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Cass County, Indiana
Biographical Sketches


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DEER CREEK TOWNSHIP BIOGRAPHICAL, SKETCHES.

ANDREW CALDWELL, an enterprising and progressive farmer, is a native of Ireland, where he was born in February, 1827. His parents were William and Margaret Caldwell, natives of Ireland ; the former of Irish, and the latter of Scotch descent. They lived and died in Ireland. Andrew resided in Ireland until he was twenty-five years of age, attending the schools and receiving a fair education. In April, 1852, he sailed for America and landed in Philadelphia, and began work on a farm in Pennsylvania; here he remained three years, when he immigrated to Preble County, Ohio, in 1855. and engaged in farm work; here, March 9, 1805, he was united in marriage with Lizzie Garner, daughter of John and Fanny Garner, of Union County, this State. Lizzie was born August 29, 1842. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell had born to them five children: James, Fanny M., Annie, Sarah E. and Henry V.—Annie and Sarah E. deceased. Mr. Caldwell now owns a fine improved farm of 80 acres, in Section 8, upon which he has resided since the spring of 1869.

BENJAMIN F. BIRD is a native of Decatur County, Ind.; was born July 14, 1828. His parents were William and Maria (Dent) Bird, natives, respectively, of Kentucky and Virginia; former of Scotch and the latter of German descent. They were married in Kentucky. Benjamin was reared on a farm; his education, for the day, was fair. At the age of twenty-two he began life on his own responsibility. October 18, 1849, his marriage with Harriet Small, daughter of John and Nancy Small, old and respected residents of Decatur County, was solemnized. Mrs. Bird was born October 12, 1832, in Decatur County, Ind. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Bird three children have been born: Ansbery, born October 8, 1850; John W., January 19/1854; Leroy F., December 13, 1857—all of whom are now living; the two oldest being married and living in this township. Mr. Bird is a stanch Republican. He had some aid at his start in life, and by hard work has added considerable to his fortune; he now owns two fine farms, one in Section 5 and the other in Section 6, in all 395 acres of the finest land in the county. He settled on the farm where he now resides in 1854. when there was but 10 acres in cultivation. He makes a specialty of raising fine hogs of the Poland-China breed.

JOHN H. BRIDGE, an enterprising citizen of the village of Young America, was born September 27, 1860, in Carroll County, this State. His parents were John W. and Margaret A. (Gates) Bridge, both natives of Ohio, the former of German and the latter of English descent. John was reared in Howard County, attending the district schools, receiving a good education. At the age of seventeen he began life on his own responsibility by engaging in farm work. August 3, 1882, he took for his wife Miss Ettie Johnson, daughter of Abram and Delphina (Wickersham) Johnson, residents of this township. Mrs. Bridge was born May 22, 1866, in Howard County. Mr. Bridge is a member of the I. O. O. F., in good standing. Politically he is a Republican. He located in Young America in 1881, taking charge of the flouring-mills, in which he continued for a period of one year, when he disposed of the mill and purchased the Young America Planing-mill, which he has since continued to operate with success. It is equipped in modern and improved machinery, and he enjoys a patronage sufficient .to tax the mill to its fullest capacity. He also owns a fine residence property, and is one of Deer Creek's promising young business men.

THEODORE E. BRUMBAUGH, saw-miller and brick manufacturer at Young America, was born in Elkhart County, Ind., November 21, 1863, the son of David J. and Teracy J. (Stewart) Brumbaugh, both of whom were natives of Ohio, the former of German and the latter of Irish descent. They were married in December, 1854, near Dayton, Ohio. They immigrated to Indiana in 1857, settling in Elkhart County, where they lived until their deaths, which occurred in the years of 1866 and 1867, respectively. Theodore spent his young days in this county. He came to Deer Creek Township to reside with his uncle, Samuel Sence, in 1847, and has ever since made it his home. His early education was good; after completing the common branches he, in the years of 1882-83, attended the National and the Northern Indiana Normal Colleges. He taught, at intervals, several terms in the public schools of the county. July 25, 1883, he was united in marriage with Minnie McMeans, daughter of T. A. E. and Susan (Toney) McMeans. Minnie was born November 2, 18(55, in this county, near Walton. To their union one child, Ethel, has been born. Mrs. Brumbaugh is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Brumbaugh belongs to the Masonic fraternity. He takes an active part in politics, and always votes the Democratic ticket. He now holds the position of central committeeman for Deer Creek Township. He is the proprietor of a large saw-mill, also owns a brickyard.

JOSEPH BURROUS, an early settler of Cass County, emigrated from Greene County, Ohio, in 1847, where he was born January 28, 1822. His parents were Wm. and Priscilla Burrous, natives of Maryland, the former of Irish and the latter of English descent. Joseph spent his young life on a farm, receiving a fair education for that day. When twenty-one he began to do for himself by engaging in farm work. July 28, 1845, he was united in marriage with Mary Custenborder, daughter of Geo. and Elizabeth Custenborder, the former a native of Germany and the latter a native of Pennsylvania, both of German descent. Mary was born March 14, 1825, in Pennsylvania. When eight-years of age her parents immigrated to Ohio, where she spent her early life. They had born to them six children: Sarah E., Priscilla J., Mary C., Amanda E., Wm. O. and John E., all of whom are now grown and living. Mr. and Mrs. Burrous are worthy members of the German Baptist Church, Mr. Burrous holding the position of deacon. When Mr. and Mrs. Burrous began life together they were in stringent circumstances. He purchased eighty acres of land in Section 22 and began to make a home. By careful management and good husbandry he has accumulated considerable of property. He now owns two fine farms, one in Section 16 and the other in Section 22. He expects to end his days where he has spent the best part of his life in making a comfortable home.

SAMUEL E. COIN, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Tennessee; was born near Knoxville, on July 10, 1824. His parents were Alexander F. and Cassinda (Giddens) Coin, natives of Tennessee; the former of Irish and the latter of English descent. When six years of age, his parents immigrated to Carroll County, this State, and engaged in farming, and here Samuel spent his boyhood and youth. His early education was limited. In about 1840 he settled in this township and has ever since made this his home. On May 15, 1851, he married Eleanor Ehine, daughter of John and Margaret (Willbarger) Ehine, both natives of Virginia and of German descent. Eleanor was born in Gallia County, Ohio, on February 10, 1826. Her parents immigrated to Tippecanoe County, this State, in 1829, and in 1840 they came to Howard County, Mr. and Mrs. Coin had born to them twelve children, namely: Leonadeth, born February 14, 1852; Martin W., May 1,1853; Margaret. C. September 9, 1855; John A., January 12, 1856; Martha J., December 12, 1857, died February 11, 1861; Sarah E., July 11, 1859, died December 18, 1862; an infant daughter, born and and died March 17, 1861; Loreta and Marietta, born May 7, 1862; Elizabeth Ann, February 22, 1864, died August 31, 1881; Samuel R. and an infant daughter, who died at birth, born September 16, 1866. All those who are deceased are interred in what is known as the Fouts Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Coin have also raised James and Arabelle Rhine, a nephew and niece of Mrs. Coin. Mr. and Mrs. Coin are members of the Dunkard Church. He is no politician, but generally votes the Democratic ticket. He, began life a poor boy, but, by dint of industry and frugality, he now owns two fine farms under a high state of cultivation, one in Section 19, the other in Section 24. His is a pleasant home; he is surrounded with the comforts of this life and is situated now so that he can enjoy a happy old age. His home is in the edge of the thriving little village of Young America.

DANIEL CLINGENPEEL is one of the pioneers of this county. He was the fifth of a family of nine children born to Joseph and Margaret Clingenpeel, natives of Chester County, Penn.. of German extraction. He was born March 4, 1823, in Franklin County, Va. When he was three years of age his parents immigrated to Preble County, Ohio. Here Daniel spent his boyhood and youth attending the schools oi that day, and received a fair education. At the age of twenty he began to do for himself by engaging in farming. November 17, 1842, he was married to Lucinda Wolf, daughter of Samuel and Mary Wolf, the former a native of Culpeper County. Va., born August 20, 1801, the latter a native of Stark County, Ohio, born in 1799, both being of German descent. Lucinda was born in Stark County, Ohio, March 4, 1824. Her parents, who resided in Stark, Richland and Preble Counties, Ohio, immigrated to Huntington County, this State, where Mrs. Wolf died November 22, 1850. After this Mr. Wolf made his home principally with our subject . He was called away June 21, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Clingenpeel had born to them eleven children: Maria, born April 1, 1844, died May 21, 1844; Mary A., March 19, 1845; Margaret J., April 3, 1847; Benjamin F., November 26, 1848, died July 30, 1849; Samuel P., June 13, 1850; Naomi E., January 12, 1853; Sarah O, May 13, 1855; Josephine C., November 21, 1857; John E., September 21, 1859, died October 5, 1860; Henry A., February 16, 1862; Ida A., December 24, 1864, died March 25, 1885. Mr. and Mrs. Clingenpeel are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He began life on his own responsibility a poor boy. When he was married he had 37 cents in his pocket. Every dollar he is now worth he has earned honestly and by hard work and good management. He now owns a fine improved farm of 125 acres in Section 4, where he expects to live and enjoy a happy old age. Our subject refers with pride to his ancestry. His grandfather, Clingenpeel, and his great-grandfather, Conrad Betz, both having served with distinction in the Revolutionary war, the latter receiving a severe wound. Mrs. Clingenpeel can trace her lineage back to Germany, her progenitors having immigrated to Virginia about 1756.

JOSEPH B. CORNELL is one of the pioneers of this county. He was born in Butler County, Ohio November 22, 1807 ; his parents were John and Nancy Cornell, natives of Maryland, of French descent. Joseph spent his early life in Butler County on a farm, attending the log-cabin schools of that day, receiving a fair education. When he was about sixteen years of age he went out into the world, to do for himself by engaging in any kind of labor that offered itself. August 5, 1832, he was married to Catharine Shaw, a native of Ohio, They have had born to them six children: Caroline, Phebe A., William, Lydia M., Wesley and Ellen —of whom Caroline and Phebe A. are deceased. Mrs. Cornell was called away in 1858. November 25, 1866, his marriage with Amy Williams, daughter of John and Catharine Myers, natives of Virginia, was celebrated. Amy was born June 3, 1814, in Montgomery County, Ohio. When she was fifteen years old, or in 1829, her parents immigrated to this county, and settled in Jefferson Township. By her former marriage Mrs. Cornell was the mother of two children: Sarah and Jerome, both of whom are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Cornell are members of the Universalist Church. Politically Mr. Cornell is a Democrat, and voted for Gen. Jackson. For 24 years he voted the Republican ticket, but of late years he has voted the Democratic ticket. He began life a poor boy, and probably did not possess $50 at the time of his marriage. He now owns a farm of 230 acres of fine land in Sections 8 and 9. He came here at an early day, and has lived to see a wonderful change —the forests have been transformed into beautiful homes. He expects to spend the rest of his days where he has spent the best part of his life in making a home.

BENJAMIN D. CORNELL is a native of Butler County, Ohio, where he was born February 24, 1833. His parents were William and Nancy A. (Davis) Cornell, natives of Ohio, the former of English descent and the latter of Irish descent. They were united in marriage May 22, 1832. They began housekeeping in Hamilton, Ohio, and resided here until 1838; when they removed to Preble County, where they resided until the fall of 1847; when they immigrated to this township, and settled on the farm now owned by John Hendrixson, in Section 9, where Mrs. Cornell died February 28, 1859. After her death Mr. Cornell moved to Jackson Township, and thence to Galveston, where he died June 23, 1874. When they came here the country was heavily timbered. They put up a log cabin and commenced to clear up a home. They lived to an. advanced age. Benjamin spent his boyhood and youth in Butler and Preble Counties, Ohio. At the age of fourteen his parents came to this township. He attended the schools of the day, receiving an education sufficient to enable him to teach for a number of years in the public schools of this county. At the age of twenty three (March 20, 1801) he was married to Sarah Bunnell, daughter of Elijah and Rachel (Varddrk) Bunnell; the former a native of Kentucky, of Irish descent; the latter was a native of New Jersey, and of English descent. Sarah was born July 25, 1835, in Montgomery County, this State. In March, 1844, her parents came to this county and settled in Section 10. Mr. and Mrs. Cornell had born to them two children: Charles, born September 15, 1857, died April 21, 1802; Frank. February 9, 1870. Mrs. Cornell is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically Mr. Cornell is a Republican. He served one term as assessor of this township, and filled the office with credit to himself and constituents. In 1882 his party honored him with the nomination for county commissioner, but the party being in the minority he was of course defeated.

JOHN W. COST, a prominent merchant at Young America, is a native of Greene County, Ohio, where he was born July 24, 1844. He was the son of Henry J. and Ann (Steel) Cost, natives of Ohio, of American descent. John was reared in Logansport. His early education was good. At the age of fourteen he began life on his own responsibility by engaging in the drug business. When the war broke out he enlisted in Company G, Seventy-third Regiment Indiana Volunteers. He was placed in the Department of the Cumberland, and was in the following hard-fought battles: Murfreesboro, Stone River, Decatur, Frankfort, Nashville, during which time he did not receive a scratch, and returned home to enjoy the country he so bravely defended. On his return from the war he again engaged in the drug business. In 1870 he was married to Amanda J. Stapleton, daughter of John and Clarissa Stapleton, old and respected residents of Logansport. This union was blessed with two children: Joseph A. and Clara A., both of whom are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Cost are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Cost is a member in good standing of the I. O. O. F. Politically he is a Republican, and upholds the principles he fought for. He is the proprietor of a fine drug store and residence property in Young America. He is a young man of ability and is building up a lucrative trade.

JACOB GRIPE, a prominent farmer of Deer Creek, and a native of the adjoining county of Carroll, was born October 7, 1846; his parents were Daniel and Anna (Baker) Gripe, natives of Ohio, of German descent. They were united in marriage on October 12, 1845, in Clinton County, Ind.; here they began life together by engaging in farming. In 1860 they removed to this county and settled in Section 20, where they resided until their deaths, which occurred, respectively, October 4, 1872, and October 27, 1884. They were members of the German Baptist Church, and died respected by all who knew them. Jacob spent his boyhood and youth in this county, attending the district schools, receiving a fair education. At the age of twenty he began to do for himself and engaged in carpentering, which occupation he followed about eight years. On September 12. 1868, he was united in marriage with Sarah Smith, daughter of Jacob and Lydia (Studebaker) Smith, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. Sarah was born June 2, 1849, in Delaware County, Ind. They had born to them seven children: Lydia Anna, born September 14, 1869; Effie D., born March 31, 1871; Eunice Irene, born November 15, 1872; Claudius F., born March 15, 1876; Charles J. and Mary E., born May 9, 1880 (Mary E. died November 11, 1880, and Charles J. died January 17, 1881); an infant unnamed born and died March 20, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Cripe are members of the German Baptist Church. Mr. Cripe, from a financial point of view, has been successful, owning 240 acres of fine improved land in Sections 15 and 16.

NICHOLAS M. DAVIS, a prominent farmer of Deer Creek Township, is a native of Butler County, Ohio, and was born February 20, 1840. His parents were John and Elizabeth (Ditchler) Davis, both natives of Ohio, born, respectively, March 7, 1817, and August 3, 1817. Their marriage occurred in Hamilton, Butler Co., Ohio, in 1837. They immigrated to this county in September, 1847, and settled where our subject now resides; this was then a wild country. Nicholas spent his young days aiding his parents in clearing the land for a home. He attended the district schools and received a fair education. December 22, 1864, he was married to Mary E. Deacon, daughter of William C. and Sarah Deacon, old residents of this township. She was born January 7, 1847, in Union County, this State. They have born to them four children: Elmer, Albertis, Annie E. and John W., all of whom are now living. Mr. Davis is a member of the I. O. O. F. and F. & A. M. fraternities in good standing. He takes considerable of interest in politics and votes the Democratic ticket. His occupation has always been farming, in connection with which he dealt in stock for several years, being very successful. He now owns 290 acres of fine land in Section 4, one of the best improved farms in the county. His residence is modern in its entirety, and reflects credit on the judgment of Mr. Davis.

WILLIAM DUNKIN. The subject of this sketch was born in Franklin County, this State, December 5, 1819. His father, Peter Dunkin, was born June 10, 1792, near Pittsburgh, Penn.., from where his parents removed to Kentucky, and later to Ohio. October 29, 1815, he was united in marriage to Mary Martin, a native of Ohio. A short time subsequent they commenced life together in Franklin County, this State, living there until 1830, when they removed to Carroll County, of which they remained residents until their death, Mr. Dunkin dying June 11, 1863. Our immediate subject was reared on the farm and early inured to the hardships incident to a farmer's life in those days. Owing to the scarcity of schools, his early education was limited. At the age of twenty-one he began life for himself, working by the month on a farm, his chief duties being to chop and grub, as the country was then nothing more than a wilderness of woods, which abounded in game of all kinds and was still inhabited by the Indians. February 10, 1841. he was married to Hannah Payton, daughter of John and Margaret Payton, natives of Kentucky, and respectively of German and English descent. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Dunkin eight children have been born, namely: John, Peter, Frank, Leonadeth. Mary J., Emma and Anne, all of whom are now living, except John and an infant unnamed. Mr. and Mrs. Dunkin are members of the Christian Church. Politically he is a Republican, and believes in the principles of his party. He began life for himself with an ax, and knows what a hard day's work is. He entered 160 acres of land in Section 25, this township, and has transformed it into one of the best farms in the county. His early recollections of pioneer 'days are good, and he can interest one with the relation of many anecdotes of log-cabin days. He has often gone to Michigan City to buy salt for his use. He and wife are enjoying a quiet life and bid fair to live to a ripe old age at the old home where they have spent so many years of the best part of their lives in making it comfortable.

BENJAMIN M. DUNKIN, next younger brother of William Dunkin, was born in Franklin County, this State, November 23. 1820, and was ten years of age when his parents came to Carroll County. Here he received a fair education for that day of log schoolhouses and poor teachers. At the age of twenty-five he began life on his own responsibility, by engaging in clearing up the farm on which he now resides. This he entered in 1844. There were but few settlers in this part of the township. He had to clear out his roads, and when traveling any distance carried his ax to cut his way through. August 28, 1848, he was married to Susan Payton, daughter of John and Margaret Payton. To this union were born two children: -Win., born September 29, 1849; Sylvenice, born March 27, 1851. April 24, 1851, Susan, the wife of Mr. Dunkin, was called away. Mr. Dunkin continued to run his farm, and June 29, 1856, he was again married to Jane Khine, daughter of John and Margaret Rhine, natives of Ohio. She was born October 29, 1829, in Gallia County, Ohio. She spent her early life at home. To this union were born six children, namely: Elizabeth M., born June 5, 1857; Mary E., born December 12, 1858; Rebecca A., born April 15, 1861; Benjamin F., born March 3, 1863; Emma J., born January 7, 1865; Ida M., born June 13, 1869—all of whom are now living. Mr. Dllnkin is a member of the I. O. O. F. Politically he is a Republican and firmly believes in the principles of his party. He voted for Henry Clay in 1844. He commenced life in moderate circumstances, but by dint of industry and perseverance he now owns a finely improved farm in Section 36. His is a comfortable home and one of which Mr. Dunkin may be proud.

MALINDA A. FARLOW, the subject of this sketch, was born May 5, 1853, the daughter of Conrad and Frany Plank, old and respected residents of Deer Creek Township. Mrs. Farlow grew to womanhood at home on the farm with her parents, attending school at intervals, receiving a fair education. September 25, 1881, she became the wife of Amos Farlow, whose birth occurred in Adams County, Ind., October 4, 1859, the son of John and Sarah Farlow, old residents of that county, some time since deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Farlow had born to them one child, William A., born July 14, 1882, died December 11, 1882. Mrs. Farlow suffered the loss of her beloved husband November 30, 1881, his death occurring suddenly, caused by the rupture of a blood vessel, from which hemorrhage resulted. Mrs. Farlow now resides with her mother, and is pleasantly situated, with sufficient means to live well and comfortably. She is a member of the Lutheran Church.

JOHN GARVER, a native of Pennsylvania, was born December 1, 1814, the son of Christian and Elizabeth (Lutz) Garver, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. When John was about nine months old his parents moved to Preble County, Ohio. Here he was reared on a farm, attending the schools of the day and receiving a fair education. Upon attaining his majority he engaged in farming. July 28, 1836, his marriage with Fanny Mass was solemnized. Mrs. Garver was born in September, 1817, in Union County, this State, the daughter of Edmond and Nancy Mass, who were, respectively, natives of Virginia and Ohio, and of English and German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Garver have had born to them seven children as follows: William, born January 12, 1838; Samuel, born April 19, 1839; Nancy, born October 10, 1840, died July 11,1862; Elizabeth, born August 29,1842; Henry, born January 12, 1848, died September 25, 1850; Joseph, born September 17, 1850, and John M., born April 13, 1853, died March 27, 1879. Mr. Garver began life a poor boy, and, by hard work, now owns a fine farm in Section 1. His is a pleasant home, and at this writing he bids fair to live and enjoy many years of happy old age.

WILLIAM GARVER, the son of John and Fanny Garver, was born in Union County, this State, January 12, 1838. He remained at home until he was twenty years of age. During his boyhood and youth he received a fair education for that day. He first engaged in farming, and has adopted this as a life vocation. November 13, 18liO, he was married to Martha J. Kennedy daughter of David and Esther (Davison) Kennedy, natives of Indiana. She was born May 18, 1841. Mr. and Mrs. Garver have had born to them five children, viz.: Henry E., bom August 4, 1801; Mary E.. born January 31, 1864; an infant son, born and died July 24,1869; Cora E., born December 26, 1873, and Herbert D. Monroe, born October 7, 1884. He began life at the bottom of the ladder, and, by dint of industry and perseverance, he has now a fine farm in Section 1. He is in the prime of life, and bids fair to enjoy for many years to come the home he has worked to make.

SAMUEL GARVER is a native of Union County, this State. He was born April 19, 1839. His parents were John and Fanny (Moss) Garver, the former a native of Pennsylvania, born December 1, 1814, the latter a native of Union County, this State. Samuel was reared in Union County on a farm with his parents, receiving a fair education. At the age of twenty he began to do for himself by engaging in farming. October 23, 1862, he was married to Margaret A. Cree, daughter of Robert and Jane (Magee) Cree, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Welsh and the latter of Irish descent. Mrs. Garver was born January 7, 1845, in Union County, this State. Her early life was spent at home with her parents, receiving a fair education for the day. Mr. and Mrs. Garver have had born to them three children: John A., born September 13, 1864; Fanny J., born January 26, 1867; Robert H., born July 19, 1870; all of whom are now living. Fanny is now married to William Hildebran, and they reside in Washington Township. Mr. Garver is a member of the order known as the Patrons of Husbandry. He has always been a man of industrious and frugal habits, and has accumulated considerable property. He now owns a fine improved farm in Section 1. In connection with his farming, he devotes considerable attention to bee culture.

JOHN HAMPSHIRE was born in Morgan County, Ohio, March 7, 1824. His parents were John and Elizabeth (Welty) Hampshire; the former a native of Maryland and of English descent; the latter a native of Pennsylvania and of German descent, her ancestors being among the first settlers of Pennsylvania. In 1828, when John was four years of age, his father died. The widowed mother, with five children, viz., Henry, John, Magdaline, Elizabeth and Susanah, were left to battle with tfle world. Mrs. Hampshire, with her youngest child, went to Perry County, Ohio, and continued to keep house. The rest of the children found homes in different families, and our subject went to live with his uncle, David Campbell, making his home with him until he was seventeen years old. Up to this time he had attended the district schools, and his education was now sufficient to enable him to teach five terms in the public schools. About this time he, with his mother and youngest sister, immigrated to Putnam County, and purchased a tract of wild land, John's share being thirty-one acres, his mother's forty. On this they built a rude log cabin, with puncheon floor and a door hewed out of linn. Such was the humble commencement of our subject, and he looks back to those pioneer days yet, and thinks that not a few of the happiest of them were spent in this little log cabin, where he made his home for ten years. At the age of twenty, on the 24th of March, 1844, he won the hand of Marga ret A. Enslem, the daughter of John and Catharine Enslem, old and respected residents of Putnam County. They commenced life together in Putnam County, and resided there until the fall of 1850, when they immigrated to this county, and settled on the farm where they now reside. His first purchase was eighty acres of wild land in Section 30, on which he put up a cabin, and every thing moved along smoothly until the death of Mrs. Hampshire, which occurred March 4, 1873. Prior to her death they had removed to Logansport, and were residing in that city when she was called away. For a while after this sad occurrence Mr. Hampshire was not engaged in any particular business, and spent a part of his time in traveling. He took a trip to California-during the fall of 1873. On returning home he was again married, to Cynthia Beck, daughter of Joseph and Margaret Showalter, the former a native of Maryland, of German descent; the latter a native of Pennsylvania and of Irish descent. Cynthia was born November 23, 1838, in Union County, this State. At the time of her marriage with Mr. Hampshire, September 19, 1874, she was, and had .been for some years, a widow. They are both united with the Christian Church. Politically Mr. Hampshire is a Republican. Some years ago he was trustee of this township, and filled the office with credit to himself and constituents. He began life a poor boy, and by dint of industry and perseverance he has accumulated considerable of this world's goods. He now owns two fine farms, one in Section 20, the other in Section 30. Every dollar he is worth he has made honestly and by hard work. His is a pleasant home, and one Mr. Hampshire may well feel proud of. A visit to it will convince one that he is a man of judgment, and believes in substantial improvements. He is now in the best of health, and bids fair to live many years and enjoy the fruits of an industrious and honorable life.

GEORGE W. HARNESS, a leading farmer of Cass County, is a native of Fayette County, Ohio, where he was born July 9, 1819. His father, George Harness, who married Harriet Sowards, Wjis a native of Hardy County, Va., where he was born and resided until he was twenty-eight years of age, when he removed to Ohio, where he lived until 1828, when he immigrated to Boone County, Ind. Two years later he moved to Carroll County, where he resided until about 1865, when he came to this township and settled on Section 31, where he died January 18, 1876, at the remarkably advanced age of one hundred and five years. George W. obtained a limited education, owing to the scarcity of schools. December 6, 1839. he was married to Drusilla Beck, daughter of Daniel and Betsey (Summers) Beck, both natives of Virginia and of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. Harness had bor n to them sixteen children, namely: Jackson, born August 21, 1840, died November 5, 1882; William, born June 2, 1842; Mary Jane, born June 3, 1844, died Januarv lr 1876; Walter M.,born February 22,1846, died September 1, 1879; George Washington, born April 26, 1848; John Weslev, born April 18, 1850, died December 30, 1876; Harriett E., born June 18, 1 832, died September 30, 1874; Thomas J. and Sarah F., born April 15, 1855 (Sarah F., died October 1, 1858); Luella Alice, born August 27, 1857, died September 23, 1874; Ida Florence, born June I8, 1859, died November 8, 1859; Frank M., born November 18, 1860, died March 11, 1880; Elmer E., born May 26, 1862, died April 27, 1867; Arminta May, born October 13, 1864, died in the spring of 1865; Charlie F., born June 2, 1866, and an infant son born February 14, 1853, died when two days old. Mr. and Mrs. Harness were very unfortunate with their children, losing twelve out of the sixteen, most of whom died after they were grown and married. Elmer E. was accidentally killed while playing with an old shotgun. Mrs. Harness is a member of the Christian Church. Politically Mr. Harness is a stanch Republican. He began life a poor man, and by industry and economy has accumulated considerable property. At one time he owned 1,840 acres of fine land. When his sons attained their majority he started each in life with a fine farm. He now lives at the old Harness homestead, one of the best farms in Section 34. During his life he has paid considerable attention to stock dealing. In 1846 he bought the first drove of hogs ever sold in Deer Creek Township, and has since that time, to a greater or less extent, made trading in stock and cattle, in connection with farming, his occupation. Of late years he has devoted his attention to another branch, making a specialty of breeding fine stock and cattle—the Hereford variety of cattle, and hogs of Poland-China breed. Mr. Harness built the first brick house in the township and the second frame barn. In his time he was a great hunter. He has been verv successful in all his undertakings, and is in a position to enjoy the fruits of his labor.

JOHN HENDRIXSON is a native of Butler County, Ohio; was born December 18, 1825. His parents were Benjamin and Sarah (Johnson) Hendrixson, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. When quite young John went out into the world to do for himself; engaging as a farm hand, he first hired to a man by the name of Kennard by the month at $5 per month, agreeing to work three months, at the end of which time Mr. Kennard raised his wages, and John continued to work for him thirteen years. He was now twenty-two years of age, after this he farmed with him for two years on the shares. Then he went to Preble County, Ohio, and farmed with his brother-in-law about three years. When he removed to Union County, this State, and followed various pursuits until January 31, 1854, when he was married to Nancy Nelson, daughter of John and Mary Allen, natives of Virginia. Nancy was born October 27, 1827. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hendrixson three children have been born: Sarah J., born October 27, 1854-; David F., August 27, 1869; Robert M., May 2, 1856, died February 18, 1878. Mrs. Hendrixson is a member of the United Brethren Church. Mr. Hendrixson is a member of the order of the P. of H. He is a Democrat in politics. He has been very successful in his vocation of farming. He owns a fine farm of over 200 acres in Section 5 and 8. His is one of the pleasant homes in the vicinity. He is now in the prime of life and bids fair to live and enjoy many years of happy old age.

THOMAS HENRY. Among the leading men of Deer Creek Township there is no one, perhaps, that commands greater respect than the subject of this biography, who was born in Ireland November 4,1832. His father, William Henry, was also of Irish birth, by occupation a farmer. He lived and died in the land of his nativity. The mother of Mr. Henry was Martha Heriry, whose maiden name was Hunter. She was an Irish woman, born in Ireland, and died in Wayne County, Ind., in 1877. Our subject came to America in 1848, and settled in Union County, Ind., and there resided until 1856, when he came to Cass County, and January 18 of that year settled near where the village of Young America now stands. On coming to Cass County he engaged in the saw-mill business, and which he continued with much success until 1877, when he engaged in farming. This he now continues, and owns 370 acres of fine land. The marriage of Mr. Henry was solemnized in 1858—Miss Mary E. Wilson became his wife. She was born in Union County, Ind., in 1837. They have four children, as follows: William, Alice, Charles A. and Mattie. Mrs. Henry is a leading member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Politically Mr. Henry is a member of the Democratic party. In 1882 he was elected trustee of Deer Creek Township. He was the regular nominee of the Democratic party, and the Republican party also adopted him, and thus he received the unanimous vote of the township. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. Henrv has made his own way in life, and has been very successful. The history of Deer Creek Township would be incomplete without a mention of this honorable man.

GEO. W. HUBLER is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born June 16, 1819. His parents were Jacob and Catharine Hubler. both natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. Geo. W., our subject, was reared in Pennsylvania. At the age of sixteen he engaged as mail agent. At twenty-one he was apprenticed to learn the shoe-maker's trade, which vocation, after serving his apprenticeship, he followed for nearly twenty years, saving his earniugs and carrying on farming at the same time. At the age of twenty-five he was married to Frances Warner, daughter of Daniel and Sarah Warner, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter a native of Maryland, of German descent. She was born April 16,1818. Mr. and Mrs. Hubler were blessed with eight children, namelv: Harriet, born September 26, 1846; John, January 12,1847; Sarah, November 6,1849; Andrew, October 20,1850; Ira, December 5, 1852; Henry, January 12,1854; Jerome, March 20, 1857; Elizabeth, December 23, 1860—all of whom are now living. Henry, who is now residing at home, is a young man of ability, and at present is the Democratic candidate for the office of county recorder. Mr. and Mrs. Hubler are members of the German Baptist Church. Politically Mr. Hubler is a Demoocrat, and generally takes an active part in supporting the nominees of his party. He now owns one of the best farms in Section 36. Mr. and Mrs. Hubler are in good health, and bid fair to live and enjoy many years of happy old age.

ROBERT HUNTER, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Butler County, Ohio; he was born on August 24, 1832. His parents were Thomas H. and Clarissa J. (Laughlin) Hunter, natives of Ireland, of Scotch descent. Robert spent his young days in Union County, this State, receiving a fair education. At the age of twenty he commenced life on his own responsibility as a laborer on a farm. At twenty-two he began to work at the carpenter's trade in the town of Liberty, Union County. This he continued to follow for twenty-seven years. He came to the vicinity of what is now Young America in 1852. Returning to Union County, he remained until 1854, when he again came to Cass County, and has ever since made this his home. On August 19, 1863, he was married to Martha Brown, a native of this State, born March 17, 1839. They had born to them these children, viz.: Clarenia, born May 18, 1864, died July 11, 1865; Ada F., born September 16, 1865, died September 24, 1866; Clara S., February 9, 1867; Edmond F., February 10, 1868; Armeta J., February 4, 1870, died October 15, 1872; Oscar B., May 5, 1872, died October 17, 1872; Pearly, born October 18, 1873; Bertha, born April 9, 1875, died April 19, 1880. All of those deceased, as well as Mrs. Hunter, who departed this life December 24, 1877, are interred in the Sharon Cemetery, in Carroll County. On April 24, 1879, Mr. Hunter was again married, to Mary A. Grow, daughter of Martin and Matilda Grow. She is the mother of Ross, born June 9, 1881, died July 3, 1881; Lewella, born June 30, 1883. Mr. Hunter is a member of the ft & A. M. order, in good standing. Politically he is a solid Democrat. He is truly a self-made man-, commencing life with no capital. He has, by his industry and frugality, amassed quite a competency, being the proprietor of a fine farm, situated near the village of Young America, where he is also engaged in the undertaking business. Mr. Hunter is in the prime of life, and is meeting with the prosperity which is a just reward of his labors.

EZRA KAHL is a native of Richland County, Ohio; he was born on February 26, 1844. His parents were Henry and Susan (Rauck) Kahl, natives of Pennsylvania, of German extraction. Ezra was reared in his native county of Richland on a farm, attending the district schools, receiving a good education, sufficient to enable him to teach twenty-one terms in this and Howard County. At the age of eighteen, on July 17, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Seventy-second Regiment Indiana Volunteers, for three years, or during the war. He was placed iu the Army of the Cumberland, under Col. A. O. Miller, commander of the Seventy-second Regiment, and Col. Wilder, of the Seventeenth Indiana, brigade commander. He participated in the following noted battles: Hoover's Gap, Farmington, Chickamauga, Okaloma, and was in all the battles fought during the Atlanta campaign, with the exception of the three assaults made by Hood on Sherman's army; at the battles of Jonesboro, Franklin, Selma. July 6, 18(55, he was mustered out, and received an honorable discharge. During his whole time of enlistment he did not receive a wound, and returned home to enjoy the Union he fought to preserve. He immediately commenced teaching school, and continued in that profession during the winter and for some time after his marriage, which occurred on March 26, 1868. His wife was Miss Sarah Hubler, daughter of G. W. and Frances (Warner) Hubler, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter a native of Ohio. She was born November 6, 1848, in Montgomery County, Ohio. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Kahl has been blessed with seven children: Theressa F., born February 15, 1869; Millie A, born February 19, 1871; Osius, Appl 17, 1873; Nevada, January 22, 1876; Ira, May 23, 1878, died July 30, 1880; ZaniaOpal. August 14, 1881; Maude H., April 27, 1885". He and wife are members of the Christian Church. Politically Mr. Kahl is a Republican. He began life at the bottom of the ladder, but by dint of industry and perseverance he now has accumulated considerable of this world's goods. He owns a farm in Section 31, which is under a high state of cultivation. He also owns a half interest in the mercantile establishment of Kemp & Kahl, of Young America. His home is a pleasant one, situated on the edge of this thriving littlo village. He is now in the prime of life, and bids fair, at no distant day, to become one of Deer Creek's leading citizens.

DAVID D. LENON was born July 8, 1839, in the adjoining county of Carroll, the son of Louis and Mary M. (Crockett) Lenon. His parents were both natives of Ohio, of Scotch and Irish descent, respectively; the former was born in 1813, the latter in 1815. They were united in marriage in 183ti. Our subject was reared in his native county on a farm with his parents, attending school at intervals in the primitive log houses of that day. At the age of twenty he engaged in farm work for himself. September 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Forty-sixth Regiment Indiana Volunteers; he was placed in the Army of the West under Gen. U. S. Grant, and participated in the following important engagements: Port Gibson. Champion Hills, Black River and was before Vicksburg during the entire siege; at Carrion Crow Bnyou, where his regiment was almost massacred; and Sabine Cross Roads, making a total of three years of active service. On his return home he engaged in sawmilling. December 19,1800, he was married to Mary M. Segraves. daughter of Henry and Mary M. Plank, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. They emigrated from Pennsylvania to Camden, Carroll County, in the year 1840; one year later Mrs. Plank died. Our subject's wife was born October 3, 1837, in Pennsylvania. By a former marriage, which occurred January 21,1858, to William E. Sograves (who enlisted in July, 1802, entered the Union Army, was captured, taken prisoner of war and placed in the Andersonville prison, where he died October 29, 1804), she had born to her three children: Alphonso A., born January 2, 1859; James H., born November 21,1851, died March 2, 1885; Martha L., February 0, 1803. Mr. Lenon is the father of five children, namely: Frank H.. born September 21, 1867; Fayalvey, June 27, 1870; Mary E.. August 1, 1872; Daisy A., May 27, 1870; Fred O., July 5, 1879; all of whom are now living. Mr. Lenon is a member of Post No. 14, G. A. R., Logansport. His political views are Republican. In his life occupation of farming he has been successful, owning a fine farm situated in Sections 7 and 12 of Deer Creek Township.

.DANIEL LYBROOK, the subject of this sketches an old resident of Deer Creek Township. He is a native of Union County, this State, where he was born on October 29, 1824, the son of John and Frances (Toney) Lybrook, both natives of Virginia, the former of German descent, whose great-grandfather immigrated from Germany to Virginia in colonial days, and was killed by the Indians. Daniel, our subject, was reared on his father's farm in Union County, and obtained an education in keeping with the facilities of those days. He remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age, when he began life on his own responsibility by engaging in farming in Preble County, Ohio. March 4, 1847, Magdalene Binehart, daughter of David and Magdalene (Fellers) Biiiehart, became his wife. Mrs. Lybrook was born December 12, 1827, in Preble County, Ohio. Her parents were of German descent and natives of Virginia, and their marriage occurred October 14, 1813. They commenced life together in Preble County, Ohio, and continued to reside there until 1853, when they immigrated to this county and leased eighteen acres of ground in the southwest corner of Washton Township. Here he remained over three years, when he removed to the tract of land which he now resides upon, in Section 6, Deer Creek Township. Here he purchased 120 acres of land, all heavily timbered. Mr. and Mrs. Lybrook had born to them eight children, namely: David A., born January 13, 1848; William E., February 16, 1850; Jacob H, June 5, 1852, died June 26, 1863; Mary F., October 5, 1855; Vallorus F., November 30, 1858; Charles E.. August 27, 1863; Harvey D., January 4, 1866; Sarah O., November 22, 1868, died March 6, 1870. Two of the children are married: David A. and Wm. E. Politically Mr. Lybrook is a Democrat.

W. E. LYBBOOK, M. D., Young America. Prominent among the physicians of Cass County is the subject of these lines, who was born February 16, 1850, in Union County, Ind. He is a son of Daniel and Magdalene'L^arook, natives of Ohio, of German extraction, and who immigrated wk Cass County in 1854. Our subject was reared on a farm, received a good education at the common schools, finishing his studies at the National Normal School, at Lebanon, Ohio, which he attended two years. He then began teaching in the public schools of Cass and adjoining counties, continuing for a number of years. He also taught in the Wabash Normal, his last teaching being at Bockfield, Ind., where he had charge of the graded schools for four years. In 1876 he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. J. W. Powell, of Bockfield, with whom he remained two years, and then entered the Kentucky School of Medicine, at Louisville, graduating from that institution in 1879. During the graduating exercises, he was chosen by his class to deliver the salutatory address, receiving a vote of thanks for his masterly effort. Returning to Young America he began the practice of his profession in the vicinity of his old home. On March 19, 1878, he was married to Addah F. Hewitt, who was born in Carroll County, Ind., September 15, 1861, a daughter of Elias and Elizabeth A. Hewitt, old and respected residents of Carroll County. By this union the following children were born: Boss E., Mary E., Bessie M., Bolland V., and Daniel E.—all of whom are now living. The Doctor is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow fraternities. Politically he is a Democrat and has served as township trustee nearly two terms being appointed the first term in August, I883,by the county commissioners to fill the vacancy occurring- by the resignation of Thomas Henry, filling'this office impartially and with credit to himself and constituents. During his term of trustee he took particular interest in the improvement of the public highways of his township, and increased the length of the school term from four and one-half to six months. He is also postmaster of Young America, being appointed by the present administration. Dr. Lybrook begaii life poor, but by careful management and fair dealings has accumulated considerable of this world's goods. As a physician, he has steadily risen in popularity, and is without a superior in the county. He is an earnest, reliable man, a respected and appreciated citizen, and successful in his chosen profession.

NEWTON J. MARTIN, the subject of this sketch, is a native of Carroll County, this State, where he was born in September. 1843. His parents were Charles and Jemima (Pachel) Martin, natives of Butler County, Ohio; the former of German and the latter of Irish descent. Newton remained at home with and assisted his parents on the farm until he attained the age of twenty-two years, receiving a good common education. On October 28, 1869, he was married to Mary A. Payton, daughter of Stephen and Eachel (McKinley) Payton; the former a native of Ohio, of English descent; the latter a native of Pennsylvania, and of Irish extraction. Mrs. Martin was born October 28, 1845, in Licking County, Ohio, and grew to womanhood in Carroll County, Ind., where she received a fair education. They had one child born to them, which lived only a short time. Mrs. Martin is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Martin belongs to the I. O. O. R. in good standing. Politically he is a Democrat, and generally takes an active part in politics. He began life in fair circumstances, and by careful management has accumulated quite an amount of property, being the proprietor of one of the best farms in Section 18. He has paid considerable attention to raising fine stock.

H. N. MILLER, a prominent citizen of Deer Creek Township, is a native of Greene County, Ohio, where he was born March 30. 1842, a child of John E. and Catharine (Minick) Miller, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. When he was about eighteen months old his parents immigrated to this county, and settled in Logansport, and in 1846 permanently located and purchased a farm of 160 acres in Deer Creek Township, where Henry grew to manhood, remaining with and assisting his parents until he attained his majority, receiving a fair education. December 21. 1865, he was married to Alice Biggie, daughter of John and Maria Biggie, natives of Pennsylvania. To this union were born seven children: John H.. William A., Irene B., Oscar, Lefie Myrtle, Warren and Harry N., two of whom are dead. February 21, 1878, Mr. Miller suffered the bereavement of losing his wife. January 21, 1886, he was again married, to Emma Baughman, daughter of O. E. and Mitilda Baughman. Mr. Miller is a member of the I. O. O. F.; also takes an active part in the Grange order, belonging to Banner Grange No. 964. Politically Mr. Miller is a stanch Republican, and takes an active part in the interest and the success of his party. In 188t> he became the candidate of his party for the office of township trustee, and notwithstanding he had a Democratic majority of eighty votes to overcome, he was elected, and is now discharging the duties of that position. As a farmer he has been very successful, having a good farm of 160 acres, a member and director in the Patrons of Husbandry Fair Association of Howard County.

DE. CHAELES D. PAEKS, of Young America, a prominent physician of the county, was born in Carroll County, this State, December 28, 1856, and is of German-Irish descent, inheriting the latter from his father and the former principally from his mother. His grandparents were originally from Pennsylvania and Ohio, those of his mother owning the present site of the Soldiers' Home, near Dayton, Ohio. His mother, after a long period of ill health, died when he was seven years of age, and in the epidemic of the so-called black erysipelas of 1873, in Carroll County, he lost his father. Until the death of the latter he assisted in the duties of the farm in summer and attended the district school in winter, at which time his education was sufficient for him to enter college and take a graded course. After attending school at Lafayette and Delphi he graduated at Hall's Business College, Logansport, Ind., in 1875, when he entered the Northern Indiana Normal School and attended six terms of 1875 and 1876. By the principal of each of the two latter institutions he was presented a written commendation of his personal worth and character, of the very highest standing. The summer of 1877 was spent on the old homestead, near Eockfield, in the family of his sister, Mrs. J. W. Groninger, during which time he was very much prostrated in health. His office reading was with Dr. Powell, of Eockfield, and the eminent ophthalmic and aural surgeon, Dr. Huntsinger. In 1878 he began a regular college course in the Louisville Medical College, from which he entered the Kentucky School of Medicine, where he remained until the summer of 1879. At the expiration of the term, one of Louisville's citizens offered a valuable prize on " Materia Medica, Therapeutics, Principles and Practice of Medicine." After one of the most rigid examinations ever held in the city the young student received the second best grade, for which he received the thanks of the college, and, in connection with the impression made during the term, was offered a position by a member of the faculty, which he would have gladly accepted but for his preceptor insisting upon the fulfillment of a former agreement; and might state, parenthetically, that of a number of contests for prizes in schools, the above is the only one in which he did not succeed. To enhance his facilities for a medical education he now entered the Rush Medical College, of Chicago, where he graduated at the close of the term of 1880. Besides the regular college requirements he received valuable private instructions, also a six months' course in the Cook County Hospital. After graduating he returned to Rockfield, and in the fall of 1880 located in Young America, where he has since been actively engaged in the practice of medicine. On October I), 1881, he was married by the Rev. W. R. Lowe, in the Campbellite Church, to Sarah A. Henry, daughter of Thomas and Mary Henry, old and much respected residents of this county. His wife received a good education, and is a member of the Baptist Church. To this union was born one child: Clara Belle, born May 22, 1883. who is now living. The Doctor generally takes an active part in politics and firmly believes in the principles of Democracy. He is a member of the F. & A. M. and I. O. O. R; also of the Logansport Medical and Surgical Association in good standing. By industry and perseverance he has built up a lucrative practice, and by careful attention to business has gained the respect and confidence of the citizens. The Doctor is one of those who do not fail to respect and aid those who may chance to be less fortunate in life, and in return is held in high esteem by that class: He is a young man of marked ability and is considered to be one of the most successful practitioners ever located here, promising to become, in no distant day, one of the leading physicians of the country.

FRANY PLANK was born near Dayton, Ohio, February 12, 1832. Her parents were Jacob and Barbara (Izar) Wolf, natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania, respectively, both of German descent. When Mrs. Plank was about five years of age her parents immigrated to Carroll County, and settled near Camden, where she grew to womanhood. She attended the district schools, receiving a limited education. December 20, 1855, she became the wife of Conrad Plank. Mr. Plank was born in Adams County, Penn., August 23, 1832. His parents were John and Catharine Plank, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. He was reared in his native State on a farm with his parents. At the age of nineteen he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, but did not adopt it as a life vocation. After his marriage he engaged in farming and followed this up to the time of his sudden and unexpected death, which occxirred June 17, 1885, caused by being thrown from his carriage by an unmanageable horse. He was an old, respected citizen. He died as he had lived, a believer in the Christian faith and a member of the Lutheran Church. He left a loving wife and three children to mourn his loss, namely: John J., born April 20, 1861; Malinda A. born May 5, 1863; George C., born March 8, 18G5; also Clarissa A., born June 23, 1857, died April 14, 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Plank began life together in poor circumstances, but by hard work and good management accumulated considerable property. Mrs. Plank now owns 240 acres of the best land in Section 7. Hers is one of the finest residences in the township. She leads, as a member of the Lutheran Church, n true and consistent Christian life.

JOHN N. POUNDSTONE was born in Fayette County, Peim., January 11, 1817. His parents were Phillip and Anne (Kreager) Poundstone; the former a native of Pennsylvania, of German descent, the latter a native of New Jersey, of German and English descent. They immigrated to Ohio in 1831. Up to this time John had attended the district schools and had learned to read, write and cipher. He remained with his parents until he was twenty-one years old, when he began life on his own responsibility by engaging at farm work. January 28, 1888, he was married to Madeline Hampshire, daughter of John and Elizabeth Hampshire, natives of Pennsylvania. She was born August 11, 1815, in Perry County, Ohio. To this union were born eight children: Richard, born May 12,1838 (now married to Susannah Zeck and resides in Illinois); Henry, born May-3, 1840 (now residing in Kansas); Elizabeth A., born June 15, 1842 (now living in Deer Creek Township); George W., born August 10, 1844 (also living in this township); Caroline, born Noveinber 13, 1848 (now residing in Young America); an infant son, born July 7, 1851, died nine days later: Phillip, born December 25. 1852, died August 3, 1853; Delilah F., born July 6, 1860, died Aiigust 16, 1860. Those that are deceased are interred in what is known as the Beech-grove Cemetery, in Carroll County, as well as Mrs. Poundstoue, whose death occurred December 25, 1877. November 28, 1878, Mr. Poundstone was married to Nancy (Ratcliff) AYelty, daiighter of Abner and Elizabeth Eatcliff, old and respected residents of Carroll County, this State. She was born August 23, 1832. in Clinton County. Ohio. She was married to David Welty, who enlisted in the service and was killed in the last battle that was fought at Nashville, Tenn. She is the mother of six children: Marion, born July 2, 1848; Marcus, born December 30, 1850; Sarah A., born January 25, 1853; Alonzo L., born November, 1855: Carrie A., born May 1, 1858, and A. O., born July 30, 18?2—all of whom are now living. Mr. Poundstone is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, which he united with in 1845. Mrs. Poundstoue is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. He began life a poor boy, and has made every dollar he is worth at hard labor. During the fall of 1842 he entered his first land in Section 36, Township 25, Kange 1 east. Here he commenced to clear up a farm, burning brush many a night until he made himself a comfortable home. He is now the proprietor of a fine farm of 140 acres in Sections 31 and 3(3, and also owns a fine residence property and seven acres of land in the edge of the thriving little village of Young America. His is a pleasant home, and he bids fair to enjoy many years of happy old nge.

GEOKGE W. POUNDSTONE, a prominent citizen and native of this county, was born near Young America August 10,1844. His parents were John and Magdalene Poundstone, old residents of this township. He received a fair education. At the age of twenty-one he engaged in farm work. At the age of twenty-eight, October 17, 1872, he was married to Sarah J. Hendrixson. daughter of John and Nancy Hendrixson. Nancy was born October 27, 1854. They had born to them four children: Allen F., born December 18, 1873; Ella M., born January 20,1870; Estella M., born December 2,1883; Dora O., born August 20, 1885—all of whom are now living. Mrs. Poundstone is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Poundstone is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry. Politically he is a Democrat, and firmly believes in the principles of his party. He began life in fair circumstances, and to-day owns a fine farm of eighty acres in Section 7. He is now in the prime of life, and is one of Deer Creek's most successful farmers. His is a comfortable home, and he is surrounded by all the comforts of a rural life.

JOSEPH SHANKS. The subject of this sketch was born in Miami County, Ohio, April 11, 1815. His parents were John and Elizabeth (Gerard) Shanks, the former of German and the latter of Welsh descent. Joseph was reared in his native county, attending the schools of the day, receiving a fair education. In 1830 he, with his parents, immigrated to Carroll County, this State, where his father purchased eighty acres of wild land, and commenced to clear up a home. Six years later he disposed of that tract and bought another situated on Deer Creek, near what is called Hen Peck. December 24, 1835, our subject married Elizabeth Crockett, daughter of William and Nancy Crockett, old residents of Carroll County. They had born to them eleven children, viz.: William, Nancy A., Tilman H., Asher, Albert, Joseph, Catharine, Jane, John, Abner, Mary A., seven of whom are now living. Mr. Shanks is a Democrat. He started in life a poor boy, and now owns 120 acres of good land under a high state of cultivation.

DK L. A. SIMMON, the subject of this sketch was born January 27, 1850, in this township, the son of John and Margaret J. (Stanley) Simmon; the former a native of Ohio, of German descent, the latter a native of this State and of English descent. They were united in marriage October 5, 1848, in this county, and have resided here ever since; the former died in March, 1876, the latter is at present making her home with the Doctor. Our subject spent his boyhood and youth here, attending the district schools, receiving a good education; at the age of nineteen he began to teach and to fittend the high school at Logansport, which he continued to do for about six years, during which time he had attended school in Kokomo and Oalveston. In 1873 he began reading medicine under Dr. Boyston, of Huntingdale, Mo., which he continued two years, when he returned to Indiana and began the practice of medicine in the vicinity of his old home. During the winter of 1879-80 he attended the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis, since which time he has been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. September 11, 1873, he was united in marriage to Willett Hull, daughter of Thomas F. and Susan Hull, of Huntingdale, Mo. She was born May 2, 1854, in Missouri., Mr. and Mrs. Simmon have born to them two children: John D., born September 5, 1876; William F., born June 14, 1878, both of whom are now living; they are members of the Christian Church. Dr. Simmon enjoys a good remunerative practice and has been highly successful in the treatment of his patients, which bespeaks for him a continuation of the patronage of the people of his community, who all esteem him highly and justly recognize his ability.

JOHN SPRINKLE, a native of Rockbridge County, Va., was born September 3, 1827, the son of George and Hannah (Barley) Sprinkle, both natives of Virginia, the former of German and the latter of Scotch-English descent. John was reared in Virginia and Putnam County, this State. In 1844 his father immigrated to Cass County, and settled in Jackson Township.' September 7, 1848, our subject was married to Margaret A. Eoach, daughter of John and Elizabeth Roach. To this union were born nine children, namely: Wilson, William, John W., George W., James Leroy, Mary E., Hannah and Elizabeth J., and an infant daughter, of whom William and the infant are deceased. Mrs. Sprinkle is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Sprinkle is a Eepublican. Mr. Sprinkle is the owner of 320 acres of as fine land as there is in Sections 2 and 11; his improvements are good. All his life he has paid considerable attention to machinery. He owns a saw-mill; also owns a threshing-machine; but age has compelled him to give his attention of late principally to farming.

PETER TOLAN, one of the oldest residents of Deer Creek Township, was born in Cumberland County, Penn., about 1800, being the eldest in a family of four children born to Daniel and Jane Tolan, who were natives of Ireland and Pennsylvania, respectively. Peter grew to manhood in Huntingdon County, receiving a fair education for the day. When quite young he was thrown upon the world to make his way; he worked at any thing that he could get to do, and has toiled many a long day for 25 cents. On January 27, 1829, he was united in marriage with Nancy Welch, in Huntingdon County. He had purchased a small farm, to which they immediately moved, where they remained until 1837, when they removed to Preble County, Ohio, and rented a farm. After a residence there of a few years he moved to Union County, Ind., living there until September, 1847. when he moved to this township and settled upon the land where he has ever since resided. He first purchased 80 acres of timbered land. This was then a low timbered country, and considered the poorest part of the township, but, by ditching and good husbandry, what was then a muddy wilderness is transformed into beautiful farms. Mr. Tolau is one among the few yet living who remembers distinctly those days of pioneer life, and who was an actual participant in hardships and trials which were incidental to those times. Mr. and Mrs. Tolan had born to them eleven children, namely: James, tforn November 4, 1829; Sarah J., April 3, 1831; Elizabeth A., January 8, 1833; Mary E., February 21, 1835; Catharine, October 21, 1836; Thomas, M'arch 25, 1838; John, August 15, 1831, died February 2,1858; Margaret, April 10, 1841; Daniel, December 25, 1842; Nancy, July 8. 1846; Caroline, March 9, 1849. Mrs. Tolan died March 26, 1851, a member of the Lutheran Church and a true, consistent Christian, beloved by all who knew her. January 5, 1858, Mr. Tolan's marriage with Mary Morrow was solemnized; she is a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Morrow, who were natives of Pennsylvania, of ScotchIrish descent. Mrs. Tolan was born July 16, 1820, in Huntingdon County, Penn., where she grew to womanhood. When she was twenty-one years old her parents removed to Preble County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Tolan are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Tolan is a stanch Republican, casting his first presidential vote for John Quincy Adams, and has voted during every presidential election since. He was honored with an election to the office of trustee of his township, serving in a creditable manner. He has been successful in his vocation of farming, owning a fine farm in Sections 5 and 8.

WILLIAM S. TONEY, a prominent and respected resident of Deer Creek Township, is the subject of this sketch. He was born in Union County, this State, August 19, 1837. He was the youngest of a family of ten children born to James and Sarah (Lybrook) Toney, natives of Virginia. The former was born October 29, 1798, and of English descent; the latter born May 6, 1802, and of German descent. They were married October 28, 1820, and began life together in Union County, this State, where they resided until 1864. when they immigrated to this county and settled on the farm with their son, our subject. Here they lived until their death, which occured as follows: Sarah died February 24, 1874, and James died December 13, 1884. W. S., our subject, -was reared in Union County, working on a farm, attending the schools of the day, as well as Smith's Commercial College, at Decatur, 111., until he received sufficient education to enable him to teach, which vocation he followed for some years in the public schools of the State. He remained at home until he attained his majority, when he engaged in farming and teaching; this was his occupation until the spring of 1864, when he moved upon the farm where he now resides. In 1871, he was married to Mary Moss, daughter of Edmund and Susannah (Rinehart) Moss, natives of Ohio and of German descent. Mary was born October 6, 1842, in Carroll County, Ind., but raised in Preble County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Toney had born to them six children: Frank H., born February 29, 1872; Elma O., born August 20, 1873; Effie M., born August 12, 1877; Charles E., born October 28, 1879; Ida 8., born December 31, 1881; and Wilmer E., born February 23, 1884; all of whom are now living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Toney are members of the German Baptist Church. Mr. Toney has been a minister of the church about eleven years. He began life in fair circumstances, and now owns a fine farm of 315 acres in Section 2. A visit to his home will convince one that Mr. Toney is a man of judgment and believes in substantial improvements. His residence is one of the finest in the township, and other improvements are modern. He was appointed to fill the unexpired term of office of his deceased brother as trustee of this township, and filled the office in a creditable manner.


HARRISON TOWNSHIP BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

THOMAS BACKUS is a native of Yorkshire England, and was born December 13, 1832. He was one of ten children of William and Alice (Harrison) Backus, viz.: John, William, Joseph, Mary, Richard, Thomas, James, Robert, Jane and Elizabeth. He immigrated to the United States in 1856, landing in Philadelphia, Peuu., in November of that year. From there he went to New York City, where he resided until June, 1857, at which time he came to Cass County, Ind., and in 1862 purchased the farm on which ho now resides, in Section 9, Harrison Township, and on October 27, 1868, took to himself a wife, Miss Nancy Herd, who was born in Yorkshire, England, September 21, 1834, and was the daughter of John and Agnes Herd. Mr. Backus owns a fine farm of 120 acres of land, which he has improved himself. Has had born to him three children, viz.: Lizzie A., born June 21, 1870; John W., born August 29, 1S72; and George T. H, bom February 10, 1876.

GEORGE W. BLACKBURN is one of nine children born to James L. and Susanna (St. Clair) Blackburn, viz.: William J., Reuben S., Joseph, Ruth A., John. Eleanor, George W., Noah C. and David W. He was married in Harrison Township, Cass County, December 1, 1875, to Phebe, daughter of Levi and Malinda (Clark) Foglesong. She was born in Harrison Township, this county, June 0, 1857. After our subject's marriage, he settled on his present farm, in Harrison Township, Section 20, where he has resided since. He owns at present 111 acres of fine and well improved land. Has had born to him four children, viz.: Florence E., born July 24, 1877; Clara D., born June 12, 1880; Goldie M.. born October 6, 1882; and Bessie, born May 16, 1885.

F. G. BUCK, M. D. (Rosedale, Ind., P. O. Oak), is a native of Pulaski County, Ind., and was born January 6, 1849. He was raised on a farm, and at the age of fourteen set out for himself. In February, 1864, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, served two years, and was mustered out with his regiment. After a common school course he attended high school, then served an apprenticeship at the watch-making and jeweler trade, and in 1870 engaged in business at Royal Center, Ind., and in August of that year married Emma Brook, who bore him one child, who died in May, 1872. Shortly after this, he removed to Winamac, Ind., where his wife died in April, 1873. He then completed his medical course, which had been commenced on leaving high school, Drs. W. H. & G. W. Thompson, of Winamac, Ind., being hie preceptors. In 1874 he entered the Indiana Medical College, where he attended a full course of lectures, and in the winter of 1875—70 he attended a second term, after which he began the practice of medicine at Rosedale, Ind., which he has since pursued with success. June 1, 1878, he married Miss Annie M. Jones, who was born in Pulaski County, Ind., May 11, 1860. The Doctor is a wide-awake, intelligent, and enterprising man, and is highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a thorough medical scholar, as well as a successful and eminent physician and surgeon. In March, 1882. he received the degree of M. A. from the St. Louis School of Anthropology, and a year later they conferred on him the degree of M. D. He is a member of the Pulaski County Medical Society and also a member of the Indiana State Medical Association. He is also a member of the Masonic order and the Odd Fellows.

LEVI BURTON, son of Leonard and Emma (Medcalf) Burton, was born in Rush County, Ind., September 26, 1826. He was married in Cass County, Ind., in August, 1849, to Martha J., daughter of Robert Murray, and immediately afterward settled upon the same farm on which he now resides, in Section 4, Harrison Township, which he has improved, and upon which he has resided since. His wife died in November, 1850, having borne him one child. Emma A. He was again married in July, 1851, to Ann Elgin, by whom he has had born to him seven children: Jane, Eleanor, Phebe, Sarah S., John E., Pegy and Mary. This wife died in March, 1872. Mr. Burton is a fine man and is highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a member of the Christian Church. He owns at present 240 acres of fine and well-improved land.

HEZEKIAH CAST is a native of Clinton County, Ohio, and was born February 17, 1825. His parents, Horatio and Jane (Mount) Cast, were natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The former, Horatio Cast, was born in North Carolina July 16, 1795; and his parents, Ezekiel and Mary (Johnson) Cast, emigrated from North Carolina to Clinton County, Ohio, in a very early day, and there resided until death. Horatio Cast, the father of our subject, and Miss Jane Mount were married in Clinton County, Ohio. She was born in Tennessee, in August, 1798. In 1843 Mr. Horatio Cast and family moved to Clinton County, Ind., where they afterward resided until death, which occurred as follows: The mother died February 1, 1864, and the father died November 16, 1874. They were the parents of eleven children, viz.: Amos J., Ezekiel "W., Hezekiah, Thomas, Alvin. George W., John M., Mary E., Elizabeth J., James R., and one son who died in infancy and not named. In 1848 Mr. Hezekiah Cast, our subject, came to Rush County, Ind., and was there united in marriage, February 8, 1851, to Phebe J., daughter of Leonard and Emma Burton. She was born in Rush County, Ind., February 6, 1830. In the following March, after out subject's marriage, he moved to Cass County, Ind., and settled upon the same farm on which he now resides, in Section 8, Harrison Township, owning, in all, 320 acres of fine and well improved land. He had born to him five children, viz.: John "W., born January 24, 1852; Emma J., born August 29, 1855, and died October 16, 1860; Leonard H., born January 12, 1859; James T., born May 18, 1861, and Gary C., born September 23, 1865. Mr. Cast and wife are members of the'Christian Church.

JOHN T. CASTLE, an old and highly esteemed pioneer of Cass County, Ind., is a native of Frederick County, Md., and was born March 29, 1807. His parents, George V. and Catherine (Horine) Castle, were also both natives of Frederick County, Md., and of English, Scotch and German extraction. They were married in Frederick County, Md., and from there moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, and subsequently to Butler County, Ohio, where the father died. The mother afterward came to Cass County, Ind., where she resided until her death. They were the parents of thirteen children, viz.: John T., Priscilla, George V. B., Mahala, Noah, Isaac, Rebecca, Thomas, Elizabeth, James, Mary, Huldah and Peter. John T., our subject, the eldest member of the family, was married in Warren County, Ohio, March 22, 1836, to Sarah A., daughter of Arthur and Sarah (Eckles) Foffield. She was born in Butler County, Ohio, January 9, 1818. In August, 1836, Mr. Castle, our subject, immigrated to Cass County, Ind., and settled upon land in Section 10, Harrison Township, which he had entered in the fall previously. Here he toiled and labored hard to subdue and cultivate his land, and resided twenty-eight years. He then settled upon the land where he now resides, in Section 10, where he has resided since. He owns a fine farm of 80 acres of land, which is well improved. He is a highly esteemed, man. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has had no children born to him.

WILLIAM DONOVAN was born in County Cork, Ireland. March 9, 1826. His parents, William and Mary (Hurley) Donovan, were also natives of County Cork, Ireland, where they were married, and from there immigrated to Quebec, Canada, and from there, a few weeks later, to New York, and subsequently to Lancaster County, Penn., where the mother died; and in 1834 the father, with his family, moved to Wabash County, Ind.,.and in 1840 to Cass County, Ind., settling upon a part of the same farm on which our subject now resides, in Harrison Township, Section 13, which he had entered in 1836. He was the father of two sons: Dennis and William, our subject. He came with his father to this county in 1840; was married, in Wabash County, Ind., November 28, 1847, to Mary Coughlin, who was born in Lancaster County, Penn., in December, 1830, and a daughter of John and Ellen (Holand) Coughlin. After Mr. Donovan's marriage he settled upon the land which his father had entered in Section 13, Harrison Township, where he resided until 1880, when he settled upon another farm adjoining it, which he had purchased previously, where he has since resided. He owns at present 120 acres of land. Has had born to him four children: Mary E., John F., William P. and Dennis E. Mr. Donovan and family are members of the Catholic Church.

DANIEL FOGLESONG, an old and highly esteemed citizen of Cass County, Ind., is a native of Rush County, Ind., and was born March 14, 1823. His parents, George and Mary (Overleese) Foglesong, were natives of Maryland and Kentucky, respectively. The former, George Foglesong, was the eldest of three sons, born to George and Mary Foglesong, who were both natives of Germany, and from there immigrated to the United States in an early day. He was born in Maryland in November, 1801; was married to Mary Overleese in Montgomery County, Ohio, and from there, in 1821, moved to Rush County, Ind., where he resided until 1835, when he moved to Cass County, Ind., where he afterward resided until death. He died in 1863, and his wife died in 1878. They were the parents of thirteen children: Abraham, Daniel, Levi, John, Lydia. Eliza, Mary, George, Sarah, Rebecca, Amanda, Leonard and an infant daughter, who died young and not named. Daniel, our subject, came with his parents to this county in 1835, where he has resided since. He was married, in Harrison Township, this county, October 9,184-4, to Sarah J., daughter of Daniel and Mary (Borum') Remley. She was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, April 20, 1821. After our subject's marriage he settled upon his present farm, where he has resided since. His wife died August 8,1873, having borne him seven children: Mary, John, Huldah, Sidney A., Sarah I., Martha A. and Daniel S. September 30, 1874, Mr. Foglesong married Sarah J., daughter of Emanueland Eliza (Deer) Grauel. She was born in Cass County, Ind., August 16,1845. By this marriage two children have been born to Mr. Foglesong: Harvey and Flora. Mr. Foglesong was elected to the office of commissioner of Cass County in 1874, and held the office three years. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ISAAC GRANT, an esteemed pioneer of Cass County, was born in Brown County, Ohio, February 5, 1828. His parents, William and Phebe (Washburn) Grant, were natives of Kentucky and Ohio, respectively, and immigrated to Cass County, Ind., in the spring of 1830, where they afterward resided until death. They were the parents of eleven children, viz.: John L., Moses C., Isaac, Nancy A., Lewis, Simon B., Cyrus, George W.. Lydia J., James A. T. and William R. Isaac, our subject, came with his parents to this bounty in 1830, where he resided until 1852, when he went to California, where he engaged in mining and farming, and resided until 1860, in which year he returned to Cass County, Ind., and in December, 1861, enlisted in Company B, Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until September, 1865, when he was mustered out, and afterward returned to Cass County, Ind., where he was married, December 2, 1865, to Minerva J., daughter of Aaron and Trece Ann (Corts) Pool. She was born in Brown County, Ohio, May 4, 1842. After our subject's marriage, he settled upon the farm where he at present resides. He owns 270 acres of fine land. Has had born to him five children, viz.: Artemas W. (deceased); Arthur L. (deceased); William D. B., John A. W. and Frank M. Mr. Grant is an enterprising and highly respected man. He and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

JOHN HERD was born in Yorkshire, England, March 1, 1838, and is the third child born to John and Agnes (Steinton) Herd, both natives of Yorkshire. The father of the subject of this sketch was a game-keeper on the estate of Lord Upton. When John, Jr., was ten years old, his father came to America and settled on the farm where John now lives. Owing to unfortunate sickness in childhood he was crippled so that he has always fceen unable to perform manual labor. He was educated in the public schools, and sucli select schools as could be reached without going out of the State, and finally took a course in a commercial college at Chicago. About
1858, he commenced teaching in the common schools of this county. He purchased the interests of other heirs in the homestead, and carries on a farm of 240 acres. March 10, 1878, he was married to Emma Burton, daughter of Levi Burton, of this township. Four children: Martha Agnes, Nora, John P. and Flora. Mr. fiurd has filled the office of trustee of his township once, and at other times called upon by his party (Republican) to fill important trusts.

I. M. KING, an old and highly esteemed pioneer of Cass County, is a native of Harrison County, Ky., and was born June 2. 1817. The parents from whom he descended were Armistead and Elizabeth King, who were both natives of North Carolina. The former, Armistead King, was a son of Joseph and Sarah King, who moved from North Carolina to Bracken County, Ky., in a very early day. and afterward resided until death. They were the parents of seven children, viz.: Lydia, George, William D., Susan, Nancy. John and Armistead, the father of our subject, the eldest member of the family, a soldier in the war of 1812. He was married in Harrison County, Ky., and from there, in 1830, moved to Rush County. Ind.. and from there to Boone County, Ind., where they lived until their death. They were the parents of seven children, viz.: Jared R., Martha, Elizabeth, Jane, Sarah, Armistead L. and Isaac M.. our subject, the eldest member of the family. He was married in Rush County, Ind., November 30, 1836, fb Amanda M., daughter of Henry and Sarah (Swigard) Sageser. She was born in Bourbon County, Ky., March 4, 1821. After Mr. King's marriage he purchased land and settled in Rush County, Ind., where he resided until the spring of 1839, at which time he moved to Cass County, Ind.. and purchased and settled upon the same farm on which he now resides. He owns 180 acres of fine land. Has had born to him six children, viz.: Mary M.. born March 4, 1839, died June 7, 1874; Leonard B., born May 2, 1841; Armistead, born November 9, 1843. died March 1, 1879: Edward G., born January 22, 1849, died August 25, 1864; Richard B., born August 8, 1852; Isaac M., born February 8, 1855. Mr. King and wife are members of the Christian Church.

FREDERICK KLING was born in Germany, June 5. 1830. His parents, Peter and Mary Kling, immigrated to the United States in 1847, first settling near Buffalo, N. Y., and from there, in 1852, moved to Cass County, Ind., where they afterward resided until death. They were the parents of six children, viz.: Frederick, Maud, Valentine. Mary, Elizabeth and Clara. Frederick, our subject, came with his parents to Cass County, Ind., in 1852, and has lived here since. He was married at Logansport, May 29, 1860, to Sophia Smith, who was born in Germany March 16, 1834. After Mr. Kling's marriage he settled upon the farm on which he now resides, in Harrison Township, Section 30. He owns 121 acres of Une and well improved land. Has had a family of eight children, viz.: Mary, Joseph, Sophia, Catherine, Emma, Clara, William G. and one daughter, who died in infancy and not named.

JOHN MORPHET was born in Yorkshire, England, August 17, 1831. His parents, Richard and Sarah (Gibson) Morphet, were also both natives of Yorkshire, England, and were both born in the year 1798. They resided in Yorkshire until their deaths, which occurred as follows: The mother died November 22, 1869, and the father March 8, 1879. They were the parents of nine children, viz.: Richard, Leonard, Thomas, John, Thomas M., Elizabeth, William, Mary and one daughter, who died in infancy and not named. John, our subject, immigrated to Cass County, Ind., in 1851, settling in Harrison Township, and in February, 1853, purchased a part of the same farm on which he now resides. On July 30, 1859, he married Miss Sarah J., daughter of John and Susan Burton. She was born in Cass County, Ind., June 7, 1839. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Morphet, viz.: Richard L., born July 18, 1860; John W.. born March 11, 1862; Sarah S., born February 5, 1864; Mary A., born October 4, 1866; Elizabeth G, born September 4, 1869; Phebe J., born February 15, 1873; Charley L.. born May 10, 1878, and died August 7, 1879; and Earl B., born July 11, 1884. Mr. Morphet and wife are members of the Christian Church.

WILLIAM MORRISON was born in Fayette County, Ohio. August 16, 1826, the son of Daniel and Nancy A. (Pinkerton) Morrison, who were natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively, and of Scotch and Irish extraction. The former, Daniel Morrison, was a son of William Morrison, who was a native of Orange County. N. Y. His father, Daniel Morrison, was a native of Scotland, and emigrated from there to Orange County, N. Y., at a very early day. William Morrison, the grandfather of our subject, was born in Orange County, N. Y., in the year 177(1 He married a Miss Affie Crane, and in 1816 immigrated to Fayette. County, Ohio, where he afterward resided until his death, which occured in 1836. He was the father of eight children, viz.: Oliver, Daniel. John. Samuel D., Maria, Joslah, Ann J. and Eleanor. Daniel, the father of our subject, the next to the oldest member of family, was born in Orange County, N. Y.. April 9, 1801. He moved with his parents to Fayette County, Ohio, where he was married in September, 1825, to Nancy A., daughter of David and Elizabeth (Miskimmins) Pinkerton; she was born in Allegheny County, Penn., August 5, 1803. After Mr. Daniel and Nancy A. Morrison's marriage, they settled in Fayette County, Ohio, where they resided until 1838, at which time they moved to Cass County, Ind., where he died April 20, 1877. His widow still survives, and now makes her home with her children, which were seven in number, viz.: William, Eleanor, Ann E., Theodore P., Jane, Martha M. and Daniel D. William, our subject, the eldest member of the family, came with his parents to this county in 1838, where he resided until 1851. when he went to Columbus, Ohio, and he was employed as an attendent in the State Lunatic Asylum, of that place, for three years. He was married at Columbus, Ohio, May 2, 1854 to Wilhelmina. daughter of John and Elizabeth (Markle) Cook. She was born in Berks County, Penn., October 30, 1829. In 1854 Mr. Morrison, our subject, moved to Cass County, Ind., where be has resided since. He owns 176 acres of fine and well improved land. Has had born to him six children, viz.: Hiram (deceased), Edward., Ann E.. David T., Lewis C. (deceased) and Mary J. Mr. Morrison and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

BOBERT MURRAY was born in Highland County, Ohio, February 3, 1826. His parents, Robert and Elizabeth (Robinson) Murray, were both natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch-Irish extraction, and were born in the years 1792 and 1793, respectively. They were married in Highland County, Ohio, and thence, in 1839, moved to Cass County, Ind., where they resided until death. He died November 9, 1863, and his wife survived him fourteen days. They were both members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he was an elder for a number of years previous to his death. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and was taken prisoner at the surrender of Gen. Hull. They were the parents of thirteen children, viz.: Nancy, Isabelle, Margaret, Eliza J., Susan. James, Sarah A., Robert, Martha J., Catherine, Mary E., Sidna A. and Elizabeth N. Robert, our subject, came with his parents to this county in 1839, where he was married, November 12. 1850, to Hannah, daughter of James and Jane (Starr) Dean. She was born in Montgomery County, Ind., October 26,1833. After our subject's marriage he settled upon the same farm on which he now resides, in Harrison Township, Section 4, where he has resided since. He owns a fine farm of 125 acres of land. Has had born to him nine children, viz.: A. D., born December 25, 1852; Rosettie T., December 3, 1854; Drucilla J., September 25, 1856; Alice A., October 23, 1858; infant daughter, died May 9, 1861, two days old: Indiana H, born April 11, 1864; Asa J., September 30, 1867; Sarah M., October 7, 1870, and Clara B., August 3, 1874. Mr. Murrav and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HIRAM SEWARD. son of Daniel and Sarah A. Seward, was born in Butler County, Ohio, November 10, 1841. He came to Cass County, Ind., in 1863, and was here married, on February 21, 1867, to Mary C., daughter of Daniel and Sarah J. Foglesong. She was born in Cass County, Ind., December 2, 1846. In 1868. Mr. Seward, our subject, purchased and settled upon the farm on which he now resides, in Harrison Township, Section 2. He owns at present 820 acres of fine land, which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation, 80 acres of which lie in Cass County and 240 in Fulton County. He has had born to him four children, viz.: Webster, William. Leonard and Jane. Mr. Seward is highly esteemed by all who know him. He is a member of the Masonic order.

WILLIAM SHADINGER, born March 18, 1835, was the ninth of eleven children born to John and Elizabeth (Wisimer) Shadiuger, who were both natives of Bucks County, Penn., where they were married in 1820. They came to Ohio and settled near Cincinnati, where the subject of this sketch was born, and from where he was brought to Indiana in 1839, and reared and educated in the common schools of Miami County. In the winter of 1860-61 he went to Minnesota, and when the tocsin of war sounded in 18G1 he promptly enlisted as a private in Company F, First Minnesota Infantry, and took part in the first battle of Bull Run. He served •with his regiment and took part in all its campaigns  and Jbattles, including the second battle of Bull Run, the Wilderness, and battles about Richmond, until he was severely wounded at Vienna, Va., about September 1, 1862, on account of which he was discharged in March, 1863. After recovering sufficiently from his wound, he traveled for five years, principally in the West—across the plains, Utah, Oregon and the wilds of the Northwest. Returning to Mexico, Ind., May 21, 1874, he was married to Martha A. Olliver, a daughter of Turner and Nancy (Hendricks) Olliver, natives of Kentucky. In this union four children have been born, viz.: Emma Louisa, Elmer Edgar (deceased), Jesse Milroy and Lizzie Edna. Mr. Shadinger united with the Baptist Church in 1874, and adheres rigidly to that faith. Since 1875 he has resided in Harrison Township, and followed farming. He is a Republican in politics. Honest, industrious and prosperous, he deserves, as he possesses, the esteem and confidence of all who know him.

WILLIAM W. STEVENS, saw and planing-mill and lumber dealer, Altoner, Ind., P. O. Nebo, is a native of Cass County, Ind., and was born in Harrison Township February 15, 1838. His parents, James N. and Maria (Backus) Stevens, immigrated to Cass County, Ind., in an early day. They were the parents of seven children, viz.: John, Mary, Julia A., George W., Loren C., William W. and Maria J. William W., our subject, was married in Harrison Township, this county, May 27, 1859, to Mary, daughter of John and Jane Hall, and afterward settled on a farm in Section 11, Harrison Township, where he resided until 1860, in which year he purchased and settled upon a farm in Section 16, Harrison Township, and in May, 1884, moved to Altoner, Ind., and erected a saw and planing-mill, and has since engaged in the lumber trade. He has a family of four children, viz.: Jennie M., James N., Loren C. and Laura E. JOHN T. WALKER was born in Brown County, Ohio, December 19, 1841. His parents, William and Mary (Roberts) Walker, were both natives of England, and were born as follows: The father June (5, 1802, and the mother June 7, 1817. They immigrated to the United States in an early day, and were married at Cincinnati. Ohio, after which they settled in Brown County, where they resided until about the year 184.7, at which time they removed to Cincinnati, where the mother died April 19, 1849. He subsequently married a Mrs. Mason, who died shortly afterward. He came to Cass County. Ind., in 186ti, and subsequently returned to Cincinnati, where he died May 25, 1807. He was the father of five children, viz.: Ann E., Hannah A.. John T., William W. and Winnifred. John T., our subject, was educated at Farmers' College, Ohio, and September 30, 18(51, enlisted in the First Company of Minnesota Sharpshooters, and served until September 14, 1865; was promoted to corporal and sergeant, and in December, 1864, was promoted to first lieutenant, and then to, captain July 14, 1865, in which capacity he served until his discharge, September 14, 186*5; after which he returned to Isanti County, Minn., from which place he enlisted, having gone there in the fall of I860. In June, 1867, he came to Cass County. Ind., and was married in Harrison Township, January 27, 1869, to Mattie M., daughter of Jacob Yantis. She was born in Graves County, Ky., December 10, 1846. After Mr. Walker's marriage he settled upon his present farm, where he has resided since. He has had born to him four children, viz.: Infant daughter, born September 21, 1869, died at the age of eighteen days; Gertrude M., born July 1, 1874; Walter Y., born May 4, 1876, and Ida F., bom March 4, 1878.

JOHN H. WEYAND, son of Daniel and Eliza (Beckley) Wevand, of Boone Township, was born in this county September '28, 1836. He was married, in this county, July 8, 1860, to Sarah S., daughter of Richard and Elizabeth C. (King) Burton. She was born in this county July 21, 1842. After Mr. Weyand (our subject) was married, he first settled on land in Section 24, Boone Township, which he improved, and upon which he resided until the fall of 1862, at which' time he moved to Harrison Township, and in January, 1863, purchased and settled upon a farm in Sections 10 and 11, Harrison Township, and in July of that same year settled upon the farm on which he now resides, Section 9, Harrison Township. He owns at present 339 acres of fine and well-improved land, all of which lie in Harrison Township. He has had born to him four children: Rosie J.,born August 27, 1861; Grandville N., born December 8, 1864; Florence V., born August 28, 1866, and Bertha E., born November 7, 1876.

EDWARD WHITFIELD was born in Yorkshire, England, September 14, 1849. His parents, Edward and Elizabeth (Batty) Whitfield, were also natives of England, and from there, in 1857, immigrated to Cass County, Ind., where they still reside. They are the parents of eleven children: Dorothy, Ellen, Ann, Richard, Thomas, Elizabeth, Edward, Jane, Matthew, Phebe and Ellen. Edward, our subject, came with his parents to Cass County in 1857, and has resided here since. He was married, at Logansport, Ind., August 14, 1869, to Lavina J., daughter of John and Elizabeth (Demoss) Foglesong. She was born in Harrison Township, this county, October 10, 1852. In 1870 Mr. Whitfield, our subject, settled upon the farm on which he now resides, where he has lived since, and owns at present 210 acres of fine and well-improved land. Has had born to him four children: Dorothy E., born December 29, 1870, deceased; John E., born in December, 1871. deceased; Emma E., born February 22, 1873, and Hattie J., born February 22, 1875. Mr. Whitfield is an intelligent and enterprising man, and is highly esteemed by all who know him.

JOEL C. WICKARD was born in Ripley County, Ind., November 26, 1832. His parents, Joseph and Elizabeth (Watson) Wickard were natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively, and of German and Scotch extraction. The former, Joseph Wickard, was a son of Bartholomew Wickard, who was a native of Germany, and from there immigrated to the United States in a very early day, settling in Monongalia County, W. Va., where he engaged in shoe-making, and was there married to Sarah Tice; and from there subsequently 'moved to Butler County, Ohio, where he afterward resided until death. He was the father of eight children: John, Hannah, Pegy, Sarah, Jacob, Mary, Elizabeth and Joseph, the father of our subject, the eldest member of the family. He and Elizabeth Watson were married in Butler County, Ohio, and afterward settled near Hamilton, Ohio, where they resided some time; and from there subsequently moved to Ripley County, Ind., where they afterward resided until death. They were the parents of ten children: Isaac, Levina, John, Joycy, Sarah, Elsy, Joseph, Joel C., Jacob M. and Catherine. Joel C., our subject, was married in Butler County, Ind., in October, 1854, to Hannah C., daughter of John and Elsy (Craser) Wickard. She was born in Butler County, Ohio, in August 1836. Shortly after our subject's marriage, he moved to Douglas County, Ill., where he resided until the spring of 1856, at which time he removed to Butler County, Ohio, and from there, in 1858, to Carroll County, Ind., and from there to Macon County, Ill., and then back to Carroll County, Ind., and from there to Cass County, Ind., in the fall of 1865, purchasing and settling upon the farm on which he now resides, in Harrison Township, Section 3. He owns 185 acres of fine and well-improved land. His wife died February 22, 1879, having borne him twelve children: Mary S., William A. (deceased), Wilkerson B., Catherine C., Willard, Wilson D. (deceased), Urilla, Dennis F., Elsy, Cordelia, Melvin (deceased) and James (deceased).

THOMAS WILSON was born in Wesmoreland Comity. England, September 9, 1838. The parents from whom he descended were John and Margaret Wilson, to whom eight children were born, viz.: James. Isabelle, John, Elizabeth, Thomas, Isaac, Mary and Richard. Thomas, our subject, immigrated from England to Gass County, Ind., in 1856, and subsequently purchased land in Section 4, Harrison Township, upon which he settled and began to improve the land. He was married, December 6, 1860, to Rebecca E.. daughter of John and Elizabeth Callaham. She was born in Cass County, Ind., March 27, 1842. After Mr. Wilson's marriage he settled upon his land in Section 4, where he resided until 1862. when he moved to Canada West, where he resided some time, and from there removed to Cass County, Ind., and settled upon the farm upon which he now resides in Section 3, Harrison Township. He owns 200 acres of fine and well improved land, 178 acres of which lie in Cass County, and 22 acres in Fulton County. He has had born to him five children, viz.: Maggie B., Ida M., Isaac A.. Nellie, and an infant son, who died young and unnamed.

WILLIAM WINN, son of Richard and Alice (Batty) Winn, was born in Yorkshire, England, February 4, 1835, and came with his parents to Cass County, Ind., in 1847, where he was married, August 11, 1861, to Susan, daughter of Peter and Christena (Freshour) Michael. She was born in Cass County, Ind., April 6, 1837! After our subject's marriage he settled upon land in Section 1, Harrison Township, where he resided until the fall of 1876, at which time he moved to Carroll County, Mo., and resided until 1877, when he removed to Cass County, Ind., and settled upon his present farm, where he has resided since. He owns a fine farm of 160 acres of land. He has had born to him four children, viz.: William A.. Willard, Thomas E. (deceased) and Gilbert (deceased).

RICHARD WINN is a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born August 3, 1836. His parents, Richard and Alice (Batty) Winn, were also both natives of Yorkshire, England, and were born as follows: The father in December, 1806, and the mother in April. 1816. They were also married in Yorkshire, England, and from there, in 1847, immigrated to the United States, settling in Cass County, Ind., where they afterward resided until their death, which occurred as follows: The mother in February, 1872, and the father in August, 1875. They were the parents of eight children, viz.: William, Richard, Edmund, Thomas, Agnes, Isabelle M., Thomas. B. and Leonard W. Richard, our subject, came with his parents to thin county in 1847, where he was married, August 23, 1860, to Isabel!*.', daughter of John and Agnes (Stainton) Herd. She was born in Yorkshire, England, February 16, 1837. After our subject's marriage, he settled upon his present farm, where he has resided since. He owns 340 acres of fine aud well improved land. Has had born to him ten children, viz.: Agnes, John W., Mary E., Thomas J. (deceased), Margaret A. (deceased), Charles E., Henry C., James M., Florence E. and Edna M. Mr. Winn and-wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Winn was elected trustee of Harrison Township in 1884, and re-elected in 1886.

JACOB YANTIS, a highly respected pioneer of Cass County, is a native of Spencer County, Ky., and was born December 15, 1817. His father, Aaron Tantis, was born in Boyle County, Ky., April 11, 3,787, and was a son of Jacob Yantis, who was a native of Germany, and from there immigrated to the United States previous to the Eevolutionary war, in which he served, under Gen. Greene. He was twice married, and was the father of eight children, viz.: George, John, Amos, Aaron, Rebecca, Rachel, Enoch and Jesse. Aaron, the father of our subject, was married in Spencer County, Ky., in the year 1812, to Martha Cochran, who was born in Clark County, Ky., in the year 1790, and>was a daughter of Robert and Jane (Laird) Cochran. After this marriage, Mr. Yantis settled in Spencer County, Ky., where the mother died March 30, 1835. In the following year, Mr. Yantis and family moved to Logansport, Ind., where he resided several years, after which he retired and made his home with his children until death, which occurred on July 19, 1861. He was the father of eight children, viz.: Jane, James, Jacob, John, Robert, Samuel, William L. and Benjamin F. Jacob, our subject, came with his father to Cass County, in 1836, where he remained until the following spring, at which time he returned to Spencer County, Ky., and was there married, October 9, 1845, to Margaret A. Scott, who was born in Shelby County, Ky., November 28, 1824. In December, 1845, Mr. Yantis moved to Graves County, Ky., where he resided until November, 1857, at which time he moved to Cass County, Ind., and settled upon the same farm on which he now resides in Section 14, Harrison Township. He owns at present 290 acres of fine and well improved land. Has had born to him five children, viz.: Mary M., Viola, Jane E., Aaron S. (deceased) and Emma F. Mr. Yantis is an enterprising and highly esteemed citizen.

Source: History of Cass County, Indiana By Thomas B. Helm, Brant and Fuller, Chicago (Ill.)

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