Genealogy Trails

Huntington County, Indiana
Biographies


BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES CLEAR CREEK TOWNSHIP

DANIEL BEGHTEL, a pioneer of Huntington County, and one among the early settlers of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born May 17,1815. He was the second of eleven children born to Frederick and Elizabeth (Wareham) Beghtel, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. He was reared upon a farm in his native county. In youth he moved with his parents to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, where he was married to Mary Ann Cox on the 7th day of November, 1837. She was born in Bedford County, Pa., September 17, 1814, and was the daughter of Jacob and Esther Cox, the former a native of England, and the latter a native of Bedford County, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Beghtel continued to reside in Tuscarawas County until 1844, when they came to this county and settled in the woods of Clear Creek Township. Their home was in the wilderness and the clearing up of a farm occasioned for them a great deal of hard work. Mr. Beghtel chopped, grubbed, burned brush, rolled logs, made rails, and while he was thus industriously engaged his wife stood bravely by his side, presiding over the duties of the household as only a devoted wife could. But their labors were rewarded. The forest melted away and in the course of a few years they had a good farm and a comfortable home. Those early days were times of good feeling and genuine sociability. Not infrequently did Mr. Beghtel lend a helping hand to his neighbors and assist them to raise their cabins and roll their logs. He assisted to erect fifty-six cabins during the first year. He and wife continued to reside upon the scene of their labors until about 1877. when they removed to their present home. They are the parents of ten children as follows: Henry, born August 30, 1838; Franklin, born October 27,1840, died July 26, 1872; Catharine A., born May 1,1842; Isaiah, born May 81,1844; Joseph, born April 2, 1847; Lydia Ann, born December 3, 1848; William, born March 12,1851; Eli, born March 1, 1853; Sarah J., born December 21, 1855, died November 16, 1857; George W., born May 1, 1858, died January 19, 1859. Mr. and Mrs. Beghtel are members of the United Brethren Church. The son, Joseph Beghtel, is a minister in that church and at present is stationed at Bremen, Marshall County, this State. He is a self-made man and a successful worker in the cause of Christ. In politics Mr. Beghtel is a Republican. He and wife have a comfortable home where they are spending the decline of life. They have now lived together nearly fifty years and though aged and worn with years of toil they are enjoying good health, and bid fair to live many years yet to enjoy the fruits of their labors in earlier days.

FELIX BINKLEY, one of Huntington County's pioneers, and one among the early settlers of Clear Creek Township, was born in Lancaster County, Pa., March 29, 1809. He was the fourth of eight children, five sons and three daughters,  born to Felix and Catharine (Graibill) Binkley, both of whom were also natives of Lancaster County, Pa., of German descent. The former was the son of John and Eliza (Hair) Binkley, and the latter was the daughter of John and Catharine (Rupp) Graibill. The antecedents of Mr. Binkley originally came from Germany. The early life of our subject was spent in his native county. During his boyhood he worked upon a farm, and when a youth of fourteen he entered upon a three years' apprenticeship with William Wiley, who was to teach him the shoemaker's trade. After serving out his time he returned home, and for a few years assisted his father upon the farm. At the age of twenty one he accompanied his parents to Stark County, Ohio, where, on the 9th day of December, 1830, he was married to Anna Kitt, who was born in Stark County, Ohio, precisely four years after the birth of Mr. Binkley, or March 29, 1813. Her parents, Jacob and Barbara (Wolf) Kitt, were natives of York County, Pa., the former of English and the latter of German descent. Jacob Kitt was born in March, 1779; married April 19, 1800, to Barbara Wolf. Some of the ancestors of Mrs. Binkley have lived to a remarkably old age. Among them were her father, who lived to be one hundred and one years of age, and her great grandmother, who reached the advanced age of one hundred and five years. During the first six years after their marriage, Mr. and rs. Binkley resided in Stark County, Ohio, the former working at his trade. On the 25th day of April, 1836, they set out in a wagon for Huntington County, whither they arrived on the 20th day of May, following. They wended their way to Clear Creek Township, and settled upon a tract of woods land in Section 20, where they have ever since resided. Since 1836 the occupation of Mr. Binkley has chiefly been that of a farmer, though he has occasionally worked some at his trade to supply the wants, not only of his own household, but also his neighbors'. His wife, now an aged lady, has stood by his side, sharing alike his prosperity and adversity, managing the duties of the household and administering to her husband's wants as only a devoted wife could. They are the parents of four children,  three of whom are living: Catharine, born March 5, 1832; Jacob, born May 29, 1834; Reuben K., born February 10,1842, and Barbara Ann, born June 28, 1850, died November 15, 1853. Mr. and Mrs. Binkley are members of the German Baptist Church. They are among the living monuments of pioneer life, and are among the county's worthy and esteemed citizens.

LEVI BONBRAKE, farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, July 31, 1837. He was the oldest of four children, two sons and two daughters, born to Jacob and Elizabeth (Krichbaum) Bonbrake, both natives of Pennsylvania. He spent his early life working upon his father's farm. At the age of sixteen he began to learn the carpenter's trade. This was finished in due time and has been his chief occupation ever since. He was married in his native county to Catharine Briggle, February 14,1861. She was also born in Stark County, Ohio, the event occurring February 26, 1839. Her parents, Joseph and Catharine (Beard) Briggle, were natives of Germany and Pennsylvania, respectively. In April, 1863, Mr. and Mrs. Bonbrake, accompanied by the parents and brother of the former, came to Huntington County and located upon a farm in Section 29, Clear Creek Township. The two families occupied the same log cabin until the following spring, or in March, 1864, when our subject and his family moved to a house of their own on the north side of the farm and upon the site of their present residence. There they have resided ever since, excepting the summer of 1867, during which his residence was in Wabash County, he having purchased a saw mill in that county. While Mr. Bonbrake has all the time superintended the management of his farm, he has hired men most of the time to do the work it occasioned, preferring himself to work at his trade. He built with his own hands the first Methodist Church in Clear Creek Township, the work being done in 1864. In 1874, he built the German Baptist Church of that township. Besides these he has erected two school houses and a vast number of dwelling houses and barns. Three years ago he retired from his trade, and since his attention has been given to his farm and to grain-threshing. Mr. and Mrs. Bonbrake are the parents of but one child, Edwin J. Bonbrake, who was born December 21,1864. Mrs. Bonbrake has a membership with the Methodist Episcopal Church. Politically, Mr. Bonbrake is an ardent Republican. He held the office of trustee in his township two years, having been elected October 8, 1872. He has frequently been solicited to accept other offices of trust but declined, as he preferred the quietude of domestic life, to the publicity of office-holding. He owns ninety and one-half acres of excellent land, situated in one of the best farming localities in Huntington County.

SIMON S. BONBRAKE, an industrious and successful farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, May 1, 1842. He was the third child born to Jacob and Elizabeth (Krichbaum) Bonbrake, the former a native of Somerset County, Pa., and the latter a native of Centre County, Pa., both of Pennsylvania. Dutch descent. The great grandparents of Jacob Bonbrake, came from Germany, as did also the grandparents of his wife, Elizabeth Bonbrake. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood and youth in his native county working upon his father's farm. At twenty years of age he accompanied his father and mother to this county and located with them in Section 29, Clear Creek Township, There he has ever since pursued the vocation of a farmer, and as such he has been very successful. His first marriage occurred in this county, January 3,1867, to Elizabeth A. Culp, who was born in Pennsylvania, June 5, 1846, being the daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth Gulp, both natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Bonbrake continued to live happily together until the union was broken by the death of his wife, December 12, 1878. His second marriage occurred October 12, 1882, when Emma Henline became his wife. She was born in Clear Creek Township, this county, August 2, 1849, and was the daughter of Cornelius and Mary (Flora) Henline, now old residents of Clear Creek Township. The first marriage of Mr. Bonbrake resulted in the birth of five children: Ida May, born May 11,1367; Alice A., born August 11, 1870; Grant A., born January 24, 1874; Bertha, born June 12, 1876, died September 2, 1876; Lizzie A., born December 7.1878, died February 27,1879. It is a remarkable fact that these two children died at precisely the same age, viz.: two months and twenty days. In politics, Mr. Bonbrake is a staunch Republican. He owns seventy-nine acres of excellent land, about sixty-five of which is in a high state of cultivation.

MRS. ANN BROWN, of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Darbyshire, England, born January 29,1807. She was the second of eight children, four sons and four daughters, born to Robert and Hannah (Rhodes) Taylor, both of whom were also natives of England. Her paternal grandparents were James and Sarah Taylor. Her maternal grandparents were John and Ann (Garside) Rhodes. She grew up to womanhood in her native country, and in 1827, when she was in her twentieth year, she accompanied her father, mother, three brothers and three sisters to America. They embarked at Liverpool on September 8th, and reached the City of New York on the 12th day of November, 1826. Her oldest brother, James Taylor, had come to America the preceding spring. The family first located in the City of Troy, N. Y., where they resided six years, the father being employed in a cotton factory. In 1833 they moved to Carroll County, Ohio, and settled upon a farm where the father and mother spent the rest of their lives. They died aged respectively, eighty-eight and seventy-five. In the meantime she was married in the twenty-second year of her age to William Nichalson, the event occurring in Troy, N. Y. Her husband died a year or so afterward leaving to her care one child, Elizabeth, who accompanied her widowed mother and grandparents to Carroll County, Ohio, and later on was married there and died in less than one year afterward. The second marriage of our subject occurred in Carroll County, Ohio, in 1835, when James Brown became her husband. He was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., June 17, 1805, and was the son of George and Mary Brown, the former of whom was a native of Ireland, of Irish descent. Two years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Brown moved to this State, and settled in Fayette County. They resided there two years, and after spending six months among friends in Carroll County, Ohio, they came to Huntington County and settled down in the woods of Clear Creek Township, where Mr. Brown died May 24,1885, in the eightieth year of his age, and where Mrs. Brown still continues to reside. She is now in the eighty-first year of her age, and at this advanced age she is in full possession of her mental faculties, and enjoying good health. Her marriage to Mr. Brown resulted in the birth of seven children: William H., Jane (deceased), Mary, John T., Sarah, Robert T. and Joseph R.

ALBERT S. BROWN, a farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Warren Township, this county, February 13, 1858, He was the third of six children born to Nehemiah and Sarah M. (Moore) Brown, the former a native of Preble County, Ohio, and the latter a native of Wayne County, this State, both of English descent. He was reared upon his father's farm, in this county, and attended the district school in which he received the rudiments of an education. During the summers of 1877 and 1878, he attended the normal school at Valparaiso. In the fall of 1877 he took up the avocation of a teacher and taught, in all, six terms, with good success. His marriage to Anna M. Sprinkle occurred October 26, 1881. She was born in Huntington Township, this county, July 14, 1861, and was the daughter of Henry and Mary (Storm) Sprinkle, a history of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Brown located upon a farm in Warren Township. There they continued to reside until in September, 1883, when they removed to Clear Creek Township and settled where they now live. They are the parents of one child, Herbert A., born April 13, 1884. By virtue of his birth, Mr. Brown is a member of the Quaker Church. Mrs. Brown is a member of the Brethren Church. In politics the former is a Prohibitionist. He is an industrious and enterprising young farmer and a good citizen.

SAMUEL BUCHER, of Clear Creek Township, was born in Wayne County, Ohio, May 20, 1832. He was the son of Michael and Mary (Thorn) Bucher, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. He was reared upon a farm in his native county, and at the age of twenty-one he adopted the vocation of a farmer for himself. He was married in Wayne County, Ohio, February 4, 1856, to Eliza Jane Johnson, who was born in Wayne County, Ohio, November 8, 1836. She was the daughter of Henry and Catharine (Gingery) Johnson, the former a native of Ohio, and the latter a native of Franklin County, Pa., of Irish and German descent, respectively. About one year after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bucher came to Huntington County and located upon a farm in Section 36, Clear Creek Township, where they have ever since resided. The life occupation of Mr. Bucher has been that of a farmer. In March, 1872, he had the misfortune of losing his eyesight, and since then he has been entirely blind. He and wife are the parents of three children: Sarah E., born May 9, 1857; Mary C., born August 6, 1859, and William A., born January 24, 1863, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Bucher and three children are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics our subject is a staunch Democrat. He has a good farm of eighty acres and a comfortable home, where he and wife with their son, William, reside in a quiet, happy way. They are among the worthy and esteemed citizens of the Township. In addition to the farm he lives on, Mr. Bucher owns two other good farms, one of fifty acres in Section 6, Union Township, and one of 120 acres in Section 16, Jackson Township.

JOHN M. CROLL, a prominent farmer of Clear Creek Township, and one of the old residents of the county, was born in Huron County, Ohio, January 29, 1829. He was the eighth in a family of twelve children, three sons and nine daughters, born to John and Elizabeth (Crist) Croll, both natives of Pennsylvania, of Dutch descent. In 1840 his parents came to this county and located where the subject of this sketch now resides. There the father and mother died October 3,1840, and September 14,1864, respectively. Our subject spent his youth assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. He continued to reside with his mother, farming the place until her death,  and there he has continued to reside ever since. Soon after his mother's death he purchased the interest of other heirs to the home place, and thus became sole owner of a good farm. He was married September 24,1868, to Louisa Oats, daughter of Jacob and Susan (Ream) Oats. She was born in Perry County, Ohio, December 27, 1832. To them one child was born: John L., born February 26, 1869. The first wife, of Mr. Croll died February 18, 1879, and on the 14th day of October, 1883, he was married to Mrs. Martha M. Cole, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Keller) Snyder, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter a native of Fairfield County, Ohio. She was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, June 13, 1851. This latter marriage has resulted in the birth of two children: William B., born February 14, 1884, and Adda May, born January 15, 1886. In politics Mr. Croll is a Republican. He owns a handsome farm of 131 acres, about half of which is in cultivation. His farm is situated in a good agricultural locality. He is an industrious and successful farmer.

JOHN R. EMLEY, deceased, who came to this county in January, 1835, and became the second settler of Clear Creek Township, was born in Monmouth County, New Jersey, April 6, 1787. He was the son of Samuel and Meribah (Robbins) Emley, both natives of Monmouth County, New Jersey. The former was a descendant of William Emley, who came to America as a commissioner for a Society of Friends, in 1677, and he was born in Monmouth County, New Jersey, May 5, 1750. He died in Burlington County, New Jersey, July 11,1811. His wife, Meribah Robbins, was born in Monmouth County, New Jersey, and was of Welsh descent, her parents having emigrated to America from Wales. The subject of this sketch accompanied his parents to Burlington County, New Jersey, where his marriage to Mary Cook occurred, February 22, 1808. She was born in Burlington County, New Jersey, November 6, 1790. She was the daughter of Joel and Kiturah (Meirs) Cook, both natives of New Jersey, the former of Irish, and the latter of Scotch descent. John R. Emley, was a miller by trade, having entered the mill of his father at fifteen years of age. In 1809, he and his wife moved to Schoharie County, New York, but in 1811, they returned to Burlington County, New Jersey, and in the following year, he and his brother moved to Middlesex County, New Jersey, where they had become the owners of a mill property. In 1814 our subject returned to Monmouth County, New Jersey, and settled upon a farm. He continued to farm in that county, until 1822, when he moved to Salem County, New Jersey, where he resided upon a farm, until he came to this country in 1835. He settled in the woods of Clear Creek Township, where, assisted by his sons, he cleared out a farm and where he pursued the vocation of a farmer, until the time of his death, which occurred February 27, 1868. His wife survived him until November 17, 1870. They were the parents of fourteen children: Joel C., born February 1, 1809; Samuel, born May 14, 1810; Wesley, born January 21, 1812, died October 12, 1836; Meribah, born April 12, 1813; David M., born December 2, 1814, died August 22, 1835; Martha, born April 11, 1816; Anthony, born April 8, 1818; Kiturah Ann, born January 22, 1820, died January 15,1826; Edna, born August 13, 1822, died October 6,1881; Sexton, born July 30, 1825; Leah A., born January 19,1827; Amanda, born January 29, 1829; Chaltha, born January 6, 1833, and a son that died in infancy, unnamed. Mr. and Mrs. Emley were not members of any church, but were affiliates of the Methodist Church.

JOEL C. EMLEY, of Clear Creek Township, was born February 1, 1809, and was the oldest of fourteen children born to John R. and Mary (Cook) Emley, a biography of whom appears above. His boyhood and youth were spent working upon a farm. At the age of twenty-one, he entered upon an apprenticeship, with a view to learn the carpenter's trade. After serving three years he worked as a journeyman for seven years. In 1840 he began to take contracts himself, and thus continued until the 26th day of December, 1849, upon which day, in falling from a building, he sustained an-injury to his left lower limb, which rendered him unfit for that trade. He then turned his attention to blacksmithing, to which his attention has been directed ever since. He followed his parents to this county in 1854, and settled where he now lives in Section 21, Clear Creek Township. During the first three years of his residence here he also worked at his former trade some. His first marriage occurred September 3, 1831, to Charlotte Demaris, by whom he had three children: Elizabeth C., born July 12, 1832: Mary C., born May 15, 1834, and James D., born January 30, 1836. The first wife of Mr. Emley died May 4, 1836, and on the 30th day of March, 1840, he was married to Sarah Keen, who died August 5, 1871. This latter marriage resulted in the birth of seven children: Charles W., born November 22, 1844; Rachael J., born March 4, 1848, and Awilda, born May 9, 1855, living, and John S.. born April 19, 1841, died February 10. 1844; Daniel K., born March 23, 1843. died, February 20, 1844; John S., born July 19, 1846, died May 7, 1850; Robert H., born May 15, 1850, died November 29, 1852. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge, and at present is the oldest Odd Fellow in the county, and was formerly a member of the Washington Beneficial Society, of Salem, N. J. His first presidential vote was cast for Andrew Jackson, and ever since he has supported the principles of the Democratic party.

SAMUEL EMLEY, the second child born to John R. and Mary (Cook) Emley, and one of the old and honored residents of Clear Creek Township, was born in Schoharie County, New York, May 14, 1810. He was a young child, but a year old, when his parents returned to Burlington County, New Jersey; about two years old when they removed to Middlesex County; four years old when they entered Monmouth County, and about twelve years of age when they settled in Salem County, New Jersey. In this latter county he spent his youth working upon a farm, and in that county his marriage to Anna Efft occurred, March 7, 1833. She was born in Salem County, New Jersey, February 1,1814. About April 20,1834, Mr. and Mrs. Emley set out for the far west. They sailed from Salem County to Philadelphia on a steamboat. From Philadelphia to Pittsburg they were conveyed on a canal boat, excepting a distance of thirty-seven miles over the Alleghaney Mountains, which was made by rail, the rude coaches being propelled up and down the inclined planes by a stationary engine. At Pittsburg the family secured passage upon an Ohio steamer for Cincinnati, whither they arrived on the fifth day of May, 1834. On the 14th day of the month, his birthday, he arrived with his family at the home of his uncle, Anthony Cook, in Warren County, Ohio. In that vicinity Mr. Emley found a log cabin in which to place his family and being entirely void of means he worked out at clearing, and upon a farm, by the month and day for over three years. His wages during the first month was but 80. The best wages he commanded at any time was $I3. per month. Some idea may be had of his economy when it is learned that at the end of three years he had nearly $400 in his pocket. With this he determined to come on further west where land was cheaper and buy a home of his own. Accordingly, about the 20th of January, 1838, he placed his family and household furniture in a wagon and started for Huntington County, whither his father, mother, three brothers and six sisters had come a few years previous, and whither he and his family arrived early in February. With $240 of his money he purchased an eighty-acre tract of land in Section 20, Clear Creek Township, paying for it $3 per acre. Upon that he built a cabin, moved into it his family and immediately set about clearing a portion of his land. This occasioned for him an abundance of hard work; but of that he was not afraid and, with his willing wife by his side, attending to the household duties, assisting occasionally in the clearing and administering to his wants as only a devoted wife can, he toiled on and in a few years the wilderness home was converted into a good farm. Nor did the arduous labors of Mr. Emley end here. After a few years he was able to purchase other tracts of land in the vicinity of his home. They, likewise, were chiefly placed in a state of cultivation through his own exertions. About 260 acres of land was fitted for the plow by his own hands. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Emley resulted in the birth of six children, two sons and four daughters, all of whom are living. Their names are: John W., Catharine, Charlotte, Mary A., Elizabeth and Fletcher J. Politically, Mr. Emley is a staunch Democrat. He recalls with pleasure his first presidential vote which was deposited for Andrew Jackson. He has always possessed the confidence of the public and very frequently he has been called upon to fill offices of trust. In 1858 he was elected a member of the Board of County Commissioners and served three years. He was a candidate in 1861 for re-election but was defeated. He was elected again in 1864 and again in 1867, serving altogether nine years, which is three years longer than the united terms of any other commissioner the county has ever had. In former years he served as one of the township trustees in his township a number of years. Although a poor man when he entered the county Mr. Emley has amassed considerable wealth. Besides a fine farm of 180 acres where he now lives he is the owner of property in the City of Huntington that gives him an income of over 8400 a year. He has made about $30,000 in this county, all of which is the product of his industry, frugality and economy. About half of this amount has been used in providing comfortable homes for his children. He and wife are among our time-honored pioneers and most worthy and esteemed citizens.

ANTHONY EMLEY, the fifth son of John R. and Marv (Cook) Emley, and one among the old residents of Clear Creek Township, was born in Burlington County, New Jersey, April 18, 1818. When he was a young child, about three years old, his parents removed to Salem County, N. J., where his boyhood and early youth were spent working upon a farm. Between the 10th and 15th of September, 1834, the family set out in two wagons for the far west. On reaching Warren County, Ohio, some time in October, they stopped for a few weeks to rest, and to visit with relatives. On the 1st day of January, 1835, the journey was resumed, and on the 8th day of the same month, the family reached the village of Huntington, which then consisted of a few log cabins. In the preceding November, the father made a trip to this county and entered a 240-acre tract of woods land, lying in Sections 20 and 29, Clear Creek Township, upon which a cabin was built, during the month of February, 1835. This completed, the family occupied it in the latter part of that month. The father, with the assistance of his sons, immediately set about clearing the land, and, as years rolled on, the forest was converted into well tilled fields. The subject of this sketch bore his share of the burden, thus involved. He remained home with his parents until he reached the age of twenty-five, when he purchased a lease in Section 20, of that Township, settled upon it, and began farming for himself. In the fall of 1845, he moved to the site of his present farm, upon which there was then not a stick amiss. It thus became necessary a third time for him to enter the forest, with ax in hand, and compel her to surrender to the advancing strides of civilization. Nor did he stop here. Since then he has assisted in clearing two other tracts of land in that township, and there is perhaps not a man in the county who has placed more of the county's land in a state of cultivation than Mr. Emley. His marriage to Eveline Eliza Herndon occurred June 18, 1843. She was born in Campbell County, Kentucky, March 20, 1825. She was the daughter of John and Nancy (Rariden) Herndon, both natives of Kentucky. Their marriage resulted in the birth of three children: Martha Ann, born February 8, 1850, died July 3, 1865; Buena Vista, born November 16, 1851, and Malcom P., born August 3, 1855. Mrs. Emley is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Emley is a member of the Highland Grange, No. 1724, and in politics he is a staunch Democrat. His first presidential vote was cast for Martin Van Buren, and he has tenaciously supported the principles of that party ever since. He is one among those grand and honored pioneers of the county. Mr. Emley is now the oldest living resident of Clear Creek Township.

GEORGE FARMER, an industrious citizen of Clear Creek Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, June 3, 1848. He was the fourth of seven children born to Jose and Lydia (Black) Farmer with whom he came to Huntington County, before he was two years old. The family settled upon a farm in Clear Creek Township, where the father and mother spent the rest of their lives and where George grew up to manhood and still continues to reside. He has adopted farming for his life occupation. He was married March 19, 1876, to Mary J. Sickafoose, who was born in Whitley County, this Sate, January 6, 1855. She died November 7, 1885, leaving to the care of our subject three children: Carrie A., born December 18, 1876; Melvin E., born August 22,1878, and Orville T., born January 12, 1882. Mr. Farmer is a member of the United Brethren Church, and a Republican in politics. He owns a farm of eighty-five acres, about sixty of which are in cultivation. He is a successful farmer and a first- class citizen.

GEORGE W. FINKENBINER, a prominent farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, January 26,1844. He was the fourth of nine children, four sons and five daughters, born to George and Susannah (Stands) Finkenbiner, both natives of Pennsylvania, of German descent. The paternal grandfather of our subject was Henry Finkenbiner. The latter spent his early life in the village of Sparta, Stark County, where during winter he attended school, and during summer he indulged in all the sports and pastimes which the genius of youth can invent. His father was a blacksmith by trade, and at eighteen years of age our subject entered his father's shop, and with him learned the trade. At the age of twenty, or in May, 1864, he entered Company F, One Hundred and Sixty-Second Ohio Regiment, with which he served four months. Upon returning from the war he resumed his position in the blacksmith shop, and in the spring of 1865, he accompanied his father and mother to this county and settled with them upon a farm in Warren Township. He continued to work in his father's shop until he reached the age of twenty-five when he went to W abash County and worked in the shop of his brother Henry, one year. He then returned to this county and set up a shop for himself in Clear Creek Township. That was in Section 16. Four years later he removed to a farm in Section 19, and in August, 1881, he removed to his present home in Section 30, of that township. Since 1873, his attention has been given to his trade and to farming. He was married September 13,1871, to Elizabeth Emley, who was born in Clear Creek Township, this county, July 26, 1845. She was the fourth daughter and fifth child born to Samuel and Ann (Efft) Emley, a biography of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Finkenbiner are the parents of three children, as follows: Ernest C.,born September 9, 1872; Faira E., born July 14, 1874, and Clarence W., born December 26, 1882, all living. Mr. Finkenbiner is a member of the Christian Church, the G. A, R., and politically he is an ardent Republican. He owns 193 acres of land situated in one of the best farming localities in Huntington County. His farm is well equipped with good fences and buildings. He is a first-class mechanic and an industrious and successful farmer.

REUBEN H. GILL, an old and honored resident of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Bracken County, Ky., and was born January 9, 1817. He was the sixth of eight children,  live sons and three daughters, born to Reuben and Nancy (Hanson) Gill, natives of Virginia and Maryland, respectively, the former of Irish and English, and the latter of English descent. Our subject was reared in his native county, working upon a farm. He remained at home until he reached the age of twenty-three, after which he worked a part of the time at the trade of a stone mason, and continued in this way for a number of years. His marriage to Martha S. Herndon occurred in his native county, December 3, 1840. She was born iii Campbell County, Ky., January 14, 1822, and was the fourth in a family of five children,  three sons and two daughters, born to John and Nancy (Rariden) Herndon. She was left an orphan very early in life and in consequence she was reared chiefly among strangers. During the six years prior to her marriage she made her home with Aaron Gregg, who was a relative by marriage, and who resided in Bracken County, Ky. During the first year after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Gill resided upon a farm in Bracken County. In 1842 they came to this county and settled in the woods of Clear Creek Township, where they have ever since resided. The site of their present farm was then a wilderness and the clearing of the farm occasioned a great deal of hard work. Mr. Gill chopped, grubbed, burned brush, rolled logs, made rails and, in fact, everything which the development of a new country necessitates. While thus industriously engaged, his wife stood bravely by his side, presiding over the duties of his household and administering to his wants, as only a devoted wife could; and not infrequently did she, too, enter the clearing, and assist in such ways as she could to prepare the ground for the plow. They are the parents of twelve children as follows: William F., born October 29, 1841; Susan F., born October 12, 1843, died August 12, 1865; John S., born March 21, 1840; Sarah E., born August 25, 1848; Elias H., born October 6, 1850; Laura E., born February 27, 1852; Mary L., born May 23, 1855, died June 19, 1859; Axalonia M., born September 20, 1857; Joseph M., born March 14, 1860; James E., born March 15, 1863, died August 17, 1865; Martha E., born April 13, 1865, and Desse B., born February 15, 1871. Mr. and Mrs. Gill are members of the Christian Church. In politics Mr. Gill formerly affiliated with the Whig party, casting his first presidential vote for William Henry Harrison in 1840. He was a firm supporter of Henry Clay, and continued to act with the Whig party until 1856, since which time he has ardently supported the principles of the Republican party. He has filled the office of trustee of his township in all about twelve years, and he has also held the office of assessor one term. He owns 120 acres of good land and a comfortable home, where he and wife are spending the decline of life in a quiet, happy way. Though it is now nearly forty-seven years since their marriage, both are enjoying good health, and promise to live for many years to come, to reap the benefits of their labors in earlier years, e and wife have lived a useful and industrious life and they enjoy the universal respect and esteem of all.

AMOS GOBLE, a successful young farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born about one mile from his present home, August 17,1850. He was the third of seven children born to Peter R. and Caroline M. (Groves) Goble, who are among the old residents of Clear Creek Township. He was reared upon a farm, and received in the district school a good common school education. He afterward attended select schools in Clear Creek Township two terms, and later on he attended a term of normal school in Huntington. During the winter of 1871-2 he taught school in Whitley County. In September, 1872, he entered College at Hillsdale, Mich., where he remained one term. He then returned to this county, and during the winter of 1872-3, he worked upon a saw mill owned by his father and brother. During the winter of 1873-4, he taught school in Clear Creek Township. His marriage to Hanna Layman, occurred February 22, 1874. She was born in Washington Township, Whitley County, February 13, 1855, and was the daughter of Adam and Lucinda (Hanes) Layman, both natives of Ohio. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Goble resided in the village of Goblesville, for a period of nine years — the former, during that time, being engaged in saw-milling. In the fall of 1883, they located upon the farm they now occupy, and since then the occupation of Mr. Goble has been that of a farmer. He and wife are the parents of three children, as follows: Stella M., born December 5, 1874; Anson O., born March 9,1877, and Cecelia J., born February 15, 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Goble are members of the United Brethren Church. In politics the former is a Republican. He owns a good farm of eighty acres, about half of which is in good state of cultivation. His farm is situated in a good farming locality, and is a very desirable location.

JOHN HELSER, a prominent farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Perry County, Ohio, January 10, 1839. He was the oldest of seven children, four sons and three daughters, born to Daniel and Mary Helser, both natives of Pennsylvania, of Dutch descent. The boyhood of our subject was spent working upon a farm in his native county. At the age of fourteen he accompanied his father, mother, one brother and two sisters to this county and located with them in Clear Creek Township, near where he now resides. Shortly afterward the family removed to a farm in Section 31, of Clear Creek Township, where the father died in the spring of 1881, and where the mother still resides. There John spent his youth assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. His marriage to Julia A. Delvin, occurred August 2, 1863. She was born in Clear Creek Township, this county, less than one mile from her present home, May 11, 1845, and was the youngest of seven children, four sons and three daughters, born to Thomas and Julia A. (Ream) Delvin, who were respectively, natives of Dublin, Ireland, and Perry County, Ohio. They were married in Perry County, Ohio, and in an early day, made one among the first settlements in Clear Creek Township. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Helser, died in this county at the advanced age of one hundred and four years. For a short time after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Helser resided in Huntington — the occupation of the former being that of a teamster. In 1864, they located where they now reside, in Section 32, Clear Creek Township. Since then the entire attention of Mr. Helser has been given to farming and stock raising. He and wife are the parents of four children, two sons and two daughters, all of whom are living. Their names are Addie I., born April 28, 1864; Roscoe, born December 4, 1866; Cora I., born September 14, 1869, and Oren D., born May 23, 1872. Mr. Helser is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a Republican in politics. He owns fifty-four acres of land, most of which is in cultivation. His farm is fitted up with a handsome brick residence and other substantial buildings.

CORNELIUS HENLINE, an old and honored resident of Huntington County, and one among the early settlers of Clear Creek Township, was born in Pike Township, Stark Co., Ohio, May 6,1815. He was the third in a family of six children, five sons and one daughter, born to Martin and Elizabeth (Heminger) Henline, both natives of Somerset County, Pa., of Dutch descent. The former was the son of Cornelius and Eve (Bronsteter) Henline. The father of our subject died when the latter was but eight years of age, in consequence of which, very early in life, Cornelius was taught to rely upon himself. The greater portion of his boyhood and youth was spent working out upon a farm by the month and day. At nineteen years of age he began to learn the carpenter's trade. This was finished in due time and to it his entire attention was directed for about sixteen years or during the time that he remained in Stark County, Ohio. He was married there December 23, 1841, to Mary Flora, a native of Bedford County, Pa., born March 26, 1814 and daughter of Jacob and Magdalene (Bechtle) Flora, both natives of Maryland, the former of English, and the latter of German descent. Mrs. Hen- line had three brothers and two sisters, all of whom are deceased. In 1843, Mr. and Mrs. Henline came to this county and settled in the woods of Clear Creek Township, where they have ever since resided. Having settled when they first came in a wilderness, a great deal of hard work naturally devolved upon them in the development of a farm. Mr. Henline grubbed, chopped, made rails, burned brush, rolled logs, while his wife stood bravely by his side presiding over the household and administering to his wants as only a devoted wife could. They are the parents of ten children as follows: Sevillah, born October 1,1842; Urias, born August 10, 1844, died March 14, 1845; Washington, born January 22, 1846: Franklin, born February 13, 1848; Emma, born August 2, 1849; Keturah, born November 12, 1851; Rebecca, born January 13, 1854, died April 8, 1862; Martin, born July 6, 1856; Flora Ellen, born April 15, 1860, and Gilbert, born September 28,1862. Mr. and Mrs. Henline are members of the United Brethren Church. In politics the former is a Republican. Many years ago he was a member of the Board of Township Trustees, during two terms. He owns a farm of 120 acres, about ninety of which, is in a high state of cultivation. He and Mrs. Henline have a comfortable home where they are spending the decline of life.

MARTIN HOKE, an old resident and prominent farmer of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, born February 2, 1827. He was the fifth of eight children, five sons and three daughters, born to Henry and Elizabeth (Longanecker) Hoke, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Irish, and the latter of Dutch descent. He spent his early life in his native county working upon a farm. He began farming for himself at the age of twenty-one and continued to follow that pursuit in Columbiana County until 1852, when he moved to this county and located where he now resides in Clear Creek Township. His life occupation has been that of a farmer, and as such he has been very successful. He was married in his native county January 3, 1850, to Catharine Metz, who was born in Stark County, Ohio, November 15, 1827. She was the daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Gisleman) Metz, both natives of Ohio. The first wife of Mr. Hoke died May 9, 1861, and on the 28th day of February, 1862, he was married to Rachel Metz, a younger sister of his first wife. She was born in Stark County, Ohio, May 22,1840. Her death occurred May 9,1881, and the third marriage of Mr. Hoke occurred July 23,1882, when Mrs. Elizabeth Bolinger became his wife. She was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, September 15, 1826. She was the daughter of David and Catharine (Witter) Shoemaker, the former a native of Columbiana County, Ohio, and the latter a native of Maryland. The first marriage of Mr. Hoke resulted in the birth of four children: Lucy A., born September 16, 1850; Ira C., born July 30, 1854; Emry Q., born April 22, 1858, and Jonas O., born July 23, 1860; died July 30, 1861. He and his second wife had born to them five children: Rosco P., born January IS, 1863; Lincoln, born August 12, 1864; Ida B., born August 22, 1867; Jesse E., born November 30,1873. and Amzi, born June 17, 1876. Mr. and Mrs. Hoke are members of the German Baptist Church. In politics the former is an ardent Prohibitionist. He owns 120 acres of land situated in one of the best farming localities in Huntington County. His farm is fitted up with a handsome brick residence and other substantial improvements. He began life with but little capital but through industry, economy and perseverance he is now in good circumstances. Mr. Hoke and his present wife were born within two miles of each other in Columbiana County, Ohio, but never formed an acquaintance until they came to this county. He has been a member of the German Baptist Church ever since he was eighteen, and Mrs. Hoke has belonged to that church ever since she was sixteen.

HENRY HUGHEL, a prominent citizen of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Clark County, Ohio, and was born August 19, 1824. He was the eleventh of fourteen children, nine sons and five daughters, whose names, in the order of their ages, are as follows: Ephraim, Cyntha, Alvarus, Jane, Lavini, Lewis, Clark, Josephus, Aaron, Elizabeth, Henry, Silas, Rhoda and David. The last two, Rhoda and David, were twins. Eight members of this family, Cyntha, Jane, Lavina, Lewis, Josephus, Henry, Silas and Rhoda, are still living. The parents of our subject, Richard and Jane (Baker) Hughel, were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively, the former of English, and the latter of German descent. Richard Hughel accompanied his parents to Kentucky, when he was four years old. There he grew up to manhood; but later on he moved to Ohio, and became an early settler of Hamilton County. Here his marriage to Jane Baker occurred. In about the year 1812 they moved to Clark County, Ohio, where both spent the balance of their lives, their respective deaths occurring in 1846 and 1867. Jane Baker was the daughter of Ephraim and and Rhoda (Lums) Baker, the former of whom was the son of Ephraim Baker. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county working upon a farm. His marriage to Evaline Shoemaker occurred there on the 13th day of January, 1847. She was born in Highland County, Ohio, September 10. 1829, and was the third of six children, two sons and four daughters, as follows: Catharine, Maria, Evaline, Edmund, Samuel and Sarah J., of whom Catharine, Evaline and Samuel are still living. Mrs. Hughel's parents, David and Sarah (Linaweaver) Shoemaker, both natives of Rockingham County, Va., of German descent. David Shoemaker was born in the year 1795, and was the son of Martin and Elizabeth Shoemaker, both natives of Virginia. He accompanied his parents to Highland County, Ohio, when he was about sixteen years of age. His marriage to Sarah Linaweaver occurred in Rockingham County, Va. When Mrs. Hughel was sixteen years old her parents moved from Highland County, Ohio, to Clark County, Ohio, where the father died September 6,1855, and where the mother died in 1869. During the first six years following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hughel resided upon a farm in Clark County, Ohio. In 1854 they moved to this county and settled in the woods of Warren Township. Mr. Hughel cleared up a farm there and continued to cultivate it until in 1875, when he moved his family to their present home in Section 33, Clear Creek Township. Since 1876, the attention of Mr. Hughel has been divided between his farm and the manufacture of tile. For this latter industry he has erected upon his farm substantial buildings, and in this line he is doing a profitable business. He and wife are the parents of nine children, as follows: Sarah M., born November 8,1848; Mary J., born December 13, 1850, died September 13, 1852; Alcinda E., born September 6, 1863; David R., born September 16, 1856, died October 19, 1856; Samuel M., born July 30,1858, died November 17,1863; Catharine A., born July 14,1861; Isadora R., born August 29, 1864; William H., born August 1, 1868, and Olive C., born January 28, 1872. Mr. Hughel owns eighty acres of good land, nearly all of which is in a high state of cultivation. In politics he is a Democrat. He is an industrious and successful farmer and manufacturer. Sarah M. Hughel was married to Simon Bruch, September 1, 1867. Two children: Sarah E., Sophia E. Alcinda E. Hughel was married to Solomon Ricksecker, March 18, 1875. Four children: Allen S., Annette P., Bertha M., and Lizzie B. Catharine A. Hughel was married to Frederick G. Hipp. Aug. U, 1877. Five children: Charles H., Herman E., Ivy M., Vernon C., and an infant son, unnamed.

ABRAHAM KAYLOR, an old and honored resident of Clear Creek Township, was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, June 4,1820. He was the youngest of seven children, three sons and four daughters, born to Abraham and Magdalene (Metts) Kaylor, both of whom were of Dutch descent. He spent his youth and early manhood in his native county. His father died when he was seven years old and as soon as he became old enough he found employment upon a farm by the month and thus continued until he reached his fourteenth year, when he and one sister and their widowed mother settled upon a small farm of forty acres, the management of which devolved upon him. About two years later they removed to Trumble County, Ohio, where two years were spent upon a farm. They then removed to Stark County, Ohio, where the marriage of our subject occurred in 1842, when Ann Eliza Stump became his wife. She was born in Lancaster County, Pa., in 1819. being the daughter of Casper and Magdalene Stump, of Dutch descent. In 1852, Mr. and Mrs. Kaylor moved to this county and settled where the former now resides. They continued to live happily together until their union was broken by the death of his wife, March 24,1884. The life occupation of Mr. Kaylor has been that of a farmer, and as such he has been very successful. He is the father of eight children as follows: Mary J., born May 22, 1843, died August 22, 1843: Mary A,, born May 17, 1844; John, born October 5, 1846, died April 7,1858; Elias, born January 31,. 1849, died August 22,1869; Anna Eliza, born July 19,1851; Franklin, born January 17, 1854; Emetine, born April 15,1856, and Angeline, born September 15, 1858, died March 3, 1862. Mr. Kaylor is a member of the Christian Church. In politics, he is a Republican. He is one of the old residents of Clear Creek Township, and one of her most worthy and esteemed citizens.

FRANKLIN KAYLOR, an enterprising young farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born upon the farm where he now lives January 17, 1854. He was the sixth child born to Abraham and Ann Eliza (Stump) Kaylor, a biography of whom appears above in this work. His entire life has been spent at the old home, the possessor of which he became in 1885. He continued to work for his father until the year 1882, when he began farming for himself, and has adopted that pursuit for his life occupation. November 21, 1883, he was married to Fannie Shearer, daughter of Thomas M. and Amanda H. (Emley) Shearer, of Clear Creek Township. She was born in that township December 10, 1859. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of two children: Albert L., born January 18, 1885, and Orland S., born November 18, 1886. Mr. Kaylor is a member of the Christian Church, and a Republican.

JACOB KAYLOR, a prominent citizen of Clear Creek Township, was born in Mahoning County, Ohio, May 29, 1815. He was the fourth of seven children born to Abraham and Magdaena (Metts) Kaylor, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter a native of Maryland. He grew up to manhood in his native county, working upon a farm. At twenty-two years of age he went to Stark County, Ohio, where he found employment upon a farm by the month and year. His marriage to Magdaena Stump occurred in Columbiana County, Ohio, on the 18th day of March, 1842. She was born in Lancaster County, Pa., in October, 1820, and was the daughter of Casper and Sarah (Fishel) Stump, both natives of Pennsylvania. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Kaylor located upon a farm in Stark County, Ohio, but in 1850 they removed to Mahoning County, Ohio. Two years later, or in the fall of 1852, they came to this county and settled in Clear Creek Township. They had located in the woods, and the clearing of a farm occasioned a great deal of hard work. Mr. Kaylor toiled away with his maul and wedge, ax, saw and mattock, and not infrequently did his wife enter the clearing too and assist in ways that she could to prepare the ground for the plow. In 1861 they removed to another tract of woods land, and again assumed the task of clearing up a farm. In May, 1863, they removed to a farm in Section 15, of the same township, where they resided until in August, 1886, since which time they have occupied their present comfortable home in Section 16. They are the parents of eleven children, as follows: Harriet, born October 1,1842 died April 30, 1872; Harmon, born October 4,1843; Charlotte, born March 24, 1845; Jefferson, born January 29, 1847; Analiza, born November 7, 1849, died October 2, 1850; Jeremiah, born October 20,. 1851; Mary Ann, born April 7,1854; Matilda, born April 27,1856; Emma J., born May 11, 1858; Amelia, born March 2, 1860, and Levi, born July 29, 1S63. Mr. and Mrs. Kaylor are members of the Christian Church. In politics, the former is a Democrat. He owns two farms in Section 15, one of eighty and the other of forty acres, and besides he has a small tract of land and a comfortable home where he lives.

HARMON KAYLOR, a citizen of Clear Creek Township, was born in Stark County, Ohio, October 3, 1843. He was the second of ten children born to Jacob and Magdalena (Stump) Kaylor, with whom he came to the county when he was ten years old. His youth was spent upon his father's farm. In December, 1862, he entered the service of the Union Army, in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-First Regiment, Thirteenth Indiana Cavalry, with which he served until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Tenn., and Mobile, Ala., and in both he discharged his duties becoming a loyal soldier. On returning from the war he worked for a short time at the carpenter trade, but in the fall of 1866, he began to learn the trade of blacksmith. This was finished in due time, and has received his attention ever since. Since February, 1881, he has conducted a first-class blacksmith and wagon-making shop, in the village of Gobles- ville. His marriage to Eliza Forst occurred May 12, 1807. She was born in Warren Township, this county, February 22, 1849, and was the daughter of Samuel and Eliza (Miller) Forst, the former a native of Ohio, and the latter a native of Germany. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of seven children, as follows: Clemet F., born February 9, 1868; Mary E., born January 16, 1871, died July 23, 1872; William E., born May 25, 1873; Samuel A., born May 3, 1876; Clara V., born October 18, 1878; Emma A., born December 5, 1880, and Bertha M., born June 11, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Kaylor are members of the United Brethren Church. The former is a member of the G. A. R., and independent in politics. He is an industrious workman, and a skillful mechanic. In April, 1870, Mr. and Mrs. Kaylor moved to Buchanan. Mich., and four years later they removed to Berrian Springs, Mich. A few months later they removed to Stevensville, of that State, where they resided until in January, 1876. They returned to West Point, in this county, where they resided about five years. They then moved to their present home.

JOSIAH C. KITCH, a farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Section 22, of that township, about three miles from his present home, February 8, 1850. He was the third son of Daniel and Nancy (Glass) Kitch, who immigrated here from Columbiana County, Ohio, in 1853, and settled on the farm upon which our subject was born. When the latter was but a year old they removed to a farm in Section 33, of the same township. There his early life was spent assisting to cultivate the farm in summer and attending the district school in winter. At eighteen years- of age he took up the vocation of a teacher and this furnished' his winters' employment for a period of eight years. He was- considered a successful teacher and his patrons frequently showed their appreciation of his services by re employing him. He enjoys the satisfaction of having admirably governed his pupils- without a single instance of corporal punishment during his entire career. His vacations were chiefly spent working upon the farm, though a portion of the time was spent in normal school, the better to fit himself for his profession. At the age of twenty-one he began farming for himself upon the old home place, and he has been thus employed during each successive' season excepting one, during which he was employed upon a. farm by the month. His home has always been in this county, as has also his presence, with the exception of a little time consumed with pleasure trips, one of which was made to the Centennial in 1876. He was married to his former pupil, Isabelle C. Ellis, on the 8th day of February, 1882. She was born in Adams County, Ohio, November 18,1861, being the daughter of Clinton C. and Mary E. (McGooney) Ellis, with whom she came to this county when she was five years old. Her parents first settled in Wayne Township, but are now residents of Lancaster Township. Mr. and Mrs. Kitch are the parents of one child, Claude E., born January 18,1883. This child is the remarkable possessor of two great, great grandparents, both of whom are the great grandparents of Mrs. Kitch. Our subject and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics, the former is a Republican. He possesses a membership in the Farmers' Mutual Fire Insurance Association, of which society he has been secretary since November, 1884. He purchased the old home farm in the spring of 1883, upon which he still continues to reside. It consists of eighty acres of excellent land, about three-fourths of which is in cultivation.

JOSEPH MISHLER, an old and honored resident of Clear Creek Township, was born in .Montgomery County, Ohio. October 29, 1833. He was the fifth in a family of seven children, born to John and Elizabeth (Rosier) Mishler, with whom he came to this county when he was in the eighteenth year of his age. The family settled in Clear Creek Township, where our subject remained assisting to clear and cultivate the farm until he was twenty-five years old. He was married January 13,1859, to Elizabeth Shively who was born in Freble County, Ohio, May 5, 1839. She was the daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (Brower) Shively, with whom she came to this county when she was yet a young child. Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Mishler settled upon the farm they now occupy, where they have ever since resided. The life occupation of Mr. Mishler has been that of a farmer, and as such he has been reasonably successful. He and wife are members of the German Baptist Church. In politics the former is a Democrat. He owns a good farm of 158 acres, about half of which is in a high state of cultivation. His farm is fitted up with good buildings and fences, and is a very desirable location. He is an industrious and successful farmer, and he and his wife are among the worthy and esteemed citizens of the county.

JOHN A. MORROW, an old and honored resident of Clear Creek Township, was born in Preble County, Ohio, February 24, 1819. He was the ninth of ten children born to George and Sarah (Jones) Morrow, both natives of North Carolina, of English descent. He was reared upon a farm in his native county. In about the year 1849 he came to this county, and in the following spring he located upon a tract of woods land in Section 15, Clear Creek Township, where he has ever since resided. His home was in a wilderness, and the clearing of a farm occasioned for him a great deal of hard work. He toiled away with his maul and wedge, ax and mattock, and in the course of a few years he had a good farm and a comfortable home. He was married in March, 1859, to Mary M. Keedy who was born in Stark County, Ohio, November 12,1832, and was the daughter of Henry and Susan (Shutt) Keedy, both natives of Washington County, Md., of German descent. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of five children, as follows: George H., born December 18, 1860, died October 28, 1881; Simon, died in infancy; Margaret I., born February 4, 1866; the next was a son that died in infancy, unnamed, William M., born December 8, 1870. Mr. and Mrs. Morrow are members of the United Brethren Church. In politics the former is a Republican. Mr. Morrow is one of the old residents of Clear Creek Township, where he is well and favorably known.

MRS. CATHARINE MYERS, widow of the late Anthony Myers of Clear Creek Township, was born in Germany, November 10,1825. She was the daughter of Philip and Elizabeth (Rutman) Agne, with whom she came to America when she was seven years old. Her parents settled upon a farm in Stark County, Ohio, where she continued to reside with them until about 1844. In that year the parents removed to Portage County, Ohio, where both spent the rest of their lives. The mother died February 24, 1863, and the father died February 14, 1879. The subject of this sketch was married to Anthony Myers on the 13th day of May, 1847, in Akron, Summit Co., Ohio. For two years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Myers resided with the former's parents upon a farm in Stark County, Ohio. They then moved to Middlebury, Summit County, Ohio, where Mr. Myers acted in the capacity of foreman in a pottery for a period of nearly nine years. In October, 1857, they came to this county and located upon a tract of woods land which the husband had previously purchased in Warren Township. They resided there until March, 1875, when they removed to Clear Creek Township, and settled where Mrs. Myers now resides. On entering this county Mr. Myers adopted the vocation of a farmer, in which pursuit he continued until his death, which occurred November 5, 1886. Mrs. Myers is the mother of eight children, as follows: Henry P., born February 20,1848; Flora L., born June 20, 1849; Mary E., born October 8, 1851; Edward A., born September 21,1853; Clara C, born December 26,1858; John W., born January 25, 1861, died January 22, 1884; Harriet E., born March 26,1863; Cora E., born April 19,1866. Mrs. Myers is a member of the Lutheran Church. Her seven children are members of the United Brethren Church. She owns a farm of 256 acres, most of which is in cultivation. Her husband, Anthony Myers, was born in Germany, January 15, 1821. He came to America with his parents when he was seven years old.

GEORGE SHAVEY is a native of France, born November 30,1838, and son of James and Margaret (Morrell) Shavey, with whom he came to America when he was nine years old. On reaching this country the family continued westward, and after stopping three months in Wayne County, Ohio, they came to this State and settled in Whitley County, where George spent his youth working on a farm. After he became of age he began farming for himself upon his father's place. He thus continued until in February, 1864, when he entered the service of the Union Army -in Company I, One Hundred and Fifty-Second Indiana Regiment, with which he served until the close of the war. He then returned to Whitley County, and resumed his position upon the farm. January 14,. 1869, he was united in marriage to Hannah M. Householder, a native of Perry County, Ohio, born January 1,1849. She was the daughter of John and Rachel (Goble) Householder, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, respectively. In March, 1873, Mr. and Mrs. Shavey came to this county and settled where they now live. It was then a tract of woods land, and the clearing of a farm occasioned for them a great deal of hard work. But with this the forest melted away and a good farm and a comfortable home is the result. They are the parents of three children, as follows: Joseph F., born October 31, 1869; Mary C., born March 8, 1872, and Rachel M., born May 22, 1876. Politically Mr. Shavey is a Democrat, and has never scratched a ticket but once in his life. He owns 150 acres of excellent laud, situated in one of the best farming localities in Huntington County. He is a successful farmer and a good citizen.

HENRY SHOCK, one of the worthy citizens of Clear Creek Township, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, November 12, 1835. He was the fifth of seven children born to Adam and Mary (France) Shock, with whom he remained working upon the farm until he was twenty-three years of age. He was married March 15,1859, to Mary Flora, who was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, February 25, 1842. She was the daughter of Joseph and Rosina (Bennett) Flora, natives of Pennsylvania and Kentucky, respectively. In 1864, Mr. and Mrs. Shock came to this county and settled where they now live. They are the parents of eleven children, all of whom are* living. They are: Ezra F., Sarah A., Clara, Cora E., Rosella, Joseph H., William A., David W., Harvey M., Jennie M , and Minnie H. Mr. and Mrs. Shock are members of the German Baptist Church. In politics the former is a Democrat. He was elected trustee of his township in 1884, and served one term to the satisfaction of the public. He is an industrious and successful farmer, and he and wife are among the worthy and esteemed citizens of the county.

SAMUEL SHOCK, a prominent citizen of Clear Creek Township, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, July 23, 1817. He was the son of Adam and Mary (France) Shock, the former a native of Huntington County, Pa., and the latter a native of Botetourt County, Va. He was raised upon a farm in his native county. In 1864 he came to Huntington County and engaged in farming in Clear Creek Township. He thus continued until 1872, since which time his attention has chiefly been given to saw milling. He was married February 18,1859, to Lydia Freehafer, who was born in Wayne County, Ohio, February 8, 1839, and was the daughter of Augustus and Sophia (Briner) Freehafer, the former a native of Berks County, Pa., and the latter a native of Wayne County, Ohio. Mr. and Mr. Shock are the parents of ten children, as follows: Mary C., Joseph H., John, Frank. Sarah A., Emma, Samuel A., Hattie, Maggie, and Lizzie, two of whom, Sarah A., and Emma, died, aged respectively, eighteen months, and nine years. In politics Mr. Shock is a Democrat, and a reliable and influential man.

HENRY S. SPRINKLE, a farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Knox Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, April 16,1838. He was the fourth of six children, two sons and four daughters, born to Henry and Susannah (Summers) Sprinkle, the former of whom was the son of Henry and (Lesh) Sprinkle, and the latter was the daughter of David and Mary Summers. The subject of this sketch spent his boyhood in his native county working upon a farm. At fifteen years of age, or in 1853, he accompanied his parents to this county and and located with them upon a tract of land in Section 4, Huntington Township. There he worked upon the farm until he reached the age of eighteen, when he took up the trade of a carpenter, and at that time worked at it about eighteen months. He then returned to his father's farm, the management of which he superintended until in November, 1862, at which time he moved to Washington Township, Whitley County, where he settled in the woods and at once set about clearing up a farm. But about one year and a half later, or in August, 1864, he removed to Cleveland Town ship, that county, but in April, 1865, he returned to this county and again located upon the old home place, in Huntington Township, it having been purchased by him. In August following he sold that farm and moved to the city of Huntington where he was engaged in divers pursuits for two years. His employments may be summarized as follows: four months in the produce trade, two or three months a3 a railroad bridge carpenter, then six months at the carpenter's trade, and three months as a clerk in a dry goods store. He then purchased an interest in the marble works of Dooling, Becker & Co., to which his attention was given, until in August, 1867, when he removed to his present beautiful home in Clear Creek Township. He was married October 14, 1860, to Mary A. Storm, a native of Logans- port, this State, born of Irish, German and English descent, August 20, 1840. She was the second of six children, three sons and three daughters, born to James and Barbara (Kitt) Storm, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter a native of Stark County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Sprinkle have had five children, as follows: Anna M., born July 14, 1861; Emma B., born February 11,1864, died October 19,1867; Charles R., born March 10, 1867, and Reuben H., born December 18, 1869, died February 25, 1883, and Farie F., born June 21,1876. In August, 1862, Mr. Sprinkle joined the German Baptist Church. He continued in active membership until in September 26, 1885, when, on account of his unwillingness to refuse the use of their church building to other branches of the society, he was expelled. He did not allow this, however, to interfere with his attendance, but his membership he continues to withhold, feeling that he would rather be right than a member of a church. Politically Mr. Sprinkle is an ardent Republican. He has been solicited a number of times to accept offices of trust, but always declined. He owns a fine farm of 155 acres, fitted up with a handsome brick residence, a fine barn and good fences, making it altogether, one of the most desirable places in the county. He is a good farmer, a man of positive convictions, whose industry, perseverance and economy have placed himself and family in comfortable circumstances.

HARMAN STULTS, an aged and honored resident of Huntington County, was the third son and fourth child of John H. and Catharine Ann (Smith) Stults, and was born in Belfast Township, Bedford Co., Penn., October 23, 1812. When he was yet a child less than four years old his father and mother moved to Ohio, and became early settlers of Stark County. There his boyhood and youth were spent assisting to clear and cultivate his father's farm. In winter he attended school a portion of the time, but the advantages were poor, consequently his early education was quite limited. He continued to work upon the farm until he became of age, after which his attention was divided for a period of about ten years between the farm and the carpenter's trade. He was married in Stark County, to Sarah Decker March 31, 1844. She was born in Centre County, Pennsylvania. May 13,1822, and was the daughter of Benjamin and Rachel (Swihart) Decker, both natives of Pennsylvania. In the fall of 1850, Mr. and Mrs Stults moved from Stark County, Ohio, to Whitley County, this State, and located upon a tract of woods land in Cleveland Township. There Mr. Stults cleared up a farm which he continued to cultivate until in February, 1872, when he and wife moved to this county and located where they now reside in Clear Creek Township. They are the parents of eight children, as follows: Benjamin F., born May 31,1845, at present a minister in the Lutheran Church, and stationed at Middlebury, Elkhart County; Maria C., born November 25,1846; Athalia, born July 7, 1849; "Jeremiah H., born July 22, 1851; Lorena, born May 17,1854, died June 5,1854; Sarah E., born June 7, 1857; Sumantha A., born November 17, 1860, and Emma M., born February 20, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Stultz are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Jeremiah H. Stultz is a carpenter in the City of Huntington. The father of Mrs. Stultz, Benjamin Decker, now lives in Stark County, Ohio, at the advanced age of ninety-four years.

JACOB STULTS was born in Stark County, Ohio, February 3rd, 1844, son of John Harman and Catherine (Smith) Stults, and is of German descent. The paternal grandfather of our subject was George Stults, a native of Germany, and who, when a mere boy, emigrated to America between 1740 and 1750, and settled in North Carolina. He was a soldier in the War of the Revolution, and died soon after that conflict. The father of Mr. Stults was born in North Carolina, June 10,1779. He moved to Pennsylvania, and there married in 1806, and then emigrated to Stark County, Ohio, in 1816, and there remained until 1848. when the family came to Indiana, and settled in Whitley County, and in. 1855 came to Huntington County, and died here in 1865, in the 86th year of his age. He was a farmer. The mother of Mr. Stults was born in Pennsylvania, in 1783. She was the daughter of George Smith, who was taken a prisoner of war during the time of the Revolutionary War, but was only retained a short time, and, through the kindness of an English officer, he was permitted to escape, and return to his family of three small children. He died in Pennsylvania. The mother of subject died in Huntington County, Ind., 1862. Our subject is the ninth of ten children — seven of whom are now living, was raised on the farm, and was a student at the early subscription schools of Stark County, Ohio. In the fall of 1845 he began teaching school. He continued teaching more or less each year for twenty-one years. In 1851 he purchased eighty acres of land in Huntington County, where he now resides, and has been a successful farmer. Married March 25.1852, to Miss Margaret E., daughter of James C. Best, of this county. By this union one child was born, Marion B. Mrs. Stults died May 21,1855. Mr. Stults was married again May 18, 1856, to Miss Harriet Kennedy, a native of Virginia, born October 8th, 1830, daughter of John and Ann (Lyle) Kennedy. They have three children living of four born, viz.: Maggie E., Sherman P., Addie B. (deceased), and Howard B. Mr. S. was formerly a Whig, now a Republican. He and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The dates of his brothers' and sisters' births are as follows: John, 1807; Samuel. 1808; Polly, 1810; Harman, 1812; George. 1815; David, 1817; Elizabeth, 1819; Joseph, 1821; Jacob. 1821; William 1821).

HARMAN W. STULTS, a citizen of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Stark County, Ohio, born September 19, 1835. He was the second of seven children — four sons and three daughters— born to John and Mary (Becher) Stults, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former born in Bedford County, and both of German descent. His boyhood was spent in his native county upon his father's farm. When he was thirteen years of age he accompanied his father and mother to this county. That was in 1848. The family settled in Section 1, Warren Township, where Harman spent his youth assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. His marriage to Lucinda Kitt occurred March 24,1859. She was born in Clear Creek Township, this county, within three miles of her present home, September 9, 1839, and was the third daughter of Isaac and Catharine Ann (Slusser) Kitt, a biography of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Stults moved into a log cabin which the former had erected upon a tract of land in Section 17, Clear Creek Township. There Mr. Stults at once set about clearing up a farm, and at the expiration of five years, when he sold the place, he had forty-five acres of it in a state of cultivation. On the 21st day of April, 1864, he moved to his present home in Section 19, of Clear Creek Township. There he has continued to reside ever since. His life occupation has been that of a farmer, and as such he has been reasonably successful. Since February, 1864, the state of his health has compelled him to confine his labors to the management of his farm only, and in addition to this, business of an executive and administrative character has occupied a good portion of his time. Mr. and Mrs. Stults are the parents of eight children,  three sons and five daughters, all of whom are living. Their names are: Mary C., born January 21, I860; Almira J.,born April 13,1861; Silvanus E., born November 33,1862; Ida M., born June 19,18«4; Landa. born May 20, 1866; Dilla K.. born August 19,1872; Blanche V., born March 24,1875; Oliver Hazard Perry Throckmorton, born June 1, 1877. Mrs. Stults is a member of the Lutheran Church, Mr. Stults is a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge and an ardent Republican in politics. In the spring of 1857 he was elected to the office of Constable in Warren Township, and as such he served two years, until he moved to Clear Creek Township. In this latter township he had resided but a few weeks when he was elected to the same office. With the exception of one year he held the office continously until 1868. In April of that year he was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace. He was re-elected in 1872 and in 187»s and again in 1880, serving in all for a period of sixteen and one half consecutive years. He would probaby have been continued had he not prefered to retire. He owns one hundred and fifty-seven and one-half acres of excellent land, most of which is in a good state of cultivation.

LEVI SWANK, an old and honored resident of Clear Creek Township, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, July 25,1833. He was the sixth of ten children born to Jacob and Sarah (Ra- sor) Swank, natives of Kentucky and Pennsylvania, respectively, the former of English, and the latter of Dutch descent. He was reared upon a farm in his native county. When he became of age he began to learn the carpenter's trade. This was finished in due time and received his attention for five years. His marriage to Mary Fisher occurred in Montgomery County, Ohio, February 10, 1859. She was born in Dauphin County. Pa., August 25,1839, and was the daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Books) Fisher, the former a native of Lancaster County, Pa., and the latter a native of Dauphin County, Pa., both of German descent. In the spring of 1861, Mr. and Mrs. Swank came to Huntington County, and located where they now reside in Clear Creek Township. Since then the occupation of Mr. Swank has been that of a farmer. He and wife are the parents of nine children, as follows: Theodore S., born December 25, 1859; Manasseh, born January 7, 1862; David L., born January 23, 1864; Wallace, born March 16, 1866, died March 10, 1868; Charles, born November 30, 1867; Oscar, born March 23, 1870; Fletcher T., born May 19,1872; Sarah, born October 3, 1874. and Oliver P. M., born February 14,1878. Mr. and Mrs. Swank are members of the United Brethren Church. In politics the former is a Republican. He owns 160 acres of excellent land, most of which is in a high state of cultivation and is fitted up with good fences and buildings. Two of his sons, Theodore S. and Manasseh, are fitting themselves for the ministry, while the next younger son, David L. Swank, has acquired considerable proficiency as a musician.

GEORGE A. TELFER, an enterprising farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Henry County, Ohio, March 19, 1841. He was the youngest of six children born to William and Isabella (Berry) Telfer, both natives of Edinburgh,Scotland, their respective births occurring February 6, 1806, and December 28,1807. His parents were married in their native country, on the 7th day of September, 1827, and in 1834, they emigrated to America, and first settled in Quebec, Canada. In the following year they removed to the State of New York; in 1836, they removed to the State of Michigan. A year later they returned to Ohio, and settled in Henry County, where they resided when the subject of this sketch was born. William Telfer, the father of our subject, died there about seven weeks after the latter was born, or May 12,1841. His parents had born to them six children, whose names and dates of births and deaths are as follows: William, born August 15, 1828, died September 4, 1834; Ann, born May 28, 1830, died October 20, 1838; James, born September 12, 1832, died May 30, 1833; Margaret, born April 2, 1834; died September 14,1835; Ann Margaret, born May 16, 1837; died March 6, 1844. By this it will be seen that our subject is the only one now living — his brothers and sisters all having died before he was born except one, Ann Margaret, who died when he was but three years old. In 1844, he 'accompanied his mother to the village of Huntington-, where his boyhood was spent at the home of his mother, who in the meantime was re-married, and thereafter successively became the wife of James Mackly, Thomas Wickham, and Daniel Frankforther, who died in 1845, 1849 and 1857, respectively. She and her last husband moved to a farm in Clear Creek Township, in 1853, where George spent his youth working upon a farm. At the age of twenty-three he began farming for himself, and this has been his occupation ever since. He has resided where he now lives since January 1, 1856. He was married on Sunday, January 1, 1871, to Caroline Farmer, a native of Stark County, Ohio, born December 5, 1843. She was the daughter of Josie and Lydia (Black) Farmer, both natives of Stark County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Telfer have seven children, as follows: Emry, born December 28, 1871; Isabella, born February 21, 1874; John, born February 24, 1876; George, born August 27, 1878, Ann, born March 11,1881; James, born February 19, 1884, and Dessie, born July 24, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Telfer are members of the United Brethren Church. In politics the former is an ardent Republican. His mother, who was a well-informed scholarly lady, died at his residence, June 6, 1878. Mr. Telfer is an honest, upright man, and a good citizen.

MICHAEL WEBER, one of the old settlers of Huntington County, and one of the early residents of Clear Creek Township, is a native of Germany, born March 6,1813. He was the son of John and Catharine Weber, the former of whom died when Michael was but six months old. His mother died in 1839. After he became old enough he entered school and continued to attend until he reached the age of fourteen. He then began to learn the tailor's trade, and to it he gave his attention three years. He then took up the vocation of a farmer, at which he has ever since continued. In March, 1835, he was married in his native country to Mary Falter, who also, was born in the month of March, 1813. She was the daughter of Philip Falter. In 1840, Mr. and Mrs. Weber emigrated to America, and on reaching this country continued westward, and in December, 1840, they located upon a tract of woods land in Section 25, Clear Creek Township. There Mr. Weber has continued to reside ever since. His first wife died with the cholera, August 31, 1849 and on the 20th day of June, 1850, he was married to Mrs. Anna Barbara Smith, who was born in Germany, November 5,1819, and was the daughter of Albert Hofmann. She was married to Adam Smith in her native country September 16, 1848. Immediately after their marriage they came to America, and first settled in Ft. Wayne, but about six months later they removed to this county where Mr. Smith died from an attack of the Cholera, July 28. 1849. By his first wife Mr. Weber had eight children, as follows: Jacob, William, Philip, John, Frank, Christian, Mary and Henry, of whom Frank, Christian, Mary and Henry are dead. He and his present wife are the parents of three children, as follows: Anthony, Frederick and Margaret, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Weber are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics the former is a Democrat. He served as one of the trustees of his township for two years, many years ago. He has been honored with the position of school director for twelve years, and besides he has occupied the position of trustee in the church. He has a good farm of eighty acres and a comfortable home.

JOSEPH T. WILSON, a prominent farmer of Clear Creek Township, was born in Beaver County, Pa., March 15, 1819. He was the fourth in a family of eleven children,  nine sons and two daughters,  born to John and Margaret (Nicholl) Wilson, the former a native of Ireland, of Irish descent, and the latter a native of Beaver County, Pa., of Scotch descent. When the subject of this sketch was but two years old his parents moved to Wayne County, Ohio, where his early life was spent upon a farm. In 1844 he came to this county and purchased the land he now occupies, but shortly afterward he returned to Wayne County, Ohio. In the fall of 1845 he again came to this county and he has been one of its residents ever since. In 1849 he returned to Wayne County, Ohio, where, on the 15th day of November, he was married to Sarah Hiner, a native of Pennsylvania, born December 21,1820. She was the daughter of Henry and Mary (Philips) Hiner, both natives of Pennsylvania. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Wilson located upon the formers farm in Clear Creek Township where they lived happily together until their union was broken by the death of his wife, January 17, 1879. Mr. Wilson is the father of seven children: John, Henry, Robert, Mary, Sarah E., Joseph T. and James H., all of whom are living, except Mary, who died in the twenty-third year of her age. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Lutheran Church. In politics, he is a Democrat. He owns 220 acres of land, a good portion of which is in a high state of cultivation. His farm is situated in an excellent farming locality, and is a very desirable location. He is an industrious and successful farmer, and a first-class citizen.

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