HENRY COUNTY, INDIANA

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF DANIEL H. BURRIS


    The first of the Burris family to come into Henry County, Indiana, was Daniel Burris, accompanied by his wife, Mary (Horton) Burris. This couple emigrated originally from North Carolina to Highland County, Ohio, where they settled, but the length of their stay there cannot now be determined. About the year 1830. they moved from there to Indiana where they settled in the southwestern part of Henry County, near the present site of the village of Elizabeth City, about seven miles northwest of Knightstown. He was a member of the Friends' Church and like so many other members of that body hated with a righteous fervor the institution of slavery. He was an abolitionist and in the days of slavery assisted runaway negroes along the underground route to Canada. He was born in North Carolina on July 10, 1771. and his wife was born in the same State on March 25, 1778. They were married in North Carolina about the year 1794. They lived to be very old people and dying were both buried in the cemetery at Greensboro, Henry County, Indiana.
    Daniel Burris and his wife evidently belonged to that strenuous class, so often approved by President Theodore Roosevelt; they also plainly believed the Bible injunction, "Multiply and replenish the earth," since they were the parents of sixteen children, twelve boys and four girls, namely: Rachel, born March 21, 1795: Stephen, born November 5, 1797; John H., born July 3, 1799; Jacob, born February 1, 1801, Martha, born April 13, 1803; Daniel and Mary, twins, born April 21, 1805; Bowater, born February 25, 1807; Abraham, born March 10. 1809: Moses, born February 6, 1811; Horton, born March H, 1813; Miles, born December 6, 1814; Andrew, born April 10, 1816; Louis, born February 22, 1818; Elias, born June 1, 1819; and Rebecca, born January 17, 1821.
    Daniel Burris. on coming to Indiana from Ohio," entered on April 23, 1831.
the following described piece of land, embracing one hundred and thirty two acres, being the northwest quarter (fractional), section one, township sixteen north, range eight east. This land adjoins the plat of Elizabeth City on the northwest and is now owned by Kinnan T. White. This was then virgin land, covered with heavy timber and almost impenetrable undergrowth, but it was not long before, like their fellow pioneers, the family went to work building their cabin, clearing the land and in the then primitive way commencing to farm. Looking over this land today and over other lands, not only in that vicinity but throughout the State of Indiana, the beholder, however much he may know of pioneer history, has but a dim and inadequate conception of the hardihood and toil required to transform the wilderness into farms and gardens hardly surpassed for beauty of scene and fertility of soil.

DANIEL H. BURRIS

    John H. Burris. the third child and second son of Daniel Burris. and his wife. Elizabeth (Kinder") Burris. a sister of George Kinder, of Charlottesville, Hancock County, Indiana, recently deceased, were the parents of Daniel H. Burris, the subject of this sketch, who was born April 27, 1846, and has resided at Elizabeth City during his whole life. John H. Burris, his father, was a farmer and blacksmith, who carried on his trade at Elizabeth City. He was twice married and reared a large family. Daniel H. was his son by the second wife. John H. Burris was killed on the railroad track near Raysville, Henry County, in 1868. Having been across the river to Knightstown, he was walking along the track towards the home of his daughter, Mrs. Cornelius Coon, whom he was visiting. and being hard of hearing, he was run down by a train and instantly killed.
    Daniel H. Burris was married to Margaret Ogle, January 20. 1866. She
has ever since been a true, loyal and devoted helpmeet to her husband, very economical, a great money saver and withal an excellent housekeeper. The Ogles were natives of Illinois. Daniel H. Burris took up the trade of a blacksmith at Elizabeth City in 1871 and has followed that occupation jointly with farming down to the present time. He lived with his father on his grandfather's farm, which is now owned by Kinnan T. White, prior to the Civil War.
    His first military service was in the Union Guards of Knightstown. Indiana
Legion, which like the Middletown Rifles of Middletown, the Needmore Rangers of .Mechanicsburg. the New Lisbon Indiana State Guards of New Lisbon, and the New Castle Guards of New Castle, constituted a part of the military organization of the State of Indiana and served to keep alive the military spirit at home and to familiarize the young men with military discipline, thus making them a recruiting agency for the regiments already at the front and for new regiments when additional calls were made. At the time of the Confederate raid through Indiana under General John H. Morgan, he served as a private in Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry (Morgan Raid). The service was brief and the danger being over the regiment was mustered out. Company A was organized by Captain John M. Hartley, of Knightstown. where the company was mainly recruited. Captain Hartley was afterwards Lieutenant Colonel of the regiment. A deplorable incident connected with the Morgan Raid occurred to the 105th regiment, while it was in pursuit of the Confederate raiders. The regiment had marched to Lawrenceburg, there being a rumor that the enemy was returning to capture that place. To prevent such a result, the regiment moved out to check the advance of the raiders and while getting into position, through some blunder, an indiscriminate firing began among the men which was not brought under control until eight soldiers were killed and twenty wounded. Apparently some of the regiment mistook their comrades for Morgan's men, who, it afterwards appeared, were many miles beyond the scene of the unfortunate conflict. His next service was as a private in Company A. 139th Indiana Infantry. He was mustered into the service of the United States, June 5, 1864. and was mustered out with the regiment on September 29, 1864. It was a one hundred day regiment and was organized to serve in Kentucky. His last service was as a private in the 22nd Indiana Infantry into which he came as a recruit. November 28. 1864. He was not assigned to a company in the regiment but continued in the service until May 8, 1865. when he was mustered out.
    Daniel H. Burris, since he was old enough to vote, has been a steadfast  Republican and among his cherished recollections are his faithful and patriotic service in the Civil War and the fact that he has voted twice each for Presidents Ulysses S. Grant, Benjamin Harrison and William McKinley, and once each for James A. Garfield, James G. Blaine and Theodore Roosevelt. He is a member of the Jerry B. Mason Post, No. 168, Grand Army of the Republic, Knightstown, and no man in Southwestern Henry County stands higher among his friends and neighbors. He is possessed of an excellent home at Elizabeth City, which is surrounded by spacious grounds, and there he is enjoying to the full the sunset of a happy and well spent life.

ANCESTRY OF MRS. JOHN H. (KINDER) BURRIS.

    The Kinder family to which Elizabeth, the wife of John H. Burris and the
mother of Daniel H. Burris, belonged, came from Wyeth County. Virginia, in 1832, crossing the Ohio River at Cincinnati and traveling overland to Indiana. They settled at Charlottesville. Hancock County. The father, Henry Kinder, died there in February, 1846. The mother, Magdalene Kinder, died a year or two prior to her husband. Both are buried in the cemetery at Charlottesville. They were the parents of eleven children, six sons and five daughters. Henry Kinder was a practical farmer and followed that occupation until his death. The family has been for many years a prominent one in Charlottesville and in Hancock County, where a number of the descendants now reside, who are held in the highest regard and esteem. Two members of this family are known to have served in the army during the Civil War. George Kinder was я Corporal in Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry; he served from November 18, 1861, to February 5, 1865, when he was mustered out. Jefferson Kinder enlisted as a private in Company B, 19th Indiana Infantry ; he was appointed a Sergeant and veteranized. He served with that regiment until it was consolidated with the 20th when he was transferred to the 2Oth Regiment reorganized. He was mustered out July 12, 1865.

MILITARY SERVICE OF THE BURRIS FAMILY.

    The loyalty and patriotism of the Burris family is well illustrated by the fact that fourteen grandsons of Daniel and Mary (Horton) Burris served in the army during the Civil War, namely Aaron Burris served as a private in Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry. during the Confederate raid in Indiana under General John H. Morgan.
Arthur M. Burris served as a private in Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry.
He was mustered in June 5, 1864, and mustered out September 29, 1864.
Asahel Burris served as a private in Company B, 110th Indiana Infantry.
during the Confederate raid in Indiana under General John H. Morgan.
Daniel Burris served as a private in Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. He
was mustered in August 12, 1862, and was discharged for disability on April 8, 1864.
    Daniel H. Burris served in the Union Guards of Knightstown, Indiana Legion; also as a private in Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry, during the Confederate raid in Indiana under General John H. Morgan ; again as private in Company A, 139th Indiana Infantry; mustered in June 5, 1864. and mustered out September 29, 1864; also as private, unassigned. 22nd Indiana Infantry: mustered in November 28, 1864; mustered out May 8, 1865.
    Daniel L. Burris served as a private in Company F, 6th Indiana Infantry (three months). He was mustered in April 25, 1861, and was mustered out August 2, 1861.
    Elwood Burris served as Corporal in Company A. 105th Indiana Infantry, during the Confederate raid in Indiana under General John H. Morgan; he also served as a private in Company A, 38th Indiana Infantry; he was mustered in September 26, 1864, and was mustered out July 15, 1865.
    Eden Burris served as a private in Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. ,He was mustered in November 18, 1861, and was mustered out March 9, 1865.
    Henry J. Burris served as a private in Company F, 84th Indiana Infantry. He was mustered in August 13, 1862, and was discharged for disability on January 4,  1863.
    Jacob Burris served as a private in Company A, 19th Indiana Infantry. He was mustered in July 29, 1861; wounded and captured in the battle of the Wilderness, Virginia, May 6, 1864; unaccounted for.
    Mathias Burris served as a private in Company A, 105th Indiana Infantry, during the Confederate raid in Indiana under General John H. Morgan.
    Nelson Burris served as a private in Company A, 57th Indiana Infantry. He was mustered in November 18, 1861 ; veteran; appointed Principal Musician; non commissioned staff; mustered out December 14, 1865.
    John Burris and Wilson Burris entered the army from Iowa but the record of their service is not now obtainable.
Five of these grandsons of Daniel and Mary (Horton) Burris are sons of
John. H. Burris by his two several marriages, namely: Daniel H., Eden, John, Nelson and Wilson.

JACOB BURRIS.

    Jacob Burris was the father of Elwood Burris. He was married first to Christina Hiatt, in Ohio, and second to Charlotte Wilson. He was the father of ten children, eight boys and two girls, all by his first wife. Elwood was born June 27, 1836. He was first married in 1856 to Rebecca Norton and second to Ruth Abigail Paxton. He is the father of six children, two boys and four girls. He is as above stated one of the fourteen grandsons of Daniel and Mary (Horton) Burris who took part in the Civil War. He now resides at Willow Branch, Hancock County, Indiana, six miles west of the growing town of Shirley, and it is to him that the author of this History is indebted for much of the information here recorded touching the Burris family.

Source:
Hazzard;s History of Henry County 1822-1890