Genealogy Trails

DEARBORN COUNTY, INDIANA
BIOGRAPHIES


Charles Tebbs Bonham

Charles Tebbs Bonham. Shrewd business capacity, special adaptiveness to his vocation, appreciation of his calling's many advantages and a firm belief in his own ability to succeed, have placed Charles Tebbs Bonham among the leading promoters of agriculture and stock raising in the Whitewater vicinity of Hamilton county. From the fertile soil of this locality, his hands have brought forth ample means and his present status among his fellow-citizens is that of a financially strong and morally high farmer. Mr. Bonham was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, July IO, 1878, a son of John Hughes and Sarah (Hargitt) Bonham, both natives of Dearborn county, Indiana. Mr. John H. Bonham engaged in the agricultural business throughout his life and both he and Mrs. Bonham are now living retired in Dearborn county, Indiana. He is a Democrat in politics and takes great interest in political affairs. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and is accounted one of its most charitable members. Mr. and Mrs. Bonham were the parents of five children and they are as follows: Mary, who is the wife of John Siefferman, of Dearborn county, Indiana; Charles T.; Nora, who is the wife of Floyd Jackson, of Dearborn county; John, who resides in Whitewater township, Hamilton county, Ohio, and Alta, who is the wife of Charles Thomas, of Butler county, Ohio. Charles Tebbs Bonham obtained his early education in the local schools of Dearborn county, Indiana and upon the completion of his studies, returned home and assisted in the agricultural operations of his father's farm. He continued in this until 1903, when he rented one of his father's farms, and engaged in business for himself. After continuing in this for nine years he purchased a farm in Whitewater township, which he sold some time later. He then purchased his present fine farm of 125 acres, where he is now engaged in general farming. Mr. Bonham also makes a specialty in raising high grade Jersey cattle for which he has more than local fame. Politically, Mr. Bonham is a stanch Democrat, but never cared for the eminence of office, preferring to devote his time to his home and business. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church; his wife of the Christian church, and all are active in the affairs of both. On October 12, 1903, Mr. Bonham was united in marriage with Miss Mary Bodle, a daughter of John and Bell (Henry) Bodle, well-known agriculturists of Dearborn county, Indiana. Mr. Bodle is now living retired with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Bonham. To this union have been born two children: Howard Eugene, and Olive Irene, both living at home. In concluding this review of Mr. Bonham's life, will say that he is a man of the highest integrity, and one who is known throughout the community for his charity, fairness, and capability.
Source: Memoirs of the Miami Valley By John Calvin Hover, Joseph Daniel Barnes

Leonard Amm

Leonard Amm. In the history of St. Joseph county the name of Leonard Amm should not be omitted, for through many years he has been one of the leading agriculturists of Liberty township, progressive, enterprising and persevering. Such qualities always win success, and to Mr. Amm they have brought a handsome competence as the reward of his well directed efforts. He is a native of Dearborn county. Indiana, born on the 27th of March. 1855. a son of Andrew and Margaret (Kundinger) Amm. in whose family were seven children, five sons and two daughters, and six are now living: Adam, a farmer of Lincoln, Nebraska; Maggie, the wife of Albert Miller, who is living retired in Cincinnati, Ohio; George, who is married and resides in Dearborn county, Indiana, and with whom his father resided; Fred, who is married and also follows farming in Dearborn county; Leonard, whose name introduces this review; and Lizzie, the wife of Adam Ester, an agriculturist of Dearborn county.

Mr. Amm, the father, was born in the province of Byron, Germany, and after his marriage, with his young wife he left home and native land on a sailing vessel bound for New York, three weeks having passed ere the worn and weary travelers sighted land. Their first permanent home was in Hamilton, Ohio, but they subsequently removed to Dearborn county, Indiana, where they became the owners of sixty acres of partially improved land, their first home being a little log cabin, and this land is yet in the name of Mr. Amm. From the time of his arrival in America he was a loyal and devoted son of the republic, and would have served his adopted country in the Civil war had he not been exempted therefrom on account of having lost one of his fingers. He staunchly upheld the principles of the Republican party, and was a worthy member of the German Lutheran church, as was also his wife. She was born in the same place as her husband, about 1823, and her death occurred in 1895, when she had reached the age of seventy- two years. She was a kind and loving wife and mother, and she now sleeps in Dearborn county, where a beautiful stone stands sacred to her memory. Mr. Amm died May 27, 1907. at the home of his son George, in Dearborn county, and he was interred on Decoration Day. He was eighty-four years, four months and seventeen days old at the time of his death, and he is buried beside his wife in the county of Dearborn. His mind remained clear and was filled with many pleasant memories of the past.

Leonard Amm, their son, spent the early years of his life in his native county of Dearborn, and has devoted his entire business life to agricultural pursuits. He is a self educated man, and at the age of seventeen years he began the battle of life for himself, receiving fifteen dollars a month in compensation for his farm labor. When he had reached the age of twenty-one years he came to Liberty township, St. Joseph county, his first employer here being Peter Geyer, on whose farm he worked for four years. He was an industrious lad, and having saved his wages was enabled on the expiration of that period to purchase forty acres of land, only about five of which had been cleared, and he was obliged to go in debt for a part of the farm. As the years grew apace success rewarded his well directed efforts, and he was soon able to clear his indebtedness and to also purchase thirty-seven acres just across the road, while later he became the owner of forty-two acres where his house stands. He subsequently sold his first purchase of forty acres, and his farm now consists of one hundred and twenty acres, all excellent land and under a fine state of cultivation.

On the 10th of August, 1879, Mr. Amm was united in marriage to Miss Nancy E. Newcomer, and their five children, three sons and two daughters, are: Elmer G., who is an employee of the Armour Company in South Bend. He received his diploma from the common schools with the class of 1899, and married Miss Ida Harmon, by whom he has three children, Clarence, Merrill and Milbourn L. He gives his political support to the Republican party, and the family are members of the Lutheran church. Edmund D. resides with his brother Elmer in South Bend. He was a member of the class of 1900, and also spent two years in the high school of North Liberty. Celestia, who is pursuing her studies in the eighth grade and is also receiving musical instruction ; Lodema, a member of the seventh grade and also a music pupil; and Sterling Albert, the youngest of the family, who is a bright little lad in the fourth grade. Mrs. Amm was born in Liberty township January 21, 1859, and is the sixth 'of the seven children born to Samuel and Susanna (Stump) Newcomer. Six of the number are now living: John, a retired farmer of Liberty township; Katie, the wife of Christopher Eisenmanger, a retired farmer of Marshall county, Indiana: Mary, the wife of Albert Harmon, also of Marshall county; Eliza, wife of Moses Kaser, a farmer of Union township, St. Joseph county; Nancy E., the wife of Mr. Amm: and Samuel, who is married and resides on a farm in Marshall county, Indiana. Mr. Newcomer, the father, was born in Holmes county. Ohio, April 2, 1821, and died in 1897, in* Liberty township. In true pioneer style he journeyed from his native state to St. Joseph county, Indiana, where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in the dense timber, and the first home was the primitive log cabin so common in the early days. He was a Jackson Democrat in his political affiliations, while religiously he was a Mennonite. Mrs. Newcomer claimed Pennsylvania as the state of her nativity, her natal day being the 10th of August, 1823, and her death occurred at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Amm, May 20, 1906. In 1904 an organization for the reunion of the Newcomer family was instituted, their meetings to be held yearly, and in 1905 the reunion was held at the home of Mrs. Amm, at which one hundred and twenty of the relatives were present. On that occasion photographs of her mother and children, also her mother and grandchildren and her mother and great grandchildren were taken. This is the only organization of the kind known to exist in Liberty township.

Mr. and Mrs. Amm began their married life on the little forty acre tract purchased by the husband, and although their capital was then extremely limited their diligence and careful management have enabled them with the passing years to acquire a competence and to become leading agriculturists in the township. Their pleasant home is known as "Mapleridge Farm." Mr. Amm is a stanch Republican in his political affiliations, having cast his first presidential vote for R. B. Hayes, and he has ever since supported its presidential candidates. He is a member of the advisory board of Liberty township, and both he and his wife are members of the German Lutheran church. Mrs. Amm recently went on an extended trip to Pennsylvania, where she visited relatives and viewed the beautiful scenes of the Keystone state.
Source: A History of St. Joseph County, Indiana By Timothy Edward Howard

Anson Thatcher

Anson Thatcher resides on section 17, Kirklin Township, where he has a fine farm of 280 acres, and also owns ninety-eight acres on section 18. He came to Clinton County in December, 1865, and lived in Johnson Township until the following spring, when he moved to his present farm. A small frame house was on his farm, and it was partly under cultivation. He has greatly improved his farm, and in 1883 built an upright part to his residence and a fine frame barn. He has 1,000 feet of tiling, good fences, and his buildings are among the best in the township. Mr. Thatcher was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, December 8, 1836, a son of Harvey and Milly (Barre) Thatcher. His father was born in New York State, in 1804, and when a boy accompanied his father, Elijah Thatcher, to Dearborn County, Indiana. Elijah Thatcher was killed by falling from a fence on which he was sitting talking to a neighbor; the rail turning threw him to the ground and broke his neck. Harvey Thatcher died in 1863. He was a devoted Christian man, and in politics was a Whig. The mother of our subject was born in Virginia, eight miles from the Blue Ridge Mountains, in 1806, and when a child accompanied her parents to Dearborn County, Indiana, and was there married about 1825. She is still living on the old homestead. The family consisted of twelve children—Eliza J.,Ezra D., Elijah (deceased), Clarissa (deceased), Anson, Catherine, Mary A., Samuel, Susannah. J., William and Elizabeth O. When Anson Thatcher was nine years old his parents moved to Fayette County, and there he was reared, living there until 1865, although he had spent one summer in Clinton County prior to his removal here, coming in 1862 and working by the month, making his home with his brother Elijah. He was married June 23, 1863, to Phoebe Hinesley, who was born in Clinton County, Indiana, May, 1845. Her father was an early settler of Clinton County, it being his home thirty-eight years. Her mother died when she was but two years old. Mr. Thatcher has one son—Francis E., who was born September 10, 1865, and married Essie Ward. Mr. Thatcher had but limited educational advantages, and feeling the disadvantage of waiting until manhood to acquire his education his son has been given the benefit of the best schools, attending La Fayette College several terms. Mr. Thatcher is a representative man of his township, being enterprising and public spirited. In politics he is a Republican.
Source: History of Clinton County, Indiana By Ill Inter-state Publishing Company

Virgil H. Whipple
WHIPPLE, VIRGIL H., Farmer, Sec. 14; Harvard P. O. ; born in Franklin Co.. Mass., town of New Salem, March 27, 1810; came to the town of Dunham, (IL) 1844; owns 160 acres of land two and a half miles from Harvard (IL). Married Jane Durant March 14, 1848; she was born in Dearborn Co., Ind.; had nine children- four boys and five girls ; lost two boys and one girl. 
[Source:  1877 Directory of McHenry County, IL - Transcribed by K. Torp]

HARRISON ABBOTT, farmer, Washington Township, resides on Section 9, and has a fine body of land, all under a good state of cultivation.   He was born in New Jersey, April 21, 1814   His parents, William and Elizabeth (Naylor) Abbott, were born in New Jersey, and moved to this county in 1816, where he was engaged in farming up to his death, July 4, 1860, being seventy-two years, seven months and eighteen days old.   The mother died August 1, 1854, at the age of sixty-one years.   Mr. Harrison Abbott was married December 29, 1839, to Miss Mary Smith, a native of Washington Township, who was born August 19, 1821.   By this union seven children were born, viz.: Enoch, Rufus, Sarah A., William, Rafe, Hartsell, and Marietta.   Mr. and Mrs. Abbott are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. During his life Mr. Abbott has followed the occupation of a farmer, in which industry he has creditably succeeded   As a citizen he has been no less fortunate in gaining the esteem of his Fellow men.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

HARTZELL ABBOTT, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Dearborn County, Ind., July 6, 1835. His parents, "William L. and Elizabeth (Naylor) Abbott, were both natives of New Jersey, where they married, and from thence, in 1816, immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., where they resided until their deaths, which occurred, the mother August 1, 1854, and the father July 4, 1860. They were the parents of seven children, viz.: Elias, Henry H, Enoch, William N., Mary, Eliza A, and Hartzell, our subject. He, the youngest member of the family, was married at Lawrenceburgh, Ind., August 15, 1861, to Nora A, daughter of James and Nora (O'Conner) Johnson. She was born in this county, January 26, 1843. After Mr. Abbott's marriage he settled on his present farm, his fathers old homestead, where he has since resided. He owns 165 acres of tine land, and his wife owns forty acres. They have had born to them five children, viz: Frank Sheridan S., James S., William N. (deceased), and Demas H. Mr. Abbott is a member of the order of Odd Fellows, and also of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

J. H. ABBOTT, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Dearborn County, Ind., March 10, 1839.    He is one of four children, born to Elias and Nancy (McComas) Abbott.    His father was a son of William L. Abbott, a native of New Jersey, where he married Elizabeth Naylor, and from thence in an early day, immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind., where he afterward resided until his death.   They were the parents of seven children, viz.:   Harrison, Enoch, William N., Mary, Eliza A., Hartzell, and Elias, the father of our subject, the eldest member of the family. He was born in New Jersey, February 3, 1812, and came with bis parents to this county when a small boy.    He and the above Nancy McComas, were united in marriage in this county, and afterward settled on the same farm on which our subject now lives.   She was born September 8, 1815.   In 1867 they moved to Dillsborough where he died January 28, 1869.   His widow still survives, and resides at Dillsborough.   Their children were Mary A., James H., Elizabeth A., and Sarah F.   J. H., our subject, enlisted in the service August 11, 1862, in Company B, Eighty-third  Regiment Indiana Volunteers, and served until June, 1865, at which time he was discharged, and  returned to Dearborn County where he was married December 24, 1866, to Emma L., daughter of Nathan, and Sarah (Powell) Smith.    She was born in Clay Township, this county, October 22, 1846.   After our subject's marriage, he first settled at Dillsborough where he clerked in John M. Hoover's store until November, 1868, at which time he purchased an interest in the store, which they continued together until the spring of 1871, when he sold out his interest in the store and moved on the farm where he at present lives, and has since resided. They have had born to th em three children, namely: Orrin M., L. A., and Charley E. Mr. Abbott is a tine man; is a member of the G. A. R., of the Masonic Order and Odd Fellows.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

LEONARD ADKINS, retired, Sparta Township, was born in Worcester County, Md., February 16, 1812.   The parents, from whom he descended, were William P. and Ebby (McGee) Adkins, both natives of Worcester County, Md.   The former was a son of Nimrod and Elizabeth (Parsons) Adkins, who were also natives of Maryland.   He and the above Ebby McGee were united in marriage in Worcester County, Md., and there resided until their deaths.   Their children were as follows: Maria, Leonard, James, Sarah, William R., Samuel, and Hannah. Leonard, our subject, moved to Maysville, Mason Co., Ky., in 1838, where he learned the mason trade, which he has pursued during the greater part of his life.   In the spring of 1843, he moved to Moore's Hill, and has resided there principally ever since.   He was united in marriage August 23, 1843, to Mary Davis, who was born in this township December 14, 1821, and was a daughter of Spencer and Elizabeth Davis.   After Mr. Adkins's marriage he settled at Moore's Hill, and has resided there the greater part of the time.   He formerly dealt quite extensively in real estate.   He is an excellent man, and is highly esteemed by all who know him.   Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.   They have had born to them nine children, viz.: Maria P. (deceased), Elizabeth, Laura A. (deceased), James M., William S., Charles R., Flora B., Edward S., and Abraham L.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

WILLIAM S. ADKINS, dealer in meats, Sparta Township, is one of the most wide-awake and accommodating young men of the place; born at Moore's Hill, Dearborn Co, Ind., May 30, 1854. He is one of seven children born to Leonard and Mary (Davis) Adkins, of Moore's Hill, whose sketch appears above. He was educated in the district schools and at Moore's Hill College. He first opened a meat market in 1876, which he continued for a short time only, and afterward turned his attention to farming. In 1878, he again engaged in selling meats, which business he has since followed. He is doing an extensive business here, and is also carrying on a meat market in partnership with his brother, at Osgood. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. In 1880-81, he held the office of marshal of Moore's Hill, and at present is a member of the town board.   He is a genial young fellow.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

ADAM ADLER, farmer Sparta Township, was born in Germany, March 22, 1813. He was the second of eight children, born to Andrew and Barbara Adler, who were also natives of Germany, where they resided during their lives. Our subject was married in Germany in 1846, to Catherine Tronsier, and in the same.year immigrated to the United States, landing at New York City in November of that year. He shortly afterward came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1853 moved to Dearborn County, Ind.. settling on the same farm on which he now lives, which he had purchased in 1849. He owns sixty acres of good land, which i6 well improved.   Himself and wife have had born to them five children, viz.: Thomas, Peter (deceased), Nicholas, Catherine, and Henry.   Mr. Adler and family, are members of the Catholic Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JAMES AIKEN, a farmer of Manchester Township, and a native of this county, born November 15, 1822, is a son of John and Mary (Johnston) Aiken, natives of Fermanagh County,Ireland. The maternal grand-father, James Johnston, with his wife and part of his family, immigrated to America in 1818, landing at New York, thence came to Pittsburgh, where he built a family boat and came down the Ohio River to Cincinnati, where he left his family and walked to Manchester, this county, and stopped with Daniel Plummer, an early settler, and a Methodist minister. Soon after, he entered eighty acres of land in Section 3, this township, where he erected a log-cabin opening out right in the woods, into which he moved with his family, and commenced the work of making a farm. He was then sixty years of age, yet he performed much hard pioneer work. He lost his wife by death, in 1839. He died in 1848, aged ninety years. There were two of his sons, Jarret and Charles, who came to this county soon after their father, the former died at Louisville, and the latter settled in New Orleans, where he resided till the war of the Rebellion, since which, nothing has been heard of him. Mr. John Aiken came to America in 1821, was married at Philadelphia, and in the fall of the same year came to Indiana, and settled with his father-in-law, James Johnston, on Section 3, living in their house until he built a log house near where Mr. James Aikens' present residence stands. Here he resided until his death, July 2, 1860, aged sixty-five years. His widow died April 2, 1865, aged seventy-one years. They had two sons, and two daughters: James, Marvin Irvin, who, in April, 1859, went to California, where he resided, the last known of him; Elizabeth Ann, wife of Nathaniel Lewis, who resides in McDonald County, Mo., and Mary Jane, who died young. James Aiken, the eldest of his father's family, has never removed from the old home place where he was born and raised, having resided here sixty-two years. He was married May 11, 1865, to Miss Eliza Strain, daughter of Robert and Mary Strain, natives of Ireland, he being of Scotch descent; they lived and died in their native land.   Mrs. Aiken has one sister, Mary, wife of William R. McConnel, residing in Dearborn County. Mr. Aiken and wife, have six children: Robert James, Mary E., Jennie, Aggie, Hattie. and William Marvin. Mr. Aiken has devoted his life to farming and stock raising, and by industry and close application to business, has been very successful. He now owns 220 acres of land, with good new buildings, which he has erected, with other improvements. His farm now embraces all the land that was in possession of his ancestors. It is a pleasant farmer's home. Mr. Aiken is one of the prominent, reliable and honored farmers of Manchester Township.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

ALVIN J. ALDEN, farmer, Jackson Township, is a native of Jackson Township, born January 16, 1823;  a son of Isaac and Ruth (Morgan) Alden, he a native of New Hampshire, and she of New York. In the spring of 1817 Mr. Alden, then a young single man, with his cousin, Samuel Alden, left their homes and native State, and came to Cincinnati, and soon after to Dearborn County, Ind. Alvin entered seventy-five acres of the northwest quarter of Section 23, and Samuel the southwest quarter of the same section. They erected a small cabin near the line between their lands, where they lived together and kept bachelors' hall. At that time the country was all one dense forest, the nearest neighbor being three miles distant, and to get to them and back without, losing their course, they made a blazed path through the woods. These were probably the first settlers in Jackson Township. Mr. Alden, during the first two or three years, returned to Cincinnati during the winter season where he could procure employment and earn some money to carry on his improvements during the summer season upon his land. Subsequently he erected another log-cabin on his land, and in 1822 he married and located in his new home, where he resided until his death, June 5, 1844, in his forty-ninth year. His death occurred very suddenly, as follows: He had killed a calf, and in the act of dressing it he made a stroke with his knife which passed through the hide and entered his own body, severing the femoral artery, and he died in a few minutes from loss of blood. His widow still survives, and resides with her daughter in Missouri, aged eighty years. They had twelve children, ten now living: Alvin J., George and Warren (twins), the former—George—resides in Illinois; Lydia, now the widow Wade, resides in California; Samuel J., also in California; Mary, wife of Jesse Ehler, residing in Missouri; Jonathan, residing in Kansas; Caroline, wife of John Tangman, of Ripley County; Eliza, wife of George Jeter, residing in Missouri, and Isaac, now at the Black Hills.    Of those deceased, Phineas was scalded to death by falling into a kettle of hot water, when about four years of age, and Louisa, twin sister of Eliza, who grew to womanhood, married John T. Jackson, removed to Missouri, where she died in the spring of 1884. Alvin J. Alden, the eldest child of his parents, born and reared here, was fully acquainted with the early scenes of this county. December 5, 1847, Mr. Alden was married to Miss Sarah J. Catchall, born November 27, 1827, a daughter of Thomas and Sarah (McKinly) Catchall, natives of Pennsylvania, who became early settlers of Franklin County, Ind., where he died in May, 1832 or 1833. She still survives, and resides in Jackson Township, aged eighty-five years. They had four children, three now living: Ann, now the widow Homer, residing in Ripley County;  Sarah Jane, and Rachel, now wife of William Ehler. Mr. Alden and wife have had seven children, four now survive: Alice, now the wife of William H. Woods, residing in Chicago, 111., Ruth E., wife of William Ahrends, Orpha I. and Carrie E. The three deceased, Mary L., Samuel E., and Ida E., all died within four weeks' time, in May and June of 1860, of diphtheria. Mr. Alden has passed his entire life in Jackson Township, a period of sixty-two years, has given his principal attention to farming, and has lived at his present place of residence thirty-six years. He has served in the State Legislature three terms; was first elected in 1848, then in 1854, and again in 1878, serving to the general satisfaction of his constituents. In J 863 he was elected to the office of recorder of Dearborn County, and served four years.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JAMES AMDOR, farmer, Manchester Township, is a native of Dearborn County, born November 17, 1854; is a son of Bennett and Saphronia (Manley) Amdor. He is a native of Saxony, Germany, and she, of Hamilton, Ohio. In 1837 Mr. Amdor, then nineteen years of age, immigrated to America with his parents, Michael and Mary S. Amdor, and two sisters, Christiana and Anestina. They landed at Baltimore, thence came to Pittsburgh, and to Lawrenceburgh and settled on the farm where James Amdor and his mother now reside, and here Michael Amdor and wife died. Subsequently Bennett Amdor married and settled on the home place where he resided till his death September 28, 1883, aged sixty-live years. He was the father of nine children—six now living: Nancy Caroline, wife of Elwin Day, residing in Adams County, Iowa; Mary S., now the widow of Samuel Day; Edward R.; Franklin P., now a practicing physician; Rhoda J., wife of Valentine Vogel, and James, all of whom reside in Iowa, but the latter, James, who is the youngest child, and the subject of this sketch, who grew to manhood, and remained with his father until bis death, since which he has taken charge of the farm which contains 160 acres of land with good buildings and improvements, and is a very pretty home and farmer's residence. Mr. Amdor was united in marriage February 6, 1879, with Miss Mary Megard, born in Manchester Township August 30, 1862, a daughter of John and Mary Winegard, natives of Germany, who came to America while young with their parents, who settled in Ripley and Dearborn Counties; here they grew to maturity, married and settled in the western part of this township on the place where they still reside. They have had eleven children—nine now living: Mary, Jane (wife of Frederick Killman). Sarah, William, Sophia, Emma, Maggie, Edith and Arthur. Mr. Amdor and wife have four children: John Bennett, Rhoda Jane, Bertha May and Charles Edwards.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JAMES A. ANGEVINE, of York Township, and one of the old residents of this county, was born in New York City, in 1814.   His parents James and Susan (Montfort) Angevine, were both born in the same city. His grandfather, John Angevine, was a native of France, and came to America prior to the Revolution, in which he participated as a soldier. He reared a family of twelve children—eleven daughters and one son—the latter being the youngest of the family. He was a shoe-maker by trade, and in 1818, came to this county with his son James, with whom he re-sided till his death, in 1831. His wife survived two years, passing away in 1833. James Angevine, the father of our subject, James A., grew to maturity in New York, and in his earlier years was a sailor. It is said that he passed through many disasters during his seafaring life. He finally abandoned the water, and with a capital of $500, engaged in the grocery business, meeting with excellent success. At the age of twenty three, he married his first wife, who died eleven years later, childless. At thirty-six, he married Susan Montfort, whose parents were from Pennsylvania, and whose ancestors were from Holland. Of the twelve children born to them, eleven grew to maturity. The deceased was an infant. On moving to this county in 1818, he purchased 1,100 acres of land in York Township, where he afterward engaged in farming, till old age compelled him to retire. His wife died July 2, 1869. In his ninety-third year he was taken by his relatives and others, to La Salle County, Ill., where he died July 10, 1874 November 9, 1862, Mr. and Mrs. Angevine, celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their marriage, and there were present the entire family—sons, daughters, sons-in-law, daughters-in-law, and grandchildren, twenty-one of the latter, and thirty-five in all. He was a man of unblemished character, and all his life was devoted to the best interests of his family and the community James A. Angevine, whose name introduces this sketch, grew up in the quiet walks of rural life. He resided with his parents till 1844, when he married Miss Mary A. Davis, and established a home of his own. Her parents were William and Ann (Jenkins) Davis, who were natives of Morganshire, Wales. They were married April 20, 1814, and in 1816 immigrated to the United States. They located for a short time, in New York, and then moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, where their oldest daughter, Mrs. Angevine, was born, in 1821. In the following year they settled in this county, where they purchased land, and resided till their death, the mother passing away April 19, 1867 the father June 13, 1868. They reared a family of ten children, nine still living, namely: George, John, Thomas, Griffith, David, Mary A., Elizabeth, Helen and Jennie. After his marriage, Mr. Angevine rented land for a time and by hard labor, aided by an industrious wife, gradually worked his way up to the front rank. In 1850 he purchased his present farm of ninety acres, on which he has since conducted a prosperous farming business. On the death of his father, in 1874, he inherited 120 acres, and, besides these two tracts, owns another of forty acres in this township.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

THOMAS T. ANNIS, farmer and ex-county commissioner, Lawrenceburgh City, is a native of this county, born in 1836.   His parents, Thomas and Rhoda (Fairbanks) Annis, were natives of the Genesee Valley, N. Y., and Green River Valley, Mass.'  His grandfather, Annis, was a soldier in the revolution and died in the locality of his birth—the valley of the Genesee. His grandfather, Fairbanks, was a native of Massachusetts, and married there, but subsequently moved to the Genesee.   In 1822 the two families immigrated to this county, the country having been inspected two years previous by Thomas Annis and two brothers-in-law, Sheldon and Lucius Fairbanks.   Their tour was made by wagons over the mountains to Pittsburgh where they constructed their own flat-boats, and from which point they floated down the Ohio to Lawrenceburgh.   On their way they fell in company with the Buell family which afterward became quite prominent in this locality.   Thomas Annis remained with his family in Lawrenceburgh about one year.   He had learned the carpenter's trade in the East under the old seven-year apprenticeship rule and this trade he followed the fortunes of for about twenty-five years.    His first purchase of land was made in 1824, when he obtained eighty acres which he paid for by ship-carpentering in Cincinnati, Ohio.   He subsequently added to this tract, till he owned about 255 acres, besides some town property in Lawrenceburgh and Aurora and some western land.   He reared a family of four children who grew to maturity:   David, Thomas T., Clarissa {wife of Ferris Blasdel). and Cordelia, wife of E.Butterfield.   He was an industrious and energetic citizen and did much work in his line, erecting hay-presses, houses, barns, mills, etc.   He built the frame work of the old mill between Elm and Short Streets; Lawrenceburgh, the site of which is now marked only by the stone foundation. His death occurred in 1874 his widow survived till January, 1881. Thomas T. Annis, the subject proper of this notice, grew to maturity on his father's farm, and was there chiefly employed till he was thirty-one years of age. In 1870 he married Mary Heustis, a daughter of Elias Heustis, who is elsewhere mentioned in this work. After his marriage he resided on the home-stead one year, when he purchased the Buell farm in this township. Here he resided till 1882, engaged in agricultural pursuits, then moved to Lawrenceburgh which is now his place of abode. He was elected to the office of commissioner in the fall of 1882, which he is still holding, his term of service not having expired yet. He, with his brother, owns several tracts of land in Iowa, Kansas and Dakota, and his good management of his business affairs generally has not been without its reward.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

DAVID A. ANNIS, farmer, Lawrenceburgh Township, one of its most substantial residents, was born in Dearborn County, in 1829. He is a son of Thomas Annis, and grew to maturity on his fathers farm. He was educated in the common schools, and from his youth up has made farming his chief occupation. He married, in 1862, Mary Pearson, a native of this county, and daughter of Joseph and Emiline (Ayres; Pearson, natives of Hamilton County, Ohio. Her mother was born and reared in Cincinnati till grown, then moved to College Hill, nine miles from the city, on a farm. Her parents resided in this county for a time, and then returned to Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Annis have had five children born to them: Ralph TV., Harry, Louie, Elvin, and Mary Belle. Two are deceased. After his marriage Mr. Annis began business for himself on the old homestead, to which he has made some additions by purchase. He has always devoted most of his attention to general agriculture, in which he has been quite successful, now owning an excellent farm in this county, besides a large tract in Pratt County, Kas. He is regarded as one of the best farmers of the township, and in every respect an exemplary citizen; and having resided in the county of his birth all his life, is well worthy of taking a creditable position in its history.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

CHARLES F. ARING, of Lawrenceburgh, one of the members of the Rodenberg Distilling Company, was born in Ohio in the year 1860, and has resided most of his life in a small town called Chiviott where he received his education. In 1880 he invested in the Rodenberg Distillery, in which institution he has since been employed. He was married, in 1882, to Miss Emma Brandstettmer, and they have one child—Estella. Mr. Aring is a young man of sterling qualities and bids fair to succeed in all his business enterprises. The establishment with which he is connected was built at a cost of some §15,000 by himself, Frederick and Christ. Rodenberg, and has a capacity of 320 bushels of grain per day, employing eight persons. Considering his age it is creditable to Mr. Aring*s honor and abilities that he sustains an interest in an enterprise of such proportions.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

HENRY C. ASSCHE, farmer, of Jackson Township, was born June 15, 1850, in New Orleans, on the old battle ground of the war of 1812; is a son of Christian and Louizette (Heemann) Assche, natives of Germany.   In 1842 Mr. Assche left his native land for London, England, where be spent three years in a sugar refinery, thence he immigrated to New York City; remaining there but a short time he went to Charleston S. C, where he joined the Militia Guards and served with them until in 1847, when he came to New Orleans and there went to work at his former trade in the Battle Ground Sugar Refinery, where he continued until the business was closed by the war of the Rebellion and the capture of the city by the Federal troops.    Then he entered upon  the mercantile trade, in which he continued until 1867 when he sold his stock of goods and removed to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased the property now owned by D. Brinkmier, in Jackson Township.   In 1869, having sold the above property, he purchased the farm of eighty-two acres where he now resides.   Mr. Assche is now an invalid from rheumatism, contracted by overheating his blood while working in the sugar refining business, and is sometimes confined to his bed for several months, and at times suffers excruciating pains.    He was married in 1849 and became the father of three children, one only now living—Henry C.    Mr. Assche was a Union man during the late war, but was compelled to serve in the Confederate Home Guards, and after the capture of New Orleans by the Federals he was drafted into service by the Government, but on account of his rheumatic affection was exempted.   Henry C, the only surviving child of his father, received a good commercial education at New Orleans, and at fifteen years of age entered into the employ of the Atlantic & Mississippi Steam-ship Company, with whom he continued till they closed up in bankruptcy. In 1868 he came to his father's, where he has since resided, assisting on the farm and teaching school. He has taught school every winter since 1869, and anticipates continuing in the profession. He was married, June 7, 1877, to Caroline Schweitzer, born in Cincinnati, October 6. 1850, a daughter of Henry and Christena Schweitzer, natives of Germany. They came to Ohio in 1848, and to Dearborn County, Ind., in 1859, where he died August 9, 1882, of cancer of the stomach. They had four children: Caroline, Henry, William and Emma. Mr. Assche and wife have four children: Henry, William, Louizette and Emma.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

WILLIAM EL BAINBRlDGE, Lawrenceburgh, judge incumbent of the Seventh Judicial Circuit Court, and an able member of the Dearborn County bar, is a descendant of the old English stock of Bainbridges, of which his second cousin, Com. Bainbridge, of Tripoli fame, is perhaps the most conspicuous member. He is a son of P. W., and Catharine (Palmer) Bainbridge, and was born in the State of Pennsylvania, June 5, 1829. His father was a native of Maryland, and his mother was reared in Stark County, Ohio, her parents both living to the advanced age of over ninety years. His paternal ancestors were a hardy and intelligent class of people, though his parents died when he was in childhood, and he was reared by a family by the name of Goode, from the age of six to thirteen years, at which time Mr. Goode died.   This period of Judge Bainbridge's life was passed on the farm.   He obtained the rudiments of an education during the winter terms of the district schools, and with this as a basis, by close application to his books during every moment of his leisure time, he acquired a thorough general knowledge such as is rarely attained outside of a regular collegiate course, of which latter advantage he was never able to avail himself.   Mr.  Bainbridge resided in Warren County, Ohio, till nineteen years of age.   He then spent three years in Rushville, Ind., moving to Shelbyville, Ind., in 1851.   Here he began the study of law with Judge Cyrus Wright, an able lawyer of that county, and in the meantime was also engaged in editing a political paper called the Banner, and which he says is the only act of his life, in apolitical way, that he has any reason to regret; that he undertook the enterprise without due consideration, but soon saw the error of his position as the editor of a "Native American," or "Know-nothing" paper, and true to his convictions of right, abandoned the whole thing as soon as he could possibly dispose of his press and office.   From the fall of 1855 to the spring of 1858, Judge Bainbridge spent most of his time in the State of Ohio, engaged mostly in reading, returning to Indiana in the spring of 1858, and locating at Martinsville.   While at this point he was engaged to edit the Martinsville Monitor, the Democratic paper of Morgan County, which he did with credit to himself and satisfaction of his party and friends. In the fall of 1859 he removed to Nashville, Ind., where he continued the practice of his profession till in January, 1864, when he was appointed county recorder over ten other applicants, the regular official having been removed by death.   In the fall of the same year he was elected clerk of the circuit court of that county, on the Democratic ticket, and he filled that office and practiced his profession till 1866, when he came to Lawrenceburgh, where he has ever since resided, giving his entire attention to his professional business. He served five years as city attorney for Lawrenceburgh, and, in the fall of 1884. was elected to the office of judge of the Seventh Judicial Circuit of Indiana, comprising the counties of Dearborn, and Ohio, the duties of which office he assumed October 22, 1885. On that date, the Lawrenceburgh correspondent to the Cincinnati Enquirer referred to his character and abilities in the following complimentary terms: "This morning Judge Given retires from the circuit court bench, and Hon. William H. Bainbridge dons the judicial ermine, and for the next six years will preside over the counties of Dearborn and Ohio, as sole judge. Judge Bainbridge goes upon the bench with a mind possessed of superior legal attainments, having for nearly thirty years, been an active and leading practitioner in all the courts. Always a close and hard student, as well as a deep thinker and a forcible speaker, he made his mark as an attorney, and those who know his abilities as a jurist, predict for him a high place among the judges of the land. A man of faultless character, pure motives and the strictest sense of justice and right, fair minded and impartial; the litigants in his courts will never be able to even reflect against his honesty or judicial fairness in administering the law. Having experienced the hardships of poverty in his youth, and being compelled through misfortune early in life not only to earn his own living, but under the most adverse circumstances acquire by his own exertions an education, he is in every respect a self made man, and, although but fifty-three years of age, has filled a number of important positions, being elected at different times, recorder and clerk, of Brown County, Ind. For thirty years he has been a wheel horse in the ranks of Democracy, and in every campaign and upon every stump his voice has been lifted fearlessly and eloquently advocating Democratic principles. At different localities he has edited Democratic papers, while at the same time keeping up with his legal business, thus evincing the tireless energy of the man." Judge Bainbridge was married in 1855, to Lucretia A. "Wright, of Quaker extraction, a daughter of Joshua Wright, a man of fine mental attainments, and niece of Rev. George W. Maley, a former prominent Methodist minister of Cincinnati. Mr. and Mrs. Bainbridge, are parents of five children, Maley, Cora and Lulu, living. An interesting little son of five years, and an infant daughter are deceased. Miss Cora Bainbridge is a young lady of rare musical attainments, and devotes some time in giving instructions in that most civilizing of all arts, and is now in Europe prosecuting her musical studies. In manners Judge Bainbridge is affable; in principle, firm and decisive; in business, active and energetic; in heart generous and kind. He is a firm believer in the religion of Christ, he and his entire family being members of the Presbyterian Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

CONWAY BAINUM, farmer, Hogan Township, is a native of West Virginia, born August 9, 1809. His parents William, and Elizabeth (Bryan) Bainum were born in Wilmington, Delaware; father February 29, 1765, mother in October, 1790. They came to this county in 1810, where he farmed all his life. Conway was educated at Wilmington. His father built the first cabin on the ridge between the two Hogan creeks. His parents were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; father was an official member and his house was a home for the preachers. The first quarterly meeting in this locality, was held in his house. He was a zealous worker in the church. Mr. Conway Bainum was married April 11, 1832, to Sarah Deshiell, who was born in Maryland, February 10, 1812. By this union four children: Elizabeth, Alfred H., Mary J. and Charles W. The wife died October 15, 1868. October 21,1869, he married Mrs. Harriet. (Hayes) Swing. She was born near Delhi, Ky., February 27, 1834. The entire family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Bainum is an active, energetic, well-preserved man, and bids fair to endure the frosts of many more winters before passing to his reward.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

J. W. BAINUM, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Hogan Township, Dearborn County, Ind., September 15, 1851. His parents, William and Aloveda ("Williams) Bainum, were natives of Indiana and England. The former was born in Dearborn County, Ind., in the year 1810, and the latter in Cornwallshire, England, in the year 1815. They were married in Dearborn County, Ind., and afterward settled on a farm in Hogan Township, where they still reside. They were the parents of nine children: Elizabeth, Benjamin, Martha, Mary, Louisa, James W., Vienna, Agnes, and one infant daughter (the eldest of the family), who died in infancy unnamed. J. W., our subject, was united in marriage at Aurora, Ind., October 15, 1879, to Harriet, daughter of John and Catherine (Lindsay) Spidell. She was born in Hogan Township, this county, August 27, 1851. After our subject's marriage he first settled at Wilmington, where he resided until March, 1881, at which time he moved to Clay Township and settled on the farm where he now lives and has since resided.   He owns 155 acres of fine land.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

THOMAS L. BAKER, farmer, Hogan Township, owns eighty acres in Section 26, which is well improved and under a good state of cultivation. He was born on the same section in April, 1840, and received a fair education. His father, Thomas Baker, was born in Virginia in 1790; mother, Rachel (Powell) Baker, in Pennsylvania, December 20, 1797. They came to Indiana in an early day and located in Hogan Township, where he farmed all his life, although he was a shoe-maker by trade. The father died in 1853. The mother is still living, and enjoying good health in the town of Wilmington. Thomas L. enlisted in the war, in 1861, in Company D, Third Indiana Cavalry, and served three years and two months. He was wounded in the arm at White Oak Swamps in Virginia, which renders that member almost useless. With the exception of his army experience, he has followed farming all his life. Since the war he has been compelled to farm mostly by proxy on account of his crippled arm. He is an active, energetic man, and devotes a portion of his time and talent to handling stock, at which he is able to secure a good living outside of his farming interest. Mr. Baker was married, November 15, 1866, to Miss Celestia Canfield, a native of Hogan Township, and four children were born to them: Mittie, Ada, Gatch L. and Irena. The family is endowed with considerable natural musical talent, which is being cultivated as a part of their general education.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

COL. E. D. BANISTER, Lawrenceburgh, at present inspector of Indian agencies, has been a resident of Dearborn County for the past twelve years. He came to Lawrenceburgh in 1873 and for several years was engaged as manager of the Walsh Distillery. He was prominent in the revival of the Dearborn County Agricultural Society of which he was president three years, and is notable for his ability in the manage -ment of business details. He is an active worker as a Democrat in politics, and was a delegate to the National Demo-cratic Convention held at Chicago in 1884, and also a member of the notifying committee to inform Grover Cleveland of his nomination to the presidency. In 1885. Col. Banister was appointed, by President Cleveland, inspector of Indian agencies and he is now engaged in the discharge of the duties or this office.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JOSEPH BARTHOLOME, Lawrenceburgh, one of the oldest land-lords of this city, was born in Germany in 1819. He immigrated to America in 1836 with his step-father and mother, and thereafter spent several years in different parts of the country, locating in Lawrenceburgh in 1840. He was employed as a laborer till 1848, when he assumed charge of the Bartholome House, the proprietor of which he continued to be for about thirty-three years. In 1877 he retired, placing the house in charge of his son-in-law, Frank Weikle. Mr. Bartholome was married January 23, 1843, to Anna Mary Josephine Scholle, and fourteen children have blessed their union, twelve of whom are still Jiving: Simon, Joseph, Reinhold, William, Albert, Edward, Frank, Margaret, Josephine, Augusta, Mary and Ida. Mr. and Mrs. Bartholome are members of the church. They have labored hard to maintain their children and gain the competency which they are now enjoying in their declining years.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JAMES H. BALDWIN, Sparta Township, retired, was born in Franklin County, Ohio, September 8, 1814. His parents, Samuel and Flora (Woodruff) Baldwin, were both natives of Connecticut and of English extraction, and were born as follows: the former in 1777, and the latter in 1780. They were married at Avon, Conn., in 1799, and afterward settled at Branford, where they remained until 1814, at which time they, in company with several other families,immigrated to Worthington, Franklin Co., Ohio, and from thence, in 1827, to Cincinnati, Ohio, where they remained until their deaths. He died in 1840, and his widow in 1862. They were the parents of thirteen children, viz.: Almon, Sarah, Joseph, Serene, Emily, Libanius, Serenna, Arden W.. James H., Nancy M., Samuel D., Lysander and Abel. James H L, our subject, was educated at Cincinnati, Ohio. He was a student in the first public school of the city, which was taught by Thomas Jennings of this county. He completed a classic course in the old college building of Cincinnati, Ohio, after which he engaged in painting for some time, and also reading medicine. He then attended the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, after which he traveled for a few years, returning to Cincinnati again in 1838, resuming the study of medicine, which he completed, bat has never engaged in practice. He was united in marriage at Cincinnati, Ohio, May 13, 1847, to Rhoda L., daughter of John and Huldah (Townsend) Spencer. She was born in Switzerland County, Ind, February 1, 1823. Her father was born at Providence, B. L, in 1775, and her mother in Duchess County, N. Y., in 1776. They were married in New York, and from thence in a very early day moved to Pennsylvania, and from there to Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1819, to Switzerland County, Ind. They were the parents of twelve children, viz.: Millicent, John W., Daniel, Miriam, Almira, Miranda, Lawnton, Huldah, Eli, Emily, Peter L., and Rhoda L. In 1865 Mr. Baldwin moved to Dearborn County, Ind., purchased and settled on the same property where he now resides, and has since remained. They have had born to them three children, viz.: Samuel S., Henriette L., and Jeannette D. Mr. Baldwin is a man of good general information, and is highly esteemed by all who know him.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

CHARLES BAUER, carpenter, Aurora, a native of Germany, born in Wurtemberg, March 9, 1825.    His parents Christian and Catharine Bauer, were born in Wurtemberg, the former in 1800 and the latter in 1802.   The father died in 1826 and the mother in 1869.    Charles came to America in 1847, located in Poughkeepsie, N. Y., where he remained even years and followed carpentering.   In 1854 he moved to Aurora, and carried on a sash and door factory for eighteen years. In 1872 he sold out and engaged in house building and contracting.   He built the Catholic Church, priest's house, schoolhouse, Indiana House, brewery and several other buildings.   He was a stockholder in the brewery when first built.     He was married, January 6, 1850, to Miss Catharine Schultzheis, who was born in Wurtemberg, June 9, 1826.   Himself and wife are the parents of several children, namely : Mary F., born November 21, 1850, died March 6, 1867; Louisa C, Therissa, Harriet, Emily, Carrie and Charles.    In 1865 Mr. Bauer was elected councilman from Second Ward, and served eighteen years.    He is a member of Chosen Friends Lodge No. 13, I. O. O. F.; also the Druids, and Druid Encampment and the Lutheran Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JOHN G. BAUER, of Lawrenceburgh, president and secretary of the Bauer Cooperage Company, was born in Cincinnati in 1856, and his parents are still residents of that city. His father is Jacob Bauer who is well known in business circles there but now retired. Mr. Bauer passed his early years in his native city in whose public schools he was educated, supplementing this by a course of study in the Cincinnati Business College. Up to 18S2 he was engaged in the coopering business in Cincinnati, coming to Lawrenceburgh at the above date and since remaining in the establishment with which he is now connected, a sketch of which is given elsewhere in this volume. Mr. Bauer was married in 1881 to Anna DeBenath, a native of France and a daughter of August and Anna DeBenath, her mother now being a resident of Cincinnati. He is an energetic business man, of fine executive ability and alive to every interest of the enterprise under his supervision.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

T. J. BACHMAN. In 1845 Mr. Bachman came to Aurora and engaged in the distilling business with T. & J. W. Gaff, and became a member of the firm in 1862. He was a man remarkable for his energy and enterprise. No transaction in the complicated business in which he was engaged escaped his observation. Quick in perception, punctual in attendance to bis duties, he never wanted in determination to accomplish whatever he undertook. He was a warm-hearted, kind and generous man, and assisted much in giving life and activity to the business of Aurora.   He died January 11, 1874, at the age of sixty years.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

GEORGE W. BAKER, farmer, Sparta Township, was born in Dearborn County, Ind., January 19, 1818. His parents were the old and highly esteemed pioneers—Thomas and Rachel (Powell) Baker, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania, respectively. The former was a son of John Baker, an old Revolutionary soldier, who emigrated from Virginia to Dearborn County, Ind., about the year 1801, settling near Wilmington, where he resided until his death. He was the father of six children, viz.: Thomas, John, Elizabeth, George, William and Sarah. Thomas (the father-of our subject, the eldest member of the family) came with his parents to this county in 1801, where he and the above Rachel Powell were united in marriage in about 1812. after which they settled near Wilmington, and there remained, with the exception of a few years in Ripley County, until their deaths. He died July 11, 1853. His widow still survives, and resides at Wilmington. They were the parents of twelve children, namely: Elizabeth (deceased), Susan, George W., Sarah J., Angeline, Nelson T., Huldah A. (deceased), John E., William, James M., Thomas L. and Josephine. George W., our subject, was married in Hogan Township, this county, February 11, 1841, to Margaret  A., daughter of Peter and Margaret (Higbee) Hannegan. She was born in this county February 3, 1823. After our subject's marriage, he first settled in Hogan Township, this county, and in the fall of 1842 moved to Ohio County, where he remained about four years, and from thence removed to Dearborn County, where he has since resided. In 1867 he purchased his present farm, and in the following year moved on it, where he has since resided. He owns eighty acres of fine land, which is well improved, a part of which is located in Sparta Township, and a part in Clay Township. They have had born to them eleven children, viz.: Martha A., Harlan P., Thomas E. (deceased), Zada M., Lewis W. (deceased), Ella F., Mary A, Dollie C, Hattie E., George M. and Carrie E.   Mr. Baker is a fine man, and highly esteemed by all who know him. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

D. B. BEATY, Sparta Township, farmer and dealer in agricultural implements, Moore's Hill, was born in Ohio County, Ind., February 14, 1842. His parents were William and Mary A. (Herron) Beaty, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively. The former was a son of Hugh Beaty, a native of Ireland, and from thence, in an early day, immigrated with his parents to the State of Pennsylvania, where he married Margaret Smith, a native of Pennsylvania, and afterward settled in Lancaster County, where they resided until about the year 1815, at which time they immigrated to what is now Randolph Township, Ohio Co., Ind.,entering land and afterward resided there until death. They were the parents of eight children, viz.: Jane, Rosanna, John, George, Mary, Margaret, Nancy and William, the father of our subject. He was born in Lancaster County, Penn., in the year 1805, and came with his parents to Ohio County, Ind., in 1815, where he and the above Mary A. Herron, were united in marriage and afterward purchased a farm in Randolph Township and remained there until 1855. when he removed to Dearborn County, Ind, and from thence, in 1859, to Harrison County,Ind., where he afterward resided until death, which occurred in July, 1865. The following spring of 1866, his widow removed to Aurora, Ind., where she resided until 1881, when she went to live with her daughter at Johnson City, Mo., where she still resides. Ten children were born to them, viz.: Hugh S., John H., Lydia, David B., Elisha G., William E., Margaret J., Mary E., Jesse T. and an infant son, who died in infancy and unnamed. D. B., our subject, in 1S66 began the tinner's trade, but continued the business only about two years, when he and his brother purchased the harness shop of I. T. Campbell, of Aurora, Ind., which they continued together for about one year, when our subject purchased his brother's interest and carried on the business himself until 1872, at which time he sold out and in the following spring turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, which he has since continued- He was united in marriage, near Aurora, Ind., December 19, 1872, to Nancy M., daughter of Edward T. and Elizabeth (Dowden) Hubbartt She was born in Dearborn County, Ind., December 4,1850. Three children bless their union, viz.: Carrie M., Walter E. and Edith L. In the spring, of 1885, Mr. Beaty purchased a farm in Section 9, Sparta Township, where he removed and has since resided. He owns ninety-five acres of fine land, which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and be is also a member of the order of Odd Fellows.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

GEORGE BECKENHOLDT, Lawrenceburgh, of the firm of George Beckenholdt & Co., coal dealers, was born in Dearborn County in 1848. His father, John Beckenholdt, immigrated to this country from Germany about 1830, and was for some time engaged in farming in this county. About 1845 he built the Beckenholdt Brewery in "Newtown" and for many years did quite an extensive brewing business in that city. He died in 1860. George Beckenholdt grew up on the farm and received the ordinary common school education. He continued his agricultural pursuits up to 1877, when he removed to Lawrenceburgh. In 1881 he began operations in the coal and produce business, in which he is still engaged. Mr. Beckenholdt is a reliable business man and an enthusiastic, Democrat   Mrs. Beckenholdt was Miss Mary Harrey.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

WILLIAM P. BECKETT, farmer, Washington Township, was born in this township, June 14, 1853, and completed his education at Moore's Hill College. His father, Joe S. Beckett was born in England, October 8, 1816, and came to America in 1841. His mother, Mary (Abbott) Beckett, was born in Clay Township in 1824. They were married in September, 1843. Mr. William P. Beckett, was married in March, 1874, to Miss Lydia A. Herron, a native of this township, born August 29, 1852, and two children were born to them: Stella, December 10, 1874, and Gracie, February 12, 1879, died December 3, 1881. The mother died April 26, 1883, and he married Miss Mollie A. Herron, March 26, 1884, who was born January 14, 1862. The happy couple are favorably located and surrounded with all the necessary comforts of life. Mr. Beckett is secretary of the Mount Tabor Cemetery Association, and belongs to Dillsborough Lodge, F. & A. M. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was elected steward in Mount Tabor Church in 1878, which position he has since filled acceptably.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JOE S. BECKETT, farmer, Clay Township, was born at Wakefield, Yorkshire, England, October 8, 1816. His parents, William P. and Mary (Harrison) Beckett, were also natives of Yorkshire, England, where they married and from thence, in 1841, immigrated to the United States, landing at New York City, and from there came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and shortly afterward to Dearborn County, Ind. They were the parents of eighteen children, viz.: Samuel, William, Joe S., George, Elizabeth, Mary, Emma, Ellen, John, Alfred, Annie, Arthur, Hannah M., and five who died in infancy. Joe S., our subject, spent the greater part of his early life, while in England, in the mercantile business, and in 1841 immigrated with his parents to this county, where he was united in marriage, September 14. 1843, with Mary, daughter of William L., and Elizabeth (Naylor) Abbott. She was born in Dearborn County, Ind., June 27, 1824.   After Mr. Beckett's marriage he first settled on his father's farm, and in the following year purchased a farm in Washington Township, where he moved in January, 1845, and resided until April, 1871, when he moved on his present farm, which he had purchased previously, and on which he has since resided. He owns at present 647 1/4 acres of tine land, which is well improved and under a high state of cultivation. They have had born to them seven children, viz.: Ronald A., Mary E., Eliza A. (deceased), Dorathy, William P., John H. and Joe W.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

ALEXANDER BECKMAN, of Lawrenceburgh, junior member of the firm of George Beckenholdt & Co., coal dealers, is a native of Germany, born in 1825. His father died in Germany, and in 1832, Mr. Bee km an with his mother immigrated to America, landing at Baltimore, from which point they came by wagon over the Alleghany Mountains to Cincinnati, which city they reached June 10, of the above year. He resided in Cincinnati (in 'the bloody Fourth Ward"), till 1848, in which year he came to Lawrenceburgh. In this latter city, for about thirty years he acted as proprietor of the wharf-boat, and also did a flat-boating business during that time. In 1880 he engaged in the coal business and has since been thus employed. In June, 1862, he organized Company E., Sixteenth Indiana, and was commissioned captain of the same. He did active duty in the field till December, 1863, when he resigned his commission, having been captured.by Gen. Bragg, at the battle of Mumfordsville. Mr. Beckman was one of the prime movers in the Miami Valley furniture enterprise and has always taken an active interest in the welfare of the city. He served eight years as township trustee. He was married, November 28, 1847, to Catharine M. Berte, and they have eight children living: William H., George W., Alice E., Emma, Jeannette, Maggie, Myron H. and Laura.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

ROBERT A. BELL, packer in the Aurora Furniture Factory, Aurora, was born in Evansville, Ind, January 3, 1854, where he received a good common school education. His parents, Joseph G. and Jane E. (Campbell) Bell, were both natives of Indiana. Robert served an apprenticeship at engineering, after which, in 1872, he located in Aurora, and has since worked for the Aurora Furniture Company. He was married, December 10, 1876, to Miss Flora L. Wood, who was born in Sparta March 5, 1856. By this union two children, Clarence A. and Harry H., have been born. Mr. Bell is an industrious and peaceable citizen, and labors diligently to promote the best interests of his employers.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

EDWARD BENNETT, farmer, Clay Township, was born in Yorkshire, England, July 25, 1827. His parents were Joseph and Charlotte (Otley) Bennett, both natives of Yorkshire, England. The former was a son of Edward Bennett, also a native of Yorkshire, England, where he was born about the year 1768, and was married, in 1794, to Fanny Brooke, who was also a native of Yorkshire, England, and was born about the year 1768. He was a cloth manufacturer, and after his marriage located at Harbury, where he carried on a large manufacturing establishment, and where he resided until his death, which occurred in September, 1841, and that of his widow in October, 1851. Their children were Mary, Fanny, John, Edward, Susan, Abraham, Hannah, William and Joseph. The father of our subject was the eldest member of the family. He was born at Horbury, England, February 8, 1795, and was there married about the year 1818 to Charlotte Otley, who was born also at Horbury, England, in "October, 1795. In 1842 Mr. Bennett immigrated to the United States, and in the following year moved his family over, and located in Dearborn County, where he afterward resided until his death, which occurred September 22, 1860, followed by his widow November 2,1873, at Cincinnati, Ohio, where she was living with her daughter^ They were the parents of five children, viz.: John B., George, Sarah A., Martha, and Edward, our subject. He immigrated to Dearborn County, Ind, in company with his father in 1842, where he was married, September 25, 1851, to Catherine Huddart, who was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, August 18, 1831. After our subject's marriage he settled on a part of the same tract of land on which he now lives, which had been purchased by his father in 1843. In 1869 he sold his land there, and purchased from his brother the adjoining farm, on which he now lives. They have had born to them ten children, viz.: William H., Charles E., Thomas B., Martha, George W. (deceased), Albert (deceased), Joseph, Julian, James (deceased) and Harry.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

PETER BIDNER, farmer, Manchester Township, was born in Germany, April 25, 1834, is a son of John Bidner, a native of Germany, who with his family immigrated to America in the spring of 1840, landing at Baltimore, then came to Pittsburgh, then to Cincinnati and Hamilton, Ohio, and soon after to Dearborn County, Ind., and purchased eighty acres of land, being a part of the southwest quarter of Section 29 and a part of the southeast quarter of Section 30, Manchester Township. Here his wife died. After residing here two or three years he sold his land, and returned to Hamilton, Ohio, where he married Barbara Wise. After residing there two or three years he returned to this township and purchased eighty acres, the north half of the southwest quarter of Section 20, and subsequently the south eighty acres, thus owning the full quarter section.   Here he spent most of his life.   About two years prior to his death he removed to his son John's place on Section 30, where he died in December, 1867, aged sixty-seven years. He was the father of three sons who survived and are still living, all married and residents of Manchester Township—John, Peter and Michael. Peter Bidner, our subject, was married May 2, 1858, to Dora Fillanwarth, a daughter of Jacob Fillanwarth, a native of Germany, but who came to America and became quite an early settler of Manchester Township. By this marriage Mr. Bidner was the father of six children, five now living: John J.; Anna K., now the wife of William Busse; Mary K.; Elizabeth and Emma M.   Mrs. Bidner died November 27, 1880, aged forty years. Mr. Bidner has made farming his business through life, and by his industry and good management he has been financially successful and is now one of the prominent farmers of Manchester Township.    He owns 250 acres of land well improved, and property in Lawrenceburgh.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

GEORGE M. BILL, farmer, Sparta Township, is a native of Germany, where he was born October 12,1811.   His parents, Philip G. and Barbara Bill, were also natives of Germany, where they resided until their deaths. They were the parents of four children, viz.: Christian, Lawrence, Barbara, and George M., our subject, the eldest member of the family. He was married, in Germany, November 5, 1832, to Caroline Marcey, who was born in Germany, June 13, 1807.   In 1844, Mr. Bill and family immigrated to the United States, landing at New York City in June of that year; from thence they moved to Stark County, Ohio, and in the spring of 1845 they removed to Dearborn County, Ind., settling in Sparta Township, where he has since resided.    He owns 210 acres of fine land, the greater part of which he has improved himself.   He lost his wife by death, June 10, 1869, having had by her five children, viz.: Caroline {deceased), George M. (deceased), Charles, Solomon (deceased) and Mary. Mr. Bill was again married, at Lawrenceburgh, Ind., November 3, 1874, to Rosanna Mendel, widow of John Mendel, deceased, and daughter of David and Susanna (Poe) Wilson.   She was born in Ohio, March 18. 1824. Mr. Bill is a highly respected man.    He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JUDGE JACOB R COOK, son of Thomas Bishop and Leah Cook, was born in Dearborn County Indiana, April 29, 1838. On July 02, 1865 he was married to Miss Catharine Rider, a daughter of Lewis and Tracy Rider. They have five children: William H, born September 15, 1868; Ida Bell, February 11, 1873; Sophia E, March 16, 1876; George Jacob, February 07, 1879; James Jay, September 10, 1880. Judge Cook came with his father's family to Adair County, Missouri, in 1856, being eighteen years old. He entered land near Old Nineveh about July 1859. The county employed him to cut a wagon road through the timber on the ridge east of Stahl about six miles, connecting with the Milan and Kirksville road. He had ninety hands a work three days and cut the road thirty feet wide. In 1857 he commenced teaching school; taught first in a log house about two miles southeast of Stahl, in the woods. The house was on Nathan Lay's land. He taught, in all, twelve terms of school. On November 08, 1870, he was elected Judge of the County Court of Adair County for a term of six years. On the fourteenth day of January 1884, he was appointed postmaster at Prairie Bird, eleven miles southeast of Kirksville. In 1874 he was elected trustee for Wilson Township, under township organization. In June 1861, he was elected captain of a company of Home Guards at Shibley's Point, and served three months. On February 23, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, 11th Regiment of the Missouri Cavalry, and served as company quartermaster for three years, being discharged at St. Louis March 03, 1865. In 1873 he hauled logs that were hewn from two miles west of Old Nineveh to the farm where he now lives, and built his present house, the shingles being made from whiteoak taken from the same place. Judge Cook is a Republican, a member of the Methodist church, but has no lodge affiliations.
Submitted by. Desiree Burrell Rodcay
Source: "A History of Adair County Missouri" by E.M. Violette (1911)

Gipson, Henry E, Minneapolis. 
Res Minnetonka Beach, office 654 Security Bank. Lumberman.  Born April 2, 1863 in Aurora Ind, son of William H and Frances (Decker) Gipson.  Married in 1885 to Mary E Smith.  Graduated from high school Decatur Ill 1880.  Engaged with father in lumber business Decatur 1880-88; trav salesman for c H Rudolph Lumber co Minneapolis 1888-92; member of the Scanlon Gipson Co until 1894, which firm was incorporated as Scanlon-Gipson Lumber co of which he is sec; pres McMillan Lumber Co; sec Minn and North Wis R R Co; Brooks-Robertson Lumber Co; dir F W Buswell Lumber co; stockholder Brooks-Scanlon Lumber Co.  Member commercial, Lafayette and Automobile clubs.

[Little Sketches of Big Folks in Minnesota. Publ.  1907 Transcribed by Nancy Overlander]

Thomas C. Bergen
Mr. Bergen was born in Dearborn Co., Ind., June 8,1820. He resided with his parents until 1834; then he removed to Illinois and remained until 1860, engaged in raising stock and farming, and, during the last three years of his residence, conducted a flouring-mill. He came to Colorado in 1860, and settled in the park which afterward took his name. Here he raised stock and farmed until 1875. He then moved to his present home, two miles south of Morrison. He is now giving his attention to the raising of stock, and to fish culture. He is the possessor of a large fish lake, well stocked with choice varieties of fish, the care of which will afford the owner a most interesting diversion and lucrative recompense. He was a member of the Peoples Convention, called for the purpose of petitioning Congress to admit Colorado as a State. When the county of Jefferson was first organized, he was elected on the Republican ticket County Commissioner, in which capacity he served eight years. He was married, Aug. 16, 1841, to Judith Fletcher.
 ["History of Clear Creek and Boulder valleys, Colorado ..." J Harrison Mills; W B Vickers; Frederick W Pitkin; Chicago: O.L. Baskin & Co., 1880]






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