Health & Injuries

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Deaths Report Two Flu Deaths Two Victims Succumb to Ravages of Dread Epidemic

Although the ban has been lifted and all restrictions taken off the public, and the authorities declare they have practically stamped out the epidemic of influenza two more fatalities from the dread disease have been recorded today This does not indicate, however that there is a comeback of the epidemic the deaths today being from those cases contracted while the epidemic was at its height.

Mrs. June Lepper age 22 wife of William B Lepper 2113 Bowser avenue died last night at 6:16 o'clock at the St Joseph hospital after a few days illness Mrs. Lepper was a life long resident of Fort Wayne and had a large circle of friends who will mourn her loss. Surviving besides the husband are the parents Mr. and Mrs. George. F Keller and the following brothers and sisters Mrs. Leona Bender, Mrs. Gertrude Sowers, Mrs. Anna Jinkerson, Foster A Keller. Wayne C and Miss Elsie Keller all living in Fort Wayne The remains have been removed to the home of the parents from where the funeral will be held at an hour to be announced later.

The second fatality is that of Mrs. Salorma Cattlet 4112 South Harrison street, mother of Dr. M. R Cattlet who in serving with the American Army overseas who passed away yesterday after a complication of illness aggravated by an attack of influenza. A brother Robert Fisher of south Whitley arrived in the city yesterday to take charge of the body and only he and the son survive.

Funeral services will be held from the residence Friday morning at 10 o'clock following which the remains will be shipped to South Whitley where short services will be held at the home of the brother interment will take place in the cemetery at South Whitley.

Date: Thursday, January 2, 1919 Paper: Fort Wayne News Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Volume: LXXXVI Issue: 93 Section: Editorial and State News Section Page: 12 [Transcribed and submitted by Friends for Free Genealogy]

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Inquests into Five Deaths Coroner to Finish Investigations next Week Date: Thursday, April 14, 1921

Inquests into the deaths of five men will be completed the first of next week by coroner C. ? Rothschild. The deaths under investigation are: William A. Aiken died of injuries received when struck by an automobile April 1 Robert Eiter lineman electrocuted April 1 Israel Dvall barber electrocuted in his garage March 27, James Huff and John Muller found dead

Mr. Aiken was struck by an automobile operated by Harry Lockwood and died the day after. Eiter an employee of the city light department, fatally injured while working on a pole. Huff and Muller were found dead on farms in the county In case the coroner finds anyone to blame for any of these deaths he will notify the prosecutor to take action.

Paper: Fort Wayne News Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Section: Second Section Page: 19 Piece: One of Two

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FORTY-SIX CONTAGION CASES FOR SEPTEMBER

Disease Record of Month is Much Ahead of Former Years.
Epidemics of diphtheria and scarlet fever, which have shown themselves in every city school, has caused the month of September to register a list of contagion reports ahead of any like period of the same month in the past five years.

Forty-six contagion cases were registered at the health board office during the month. Diphtheria claimed twenty-nine of the disease victims and scarlet fever caused seventeen of the reports.

During September 1916 there were but three reports of contagion. One of those was for diphtheria. In 1915 there were eleven disease reports, with eight cases of diphtheria.

The health board is making every effort to check the spread of the fever and throat ailments. Examinations have beer, made in all city schools to learn which of the boys and girls are afflicted with symptoms of the ailments and to have the sick pupils quarantined.

Four cases of illness were reported on Saturday. The reports were for
Bonnie Miller, 116 Brackenridge street. aged seven, pupil in the Jefferson school, diphtheria
F. AV. Cannon, 2016 Weisser Park avenue, aged thirty-two and
Catherine Carmen, 2016 Weisser Park avenue, aged eight, smallpox,
and Helen Lanaster. 1711 East Pontiac street. James H. Smart school pupil, diphtheria.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel Sat. Sept 29, 1917

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A Year of Violent Deaths Eighty-Four Lives Snuffed out Suddenly during 1917 Fifteen Suicides and Two Murders Mark Year- both Murders Escape Law

The 1917, according to the complete, report of Dr. J. E. McArdle was a productive one for violent deaths. Eighty four lives were snuffed out by violent means, there being sixty six accidental deaths fifteen suicides two murder and one due to alcoholism.

In the list of accidental deaths the railroads have a big lead having caused twenty deaths. Falls come next claiming eight victims, and automobiles and motorcycles together claimed nine. Of these nine, six were stuck and three were in cars or on machines.

During the Year the water claimed five victims, electricity and shotguns each claimed two and two men died from accidents in local shops.

Four children were suffocated in bed and one choked to death, while still another lad was crushed beneath the wheels of a farm machine.

Hot water, steam and hot grease claimed four victims, while fire took toll of one life. One man was killed by ammonia fumes, one by lightning one in a sewer cave-in and one in an explosion, One man as killed while inhaling chloroform to ease pain. A woman was killed in a street car riot.

Small accidents claimed one life when a case of tetanus developed from a slight injury caused by a splinter piercing a man's finger.

Alcohol took only one victim directly, one man going to his death from acute alcoholism.

Fifteen Suicides

Fifteen people during 1917 ended their own life. Guns were the favorite method, five deaths being caused by self-inflicted gunshot wounds. Hanging and carbolic acid came next with three deaths each, while two people ended their existence by inhaling gas.

Dichloride of mercury despite the number of people who tried to end their life by its use, caused only one death, while arsenic claimed another

Two Murders

The first case investigated by the coroner in 1917 was that of Joe Parrant shot to death in the Catty grocery on January 31. The man who fired the shot has not yet been apprehended although a number of suspects were held and later released.

Dorothy Quann, negress was shot to death in a house on the jail flats by George Cooper, negro, who then turned the gun on himself and ended his life being the second murder of the year to escape the action of the law

Date: Tuesday, January 15, 1918 Paper: Fort Wayne News Sentinel (Fort Wayne, Indiana) Page: 13 Transcribed and submitted by Friends for Free Genealogy

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WAS NOT CURED

Last night George W. Knoder, of 1001 Maumee avenue, was brought back from the Richmond insane asylum by his son. He was sent to February. He seemed to have recovered, but the attendants did not want him released just yet. Mrs. Knoder wanted to care for him at home. This morning he fled from the house and began acting strangely. He wanted his whole family arrested and called at the police station. He was so boisterous that he was at once locked up. It is believed that he will have to be taken back to the institution.

The Fort Wayne News Thurs. May 8 1902

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NEW MARK IN DIPTHERIA

Thirty-four Cases Reported Already This Month
Fort Wayne during the month ofSeptember has had more cases of diphtheria than it had in the corresponding months for the last two years put together. There have been thirty four cases of the disease reported to the health office already this morning while in September. 1912, but eight cases were reported and in September, 1911 thirteen cases. The department has ordered all cases of absence from school investigated with a view to unearthing incipient cases of the disease and other precautions to prevent a further spread are being observed. This morning cases were reported in the Cole family, 525 Edgewater avenue, and at 711 Prospect avenue.

The city, however, has been remarkably free from typhoid fever during the year of 1913 as but thirty-nine cases have been reported since Jan.1 and this includes fifteen or more that were brought here from other places some even outside the county. In view of the fact that during nine months but thirty-nine cases were reported in a community of 80,000 people is occasioning the department no little satisfaction. The floods last March were followed in many communities by epidemics of typhoid but in Fort Wayne not more than two cases-could be directly ascribed to the future conditions incident to the flood

The Fort Wayne Daily News Sept. 29, 1913

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Many Pneumonia Victims

One person of every five who died in Fort Wayne last year succumbed to attacks of pneumonia, the continued record of vital statistics shows.

Mortality record shows the death of 527 men and 446 women during 1916. Of that number of men and women, 362 were single, 397 married, 8 divorced and 203 widowed. Nationalities, stated on the death reports, gives Germans, 125; Irish, 12; English, 23; French. 13, and native Indiana citizens, 526.

The health board will be able to turn back $246.60 of its annual appropriation, the record will state.

Strict economy has been practiced in every division of the health department despite the fact that marvelous strides In sanitation and health have been made.

The Fort Wayne Sentinel March 6, 1917

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  • Mr Francis Burgess, of West Jefferson street, is confined to his bed on account of an injury to his foot, received by a fall on a slippery sidewalk
  • Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning; pg 1

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  • —Miss Bertha Fremion, daughter of L Fremion, who was operated upon at Hope hospital for appendicities, has passed the danger period and is rapidly convalescing
  • [page 4; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mr Robert Cook, a clerk at the Lehman clothing house, was rund down by a cab, while returning from the polo game last night and badly bruised. Mr Cook had stepped from the street car track to allow a car to pass and he walked directly in front of the cab. He was removed to his home 212 West Lewis street in the police ambulance.
  • [page 4; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mrs. Theodore Hahn, of 517 Washington boulevard, is very ill
  • [page 7; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mrs Charles J. Rulo, wife of the city detective, is confined to her home by an attack of grip.
  • [page 7; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mr James J Hayes, of the Hayes hotel, is able to be at his desk again after a severe illness.
  • [page 7; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Miss Lulu Wright, who makes her home with her aunt, Mrs. John Denzel, of 1107 East Wayne street, is critically ill at St. Joseph's hospital and it is fewared she cannot recover. On Thursday night she underwent a surgical operation, the second within several months.
  • [page 7; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Miss Grace Walter was operated upon by Dr. Potter yesterday for appendicitis. Her condition last night was favorable.
  • [page 7; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mr Calvin J Winch, who has been suffering from the grip for two weeks, now has stomach trouble and is in a serious condition.
  • [page 7; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Edward Ryan, a young son of John A Ryan, of Arcola, has been taken to St Joseph's hospital for treatment for pneumonia.
  • [page 11; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —The condition of Judge Walpole Colerick, who sustained a fracture of one of his legs in a fall at Green Springs, O., Wednesday night, is reported as improved.
  • [page 11; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mr Gottlieb C Thieme, the well known tailor, is critically ill of Bright's disease at his apartments,over the Gross drug store. His brother, the Rev Thieme, of South Bend, has been called to his bedside.
  • [page 11; Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, Feb 25 1905, Saturday Morning]

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  • —Mrs. Blanch Well of Chicago spent Sunday here at the bedside of her mother Mrs. Amelia Taylor who has been ill the past few weeks. Mr and Mrs. Addie Hecker were afternoon callers.
  • Monroeville Breeze (Monroeville, Indiana) 23 May 1940 Thurs, Pg8

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  • Charles Shifferly has been confined to his home with illness the past week.
  • Monroeville Breeze (Monroeville, Indiana) 23 May 1940 Thurs, Pg4

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  • Isaac Taylor, is reported seriously ill at her hofe[sic] on Monroe street.
  • Monroeville Breeze (Monroeville, Indiana) 23 May 1940 Thurs, Pg4

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Diphtheria

Oscar Rodewald, 1307 Scott avenue, suffers from attack of diphtheria, health board has been notified

The Fort Wayne Sentinel March 6, 1917

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Fort Wayne, Indiana July 11, 1879 The terrible heat produced three sun strokes today, one of which, that of a boy named Filson, will probably produce death. The other cases will recover Filson is at City Hospital.

Paper: Worcester Daily Spy; Date: 02-90-1882

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The family of August Yaeger of Fort Wayne, Ind., five in all, were found Wednesday in great agony from trichinosis, caused by eating raw ham. It is not thought possible for the children to recover.

(Contributed by Anna Newell)

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