republican, to the State Senate from the Twenty-fifth District, serving in the Thirty-ninth and Fortieth General Assemblies, and proving himself one of the most influential members of that body. ["Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois" Tr. by KT]

Monroe, George J.
GEORGE J. MONROE, attorney at law and financial agent, Joliet; was born in Baraboo, Sauk Co., Wis., Feb. 11, 1853; after receiving an English education in his native county, he entered Oberlin College, Ohio, at the age of 16 years, and after spending two years in that institution, became a student in the National Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio, graduating from the classical department in 1872; he had previously been engaged in teaching during his vacations, and after graduating he assumed charge of the public school at Marlboro, Stark Co., Ohio, remaining one year; he then spent about six months in traveling in the West, after which he began the study of law in the office of Sleeper & Whiton in Chicago, and also attended one course of lectures at the Union College of Law in that city; he was admitted to the bar Jan. 15, 1877, and practiced in Chicago until the fall of the same year; in March, 1878, he settled in Joliet, and entered upon the practice of his profession; in addition to his law practice, he does quite an extensive business in loaning money for Eastern capitalists. He was married Nov. 21, 1877, to Miss Addie P. Simonds, eldest daughter of S.O. Simonds, Esq., of Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Monteith, David R.
DAVID R. MONTEITH, Bogart & Monteith, Center Market, Wilmington; born in Watertown, Jefferson Co., N.Y., Oct. 26, 1836, but removed to Illinois in early childhood with his father's family, locating at Monteith's Grove, Florence Tp., this county, in 1840; his father superintended Gov. Matteson's woolen-mill at Joliet, for several years, but on account of failing health removed to Wilmington; the subject of this sketch made the overland journey to Montana in 1866, with the Montana Gold & Silver Mining Co. of Philadelphia; from Ft. Laramie they took the new route, called Boseman's Cut-off, 300 miles nearer than the old Salt Lake route, reaching Virginia City on the 4th of October; this route, though less in distance, was far more dangerous; Mr. M. acted as scout during the trip, having encounters with the Indians nearly every day; his letters to the Independent of April 3 and Sept. 25, 1867, give a full account of the trip and life in the mines during his stay; he visited mines in Washington Territory, Montana, Idaho, California and Utah, returning in 1869; owns 184 acres of land, valued at $7,200. Married in 1869, to Miss Sarah J. Bell, who was born in Ohio; three children by this union - Mamie, Fred and Ernest.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mooney, James W.
JAMES W. MOONEY, farmer, Sec. 32; P.O. Lockport; was born in Ulster Co., N.Y., Nov. 6, 1815, where he was engaged in farming, except four years, when he clerked in a grocery store; he came to this county in 1848, and first settled in Homer Tp.; in 1861, he moved, into Lockport Tp. and after remaining sixteen years, returned to Homer Tp., and for two years was engaged in boating on the Illinois & Michigan Canal, and now resides with his sons, John H. and Charles W., who work the Garden Farm in this township. Was Township Assessor and Highway Overseer in Lockport Tp. Married Lydia Ann Burt (daughter of Harlow and Hannah Burt, of Wayne Co., N.Y.) in Wayne Co., N.Y., Dec. 31, 1836; had eleven children - Jane M., born Aug. 16, 1839; Julia A., May 1, 1841; Francis, born Aug. 30, 1842, died Aug. 26, 1843; Charity, born Feb. 3, 1844, died March 4, 1849; Mary, born April 14, 1846; Helen, Aug. 24, 1847; John Henry, Dec. 30, 1849; Harriet Francelia, March 17, 1851; Lydia Josephine, Sept. 11, 1853; William Burt, April 7, 1855, died May 4, 1856, and Charles Wesley, born July 7, 1857. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois: Containing a History of the County ..." by Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mooney, William
WILLIAM MOONEY, attorney at law, Braidwood. This gentleman was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, July 18, 1841, and is the son of Thomas and Ann (Clark) Mooney, of Ireland; his father was a miner; when Mr. Mooney was but 9 years of age, he commenced to work in the coal mines; he followed mining while in Scotland; in 1865, he emigrated to America, landing in New York City; thence to Pennsylvania and Ohio; engaged in mining; in 1866, he came to Braidwood, Will Co., Ill., and commenced to work for the C. & W. Coal Co., mining. Mr. Mooney has held several offices of public trust; in 1870, was elected Justice of the Peace; in 1873, was elected to the Legislature, Twenty-ninth General Assembly (elected on the Independent ticket); in 1877, was elected City Attorney; this office he still holds; in these offices Mr. Mooney has acquitted himself in a very creditable and efficient manner; was admitted to the bar to practice law by the Supreme Court of Illinois in 1875. Married in 1876 to Miss Kitty O'Connor, of Illinois; have one child.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moore, William F.
WILLIAM F. MOORE, farmer, Sec. 34; P.O. Elwood; the subject of this sketch was born in the town of Channahon, Will Co., Ill., March 6, 1841; he married Miss Mary Schoonmaker Nov. 20, 1862; she was born in Rochester, N.Y., and died July 29, 1866; his second wife was Miss Almira Spencer, married May 13, 1872; she was born in Troy Tp., this county; he has one child living, by his first wife, viz., Lotta, and two by his present wife, viz., Mary Jane and Laura May; he has always lived in this county, except one year that he lived in McLean Co.; he came to his present place March 29, 1864; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns 160 acres in this township.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moran, Thomas F.
THOMAS F. MORAN, assistant superintendent of the Joliet Gas Works; born in the county of Roscommon, Ireland, in 1832, where he lived until 18 years of age, when he emigrated to America, landing in New York Jan. 9, 1851, going directly to Frostburg, Md.; he was engaged in the mining business for two years; from there he went to Philadelphia, where he was engaged in the Northern Liberty Gas Works for eight years, when, in 1861, he was called to fill the office of Assistant Superintendent of the Joliet Gas Works, which position he has since held during a period of seventeen years. He married in Philadelphia in 1853 to Mary Brannan; she was born in Philadelphia; they have six children now living, viz.: Edward V., Mary, Michael J., Agnes, Catharine and Joseph L. Mr. Moran has held the office of Alderman in the ward in which he lives in Joliet.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Morey, S.R.
S.R. MOREY, farmer, Sec. 17; P.O. Wilmington; owns eighty acres, valued at $40 per acre. Has held the offices of Township Clerk, School Treasurer and Road Overseer. Born May 7, 1830, in Clearfield (now Elk) Co., Pa.; came to Will Co., with his father's family Dec. 31, 1847. Married Louisa H. Smith in Oswego Tp., Kendall Co., Ill., Jan. 3, 1861; she was born March 15, 1840, in Connecticut, and came to Kane Co., Ill., with her parents in 1852; thence to Kendall Co. in 1853; four children - Emeline, Grace, Horace and Selah. His two brothers, Vinal and Charles, enlisted in the late rebellion in 1862; Vinal, in the 88th I.V.I., was in the service until the close of the war, and Charles, in the 100th I.V.I., was in the service until 1864, at which time he was discharged, on account of sickness; he died at home Nov. 4, 1865; Oscar also enlisted Feb. 24, 1864, and served until December, 1865, at which date he was discharged.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Morgan, Benjamin F.
BENJAMIN F. MORGAN, farmer; P.O. Wilmington; this gentleman is one of the old settlers of Wesley Tp.; was born in Herkimer Co., N.Y., April 2, 1811, and is the son of Ebenezer and Hannah (Chapman) Morgan; father, from Massachusetts; was engaged in farming and stock-raising; mother, from New York, who died when Mr. Morgan was very young; his father remarried; he moved to Chautauqua Co., N.Y.; here Mr. Morgan remained until 1840; Aug. 12, 1840 he married Miss Elizabeth J. Sternburg, of New York; started West to Illinois; arrived and settled in Wesley Tp., Nov. 12, 1840; when he first came here, the country was very wild; set out and made all the improvements on his farm, which to day is one of the finest improved farms of Wesley Tp.; he owns 200 acres of land that were made by hard labor and good management; Mr. Morgan's first wife died; he then married Miss Betsey E. Gould in Oct., 1861, who was born in Ohio about 1841, and is the daughter of James and Lydia Gould. Mr. Morgan has held several offices of public trust. Republican in politics. Five children; Erie F. was in the war, 100th I.V.I., but on the account of disability, was honorably discharged; Philip C., Irwin C., (Sidney S., deceased), and Mary E.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Morgan Bros
MORGAN BROS., farming and stock, Sec. 31; P.O. Elwood; William and Sidney, were born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., where they lived until 1849, when they came to Illinois with their parents, who settled in Kendall Co., where they remained about four years, and then came to Will Co.; and in 1855, they came to the present place. Mr. William R. married Miss Morriah Ellenwood Dec. 27, 1876; she was born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., Nov. 10, 1853; they have one child, viz., Eliza A. Mr. Moses Morgan, deceased, was born in Vermont, Aug. 11, 1815, and died Aug. 20, 1877. He married Miss Eliza Ann Storrs Jan. 9, 1840; she was born in Upper Canada; they had five children, four living, viz., William, Sidney, Lucy E. and Emily C.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moris, David
DAVID MORIS, dry goods merchant, Braidwood; the subject of this sketch is one of the prominent merchants of Braidwood; was born in North Wales in March, 1832, and is the son of Robert and Kittie Arther (Williams) Moris; his father was a coal mine manager; when Mr. Moris was but 9 years of age, he entered the coal mines and engaged in mining while in North Wales; June 25, 1860, in company with Thomas Radford, left Liverpool for America; landed in New York City; his first work in America was on Monongahela River, in mining coal one season; then to Palestine, Ohio; thence to Illinois, to LaSalle County; thence to Morris, Grundy County; was engaged by Nicholas Cotton in the coal mining business; he leased, for ten years, a piece of coal land; here he sunk the first coal shaft on the C., A. & St. L. R.R., located near Braceville station; he then was engaged by a company to sink two shafts; one of them was in Reed Township, Will County, and was the first coal shaft sunk in Reed Township; was engaged in overseeing the Braceville coal shaft; he then entered a mining company composed of miners, known as the Joint Stock Coal Mining Company of Gardner. This company was engaged in sinking a coal shaft at Gardner; struck a large flow of water. After spending $25,000, they abandoned it. He then returned to Braceville; thence with Odell & Cady, drilling for coal; Mr. Moris is one of the oldest and best posted coal miners in this vicinity; Nov. 10, 1873, he entered the dry goods business; this business he has followed ever since. Married Jan. 18, 1862, to Miss Eliza Jane Murphy, of New York, by whom he has had six children, two living. Father died in 1867; mother lives in North Wales.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Morrison, David
DAVID MORRISON, farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Peotone; born in County Moneghan, Ireland, April 15, 1831, where he lived until 20 years of age, attending school until 18 years of age, then engaged in farming two years, when he came to America, landing in New York May 12, 1851, where he lived four years, engaged in mercantile pursuits; then to New Jersey, as attendant in the New Jersey State Lunatic Asylum for two years; he emigrated to Illinois in April, 1857, and located in Carroll Co., where he farmed a summer and taught school in winter for a period of six years; he removed to Peotone Tp., Will Co., May, 1863; he owns 283 acres of well-improved land, valued at $40 per acre, which he has secured by his own hard labor and industry. He married March 30, 1857, Matilda Duncan; she was born in Antrim Co., Ireland, Feb. 6, 1835, and emigrated to this country in 1847. They have four children by this union, viz., William A., George A., David H. and Mary E. Mr. Morrison held the office of Assessor for three years in Carroll Co.; has held the following offices in Will Co., viz., Justice of the Peace, which he now holds and has held for nine years; School Director for nine years, and other offices at different times. He has taught school three terms while living in this township. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mottinger, John
JOHN MOTTINGER, retired; P.O. Plainfield; the above gentleman was born in Pennsylvania, May 8, 1799. He married Miss Barbara Long; she was born in Pennsylvania; they have ten children, viz., Susanna, Elizabeth, Mary Ann, Joseph, Leah, Anna C., Sarah, Lena, Rebecca, Samuel and Daniel. He lived in Pennsylvania until he was 13, when he went to Ohio with his parents, where his father died; he then went to Illinois and settled in Will Co., engaging in farming; all his children are married; his parents George and Mrs. Elizabeth Lashbaugh Mottinger, both died in Ohio; they were natives of Pennsylvania.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moulton, H.F.
H.F. MOULTON, conductor C., A. & St. L. R.R., Wilmington; was born near Portland, Me., Feb. 4, 1830; when about 15 years of age, he left his native State and went to Massachusetts, where he was employed for several years in the factories at Lowell and Lawrence; in 1853, he removed to Illinois, locating at Bloomington, McLean Co., and on the 1st of August of the following year, engaged as brakeman on the Chicago & Alton R.R., which was put in operation that season; in the spring of 1855, he took charge of a freight train, as conductor, and in February, 1861, was transferred to a passenger train, which position he has held for over seventeen years, without loss of time, and is now the oldest in the service of any conductor on the road. Married in 1856 to Miss Josephine Connor, who was born in New York City; four children by this union - Belle, Jennie, Charles and Harry. Mr. Moulton is a member of the following Masonic bodies: Wilmington Lodge, No. 208, Joliet Chapter, No. 27 and Joliet Commandery, No. 4. His longest absence from service on the railroad was during his trip to England, from June to September, 1877.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moyer, M.E.
M.E. MOYER, farming, Sec. 19; P.O. Joliet; was born in Cumberland Co., Penn., Nov. 18, 1829. He married Miss Abbie F. Neitz Sept. 29, 1859; she was born in Lehigh Co., Penn., Nov. 21, 1836; they had five children, three living, viz., Priscilla S., Clara M. and Addie F. He lived in Pennsylvania until 1847, when he came to Illinois and settled in Naperville, where he remained about nineteen years, being engaged in farming and brick-making; in 1866, he came to his present place, and has lived here ever since carrying on the farm.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Moyer, Michael
MICHAEL MOYER, farming, Sec. 22; P. O. Joliet; was born in Lebanon Co., Penn., July 10, 1803. He married Miss Sarah Erb April, 1828; she was born in Lancaster Co., Penn.; they had four children, three living, viz., Henry, George L. and Michael, Jr. He lived in Pennsylvania until 1845; was engaged in farming; he then moved to Dayton, Ohio, where he remained four months; he then came to Illinois and settled in Du Page Co.; engaged in farming, and remained there nine years; and then he came to Will Co. and settled on his present place; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns 120 acres, well improved.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Mueller, Jacob
JACOB MUELLER, general merchant, Frankfort Station; was born in Germany June 19, 1821; came to the United States in 1855, and to this State in 1856, and settled in Will Co.; he has been a resident of Frankfort for the past nine years; since his residence in this township he has held the office of School Director three years. He was married to Miss Catharina Sheer; they have had seven children, four of whom are now living, viz., Minnie, John, Ella and George; deceased, Louisa, Daniel and Julia.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Muff, Martin
MARTIN MUFF, proprietor of sample rooms and meat market, Frankfort Station; was born in Germany May 8, 1834; came to the United States in 1852, and settled in the township of Frankfort; followed farming here until 1863. In 1873, was elected President of the Frankfort Germania Saengerbund, which received its certificate, duly signed and acknowledged, having been filed in the office of the Secretary of State June 22, 1875, for the legal organization of said society; the property vested in this society, and of which Mr. Muff is President, consists of a hall located in the village of Frankfort, and three acres of land, situated in the same township. Mr. Muff was married to Miss Maria Haen; they have had eleven children, eight of whom are living, viz., Jacob, Caroline, Theresa, Henry, Emma, Fred, August and Albert; deceased - George and Charlotte, twins, and Henrietta. He has held office of Constable six years; his term for the same expires in April, 1880.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Muller, Fred.
FRED. MULLER, miller, Lockport; was born in Prussia, Germany, Aug. 16, 1827; he immigrated to America in 1854, and stopped first in Chicago, but soon came to Lockport, and was employed at general work one year; in 1855, he engaged in work for Norton & Co.; in 1859, he went to St. Louis, where he worked at gardening. When the first call was made for troops he enlisted May 8, 1861, in Co. H, 5th Regt. Mo. V.I., and served three and a half months; participated in the battle of Wilson's Creek, Mo., in which Gen. Lyon was killed; returning, he remained a short time in St. Louis, and then came again to Lockport; he worked for Norton & Co. a second time until June, 1874, when he leased the old mill, now owned by Dr. J.F. Daggett, which he is now operating. In the fall of 1863, he was drafted, but employed a substitute. He was married Nov. 10, 1865, to Elizabeth Brinkey, a native of Bohemia; has five children - Elizabeth, William, Mary, John, August. He is familiarly known as Honest Fred, the miller on the Des Plaines.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Muller, Gallus
GALLUS MULLER, chief clerk of the Illinois State Penitentiary, Joliet; born in Switzerland, Canton of St. Gall (Wyl), June 12, 1841; after a collegiate education in St. Gall and Lucerne, he entered the University of Munich, Bavaria, in 1860, and attended here one year; the next two years were passed in Turin, Italy, when he emigrated to America in 1863, landing in New York upon the 20th of December; coming directly to Chicago, he soon thereafter engaged in the music business, which he followed until 1870, when he came to Joliet as book-keeper for the Illinois State Penitentiary; after working a short time in this capacity, he was appointed chief clerk, and has held this office since that date, during a period of eight years, and under five different administrations. He was married in Chicago, in 1866, to Miss Marie De Hez; they are the parents of four children, viz., Alice, M. Pia, Walter and Ida.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Munch, F.
F. MUNCH, dealer in coal, wood, coke, etc., Joliet; is a son of F.X. Munch, who came to this country from Alsace, settling in Will Co., in 1839; he served as a soldier in the war with Mexico, and is now a highly respected citizen of Joliet Tp.; his son, F. Munch, was born in Joliet Tp., April 3, 1851, and remained at home until he was nineteen years of age, and then spent two summers in working near Minooka; in 1873, he came to Joliet City, and spent two years in the employ of J.Q.A. King, starting in business for himself in 1875. He was married Nov. 16, 1876, to Miss Jennie Hurley, daughter of William Hurley, of Minooka; they have one child - Louis I.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Munn, C.W.
C.W. MUNN, of Munn & Munn, attorneys at law, Joliet; was born in Waterloo, Wis., Dec. 30, 1848; he is the son of Col. S.W. Munn, the senior member of the firm; in early childhood, he accompanied his parents to Columbus, Wis.; thence to Madison, Lake Co., Ohio, where the family resided until March, 1854, and then removed to Wilmington, Will Co., Ill., coming to Joliet in March, 1864; after receiving an English education, Mr. Munn entered the law department of the Michigan University, at Ann Arbor, Mich., where he graduated March 29, 1871; he had previously read law in his father's office, and was admitted to the bar Aug. 13, 1870; he began practice in Joliet in April, 1871, and Dec. 1, 1872, formed a partnership with his father, which still continues. He was married in December, 1871, to Miss Helen C. Matthews, of Joliet; she died Sept. 16, 1872, leaving one child - Helen I.; he was married again Jan. 19, 1876, to Miss Lida M. Squier, of Livingston, Essex Co., N.Y., they have one child - Lulu L.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Munn, S.W.
COL. S.W. MUNN, attorney at law, Joliet; was born in St. Lawrence Co., N.Y., May 14, 1824; his father was poor and unable to assist him in obtaining an education, and he was, therefore, obliged to depend upon his own exertions for what learning he received; he worked on a farm for $8 per month, for nine months, attending a district school during the remaining three months; thus he worked two years for one man; he also spent six months at a seminary in his native county; in 1845, he left home on foot, with carpet-bag in hand and $30 in his pocket, and went to Ashtabula Co., Ohio, where he engaged in teaching and attending school at Grand River Institute, a Presbyterian manual-labor school, where he could pay his way by his industry; here he remained three years, in the mean time reading thoroughly a few of the elementary works on law. In 1848, he married Miss Imogene Mixer and removed to Wisconsin, where he completed his law studies and was admitted to the bar and began practice in 1850; in September of the same year his wife died, leaving one child - Charles W., who is now engaged in practice with his father in Joliet; in 1852, he went to California, and engaged in mining and surveying for the Government; returning, he located in Wilmington, Ill., and resumed the practice of his profession. In August, 1861, he raised a company of volunteers in Wilmington, of which he was commissioned Captain, and which was mustered in as Co. A, of the 39th I.V.I.; in December, 1862, he was promoted to Major, and served till January, 1863, when he was compelled by failing health to resign; he participated in the campaign of 1862, in the Shenandoah Valley, including the battle of Winchester, then under Gen. McClellan until the army left Harrison's Landing, in August, 1862, when his Division was ordered to Suffolk, Va., where it remained until he resigned. On his return to Wilmington, he was elected Prosecuting Attorney for the then Ninth Judicial Circuit, serving four years; in the spring of 1865, he removed to Joliet, where he has since been engaged in general practice of law, and in November last was elected as Representative to the Legislature; he served for a time on Governor Cullom's Staff, with the rank of Colonel. Col. Munn was married in 1851, to Miss A.O. Crocker, of Madison, Ohio; they have two children - Minnie I. (wife of R.A. Chapin, of Colo.) and Frank E., a law student in Geneva, Ohio.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Murdie, Andrew
ANDREW MURDIE, farmer and stock-raiser; P.O. Frankfort Station; one of our early settlers; was born in Scotland, A.D. 1837; came to the United States in 1857, and to this State, and settled in Greengarden, Will Co., in 1861; his farm consists of eighty acres, valued at $4,000; it is situated on Sec. 29, Greengarden Tp. He was married July 11, 1865, to Miss Elizabeth Scott, who was born in England, A.D. 1839; they have had seven children, five of whom are living - William, Robert, Nettie, Emma and Alfred C.; deceased, Harriet E. and Albert Henry. Mr. Murdie, since his residence in the township, has held the office of School Director nine years; he is now Township Clerk.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Murphy, David G.
DAVID G. MURPHY, firm of Murphy Brothers, livery and feed stable, Joliet; is a native of County Roscommon, Ireland; he was born Jan. 14, 1844; his father, P.F. Murphy, came to this country in 1850, settling in the town of Troy, where he was a prominent and respected citizen for twenty-seven years; he died in 1877, at the age of 92 years; the family consisted of fourteen children, nine brothers and five sisters, eight of whom are living; David G. resided in Troy until March, 1874; followed farming, and represented his township in the County Board of Supervisors for three years; on coming to Joliet, he engaged with Francis Murphy in his present business. In 1876, he was elected Supervisor in Joliet by a very large majority, but declined to serve. He was married June 10, 1868, to Miss Mary McGuire, of Lockport, Ill., and has five children - Catherine F., Mary Alice, Thomas B., Winnifred A. and Angela A. Mr. Murphy's brother, Father Thomas B. Murphy, late Pastor of St. Mary's Church, in this city, died April 10, 1878; he was a gentleman universally respected and beloved, not only by the members of his congregation, but by the entire population of the city and county.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Murphy, Francis B.
FRANCIS B. MURPHY, farming, Sec. 13; P.O. Joliet; the subject of this sketch was born in Roscommon Co., Ireland, April 10, 1833. He married Miss Mary E. Brock Nov. 14, 1864; she was born in Chicago, Ill., Feb. 13, 1845; they have six children, viz., Patrick, Catheron A., Mary, Francis B., Thomas W. and Margaret E. He lived in Ireland until 1850, when, with his parents, he came to the United States and settled in this township, where he lived until 1855, when he went to California, remaining there three years, engaged in mining; he then went to British Columbia, and returned the same year to California and remained there until December, 1867, when he returned to Will Co., Ill., spending a few months in Troy Tp.; he then went to Reed Tp. and engaged in farming; remained three years, when he returned to Trop Tp., and has lived here since; he settled on his present place in 1875; he has held the offices of School Director, Collector and Town Clerk; he started in poor circumstances and now owns eighty acres which he has earned by his own labor. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Murphy, James
JAMES MURPHY, farmer, Sec. 8; P.O. Joliet; the above gentleman is a native of Roscommon Co., Ireland; he was born July 25, 1834, and married Miss Mary Ann Rourke Aug. 13, 1859; she is a native of the same place, and was born Aug. 15, 1841; they had ten children, seven living, viz., Mary E., William J., Patrick A., Thomas F., Thresa A., John A. and Mary H. He lived in Ireland until 1850, when he came to the United States with his parents, Patrick Murphy and Mrs. Catheron (Haley) Murphy, who settled in this township, where they engaged in farming; his father died in Joliet Nov. 15, 1877, and his mother died in this township in August, 1867; he started in poor circumstances, and now owns 160 acres in this township. He has held the offices of Collector two years and Assessor some seven or eight years; also School Treasurer. [Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]

Myers, William S.
WILLIAM S. MYERS, attorney at law, Lockport; was born in Rensselaer Co., N.Y., Oct. 29, 1815; in 1818, his father moved to Lewis Co., N.Y.; in May, 1841, he left home and came to Lockport, Ill., entering the employ of H. Norton as clerk in his general merchandise establishment; the spring of 1844, he went into business for himself; in the fall of 1859, he left the counting-room, and in March, 1861, went to St. Louis as the representative of the American Wine Company, where he remained until July, 1865; largely through his influence and good management, the goods were placed upon the market, and the business established a sound basis; after his return, he began dealing extensively in real estate, and was admitted to the bar March 18, 1869. He was married Sept. 28, 1843, to Gertrude Norton, a native of New York; has had two children; both died in infancy. Republican; Episcopalian. Has held the office of Justice of the Peace seven years, and has held the office of Township Assessor. Mr. Myers does a large business in collections of every kind; he is one of the solid business men of the town.[Source: "The History of Will County, Illinois..."; Wm. LeBaron, Jr., & Co., 1878. Tr. by K. Mohler]



 

BACK -- HOME

©Genealogy Trails