Genealogy Trails
JAY COUNTY, INDIANA
BIOGRAPHIES

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A REAL DAUGHTER
Mrs. Lydia Ann Cline Simmons

My venerable father, William Cline, Sr., was a native of Pennsylvania and of German ancestry. His education was German. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary War, enlisting in Taneytown, Md., in Capt. Key's Co. and served to the end of the war. He died in Jay County, Indiana, August 23, 1853, aged 106 years and two months. He was twice married. He chose for his first wife Miss Susannah Lance. To this union was born eight children, all now deceased. Their names are as follows : Anna Mary Cline Wigner, deceased, aged 100

years; William Cline, deceased (met an untimely death while diving; his body was never found ; he left a wife and three children) ; Elizabeth Wigner deceased, aged 87 years ; Abraham Cline, deceased, aged 96 Years ; Mary Ross, deceased, aged 102 years ; Sarah Warnock, deceased, aged 89 years ; Margaret Cunningham, deceased, aged 96 years ; Conrad Cline, deceased, aged 17 years.

Four years after the death of his wife, when all of his children were in homes of their own, he chose for his second wife Miss Jane Woten. To this union were born three sons and four daughters. Their names are as follows: Susannah Bird, deceased, aged 73 years ; Cynthia Rice, deceased, aged 81 years; Alexander H. Cline, deceased, aged 53 years, a Civil War soldier ; Jerusha A. Mongar, deceased, aged 72 years ; Jacob Cline, deceased, aged 5 years; Charles W. Kline, enlisted at the age of 20 years in Civil War in 110th O. V. I. at Piqua, O.; was home on furlough spring of 1862, then returned to his regiment ; his last service was in the Battle of the Wilderness ; was reported among the missing; heard that he was taken prisoner, but never got any information concerning him. Lydia Cline Simmons. I am now nearing my 80th birthday, which will be August 24, 1916. I was born August 24, 1836, in Perry Township, Gallia County, Ohio, near the town of Patriot.

My earliest recollection was when I was about three years and six months old, when we moved from our home farm to another farm joining the home place which father had recently bought. Some time after this father built a new house, I believe in the year 1840. The people made most of their own clothing from wool and flax and also made the larger portion of their sugar from the sap of the sugar trees. They also dried their fruit, which we always had in abundance. In the spring of 1843 my little brother was killed by falling backward off of a rail fence and a rail falling on his breast. The cherry trees were white with bloom at the time  was a bright, clear day, and in a moment all was in mourning. We felt that we did not want to live there so moved back to the home place the same year.


The next year I commenced going to school. The first Sunday School that I remember attending was at a Baptist Church; Sunday Schools those days were not conducted as they are at the present time.

Now I will leave the hilly country of Gallia County, Ohio, and travel towards the State of Indiana, this being the last week in September, 1847. We bade good-bye to my native home and started on our journey to the wilderness of Indiana. First day we ate our dinner at Point Pleasant, second day by the roadside, where there was a large chestnut tree. Sister and I did not rest much as we were busy gathering chestnuts. I had never seen such large chestnut trees and I thought it was grand. We moved in covered wagons in those days as there were no railroads. We had plank roads to travel on part of our journey, and part of it was very rough and very dangerous. The weather being fine we had a very pleasant journey. It rained one night, and that was the only night we failed to have a comfortable house to stay in. It was close to where a German family lived, and when they learned that father was German, and being so old, they begged of him to stay in their house. He told them that he was no better than his family and would not go. He was then 100 years old. We were two weeks on the road and arrived at Fort Recovery, Ohio, early in October, stopping there to visit with mother's sister and family ; leaving there we soon crossed the state line and were in Indiana, and traveled south six miles to where my grand-parents, and also an uncle lived, in Madison Township, Jay County, Indiana. Here we made our home until father within a few days bought 160 acres of choice land for $450. It was heavy timber land, with no improvements. Then they began work and built two cabins right in the woods, and they soon had them finished, cleared away timber and brush, and built a fence enclosing those cabins. We moved in and called it home. This was my first experience in living in the wild woods. The deer and wild turkeys would come quite close ; our nearest Post Office was six miles away, in Randolph County, Indiana, and no church house nearer than Ft. Recovery, Ohio. Meetings were held in the dwelling houses. In the Autumn of 1849 my father and brother made a trip back to Gallia County, Ohio, and were gone about three weeks ; came home feeling well, and enjoyed their visit.


Soon after his return from Ohio, father bought 80 acres of land joining our home, which he gave to his son, A. H. Cline. The home place is now owned by his grandson, Wm. H. Cline, and is a valuable farm. I enjoy very much visiting the old (once cabin) home.

December 28, 1856, I was married to Thomas W. Simmons, who was then engaged in teaching school. At the expiration of the school, we then commenced keeping house April 8, 1857, about half a mile from mother's, and the same distance from his parents. Here we lived until the Civil War, when we moved in the "house with Father Simmons, their two sons being in the Army ; this was in the fall of 1861. As Father and Mother Simmons were left alone they thought it best that we should move in part of their house, to .take care of them as they were not able to for themselves.  My own mother died Jan. 27, 1862, aged 65 years and 16 days. Father Simmons died March 16, 1872. Before his death he divided his land, giving each child 40 acres. Mother Simmons remained with us until her death,, July 21, 1889, aged 92 years.

My husband, Thomas W. Simmons, a Civil War veteran, died September 20, 1889, aged 57 years, 8 months. I, being left alone, rented my place, reserving a part of the house and barn so I could keep a horse and buggy. I owned 30 acres of land which was a part of the land my father bought when he first came to Indiana. I gave this to my only child, Mrs. Jane Roush. Some time after this I also gave her the 40 acres, the home place, after I had bought property in the Village of Salem, three miles from our old home, still remaining on the farm where we first commenced keeping house, and  never out of sight of where we settled in the woods, after coming to Indiana in the year 1847. March 5, 1898. I moved to the Village of Salem and lived there until November I5, 1903, when I moved to Portland, Jay County, Indiana, to make my home with my daughter, Mrs. Jane R. Roush, my only child. "

I have eight grandchildren and four- great-grandchildren.

Source: Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine
By Daughters of the American Revolution

THE HAWKINS FAMILY

THE HAWKINS FAMILY was here when the first beginnings of a social order were being worked out in this region, in the days before Jay county had a separate civic identity, when what now comprises the twelve townships of this county were included within the confines of Randolph county, the country now comprised within the borders of Jay county then having been little better than a "howling" wilderness of swamps and limber fastnesses, the Indians still treading their trails hereabout and wild animals everywhere lurking in the deep forests. From the beginning the Hawkinses have been among the dominant factors in the social and economic development of this region, and in the fifth generation are still carrying on the work laid out here by the pioneer of this family. John Jay Hawkins, the founder of the family in Jay county, was perhaps the most forceful individual figure hereabout in the days before the county was organized and his influence was largely helpful in stimulating further settlement here. He died an untimely death, due to the hazard of the wilderness, and was the first white person buried in the territory which afterward became organized as Jay county. One of his sons, Benjamin W. Hawkins, was the county agent appointed to locate and "lay out" the county seat town when the county was organized in 1836. Another son, Nathan Byrd Hawkins, was the delegate from this district to the Indiana state constitutional convention in 1850 and first judge of the common pleas court in this judicial district. Prior to that and even from the days of his boyhood he had been an active force in the development of the commercial interests of the county, and has been referred to as "the first business man in the county," as will be noted by reference to the Montgomery History of Jay County (Part I of this work), where it is set out that he "started to show land to strangers" following the settlement of the family here in 1829. As a lawyer, Judge Hawkins looked after the financial affairs and property of nonresidents and in course of time, in the absence of better banking facilities, he was asked to care for the money and securities of local residents—for safe keeping. He had the first iron safe in the community and kept considerable money on hand at all times, thus virtually the pioneer banker of Jay county. One of his sons, the late Nathan B. Hawkins, former state senator from this district, assisted in establishing the second bank in the county and was active in its affairs for thirty-five years. Senator Hawkins first used the name of N. B. Hawkins & Companv in business, this later being changed to that of the Hawkins Mortgage Company, with headquarters still at Portland, now one of the best known financial concerns in the Middle West, which under the direction of Morton S. Hawkins, president of the company and son of Senator Hawkins, is carrying on the work begun by "The House of Hawkins" here in 1829. But even prior to that, in the days of John Jay Hawkins, a lieutenant in the War of 1812, and in the days of his father, Samuel Hawkins, the Indian fighter, who was colonel in command of the expedition which went to the relief of General Harrison at Ft. Wayne and was wounded in the shoulder during that memorable campaign, and who afterward became one of the pioneers of this region, settling near the present site of Eaton, Ohio, the name of Hawkins was known from Cincinnati to Ft. Wayne, back in Territorial days, and has thus been inseparably identified with business affairs throughout eastern Indiana for more than a century. The story of the days of the settlement of the Hawkins family here in 1829 is so well told in the prior narrative (Montgomery's History of Jay County—Part I of this work) that it need not here be retold, the attention of the reader being respectfully invited to a perusal of that narrative in this connection, but a brief review of that narrative for purposes of continuity is but proper. It is narrated that the founders of the Hawkins family in America were four brothers, John, Samuel, Benjamin and James Hawkins, who emigrated from England to the American colonies in the fore part of the eighteenth century and settled in the Shenandoah Valley in the Virginia Colony, these brothers being said to have been descendants of Sir John Hawkins, an English navigator, born at Plymouth about 1520, who, according to Chambers's Encyclopedia, has the "infamous distinction" of being the first Englishman that trafficked in slaves and who established the slave trade between Africa and the American colonies. His "commercial" career ended in 1568, after which he is found more honorably employed. He was appointed treasurer of the British navy in 1573, knighted for his services against the Spanish Armada in 1588, and for the rest of his life was engaged in making havoc of the Spanish West Indian trade. In 1595, along with his kinsman, Drake, he commanded an expedition directed against the Spanish settlements in that part of the world, but died, November 21, in the same year. He founded a hospital at Chatham for the relief of disabled and sick sailors. Samuel Hawkins, one of the sons of the Samuel Hawkins, the colonist mentioned above, was born and reared in the Shenandoah Valley and there spent his last days. During the Revolutionary war he served as a soldier in the patriot army. One of his sons, Samuel III, grew up in the Shenandoah Valley and when the tide of emigration began to flow west after the Revolution became one of the first settlers in Bourbon county, Kentucky.! Following Wayne's successful expedition and treaty opening new territory to settlement in what later came to be organized as the state of Ohio he moved with his family from Kentucky and became a pioneer of the region surrounding what is now Eaton, in Preble county, Ohio, an older chronicle stating that he is thought to have been the first white settler to cross the Miami river. One of this old Indian fighting pioneer's sons, John Jay Hawkins, the founder of the family in Jay county, was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, September 25, 1789, and was named in honor of John Jay who in that same year was appointed by Washington the first chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States and in whose honor also Jay county was given its name, the only county in the United States thus named. John Jay Hawkins was but a lad when he moved with his parents from Kentucky to Ohio and he grew up amid pioneer conditions in what later came to be organized as Preble county, his schooling thus having been so much neglected that he did not acquire the ability to read and write until after his marriage to Nancy Sellers, who taught him these accomplishments. She also was born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, and was a daughter of Nathan Sellers, a Revolutionary soldier who had emigrated to that section but who became a pioneer of Ohio in 1809. During the war of 1812 John Jay Hawkins served as a lieutenant in the army and later served as sheriff of Preble county. He became a man of affairs in that county and remained there until early in 1829 when he moved with his family into what then was a wilderness over in this part of Indiana, having previously selected a site for his new home on the banks of the Little Salamonie, south of where Portland seven years later was laid out when the county came to be organized. It was on March 8, 1829, that he and his wife and their six children arrived at this site after the toilsome trip along the inadequate trails of the period. During that summer the family lived in what the pioneers called a "half-faced camp," but before fall had a stout log cabin erected and were snugly ensconsed before the hard winter came. All hands pitched in and presently a clearing was effected and the making of a farm was under way. Game was plentiful and there was no lack of meat, while the sale of furs to the traders kept up the supply of such money as was needed. It was while hanging for dressing the carcass of a deer that John Jay Hawkins came to his untimely end, the carcass falling upon him and inflicting such injuries that he died from their effect on March 15, 1832, a little more than three years after his arrival here, and he was the first white person buried here. His widow survived until 1868. They were the parents of six children, four sons, Samuel, Nathan B., Benjamin W. (who became agent for Jay county at the time of its organization, as is set out elsewhere), and Joseph C, and two daughters, Avaline, who married James Simmons, and Caroline, who married B. W. Clark, whose descendants in the present generation form a numerous connection. Nathan Byrd Hawkins, the second son of this pioneer family, was born in Preble county, Ohio, October 24, 1812, and was thus sixteen years of age when he came over here into the Salamonie country with his parents in 1829. He took an active part in the work of clearing and developing the home place and also found time, as has been noted, to "show land to strangers," thus becoming the first real estate agent and business man of the pioneer community. After awhile, in order to gratify his inclination for a business career, he went to Richmond and become a clerk in Elijah Coffin's store, later becoming engaged in business on his own account at Milton. In the meantime he had attracted the attention of John S. Newman, one of Indiana's leading lawyers of the period, who advised him to take up the study of law. In 1839 he returned to Jay county and began the practice of law at Portland, which had been created the county seat three years before. Three years later, in 1842, he was elected to represent this district in the state Legislature and in 1850 was elected delegate to the state constitutional convention from the district comprised of the counties of Randolph, Jay and Blackford. Upon the creation of the court of common pleas in 1852 he was elected judge of that court, this judicial district comprising the counties of Blackford and Jay, and was serving in that judicial capacity at the time of his death on October 18, 1853. As has been noted in the introduction to this review Judge Nathan B. Hawkins took an active part in the general business affairs of the community and as a private banker afforded to the pioneers their first banking facilities. Judge Hawkins married Rebecca Shanks, who was born in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1818, and who had become a resident of this county when her parents, John and Mary Shanks, settled here in pioneer days. Of the children born to Judge Hawkins and wife, six grew to maturity, namely: John Jay, whose last days were spent in Washington, where for years he was engaged in the Government service; Jane C, who married David VanCleve Baker, in his day one of the leading lawyers of this part of Indiana; Helen H., who married Isaac A. Griffith, in his day one of the leading merchants of this county; Rachel A., who married Norton A. Meeker, a former merchant of Portland; Sarah G., who married Benjamin F. Fulton, also a Portland merchant, of whom further mention is made elsewhere, and Nathan B., Jr. Judge Hawkins was a charter member and first worshipful master of Jay lodge, No. 87, F. and A. M., and his was the first Masonic funeral held in this county. The second Nathan Byrd Hawkins was born in Portland on January 1, 1853, and was thus less than one year old when his father died. He completed his schooling in old Liber College and in the Indianapolis high school and when nineteen years of age became engaged in the lumber business at Portland, but presently disposed of that business and in 1875 assisted in the organization of the Citizens Bank at that place, of which concern "he was made assistant cashier and with which he continued actively connected the remainder of his life, thus early becoming one of the leaders in the commercial life of Portland and of this county, a promoter of the best interests of this region until his death. During the days of the natural gas "boom" here he was president of the Portland Gas, Oil and Mining Company, and did much toward the development of the industries dependent upon natural gas hereabout. In 1906 he was elected state senator from this district and served in the Senate during the sessions of 1907 and 1909. His death occurred on February 20, 1911. Senator Nathan B. Hawkins married Genevra I. Jaqua, daughter of James B. Jaqua, banker and lawver, of Portland, and of whom further mention is made elsewhere, and to this union were born three children, Estella, Morton S. and Zillah Pearl. As noted above, Senator Hawkins was the first to use the firm name of N. B. Hawkins and Company, which was later changed to the Hawkins Mortgage Company, now one of the leading financial concerns in the Middle West and whose business is carried on under the general direction of the Senator's son, Morton S. Hawkins, president of the company, who continues to make his home in Portland, direct descendant in the fourth generation of John Jay Hawkins, the founder of the family in Indiana, and third in descent from Judge Nathan B. Hawkins, "the first business man in Jay county." Morton S. Hawkins was born in Portland on February 12, 1881, and attended school there up to the eighth year when he was sent to the Jesuit Fathers school at old Albuquerque, N. M. After a season's attendance there he entered the West Texas Military Academy at San Antonio, where he was in attendance for two years, at the end of which time he returned to Indiana and entered the Law School of Indianapolis University at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1903 with the degree of L.L. B. For twelve years Mr. Hawkins continued his residence in Indianapolis, practicing his profession first in association with Pierre Gray and then for a time in association with Arthur W. Brady, general counsel for the Union Traction Company. He then formed an association for practice with Merrill Moores, present member of Congress from the Seventh Indiana district, and was for seven years thus associated, or until his return to Portland. While living at Indianapolis Mr. Hawkins promoted the organization of the Beech Grove Traction Company and was otherwise active in the general affairs of the city. It was in 1912, following the death of his father and the reorganization of the latter's extensive business interests, that Mr. Hawkins returned to Portland to take direction of the affairs of N. B. Hawkins & Company, of which he had been elected president. In 1919 this company was reorganized as the Hawkins Mortgage Company, capital stock $1,500,000, and Morton S. Hawkins has continued to serve as president of the company. In 1913, the year after he entered upon the general direction of the affairs of this financial concern, Mr. Hawkins spent nearly a year in Europe, investigating in England, Belgium, France and Germany the methods of handling small loans on personal property. About that same time the Russel Sage Foundation started an agitation in the United States to reform the small loan business and outlaw the "loan shark". Through this movement laws were passed in many states fixing a reasonable monthly rate of interest and otherwise regulating such business and subjecting it to state examination. After this form of business thus had been placed on an equitable basis the Hawkins institution called in a staff of experts and perfected plans for the establishment of welfare loan institutions in every city of over 20,000 population in the country. This work is now well under way, the Hawkins Mortgage Company's mutual system of Welfare Loan Societies now having no fewer than twentynine branches, operating in eleven states. In addition to his activities as the head of this growing institution Mr. Hawkins has, since his return to Portland in 1912, organized and promoted no fewer than ten state banks and trust companies in the states of Indiana and Ohio. He also maintains a close interest in various local industrial and commercial enterprises and was actively instrumental in the establishment of the Portland Republican, a daily newspaper started in 1913, and is a member of the board of directors of the company which publishes the newspaper. Mr. Hawkins is a Scottish Rite (32°) Mason, affiliated with the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons at Portland and with the consistory at Fort Wayne, and is also a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Murat temple at Indianapolis. On February 11, 1922, at Atlanta, Ga., Morton Sevier Hawkins was united in marriage to Fannie Lamar Manley, of that city, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Manley and a member of the well known Lamar-Doughty and Manley families of Georgia. The marriage, it was announced, was the culmination of a romantic meeting of Miss Manley and Mr. Hawkins in London during the preceding summer, the former having made the European trip during that summer with her grandmother, Mrs. Charles L. Gateley.

BENJAMIN F. FULTON

BENJAMIN F. FULTON, formerly and for years one of the most active factors in the general commercial and industrial life of Portland and who died at his home in that city in the spring of 1911, had done much to promote the general interests of his home town and county and it is but fitting that there should here be carried something in the way of a memorial to his activities. Mr. Fulton was a native of the old Buckeye state, but for forty years his activities had been centered in and about Portland and during that period he had done much to impress his individuality upon the community. He was born at Sidney, Ohio, March 25, 1848, the first born of the four children born to Isaac and Jane (Taylor) Fulton, both of whom were born in that same city, where they spent all their lives. Reared at Sidney, Benjamin F. Fulton received but meager schooling, the circumstances surrounding his youth being such as early to force him to rely upon his own efforts for a livelihood. When eighteen years of age he entered the employ of Rhodehamel Bros., of Piqua, Ohio, and after an apprenticeship in their store there was put in charge of one of their novelty wagons, the territory he covered on his sales trips extending as far west as Portland. He presently acquired also an interest in a general store at Covington, Ohio, and in 1870 gave up his road trips and devoted his attention to the store, continuing thus engaged until after his marriage in August of 1871, when he sold his interests at Covington and established his home at Portland, where he spent practically the remainder of his life. Upon locating at Portland Mr. Fulton became engaged in the grocery business. Four years later he sold that store and moved to Indianapolis where he bought another grocery store and was there engaged in business for about three years, at the end of which time he sold out there and returned to Portland, resuming there his vocation as a grocer. Two years later he sold his store to his brother, William Fulton, and he and his brother, James L. Fulton, became engaged in the hardware business, their store being on the site now occupied by the Spades grocery on Meridian street, and this business was maintained by the brothers for about ten years. Meanwhile, about two years after they had become engaged in the hardware business the Fulton brothers took up the work of drilling gas wells and organized what then was known as the Fulton Gas Company, their operations becoming quite extensive hereabout. They presently bought out the plant of the Portland Gas Company and thus acquired control of all the gas business in Portland. When oil was being sought in this county Mr. Fulton drilled in the first producing well brought in in Wayne township, and he continued his operations in this and adjacent territory until his death, one of the most active promoters of gas and oil interests in this section, his death occurring on April 2, 1911. Mr. Fulton was a Republican and was a member of the Friends church, as is his widow. It was on August 8, 1871, that Benjamin F. Fulton was united in marriage to Sarah G., Hawkins, who was born in Portland, and to this union were born two children, Ethan Allen and Jane Louise, the former of whom (now engaged in the promotion of the oil business in this county) served as an officer in the United States army during the time of American participation in the World war and is now captain of Howitzer Company of the 151st Infantry, United States National Guard of Indiana, at Portland. Capt. Ethan A. Fulton married Gertrude Rogers and has had two children, Dorothy, who married Joseph Campbell and died leaving one child, a daughter, Betty Fulton, and Pauline M. Jane Louise Fulton is a teacher of art in the Portland public schools. As noted above, Mrs. Fulton was born in Portland, where she is still living and where she is very pleasantly situated. She was born on November 27, 1850, a daughter of Nathan B. and Rebecca (Shanks) Hawkins, the former of whom, born on October 24, 1812, died on October 20, 1853, and the latter, born on February 22, 1816, died on April 1, 1882. Mrs. Fulton is a member of the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution by right of descent from her great-grandfather, Samuel Hawkins, who was a soldier of the Revolution. The family in this country was established by Joseph Hawkins, who came to the American colonies from Wales in 1685, and has been prominent in Jay county since pioneer days.

JAMES G. ORR

JAMES G. ORR, president of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, who is engaged in the wholesale fruit and produce business at Portland, one of the best known and most progressive business men of that city, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at Selma, in Delaware county, this state, August 3, 1880, son of Joseph N. and Nannie C. (Simmons) Orr, who are still living there. Joseph N. Orr was born in Delaware county, a member of one of the pioneer families of that section of the state, and early became engaged in business at Selma, proprietor of a general store, which business he still maintains. He and his wife have three children, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Nellie and Bertha. Reared at Selma, James G. Orr received his early schooling in the excellent schools of that village and supplemented the same by the course in the high school at Muncie and two years of attendance at Indiana University. Reared to a commercial life, he became engaged in business with the W. H. Moreland Shoe Company at Muncie, where for five years he was proprietor of a shoe store. He then sold that store and returned to Selma, where he became engaged in the grocery business, continuing thus engaged until in 1913, when he disposed of his interests there and moved to Portland, where he has since been quite successfully engaged in the wholesale fruit and produce business on West Race street. Ever since he became a resident of Portland Mr. Orr has given his thoughtful attention to the general commercial activities of the city and is now president of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, to the affairs of which active and influential organization he has long been earnestly devoted. He is a Republican, a Knights Templar and Cryptic Mason, a past exalted ruler of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, a member of the United Commercial Travelers, and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Orr is one of the charter members of the Portland council, Royal and Select Masters (Masonic), and is now. serving as steward of the council. In 1905, James G. Orr was united in marriage to Helen Tomlinson, of Henderson, Ky., and to this union one child has been born, a son, James N. Orr.


ANTHONY WAYNE McKINNEY

ANTHONY WAYNE McKINNEY, who died at his home in Dunkirk in the fall of 1918, was for many years one of the most potent factors in the development of the commercial interests of Jay county, particularly of the region surrounding the towns of Dunkirk and Redkey, and it is but fitting that in this formal history of the county in which he was born and in which his useful career had its fruition there should be carried some modest tribute to the good memory he left at his passing. His was a permanent and enduring work in this community and promises to be continued in successive generations, for the careful commercial plans he so wisely laid now are being carried out by his sons—Jesse, Frank and Arthur—in the operation of the McKinney department store at Dunkirk, which claims the title of "Indiana's greatest country store," an establishment containing upward of thirty departments and occupying 30,000 square feet of floor space. Anthony Wayne McKinney was born on a pioneer farm in Richland township, this county, May 2, 1847, and was a son of Joseph J. and Elizabeth McKinney, who reared their family of ten children on that quarter section homestead farm, the grant of which—secured by Joseph J. McKinney during the VanBuren administration—is still held in the family. The McKinneys of this line got their start in America in Colonial times. Joseph J. McKinney's father, Anthony Wayne McKinney, was a soldier of the War of 1812, and the latter's father, Joseph J. McKinney, was a soldier of the Revolution. The persistence of names—an admirable family practice—here is noted. Anthony Wayne McKinney, grandfather of the subject of this memorial sketch, was the founder of the family in Indiana. He served as a soldier during the War of 1812 and when settlements were beginning to be effected over in this part of Indiana he came here and set up a water power grist mill on the Mississinewa river in the Fairview neighborhood in Randolph county and thus became one of the most useful pioneers of this section, his mill attracting custom among the then widely separated settlers for miles hereabout. One of his sons, Joseph J. McKinney, named for his Revolutionary grandsire, became one of the first settlers in Richland township, Jay county. Of Joseph J. McKinney, the Richland township pioneer, it has been written that "he and his good wife Elizabeth were pioneers in the truest sense of the word, for it fell to their lot, together with other early settlers of their day, to help clear the forests and to lay out and help build the roads, and otherwise lay the foundations for our present civilization." Joseph J. McKinney was a useful and influential pioneer citizen, for years served his community as township trustee and also served two terms as representative from this district in the Indiana General Assembly. He lived to be seventyseven years of age. As noted above, he and his wife had ten children, all of whom grew to maturity, those besides the subject of this memorial sketch having been Mrs. Sarah Taylor, George W. (a soldier of the Union during the Civil war), Mrs. Nancy Goe, Mrs. Adaline Maitlen, Mrs. Mary Nibarger, Mrs. Elizabeth Hall, Mrs. Susan Knapp, Mrs. Ella Brown and Jesse McKinney. As most of these reared families of their own the McKinney connection hereabout in the present generation is a no inconsiderable one. Reared on the home farm in Richland township, Anthony W. McKinney completed his schooling at Liber College and when seventeen years of age began teaching school, continuing thus engaged during the winters for several years or until he went into business at Redkey as the proprietor of a sawmill, that having been in the days when "timber was king" hereabout. He married at the age of twentytwo and not long afterward added to his business enterprise a store at Dunkirk for the sale of hardware and agricultural implements, presently moving this stock to his home town of Redkey, where he established the first exclusive hardware and implement store in the vicinity, and where for more than thirty years he continued successfully to serve his community as a distributor of household and farm commodities. He introduced and urged upon his farmer neighbors and friends the installation of improved farm machinery and sold and started the first reaper and the first selfbinder in this section of the country, it having been written of him that "so eminently did he ply his trade in this particular line that Redkey became known far and near as a center of supply for all kinds of farming implements, supplies and repairs." With the develooment of the natural gas industry in this region Mr. McKinney took an active part in the promotion of the interests incident to that particular phase of industrial development and was one of the prime movers in the company which took charge of the work in Redkey, drilling wells and interesting outside capital in the utilization of the new fuel. During the later years of his life Mr. McKinney lived practically retired from mercantile activities aad occupied himself with looking after his various property 'interests, taking particular enjoyment and pride in the big department store which had been promoted by his sons at Dunkirk and which was the outgrowth of the business started by himself half a century before. He was a member of the board of directors of the Farmers State Bank of Redkey and was also a director of the City State Bank of Dunkirk. Though ever active in the general public affairs of his community Mr. McKinney was not an aspirant for political office and the only position of this sort he ever held was that of treasurer of the city of Redkey, in which capacity he -served for a number of years. Mr. McKinney was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Dunkirk. His wife died in 1906 and his last years were spent at Dunkirk, where his sons had made their home, his death occurring there on September 5, 1918. It was in 1869 that Anthony W. McKinney was united in marriage to Martha Jane Goe, who was born in Greene county, Ohio, a member of one of the real pioneer families of that county—a county from which so many of the pioneers of Jay county came—and to this union five sons were born, one of whom died in infancy; Harry, who died at the age of twentythree years, and Jesse, Frank and Arthur, proprietors of the McKinney department store at Dunkirk, who are doing business under the firm name of the McKinney Brothers Company. Jesse McKinney, the eldest of these brothers, was born at Redkey on August 16, 1875. He completed his schooling by attendance at the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute and a term at Oberlin College and then entered the Byron W. King School of Oratory, from which latter institution he was graduated, entertaining at that time views concerning the possibilities of a public life. Mr. McKinney is a Democrat and has always taken an interested part in public affairs. He served for two years as town clerk at Redkey and in 1906 was elected to represent this county in the lower House of the Indiana General Assembly, serving in the regular session of 1907 and in the special session afterwards called by Governor Hanley for the consideration of the county local option bill. But the call of business always has been stronger than the lure of politics and from the days of his boyhood Mr. McKinney has been in business, he and his brothers having been valuable assistants to their father in the operation of the store at Redkey, which was continued until the time of the elder McKinney's retirement, after which the younger men started out "on the road," each with a distinctive line, and for two or three vears were busy gaining some most valuable experience as traveling commercial salesmen. They then were ready for the enterprise which they had in mind and began "cashing in on a dream," as a nationally circulated house organ of a well known office-supply concern some time ago, in a most informative write-up of that enterprise in connection with a story of general office efficiency, referred to the McKinney brothers' enterprise. The brothers—Jesse and Frank and Arthur—pooled their interests and took over the old established business of their father, organizing at Dunkirk the Hardware Supply Company, with an initial capital of $15,000. As the little story of commercial enterprise here referred to says: "For six years the new firm prospered, but in those six years the three brothers had experienced visions of a larger store, a store that would not confine itself to a limited line. Dreaming of it, talking it over and figuring the possibilities of branching out only served to crystallize the idea in their minds. The day dawned when dreams came true and the Hardware Supply Company blossomed out as McKinney's Department Store. The old building (formerly used as a hotel) had been remodled and repainted, display windows added, elevators installed, intercommunicating telephones put in and each of the thirty departments carefully stocked." To much more along this line is added, "The business grew with each succeeding day." It was in 1915 that the department store had its beginning when the brothers bought the old "Boston" dry goods stock at Dunkirk and added dry goods to their stock in trade. Presently they added a furniture department, and then men's furnishings and women's readyto-wear goods and millinery and finally a line of shoes, all these lines with their various auxiliaries making a very complete department store, occupying a building 60 by 130 feet, three stories in height. In February, 1910, Jesse McKinney was united in marriage to Mary H. Gilpin, who was born in Portland, a daughter of Levi L. and Nancy (Hawkins) Gilpin, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Martha J., born on March 9, 1912. Mr. and Mrs. McKinney are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Dunkirk and Mr. McKinney is president of the board of trustees of the same, a member of the board for some years. He also for the past four years has been superintendent of the Sunday school. Frank McKinney, the second of the McKinney brothers, was born at Redkey on August 22, 1877, and the lines of his business life have run pretty closely parallel to those of his brother, above outlined. Upon leaving the high school at Redkey he entered his father's store and remained there until the establishment was moved to Dunkirk in 1909, since which time he has been a resident of the latter city, giving his attention to the affairs of the McKinney department store. On January 9, 1909, Frank McKinney was united in marriage to Charm Weaver, who was born in Dunkirk on June 12, 1885, and whose schooling was completed at Glendale College, Cincinnati. Mrs. McKinney is a daughter of John and Jennie (Maitlen) Weaver, both members of old families in this community, and the former of whom formerly was proprietor of one of the oldest complete general stores in Dunkirk, later taken over by the Dunkirk Mercantile Company. Mr. and Mrs. Frank McKinney also are members of the Methodist church, and he is a member of the board of trustees of the church. Arthur L. McKinney, the youngest of the three brothers and who in addition to his mercantile interests has been for years interested in musical expression, the author of several songs of wide recognition, was born at Redkey on November 3, 1885. He completed his schooling under a special tutor and then took up in such leisure as he could command from the duties of the store the study of music, making a specialty of piano and slide trombone, taking an active part in both band and orchestral work. His study of musical composition has given him a facility in musical expression which has found its outlet in the writing of a number of pieces which have been well received in musical circles, particularly his "When the Wheat to Gold" and "I Told Her So Long Years Ago." On February 16, 1910, Arthur L. McKinney was unitea in marriage to Lena M. Peterson, who was born in the neighboring county of Delaware, daughter of Newton and Luella (McDaniels) Peterson, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Duane P., born on April 4, 1914. Mrs. McKinney's schooling was completed at the university at Valparaiso, Ind., and prior to her marriage she had taught school at Albany, Ind. Mr. McKinney is a member of the United Commercial Travelers of America. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church at Dunkirk and he is one of the church stewards.

JAMES O. PIERCE

JAMES O. PIERCE, former secretary-treasurer of the Bimel Manufacturing Company, of Portland, who died at his home in that city in 1920 and who prior to establishing his connection with the industrial interests of the community had for some years served as a teacher in the schools of this county, left a good memory at his passing and it is but fitting that there here should be carried some modest tribute to that memory. Mr. Pierce was a native of Ohio, born on December 16, 1858, and was a son of Orange and Caroline (Selby) Pierce. He was reared at Zanesville, Ohio, and upon completing the course in the high school there supplemented the same by a course in the Zanesville Commercial College. He then came to Indiana and entered Ridgeville College, making his home at Ridgeville with his grandfather, the Rev. Asa Pierce. Upon completing the course in Ridgeville College Mr. Pierce became engaged as an instructor in the college and was thus engaged for several years, at the end of which time he accepted the position of superintendent of schools at Redkey and thus became a resident of Jay. county. For four years he served as superintendent at Redkey and then he transferred his services to the schools at Portland and thereafter made his home in Portland. For two years Mr. Pierce taught in the Portland schools and then entered the office of the Bimel Manufacturing Company as bookkeeper. He presently was promoted to the position of secretarytreasurer of the company and continued engaged with that concern for about twenty-five years, or until his retirement from business in 1913. After his retirement Mr. Pierce continued to make his home in Portland, where he had become very comfortably situated, and there he died on December 4, 1920, he then being in the sixty-second year of his age. In April, 1880, James O. Pierce was united in marriage to Sue Bowersox, who was born in Darke county, Ohio, in 1858, daughter of John H. and Diana (Harter) Bowersox, who later became residents of Indiana, and to that union were born four children, namely: Inez, who married G. T. Vail, a banker, of Michigan City, Ind., and has one child, a daughter, Barbara; J. O. Pierce, now a farmer in this county, who married Bessie Flesher and has one child, a daughter, Marian; Earl, who is living at home with his mother, and Mabel, who married L. W. Hull, a lawyer of Oshkosh, Wis., and has one child, a daughter, Nancy. Mr. Pierce was a member of the Methodist church, as is his widow, and was for more than twenty years superintendent of the Sunday school. He was a Republican and was a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland.

ROSCOE D. WHEAT, former prosecuting attorney for this judicial circuit, former county attorney, present attorney for the city of Portland, vice-president of the Jay County Savings and Trust Company and a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court for nearly twenty-five years, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and has lived here all his life, ever actively interested in the development of the best interests of the community. Mr. Wheat was born on a farm in Jackson township on February 22, 1876, and is a son of William R. and Naomi V. (Tucker) Wheat, both of whom also were born in this county. William R. Wheat, a substantial landowner of Jackson township, now living retired at Portland, is a son of William R. Wheat, Sr., who came to Indiana from Virginia and became one of the first landowners in Jackson township, this county, and an influential figure in the development of that community in pioneer days. Reared on the home farm in Jackson township, R. D. Wheat received his early schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and when little more than a boy began teaching school, a vocation which he followed for six winters, meanwhile continuing his studies in the old normal school at Portland and at the Tri-State College at Angola, from which latter institution he was graduated in 1897. During this period he also was for a time engaged as a traveling salesman, but his inclinations ever were toward the law and he was pursuing his studies along that line in the law office of George Bergman at Portland, under which preceptorship he was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court in 1897, following his graduation from college. Not long after his admission to the bar Mr. Wheat became associated with Judge J. W. Headington in the practice of law at Portland and this mutually agreeable arrangement continued until the death of Judge Headington, since which time Mr. Wheat has been practicing alone. He has served two terms as prosecuting attorney for this judicial circuit, has also served as county attorney and is the present attorney for the city of Portland. Mr. Wheat also has ever given proper attention to the general business affairs of the community and is vice-president of the Jay County Savings and Trust Company, one of the most influential fiduciary institutions in this part of the state. Mr. Wheat is a Republican and has long been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this congressional district. He is a Freemason, is the exalted ruler of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and is also affiliated with the Portland Rotary Club and the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Wheat married Nina G. Bishop, daughter of Peter L. and Maria J. Bishop, and he and his wife have one child, Alwyn Cree Wheat. The Wheats have a pleasant home in Portland and have even taken an interested part in the city's general social activities. During the time of America's participation in the World war, Mr. Wheat became associated with the Y. M. C. A. work overseas and was also attached to. the motor transport corps, rendering eight months of service overseas.

LEE E. FOSTER, D. D. S., one of the best known young dentists in Jay county, with offices at Portland, where he has been in practice since his graduation from the Indiana Dental College in 1912, was born at Farmland, in the neighboring county of Randolph, on October 12, 1889, and is a son of M. B. and Hattie (Heaston) Foster, both of whom were born in that same county, members of old families there. M. B. Foster was reared in Randolph county and early became a contracting plasterer, a business he followed with success. He was married in 1888 and he and his wife have five children, Doctor Foster having four sisters, Helen, Reba, Ruth and Inez, who are at home with their parents. Doctor Foster received his early schooling at Farmland and upon completing the high school course entered Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1912, after a course of instruction covering three years. Upon receiving his diploma the Doctor located at Portland, where he opened an office for the practice of his profession and where he has since continued in practice. On June 8, 1914, about two years after opening his dental office at Portland, Dr. Lee E. Foster was united in marriage to Mary I. Wickersham, who was born in Madison township, this county, daughter of Henry C. and Clara B. Wickersham, and to this union two children have been born, Sarah Jane, born on January 20, 1916, and John E., December 12, 1919. Doctor and Mrs. Foster are members of the Presbyterian church. The Doctor is a Republican and a Freemason. He is a member of the Portland Rotary Club and is also affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

S. A. D. WHIPPLE, former assistant attorney general of the state of Indiana, former city attorney of Portland and for many years one of the best known members of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, with offices at Portland, is a native of the neighboring county of Randolph, but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his young manhood. Mr. Whipple was born on a farm in Randolph county on August 25, 1860, son of Jason and Celia (Peelle) Whipple, the latter of whom was born at Centerville, Ind., February 21, 1819, a member of one of the real pioneer families of Wayne county. Jason Whipple was born at Providence, R. I., January 30, 1804, and grew to manhood there, becoming a machinist and wheelwright. As a young man he determined to try his fortunes in what then was regarded as the far West and after prospecting a bit in Ohio came on over into Indiana and in 1823 settled in Delaware county, where he remained until in 1838, when he came up into Jay county and located at Portland, where he became engaged as a wheelwright. Jason Whipple was a man of force and individuality and during the time of his residence here impressed himself upon the community. He served as the second sheriff of Jay county and in other ways rendered public service. During the '40s he moved down into Randolph county, where he established himself as a millwright and also as a landowner, and there he spent the remainder of his life. S. A. D. Whipple was reared on a farm in Randolph county and when twenty years of age, in 1880, began teaching school there. He taught for one term in that county and then came up into Jay county and on September 3, 1881, entered upon a term of teaching in the old Booth school, in Richland township. For ten years Mr. Whipple continued his service as a teacher in the schools of this county, in the meantime reading law, and on July 1, 1890, entered upon a term of service as deputy to the county cleric, thereafter making his home at Portland. He served as deputy county clerk for three years and then, on July 1, 1893, was admitted to practice at the bar of the Jay Circuit Court. Meantime, beginning in 1891, he had been serving as a deouty to the attorney general of the state of Indiana, Alonzo G. Smith at that time being attorney general, and he continued to serve in that capacity until 1895. Upon entering practice at Portland Mr. Whipple formed a partnership with Theodore Bailey, but this association soon was discontinued and he then entered into a partnership with W. H. Williamson, which continued for three years. In 1894 he was elected attorney for the city of Portland and for seven years continued to serve in that important public capacity. Mr. Whipple has long been recognized as one of the leaders in the Democratic party in Jay county and in the Eighth congressional district. He is affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Portland. Mr. Whipple is something more than locally known as a student of literature at its best and is the author of a story that was well received by the reviewers when it came, out some years ago. This story, "Arthur St. Clair of Old Fort Recovery," is a historical romance portraying the incidents of one of the bloodiest Indian battles ever fought in America. The scenes and incidents of the tale revolve around the great Indian battle fought on the present site of the little city of Ft. Recovery, just over the Ohio line adjacent to the eastern border of Jay county, in which General St. Clair was defeated in 1791 and his army almost annihilated. Two hundred and fifty women and children were present, most of whom lost their lives in the battle or on the retreat to Ft. Jefferson, a distance of twenty-seven miles. The remnant of the army was saved by a red-headed woman (Catherine Miller) and around and through Mr. Whipple's engaging tale of the soldiers' struggles with the Indians is woven a romance bubbling over with love's discordant trials, culminating in the union of two fond hearts which ha'1 been separated by family feuds. Mr. Whipple married Christiana H. Harker, daughter of D. S.. Harker, and to this union were born three sons, John K., James G. and Tod L., all of whom are married. James G. Whipple has two children, Mildred and Josephine, and Tod L. Whipple has two children, June and Montez.

CALDWELL C. CARTWRIGHT, retired merchant, landowner and financier and for many years one of the most prominent figures in the commercial and industrial life of Portland and of Jay county, is a native Hoosier, a fact of which he never has ceased to be proud, and has been a resident of this state all his life, a resident of Jay county since the days of his childhood. He was born at Winchester, in the neighboring county of Randolph, a son of James and Jane (Milligan) Cartwright, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania but had come to Indiana with her parents in the days of her childhood, the Milligans settling in Randolph county. James Cartwright was born in Randolph county, his parents having been among the pioneers of that county, and there he was reared. He early became engaged in the milling business and in 1852 came to Jay county with his family and erected a sawmill at New Mt. Pleasant, having secured the contract to saw the lumber for a plank road that was to be built from Richmond to Ft. Wayne. For some reason work on this road was suspended after it had been pushed north about twenty miles from Pennville, but in the meantime Mr. Cartwright had got his mill going and the local demand upon its product was sufficient to make it a profitable enterprise, and it was kept in operation for ten years or more. James Cartwright also had a general store at New Mt. Pleasant and was there engaged in business when death interrupted his further activities in 1864. His widow was left with six children, one but an infant, Emma, who died in July of that same year, at the age of eight months. Mrs. Cartwright died in the year following and within another year the only daughter, Mary Ellen, died, leaving four other children, of whom but two now survive, Caldwell C. Cartwright and his brother, Charles E. Cartwright, of Spokane, Wash. Another brother, William C. Cartwright, of Indianapolis, died on October 17, 1921. Caldwell C. Cartwright, then sixteen years of age, was the eldest of this sadly bereft group of youngsters, the others being thirteen, eight and three years old, respectively, and the burden of the care of the younger children fell upon his shoulders. He had been in attendance at Liber College, but he did not finish the course, instead securing a school and teaching the following winter. He secured a home with the family of Benjamin Bradley and then for a year assumed the operation of a sawmill,' after which he became engaged in the general mercantile business at New Mt. Pleasant in association with Charles P. Starr, a partnership which continued there for about seven years, at the end of which time the partners moved their stock to Portland and set up in business at the corner of Meridian and Walnut streets. Eighteen months later Mr. Starr sold his interest in the store to Charles F. Headington and thus began the long partnership which has since been maintained between Mr. Cartwright and Mr. Headington, who continued to operate the store until they sold it in 1919, having thus been engaged together in mercantile business for a period of forty-five years. The partnership was not broken, however, for they still hold in common farm lands aggregating 725 acres in Jay county besides certain other financial interests in common. Mr. Cartwright is vice president of the Haynes Automobile Company, of Kokomo, of which he is the heaviest individual stockholder, and also is interested in numerous concerns in and about Portland, including the Portland Forge and Foundry Company, the Portland Drain Tile Company, the reorganized Haynes Milling Company, the Portland Body Works, the Knocker Shirt Company, the Sheller Wood Rim Manufacturing Company, the grain elevator of Russell & Co., and is vice president of the Midwest Stone Quarries Company and of the Lehigh Clay Products Company. On July 8, 1868, Caldwell C. Cartwright was united in marriage, in this county, to Sophronia Reed, who was born in Jay county, daughter of Harvey and Mary J. (Carley) Reed, both of whom were born in Galipolis, Ohio. Harvey Reed was a well known farmer in the New Mt. Pleasant neighborhood and he and his wife were the parents of six children, of whom Mrs. Cartwright is the only one now living. To Caldwell C. and Sophronia (Reed) Cartwright were born three children, Elwood N., who died at the age of eighteen years; Grace, who died at the age of four years, and Earl R. Cartwright, born on January 9, 1879, who is a professional musician, now living at Portland, and of whom further and fitting mention is made elsewhere in this volume. Mr. Cartwright is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, to the affairs of which they have for many years given their interested attention.

IDA M. RILEY, a member of the excellent teaching staff of the Portland public schools and for years an active participant in the cultural activities of. that city, was born in Ohio but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of her childhood. Miss Riley was born at Phillipsburg, Ohio, and is a daughter of Davis and Mary J. (Morgan) Riley, the latter of whom was born in Lancaster county, Ohio, and was three years of age when her parents, Isaac and Sarah Morgan, came to Indiana and located at Bluffton, where she grew to womanhood and was married. The late Davis Riley, who died at Portland at the age of eighty-five years, also was a native of Ohio. He grew up to the harness-maker's trade and as a young man came to Indiana and located at Bluffton, where he presently was married. Not long afterward he returned to his former home at Phillipsburg, Ohio, but after a sometime residence there came back into Indiana and located at Huntington, where he remained for three years, at the end of which time he came with his family to Jay county and settled at Pennville. where he made his home for twenty years, or until he moved to Portland, where his last days were spent, one of the best known men in Jay county. Davis Riley and his wife were the parents of six children, of whom four are still living, Miss.Riley having three sisters—Jessie, wife of William Griest, of Portland, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work; Catherine Riley, who has for years been a clerk in the Portland postoffice, and Aletta, wife of W. H. Williams, of Winchester, Ind. Miss Riley was but a child when her parents moved, to Pennville and the greater part of her early schooling thus was received in the excellent schools of that village. This she supplemented by a course in the old Portland Normal School and then began teaching school, a profession she since has followed. For seven years she was a teacher in the schools of Pennville and Penn township and then she became "a teacher in the Portland public schools and has since been associated with the work of the Garfield school. Miss Riley is a member of the Presbyterian church at Portland and is a Republican. She is a member of the Mississinewa chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution at Portland, of which her sister, Mrs. Griest, is the present (1921) regent, and is also a member of the local lodge of the Daughters of Rebecca, the woman's auxiliary of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, her father having for years been an influential and active member of this order.

T. W. SHIMP, president of the Jay County Savings and Trust Company and one of the leading realty and insurance dealers in Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has long been recognized as one of the dominant factors in the commercial life of this community. Mr. Shimp was born on a farm in Wabash township on January 12, 1867, a son of Jesse and Emily (Hiestand) Shimp, both of whom were born in Ohio, where they were reared and where they were married. In 1861, not long after their marriage, Jesse Shimp and his wife came over into Indiana and located on a farm in Wabash township, this county. Some time later they moved to a farm in Bearcreek township and on this latter place spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of ten children, two of whom, Alonzo Shimp and Mrs. Margaret Bone, are now deceased, the remaining being George, Mrs. Laura Kimble, Mrs. Clara Flauding, and T. W. Shimp, of this county; Grace, of Indianapolis; Mrs. Belle Gilpin, of California; Charles E., of Washington, Pa., and Valentine, of Van Wert, Ohio. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, T. W. Shimp received his elementary schooling in the local district school and then attended the old normal school at Portland for three terms. He then began teaching in the schools of this county, his first school being school No. 5 in Bearcreek township, which he conducted for several terms, going then to the Salamonia school, which he taught for three years, meanwhile taking the scientific course in the Normal College at Lebanon, Ohio, and was graduated from that institution in 1891. Upon securing his diploma Mr. Shimp was made principal of the public schools at Sciotaville, Ohio, and a year later was made superintendent of the schools at Ft. Recovery, Ohio, a position he occupied for six years, at the end of which time he transferred his services to the schools of Upper Sandusky, Ohio, where he acted as superintendent of schools and as county school examiner for five years, going thence to Delphos, Ohio, where he was in charge of the schools for six years. Wearying then of school service, Mr. Shimp returned to Portland and in 1911 assisted in the organization of the Jay County Savings and Trust Company and was made cashier of the same, a position he occupied for about six years, at the end of which time he was elected president of the institution and has since served in that capacity, at the same time being actively engaged in the real estate and insurance business. During the time of America's participation in the World war Mr. Shimp was an active and influential factor in the promotion of all local defense measures and in 1919 was made president of the County Council of Defense. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Shimp has been an elder in the Presbyterian church for the past twenty years and is now clerk of the session of the local church, and for five years was superintendent of the Sunday school. He has long been a member of the public library board and has served as president of that body. On December 26, 1893, T. W. Shimp was united in marriage to Ella E. Sheward, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Clair) Sheward, and to this union three children have been born, namely: Paul Brown Shimp, now living at Wilmington, Del., who volunteered for service upon the entrance of this country into the World war, was attached to the Fifth Engineer Corps and was mustered out as a sergeant of the first class after a period of service of about two years, ten months of which was spent overseas; Eva, who is a teacher of music in the Portland public schools, and Helen, who is a student in the high school.

TOHN E. FLAUDING, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Portland and one of the best known bankers in this county, was born in Jay county and has been a lifelong resident of this county. He was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on June 21, 1876, and is a son of George and Rebecca (Kessler) Flauding, the latter of whom (now deceased) also was born in Indiana, a member of one of the pioneer families of this part of the state. George Flauding, who is now living retired at Bryant, was born in" Germany, where his mother died before he was three years of age. Following this bereavement his father came to this country, bringing his children with him and for a while the family was located in New York state, presently moving to Pennsylvania and thence to Indiana, settling in Jay county, where George Flauding grew to manhood and after his marriage rented a farm and began farming on his own account. His affairs prospered and he presently became the owner of a farm in Bearcreek township, a tract of 120 acres, on which he continued farming until his retirement and removal to Bryant, where he is now living. To him and his wife were born ten children, all of whom are living save Jesse, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Elias, William, Cora, Charles, Lawrence, Clarence, Frank and Elsie. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, John E. Flauding received his early schooling in the local schools of that neighborhood, supplementing this by attendance at the Tri-State College at Angola and became engaged in teaching school, a vocation he followed during the winters for seventeen years, his summers being occupied variously, two of these summers being given over to work on the railway section. In 1916 Mr. Flauding became employed as assistant cashier in the Farmers State Bank at Portland and on June 10, 1920, was elected cashier of that institution, the position he now occupies. Mr. Flauding is a Democrat, is a member of the Portland grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the congregation of which he is serving as secretary of the board. John E. Flauding married Clara E. Shimp, daughter of Jesse and Kate Shimp, and to this union has been born one child, a son, Wendel. Mr. and Mrs. Flauding have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.

HANSON F. MILLS, clerk of the Jay Circuit Court and formerly and for years a well known member of Jay county's excellent teaching corps, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. Mills was born on a farm in Jefferson township on April 22, 1887, and is a son of Ardon and Ella (Brubaker) Mills, both of whom also were born in Jay county, members of pioneer families here, and who were the parents of eleven children, nine of whom are still living. Ardon Mills is a substantial farmer in Jefferson township and for years has been widely known hereabout as a live stock buyer. Reared on the home farm in Jefferson township, Hanson F. Mills supplemented the schooling received in the local schools of that neighborhood by attendance at the normal school at Marion and the Tri-State College at Angola. At the age of eighteen years he began teaching school and was thus engaged for twelve years, or until his election in the fall of 1918 to the office of clerk of the Jay Circuit Court, which important official position he now occupies. Mr. Mills is a Republican and from the days of his youth has taken an active and earnest interest in local civic affairs, long having been regarded as one of the leaders in the junior ranks of that party in this county. He is a member of the Portland lodge of the Knights of Pythias and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Mills married Cleo Ada Hartley, daughter of Enoch and Anna Hartley, and to this union one child, has been born, a daughter, Margaret Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Mills have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.

JAMES W. BADDERS, sheriff of Jay county and formerly and for many years occupied in running a dray line in Portland, one of the best known men in that city,, as well as throughout the county, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Sheriff Badders was born in Jefferson township on May 1, 1858, and is a son of William H. and Sarah Ann (Burns) Badders, the latter of whom was born in Virginia and had come to Indiana with her parrents in the days of her girlhood. William H. Badders was born in Kentucky and was but a child when he came up into Indiana with his parents, the family settling in Delaware county and presently moving to Jay county, where he grew to manhood and was married, reared his family and spent the remainder of his life. He was a weaver and followed that vocation all his active life. He and his wife were the parents of four children, all of whom are living save one, Sheriff Badders having two sisters, Margaret and Sarah Jane. Tames W. Badders was but three years of age when his father died and was twelve when he was further bereaved by the death of his mother. He was taken care of in the home of John Detamore and his schooling was received in the schools of that neighborhood. He worked for Mr. Detamore until he moved to Portland and became engaged there in operating a dray line, a business in which he became quite successful. For years Mr. Badders has taken an interested part in local civic affairs and in 1920 received the Republican nomination for sheriff of Jay county. He was elected in the following election and is now serving in that important office, one of the best known and most popular men about the court house, having taken office on January 1, 1921. He is affiliated with the local camp of the Modern Woodmen of America, and takes a proper interest in the affairs of that organization. Sheriff Badders married Mary E. Fitzpatrick, daughter of James T. Fitzpatrick, and to this union have been born three children, Charles W., Cloyce and Harry Raymond.

LAWRENCE R. CART WRIGHT, county attorney for Jay county, former chairman of the Republican county central committee and for years a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, practicing law at Portland, is a member of one of this county's pioneer families. Mr. Cartwright was born at Portland on October 7, 1876, and is a son of William C. and Mary J. (Coulson) Cartwright, both of whom also were born in this county and the former of whom died at Indianapolis in the fall of 1921. William C. Cartwright was for years engaged in the mercantile business in Portland, a clerk in the Cartwright & Headington store, and was thus occupied until 1912, when he went to Indianapolis as the secretary-treasurer of the Midwest Crushed Stone and Quarry Company and in that city spent his last days, his death occurring there on October 17, 1921. To him and his wife were born three sons, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Forest S. and W. Dale Cartwright. Reared at Portland, Lawrence R. Cartwright was graduated from the high school in that city in 1896 and then entered DePauw University, from which he was graduated in 1900 with the degree of Ph. B. He then accepted a position as instructor in Washburn College at Topeka, Kan., and was thus occupied for two years, at the end of which time he entered the law school of Columbia University and in due time received his A. M. degree from that institution. For about three years thereafter Mr. Cartwright served as law clerk to Judge Monks of the Indiana State Supreme Court and then, in 1911, returned to Portland and has since been engaged there in the general practice of law. For the past three years or more Mr. Cartwright has been serving as county attorney. He is a Republican, long having been recognized as one of the leaders of that party in this district, and has rendered service as chairman of the Republican county central committee. Mr. Cartwright is a Freemason, is affiliated with the college fraternity, Phi Delta Theta, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1907 Lawrence R. Cartwright was united in marriage to Vida Wood, of Topeka, Kan., daughter of O. J. and Anna Wood, and to this union have been born three children, Jane, Wood and Rachel. During the time of this country's participation in the World War, Mr. Cartwright was one of the leaders in the local work of the Red Cross.

CARL BIMEL, president of the Bimel Spoke and Auto Wheel Company, of Portland, successor to the old manufacturing firm of L. Bimel & Son, and long regarded as one of the most active and progressive factors in the commercial and industrial life of this section of Indiana, was born at Portland and has lived there practically all his life, from the days of his boyhood interested in the extensive manufacturing plant of which he now is the head. Mr. Bimel was born on March, 13, 1889, and is a son of Fred and Margaret G. (Kelsey) Bimel, both of whom were born at St. Marys, Ohio, and the latter of whom is still living at Portland, where she has a very pleasant home on West Arch street. The late Fred Bimel, who was for years one of the leading factors in the industrial development of Portland, was born on January 8, 1859, and was a son of Lawrence and Elizabeth Bimel, the former of whom was a pioneer manufacturer of wagons and buggies at St. Marys, Ohio. Lawrence Bimel was born in Germany in 1827 and was three years of age when he came to this country with his parents, the family coming on West and locating at Wapakoneta, Ohio, where the Bimel home was established. Reared at Wapakoneta, Lawrence Bimel early learned the trade of carriage maker and in time became a manufacturer at St. Marys, where he established his home and/ built up an extensive plant, the wagons and carriages turned out in this plant having been widely distributed thereabout. In 1879 he established a branch plant at Portland for the manufacture of spokes, hubs, felloe strips and similar accessories of the carriage manufacturing line and his son Fred, just about then' coming into his majority, was placed in charge of the same, the plant being conducted under the firm name of L. Bimel & Son, the predecessor of the present extensive plant of the Bimel Company, which is operated under the general management of Carl Bimel, the third in direct line in the gradual development of this business. The plant which the late Fred Bimel started in Portland more than forty years ago, taking then advantage of the wealth of timber which still was accessible hereabout, gradually developed the industry until it became one of the most important industrial enterprises in the county. In 1910 he enlarged and modernized the plant and added to his output the manufacture of automobile wheels. This latter phase of the business was rapidly developed and soon came to be the chief object of the factory and has so continued, the Bimel wheels having gained a wide and justly deserved reputation in the automobile industry throughout the country. Fred Bimel continued active in the operation of this plant until his death and was in other ways active in the development of the general business interests of the city of his adoption, the handsome Bimel block, erected in 1896-98, at the corner of Main and Meridian streets being, in addition to the wheel works, one of the standing local monuments to his public spirit. He established the first waterworks plant and the first electric light plant at Portland and was one of the chief promoters of the C. B. & C. railroad which reached Portland about twenty years ago. Fred Bimel died on October 2, 1912, and at his passing left a good memory. As noted above, his widow survives and is still making her home at Portland, where she is very comfortably situated. It was on September 14, 1880, not long after taking up his residence in Portland, that Fred Bimel was united in marriage to Margaret G. Kelsey, who also was born at St. Marys, Ohio, and to that union were born seven children, five of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having three sisters, Lelia, Hazel and Bernice, and a brother Frederick Bimel. Reared at Portland, Carl Bimel was graduated from the high school in that city and then took a course in mechanical engineering at Purdue University, following this by a business course in the university at Valparaiso, Ind. From the days of his youth he had been interested in the operation of his father's industrial plant at Portland and after leaving college and in order further to familiarize himself with the technical details of factory operation spent a year in a large spoke factory in the South. He then returned home and in 1910 became actively engaged with his father in the operation of the Bimel wheel works at Portland. When his father died in 1912 Mr. Bimel took over the general management of the plant and upon the reorganization of the operating company was elected president of the company and has since served in that executive capacity, during this time doing much to extend the operations of the plant until now the Bimel products are regarded as standards in their line. Mr. Bimel is a Scottish Rite Mason and is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of which latter organization his father also was a member. On June 4, 1913, Carl Bimel was united in marriage to Louine Miller and to this union one child has been born, a son, Carl, Jr.

GRANT ELLSWORTH DERBYSHIRE, superintendent of the Portland public schools and for many years one of the active factors in the development of the educational interests of this part of the state, is a Buckeye by birth, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his childhood. Mr. Derbyshire was born on a farm in the vicinity of Wilmington, in Clinton county, Ohio, December 20, 1868, and is a son of Joshua and Florence (Deweese) Derbyshire, both of whom were born in Ohio, members of pioneer families in Clinton county. Joshua Derbyshire, a veteran of the Civil war, is now living in Delaware county, this state, which has been his home for many years. He served as a soldier of the Union during the progress of the Civil war, a member of C Company, Twenty-fourth regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, this service covering a period of more than four years. Upon completing his military service Mr. Derbyshire became engaged in farming in Clinton county, Ohio, and was there thus engaged until 1875, when he moved with his family to Indiana and located on a farm in Delaware county, but presently left the farm and engaged in the mercantile business at Cammack, in that county, where he is still living. Grant E. Derbyshire was but six years of age when he came with his parents to Indiana and he grew to manhood in Delaware county. Upon completing the school course there he entered a business college at Delaware, Ohio, and was graduated from that institution. He supplemented this by a course in the normal school of Valparaiso University and for five years thereafter was engaged in teaching in the district schools of Delaware county. He then for six years was engaged in teaching in village grade schools in that county, in the meantime continuing his studies at Indiana University, and in 1901 was graduated from that institution, after which for two years he was engaged as principal of the township school in the village of Cowan. Following this service Mr. Derbyshire was employed as principal of the Garfield school at Muncie for three years, at the end of which time, in 1906, he was called to become superintendent of the city schools at Portland and has since occupied that important position. Mr. Derbyshire is a Royal Arch Mason and he and his wife are members of the Church of Christ. Grant E. Derbyshire married Margaret Rinker and has three children, Chase, Leland and Carmon.

JOHN M. SMITH, dean of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, former judge of that court, former state senator from this district, former member of the lower house of the Indiana General Assembly and for many years one of the most active factors in the public life of this part of Indiana, is a native son of Jay county and has ever taken a just pride in the amazing development that has marked this region in his generation. Judge Smith is a member of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county, his grandfather, George M. Smith, a soldier of the War of 1812, having been among that considerable number of settlers who came over here from Greene county, Ohio, in 1836, the year in which Jay county became formally organized as a separate civic unit, and located on lands entered from the Government in Richland township. George M. Smith also owned land in the neighboring county of Delaware and died there in 1849. One of his sons, James A. Smith, father of Judge Smith, was ten years of age when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1836, the family settling in Jay county and later moving over into Delaware county. After the death of his father in this latter county, James A. Smith returned to Jay county and became a substantial farmer and landowner in Richland township, where he had established his home after his marriage and where he was living when the Civil war broke out. In February, 1864, he enlisted for service returned to his farm, where he remained until 1905, when he moved to Portland, where his last days were spent, his death occurring there in 1920. The Nixon corn planter which he designed and brought to perfection was one of his valuable contributions to the cause of bettering farm conditions. Joseph P. Nixon married Emaline Hite, who also was a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county, daughter of William Hite, who had come here from Ohio and had established in Jefferson township one of the first flour mills in Jay county. Mrs. Nixon preceded her husband to the grave about four years, her death having occurred in 1916. To Joseph P. and Emaline (Hite) Nixon were born eight children, six of whom are still living, those besides Doctor Nixon being James G., Millard, Anna, Elmer and Ida. Reared on the home farm in Tefferson township, Doctor Nixon received his early schooling in the schools of that district and supplemented this by a course in the old Portland Normal School and in the normal school at Marion, Ind. He early became qualified to teach school and for five years was employed as 3 teacher in the schools of this county. Meanwhile he had been giving his thoughful attention to preparatory studies in medicine and presently entered the Medical College of Indiana at Indianapolis, from which institution he was graduated in 1904. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor Nixon opened an office for the practice of his profession at Ridgeville, Ind., and was there thus engaged for six years, at the end of which time, in 1910, he located at Portland, where he since has been engaged in practice. Doctor Nixon is a member of the Jay County Medical Society, in which organization he has been an office bearer, and is also affiliated with the Indiana State Medical Association and the American Medical Association. He is a Democrat, a York Rite Mason and an elder in the Presbyterian church. In 1905, Dr. J. E. Nixon was united in marriage to Mabel Hiested, daughter of Daniel G. and Martha (Abel) Hiested, and to this union have been born three children, Wallace H., Martha and Grace.

CHARLES E. STEWART, dealer in furniture and house furnishings at Portland and one of the best known merchants of that city, was born on a farm in Rush county, Indiana, November 17, 1882, and is a son of R. F. and Susan E. Stewart, both of whom were born in that same county, members of old families there. R. F. Stewart was reared a farmer and for a year or more after his marriage continued farming in Rush county, but then moved to Indianapolis, where he lived for years, then moved to Fort Wayne, Ind., where his last days were spent. Reared at Indianapolis, Charles E. Stewart received his schooling in the schools of that city and early became employed in a furniture factory there, continuing that employment for about twelve years, at the end of which time he enlisted for service in the United States Navy and spent four years in that service. Upon the completion of his naval service Mr. Stewart, in the spring of 1908, took up the sale of carpets by sample and located at Portland. He was successful in this venture and a his interest and the remaining partners continued the business for two years, at the end of which time they sold the furniture department and confined themselves exclusively to the undertaking line. Two years later, in 1912, Mr. Williamson bought the interest of his partner, Mr. Straley, and has since been sole proprietor of the establishment, the Shadow Lawn Funeral Home, which he has equipped in strictly up-to-date fashion, adding a new chapel and motor equipment. Mr. Williamson is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the United Brethern church, in the affairs of which they take an active interest, Mr. Williamson being a member of the board of trustees of the same and the superintendent of the Sunday school. He also is a Freemason and is likewise affiliated with the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. On August 5, 1899, Nelson R. Williamson was united in marriage to Gertrude V. McBride, who was born in Crawford county, Ohio, daughter of Stephen A. and Emma (Learch) McBride, and who was nine years of age when she came to this county with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Williamson have four children, Darwin J., who was graduated from the Portland high school in the spring of 1921, Juanita, Nadene and Kathleen.

CHARLES V. GOTT, D. V. S., of Portland, one of the best known young veterinary surgeons in this part of Indiana, who served during the period of America's participation in the World war with the rank of second lieutenant, Veterinary Corps, U. S. A., is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Doctor Gott was born on a farm in the vicinity of Waveland, Montgomery county, Indiana, November 19, 1888, and is a son of Press and Nannie (Dixon) Gott, both of whom also were born in that same county and are still living there. Press Gott and wife were the parents of three children, of whom Doctor Gott alone survives. Reared on the home farm in Montgomery county, Doctor Gott had his early schooling in the Waveland schools, and for about three years after leaving school continued on the farm, a valued assistant to his father in the operation of the same. From the days of his boyhood he had been attracted to veterinary surgery and he presently entered the Veterinary College at Terre Haute, from which he was graduated in 1914, after a course of three years study. Upon securing his diploma Doctor Gott established himself in practice at Portland and was thus engaged when this country entered the World war. On July 18, 1918, he enlisted his services in behalf of the Veterinary Corps of the United States army arid was commissioned a second lieutenant, continuing this service until mustered out on January 18, 1919. Upon the completion of his military service Doctor Gott returned to Portland and resumed his practice. He is a member of the Indiana Veterinary Association and the Jay-Randolph Veterinary Association. The Doctor is also affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose. He is independent in his political views. On December 16, 1909, Dr. Charles V. Gott was united in marriage to Clara Wasson, who also was born in Montgomery county, daughter of John and May (Oliver) Wasson, who were the parents of three children, Mrs. Gott having a brother, Ira Wasson, and a sister, Kate. Doctor and Mrs. Gott have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.

JAMES L. GRISELL, city engineer and superintendent of the light, water and power department of the city of Portland and an active and influential factor in the municipality, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life save for a period during which he served as deputy to the engineer of the neighboring county of Randolph, with his residence at Winchester. Mr. Grisell was born on a farm in Penn township, in the vicinity of the city of Pennville, February 27, 1886, son of Lowell P. and Mary C. (Davenport) Grisell, the latter of whom was born in Wayne county, this state. Lowell P. Grisell, a well known farmer of Penn township, was born in this county, a member of one of the real pioneer families here, and he and his wife were the parents oi three sons, James L. Grisell having two brothers, Russell and Lowell H. Grisell. Reared on the farm in Penn township,. James L. Grisell received his elementary schooling in the district school in the neighborhood of his home and then entered the Pennville high school. Later entering the Tri-State College of Engineering, he took there the course in civil engineering and was graduated from that institution on March 11, 1911. Thus admirably equipped for the profession to which he had devoted himself Mr. Grisell accepted a position as deputy to the county engineer of Randolph county and was thus engaged for a year, at the end of which time he transferred his service to the Union Traction Company and was for a year thereafter engaged in electric railroad construction work between Muncie and Newcastle. He then returned to Winchester and resumed his former position as deputy county engineer, in which capacity he continued to serve until in January, 1918, when he accepted the position as city engineer at Portland and thus returned to his home county. A year later the positions of city engineer and superintendent of the lights water and power department of the city were merged and Mr. Grisell' has since been rendering service to the city in this dual capacity. On February 27, 1918, James L. Grisell was united in marriage to Flora J. Beck, who was born and reared at Mansfield, Ohio, daughter of Henry and Emma (Drackert) Beck, and to this union two children have been born, daughters both, Julia Ann and Mary Emily. Mr. and Mrs. Grisell are members of the First Presbyterian church of Portland and are Republicans. Mr. Grisell is a member of the Portland Commercial Club and is one of the charter members of the Kiwanis Club of that city. He is a Scottish Rite (32°) Mason, a member of the blue lodge at Pennville, of the council, chapter and commandery at Winchester and of the consistory at Ft. Wayne, and is also a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the temple at' Ft. Wayne. During the time of America's participation in the World war Mr. Grisell rendered service as a student officer of field artillery in the Central Officers Training School at Camp Zachary Taylor, Kentucky, and he is a member of the local post of the American Legion at Portland, to the expanding affairs of which patriotic body he is giving his earnest attention, as are so many of the young men of this community.

JOHN M. STARR, a well known and substantial retired farmer of Greene township, this county, now living at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. Starr was born on a pioneer farm in Greene township, the site now occupied by the village of Blaine, October 20, 1849, and is a son of Jacob and Angelina C. (Wright) Starr, who were among the pioneers of that section of the county, and the latter of whom was born in Greene county, Ohio, April 1, 1824, daughter of Merrick and Nancy (Owens) Wright, Virginians, the former of whom was a soldier of the War of 1812. Jacob Starr was born in Berkeley county, Virginia (now West Virginia), March 13, 1813, and was reared in the home of an Uncle in Greene county, Ohio. He married in this latter county and continued to make his home there until 1846, when he came over into Indiana and settled on a quarter section of land he had entered from the Government in Greene township, this county, locating there on August 26 of that year, one of the considerable number of Greene county (Ohio) people who settled in that part of Jay county about that time, Greene township being given its name in honor of these settlers who had brought pleasant memories of their old home county with them. On this quarter section Jacob Starr established his home, made a good farm and spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there in November, 1899. He had prospered in his operations and became the owner of 540 acres, a part of which tract now is occupied by the village of Blaine. To Jacob and Angelina (Wright) Starr were born six children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Charles P. Starr, of Portland, and a sister, Sarah, wife of Joel Kinsey. Reared on the home farm in Greene township, John M. Starr received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and from the days of his boyhood his life has been devoted to farming. He married when twenty-two years of age and for a few years thereafter continued to farm the home acres, or until in November, 1876, when he bought a tract of seventy acres in Greene township and launched out "on his own." As his affairs prospered there Mr. Starr bought an adjacent tract of eighty acres, this addition to his holdings giving him 150 acres of excellent land, on which he made his home until his retirement from the farm in 1907 and removal to Portland, where he bought his present residence at 616 West Main street, and has since resided there, he and his family being very comfortably situated. Mr. Starr and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Portland and are Republicans. John M. Starr has been twice married. On August 15, 1872, he was united in marriage to Sarah L. Spahr, who was born in this county, daughter of Jacob L. and Elizabeth (Boots) Spahr, also Greene county (Ohio) folks, and to this union three children were born, Cora, William J. and Leslie I. Cora Starr married James E. Sturgeon, now living at Muncie, Ind., and has three children: Lawrence, who married Wilma Hawkins and has one child, Betty Marie; Lee, who married Helen Moore, and Leah. William J. Starr, who now lives in Michigan, married Grace Smith and has eight children. Darrell, Freda, Kenneth, Clifford, Helen, Elizabeth, John and Joseph. Leslie I. Starr, who now lives at Los Angeles, Cal., married Mazie Wilson and has one child, Claudia. The mother of these children died on December 14, 1884, and on December 31, 1885, Mr. Starr married Catherine E. Rosenberry, who also was born in this county, daughter of David Rosenberry and wife, and to this union have been born four children, Forrest C, Iris, Edith M. and Herbert L., all of whom are married save the latter. Forrest C. Starr married Edith Bird, of this county, and has three children, Thelma, Merritt Warren and Jay. Iris Starr married Charles Bird! and has two children, Mildred and John, and Edith M. Starr married Clyde West and has three children, Catherine Jane, Ruth M. and Clyde. Herbert L. Starr served in the navy for thirteen months during the time of America's participation in the World war, attached to the battleship Virginia, and made three round trips to France.

BLAINE P. WEHRLY, a well known jeweler at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has resided here all his life with the exception of a period of eight years during which he was engaged in business at Hartford City. He was born at Salamonia on August 31, 1884, son of William P and Olive J. (Smith) Wehrly, the latter of whom also was born in Indiana. William P. Smith was a farmer, lumberman and thresherman at Salamonia and he and his wife were the parents of thirteen children, of whom eleven are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being John W., Prudence, Barbara, Catherine, Henry, Harvey, Alvah, Ida, Ethel and Martin. Reared at Salamonia Blaine P. Wehrly received his schooling there. He early became interested in the jewlery business, his elder brother John W. Wehrly, having a jewelery store at Portland, and after a course at the Philadelphia College of Horology and Optics entered his brother's store at Portland and was there engaged for a year, at the end of which time he was made manager of his brother's store at Hartford City. For eight years he remained in the latter city and then he returned to Portland and resumed his place in the local store, continuing thus engaged until in 1919, when he started in business for himself at Portland. Mr. Wehrly has a well stocked and admirably equipped store in North Meridian street and his long experience preparatory to entering business for himself gave him an insight into the needs of the local trade which has enabled him to meet most satisfactorily the demands along this line. On November 28, 1909, Blaine P. Wehrly was united in marriage to Gladys Ashcraft, who also was born in this county, and to this union one child has been born, a son. William Lewis Wehrly, born on May 27, 1913. Mrs. Wehrly was born on a farm in Wabash township, this county, daughter of William and Blanche (Lewis) Ashcraft, both of whom also were born in Jay county, members of pioneer families here, and who were the parents of four children, Mrs. Wehrly having three sisters, Pearl, Inez and Glee. Mr. and Mrs. Wehrly are members of the West Walnut Street Christian church. Mr. Wehrly is a Republican and is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland.

JOHN A. MORRISON, manager of the Portland Electric Company at Portland, is a native of. the old Keystone state, born in York county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 1878, and is a son of William B.. and Catherine E. (Pabst) Morrison, both of whom also were born in Pennsylvania. William B. Morrison was a farmer and merchant and he and his wife were the parents of three children, two of whom are still living, John A. Morrison having a brother, William G. Morrison. John A. Morrison received his schooling in Fulton county, Illinois, to which county his parents had moved from Pennsylvania when he was a child, and upon completing the high school course entered Northwestern University, where he took the course in pharmacy. Upon leaving the pharmacy school Mr. Morrison took service with the Des Moines Drug Company at Des Moines, Iowa, and in time was made assistant general manager of the concern. He remained with this company for twenty years, or until 1916 when he became attracted to the possibilities of electrical distribution and supplies and became engaged at Des Moines in the electrical business, continuing there until 1919 in which year he transferred his connection to the Portland Electric Company and has since resided in Portland, where he is carrying on the agency for the Lally farm and rural electric light and power plants, this local agency controlling sales for this popular equipment within a radius covering ten counties hereabout. On June 24, 1901, John A. Morrison was united in marriage to Cora Mae Allison, who was born at Hastings, Neb., daughter of Joseph S. and Martha (Huston) Allison, and to this union two children have been born, Ruth Elizabeth, who is a member of the class of 1923, Portland high school, and John R. Mr. and Mrs. Morrison are members of the Baptist church. In his political views Mr. Morrison is "independent."

WILLIAM M. PARKS, proprietor of the popular Ford garage at Portland and one of the best known young automobile men in this part of Indiana, was born at Richmond, this state, October 2, 1892, and is a son of Leonidas L. and Jennie (Randolph) Parks, both of whom were born in Preble county, Ohio. Leonidas L. Parks has for years been a teacher in the public schools of Richmond. He and his wife have seven children. Reared at Richmond, William M. Parks supplemented the schooling received in the public schools of that city by a course in Mrs. Hiser's Business College there and thus equipped for clerical work entered the office of the Gaar-Scott Company in that city, where he remained for about two years, at the end of which time he was transferred to that company's offices at Laporte, Ind., in connection with the operations of the M. Rumeley Company, heavy farm machinery. Mr. Parks remained with these people about three years and then went to Toledo as secretary to the treasurer of the Willys-Overland Company. Not long afterward, however, his services were secured by the Ford Company as division head of the purchasing department of that company and he went to Detroit, where he remained with the Ford organization for five years. By that time he had determined to enter business for himself and in casting about for a location decided on Portland. On August 1, 1920, in association with his brother, Ernest Parks, he bought the Ford garage at Portland, together with the local agency for the Ford cars and tractors, and has since been engaged in business there, proprietor of what is regarded as one of the most completely equipped garages in this section of the state. Twelve persons are employed in the place and business is carried on in snappy style. Mr. Parks is a Republican. He is a member of the local Kiwanis Club at Portland and he and his wife are attendants at the Methodist Episcopal church. On June 19, 1915, William M. Parks was united in marriage to Ruby Hunter, who was born and reared at Indianapolis, daughter of Albert A. and Ada (Schaffer) Hunter, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Rubynelle, born on March 1, 1916. Mr. and Mrs. Parks have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of the city.

R. E. KEENE, manager of the plant of the Jay County Lumber Company and one of the best known lumber men in this county, has been a resident of Portland since 1911, in which year he was made manager of the lumber company's plant with which he ever since has been connected. Mr. Keene was born at Spencer, in Owen county, this state, April 17, 1878, son of Henry C. and Cynthia A. (Lukenbill) Keene, both of whom were born in that same county, members of pioneer families there. Henry C. Keene was a well-todo farmer and he and his wife were the parents of six children, all of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Emmet S. and Elbert, and three sisters, Sophronia, Millie and Jessie. Robert E. Keene received his schooling in the schools at Spencer and as a young man went to Elwood, Ind., where he became engaged in the lumber yard of the Winters Lumber Company. He worked there about a year, acquiring a good deal of valuable fundamental knowledge of the lumber business, and then went to Windfall, where for four years he was connected with the plant of the Windfall Lumber Company. Thus broadened by further experience in the lumber business Mr. Keene accepted a proposition to return to Elwood and take the management of the yards of the Winters Lumber Company. For twelve years Mr. Keene remained at Elwood thus engaged and then, in 1911, accepted the position of manager of the yards and mill of the Jay County Lumber Company at Portland and has since resided at Portland looking after the company's affairs there. This company handles all sorts of building material and also does a lumber milling business. On November 22, 1910, Robert E. Keene was united in marriage to Margaret P. McCurdy, daughter of Ninion and Letitia McCurdy, and to this union two children have been born, James W. and Margaret. Mr. Keene is a Republican. He is a member of the Portland Country Club and is a member of the Masonic lodge at Windfall and of the Elks lodge at Elwood.

ALFRED A. ANTLES, a well known retired farmer and former stockman and a substantial landowner of this county, now living at Portland, where he has made his home for more than twenty years past, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families of the county, and has lived here all his life. Mr. Antles was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on February 10, 1851, and is a son of David and Rebecca A. (Stanley) Antles, the latter of whom was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, in 1829. David Antles was born in Wayne county, Ohio, in 1830, and was about eleven years of age when in the summer of 1841, he came with his parents to Indiana, the family settling in Bearcreek township, this county. There David Antles grew to manhood and on April 7, 1850, married Rebecca A. Stanley, who was about nine years of age when she came to this county with her parents in the spring of 1839, the Stanleys settling on the south half of the section 14 in Bearcreek township, where Grandfather Stanley died in March, 1849. David Antles followed farming all his life and was the owner of an excellent farm of 100 acres in Bearcreek township, where he died on October 14, 1892. He and his wife were the parents of eleven children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two brothers, Frank and Fred Antles. Reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township, Alfred A. Antles received his schooling in the old Center school house and from the days of his boyhood was a valued assistant to his father in the labors of the farm. He remained on the home farm until he was twenty-seven years of age, when he began farming on his own account and after his marriage established his home on a farm and continued farming until December, 1898, when he left the farm and moved to Portland, where he became engaged in the live stock business, buying mostly for the Buffalo market. In this business he continued until his retirement in December, 1917. He continues, however, to give some personal attention to his farms, of which he owns two, one of 120 acres in sections 10 and 11 of Wayne township and one of 100 acres in section 22 of Noble township. When he was eight years old, in the summer of 1859, Mr. Antles attended a summer school taught by Miss Alice Avery in a little frame house which stood on what is now the corner of Wayne and Walnut streets in Portland. In the fall of 1885, in a house on that same corner he was married. In September, 1905, he bought that iot and the house which stood on it and he and his wife have since been living there, very comfortably situated. It was on September 6, 1885, that Alfred A. Antles was united in marriage to Addie Hanlin, who was born in Jackson county, Ohio, and who was but a child when her parents, James and Irena (Stephenson) Hanlin, came to Indiana with their family and settled on a farm in Wayne township, this county. James Hanlin became one of the substantial farmers of that township and was the owner of a fine farm of 240 acres. He and his wife had three children, two of whom are still living, Mrs. Antles and her sister, Jennie. Mrs. Antles completed her schooling at Ridgeville College and has ever given her thoughtful attention to the cultural affairs of the community.

FRED W. FOLTZ, the well known local representative of the Haynes and the Buick automobiles at Portland, with salesrooms at 301 North Meridian street, and formerly widely known as a traveling salesman out of that city, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. Foltz was born in the village of New Corydon on May 1, 1883, and is a son of John W. and Margaret (Martin) Foltz, both of whom also were born in this county, members of old families here, and the former of whom was for years engaged in the drug business at New Corydon and later at Portland. Fred W. Foltz completed his schooling in the Portland high school and upon leaving school became engaged as a clerk in the drug store of I. B. Little, where he remained for about four years, at the end of which time he went into the plant of the O. A. Rawlings Lumber Company, now known as the Jay County Lumber Company, and was for seven years engaged working there as a cabinet maker. He then transferred his services to the Haynes Milling Company and for four years gave his full time to that company as a traveling salesman. For three years thereafter he gave the milling company but half his time, devoting the other half to the sale of the Haynes automobile. In 1918, Mr. Foltz also took the, local sales agency for the Buick automobile, retaining at the same time has agency for the Haynes car, and has since given his whole attention to the development of the sales of these two cars in this territory, with his sales rooms at 301 North Meridian street, in connection with which he also maintains a service station for these two cars. Mr. Foltz is a Republican. He is a 32° Mason, a member of the consistory at Fort Wayne, and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with the temple at Fort Wayne. He also is a member of the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. On November 15, 1904, Fred W. Foltz was united in marriage to Lillian May Ward, who was born at Ridgeville, in the neighboring county of Randolph, daughter of John C. and Eleanor (Biddlebarger) Ward, both of whom were born in that same county. John C. Ward was for years engaged in the mercantile business at Ridgeville, later and for about nine years was a traveling salesman for A. H. Perfect & Co. at Fort Wayne and the last years of his life were spent as manager of the J. A. Hood wholesale grocery at Union City. Mr. and Mrs. Foltz have three daughters, Garnet, Marguerite and Georgia, the two elder of whom are students in the Portland high school. The Foltzes have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.

GUY BRYAN, proprietor of the "Made Well' bakery at Portland, was born in that city and has been a resident of the same for the better part of his life. He was born on May 6, 1886, son of George W. and Maria L. (Stevens) Bryan, both of whom were born in Mad River township, Champaign county, Ohio, and who became residents of Portland fifty years ago. George W. Bryan left Ohio in 1862 and came over into Indiana, locating in Adams county, where he remained until 1872, when he moved with his family to Portland and established a grocery store on the site now occupied by the Jay County Lumber Company, and was for years one of the well known merchants of Portland. He and his wife were the parents of fifteen children, eleven of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Albert S., Aaron C., Olive N., Edith, David U., George W., Jr., Artho, Pearl, William S. and Sarah. Reared at Portland, Guy Bryan received his schooling in the schools of that city and early became attracted to the baker's trade as a vocation. He went to Valparaiso,. Ind., where he served an apprenticeship in a bake shop and remained for about eight years, at the end of which time he started out as a journeyman baker and was for twelve years or more thus engaged, working in various cities throughout the country. In 1916 Mr. Bryan returned to Portland and entered upon the study of law under the preceptorship of Frank B. Jaqua, and in November, 1918, was admitted to the bar of the Jay Circuit Court. For a year thereafter he was actively engaged in the practice of his profession and then, following the serious accidental injury of his brother, Albert S. Bryan, took charge of the latter's bakery, and for about a year operated the same in his brother's behalf, continuing thus engaged until on November 4, 1919, when he established his now well known and successful "Made Well" bakery on North Meridian street and has since been engaged in operating the same. This bakery has ovens with a capacity of 252 loaves of bread and its products are in popular demand hereabout. On September 14, 1918, Guy Bryan was united in marriage to Gertrude A. Doty, who was born in this county, daughter of Jerome and Harriet E. (Foglesong) Doty. Mr. Bryan is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Modern Woodmen.

GROVER BISHOP, cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Portland, former clerk of the Jay Circuit Court, and long recognized as one of the most active young business men of Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life, formerly and for some years a member of the excellent teaching staff of this county. Mr. Bishop was born on a farm in Bearcreek township on February 1, 1885, and is a son of Adam D. and Rosa M. (Stone) Bishop, both of whom also were born in this county, members of pioneer families, the former born in Bearcreek township and the latter in Noble township. Adam D. Bishop is the owner of an excellent farm of 160 acres in Bearcreek township, the original entry to which was made by his father during the Van Buren administration. To him and his wife were born three children, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Ward Bishop, of Portland, and a sister, Mrs. Myrtle F. Wilcox, of Richmond, Ind. Grover Bishop was reared on the home farm in Bearcreek township and his early schooling was received at the Antiville school house. This he supplemented by attendance at the Marion Normal School for a year and a half and then he began to teach school. Mr. Bishop taught two years at the Antiville school, one year at Burr Oak and one year of the eighth grade at Bryant, and then he became engaged in the insurance business, to which he gave his attention for three years, at the end of which time he accepted the appointment of deputy to the clerk of the Jay Circuit Court, a position he occupied for eight years or until his election to the office of clerk of court in 1916. Upon the completion of his four years' term of service as county clerk Mr. Bishop became associated with the local affairs of the R. L. Dollings Investment Company and was thus connected until in November, 1921, when he was elected cashier of the Farmers State Bank of Portland, the position he now occupies. On December 24, 1904, Grover Bishop was united in marriage to Bonnie Spade, who also was born and reared in Bearcreek township, this county, a member of one of the old families in that part of the county, daughter of George R. and Mary (Miller) Spade, and to this union three children have been born, Frances, Dick and Ralph, the former of whom is a member of the class of 1924, Portland high school. Mr. and Mrs. Bishop are members of the Presbyterian church and are Democrats. Mr. Bishop is a member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

WALTER M. GUEDEL, head of the Guedel Manufacturing Company of Portland and long recognized as one of the leaders in industrial circles in that city, is a native of Ohio but has been a resident of Indiana practically all the time since the days of his childhood. Mr. Guedel was born on January 1, 1886, and is a son of John and Mary (Lennes) Guedel, the latter of whom was born in Pennsylvania. John Guedel was born in the republic of Switzerland. In 1868 he came to this country and located in Ohio, where he became engaged in farming and where he married. Some years later he moved with his family to Indianapolis and in that city became employed in the saw works of the E. C. Atkins Company and established his home in that city. He and his wife had ten children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Samuel, Malinda, Charles, Louis, William, Arthur, Clarence, Henry and John. Walter M. Guedel was but a child when his parents moved from the home they had first established in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, where he was born, to Indianapolis and in the latter city he received his early schooling. Upon completing the course in the high school there he took a course in Indiana University and then entered the force of teachers employed by the Government in the Philippine Islands, manual training being his specialty, and was thus engaged in the islands for some time. Upon the completion of this term of service Mr. Guedel returned to the United States and for two years thereafter was employed as a bookkeeper in the office of the Bimel-Ashcraft Company at Dermott, Ark., being then transferred from that office to the office of the Bimel Company at Portland, since which time he has made his home in Portland. For seven years Mr. Guedel served as secretary and treasurer of the Bimel Company at Portland, or until in August, 1919, when he started in his present line, proprietor of the plant of the Guedel Manufactuing Company, and has built up a thriving business. Mr. Guedel's specialty is dashes for automobiles, the Ford Company being the chief consumer of his product in that line. Bread boards are a considerable by-product of the Guedel factory. Mr. Guedel is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the board of directors of the Country Club, a member of the board of directors of the Kiwanis Club, a 32° Mason and a member of the local lodge of Eagles. He is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. In 1910 Walter M. Guedel was united in marriage to Hazel Bimel, daughter of Fred and Margaret Bimel, of Portland, and to this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, John and Barbara. Mr. and Mrs. Guedel have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the city's general social activities.

SUMNER W. HAYNES, for more than forty years a member of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, with law offices at Portland, the nominee of the Prohibition party in 1908 for the office of Governor of the state of Indiana and in 1916 for United States senator, for many years actively and prominently identified with the county board of children's guardians, the present attorney for that board, and in other ways helpful in the promotion of good works in district and state, was born at Portland and has lived there all his life, long having been recognized as one of the most helpful personal factors in the common life of this community. Mr. Haynes was born on August 15, 1855, and is the fourth in order of birth of the eight children born to Judge Jacob March Haynes and Hilinda S. (Haines) Haynes, as is set out elsewhere in this volume, together with a comprehensive narrative relating to the late Judge Haynes, of excellent memory in this community, and details concerning the Haynes family in America. Reared at Portland, Sumner W. Haynes received his early schooling in the schools of that city, schools to the promotion of whose interests his father gave so unselfishly of his time and his services, and then entered Earlham College, where he remained three years. In the meantime he had been giving his attention to the study of law under his father's able preceptorship and thus equipped for further study entered the law school of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, and in 1880 was graduated from that institution. He was admitted to the bar upon his return from law school and in 1881 became engaged in practice at Portland in association with his father, Judge Haynes. Two years later, in 1883, Mr. Haynes entered into a partnership with W. E. Cox and this mutually agreeable association was maintained for eight years, or until its dissolution, after which Mr. Haynes formed a partnership in practice with George W. Hall. This association also was continued for eight years, or until its dissolution, since which time Mr. Haynes has practiced alone, one of the oldest members of the bar in continuous practice in this county, he and Judge John M. Smith being now recognized as the ranking members of the bar now in active practice. Though reared a Republican, his father having been one of the leaders of that party hereabout, Mr. Haynes early became an enthusiastic supporter of the principles of the Prohibition , party and has for years been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in Indiana, his time and his means and his services having been given in unstinted measure to the promotion of the Prohibition cause since he first became a campaigner in that behalf back in 1886, when the organization which eventually brought about national prohibition of the liquor traffic was just getting a good start in this state. Long a leader of that party in this county and district, Mr. Haynes was made the nominee of the party in the state for Governor in 1908, and in 1916 was further complimented by his associates in that organization by being nominated for the United States Senate. In the national convention of the party in 1916 he placed before the convention the name of Ex-Governor Hanly of Indiana, who was the party's nominee for President in that year. Mr. Haynes took a very positive stand against the principle involved in local option, as applied to the liquor traffic; considering the traffic in the nature of a crime, instead as simply a matter of expediency, he insisted that it was no part of the policy of the State to submit a question criminal in its nature and tendencies to a vote of any community. He also opposed the original "Hobson amendment" to the United States constitution, for the reason that it only prohibited the "manfacture for sale," leaving the right and power, under the constitution, for any individual or oreanization to manufacture for his or its own use. Mr. Haynes' helpful and sysmpathetic interest in behalf of child welfare work has long made him one of the leaders in that behalf in Indiana and in 1908-10 he rendered effective service as superintendent of the Indiana State Children's Home Society, his organizing ability brought to bear in that behalf having done much toward the better systematization of the work of that society. During this period of two years of service Mr. Haynes practically gave up his law practice in order to devote his undivided attention to the work to which he had given his heart, and he never has ceased to take an active and influential interest in the work, an interest which took active form in 1891 when he began his labors in connection with the beneficient work of finding homes for orphaned and homeless children in this state, and he is even now the attorney for the county board of children's guardians. For thirty-five years Mr. Haynes has been a member of the session of the Presbyterian church at Portland and in 1892 was the commissioner from this presbytery to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian church, held that year at Portland, Ore. For ten years or more he taught a class in the Sunday school of this church and for twentythree years has served as superintendent of the Sunday school. On August 24, 1881, the year in which he was admitted to the bar, Sumner W. Haynes was united in marriage to America E. Hays, daughter of Courtney and Ann (Claypool) Hays, of Portland, and to this union were born two daughters, May Beatrice and Mabel Edna, both of whom now are deceased.

ALONZO L. JAQUA, a veteran real estate dealer at Portland and for years recognized as one of the leaders in that line in this county, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Portland since he was three years of age and has thus been a witness to and a participant in the amazing development that has marked that city during the past half century and more. Mr. Jaqua was born on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, March 6, 1850, son of James B. and Eliza J. (Avery) Jaqua, the latter of whom was born at Nashville, Tenn., but had been a resident of Ohio since the days of her childhood, her parents having moved up from Tennessee to get away from slavery conditions in that state. James B. Jaqua was a member of one of the real pioneer families of Ohio, his grandfather, Gamaliel Jaqua, a native of Connecticut and a soldier of the war of the Revolution, having settled in Preble county about the time Ohio was admitted to statehood and there spent his last days. James B. Jaqua was a farmer in Darke county, a landowner and a practicing attorney. In 1853 he disposed of his interests in Ohio and moved with his family to Portland, where he established himself in the practice of law and where he spent the remainder of his life, for many years having been regarded as one of the leaders of the bar of the Jay Circuit Court, as is set out elsewhere in this work. His wife died on November 24, 1871, and he survived her nearly thirty-five years, his death occurring at Portland on May 13, 1906. They were the parents of nine children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Alice (deceased), Carrie E. (deceased), Genevra I., who married Nathan B. Hawkins, Judson A., Minnie Z., Carl W., Pearl R. (deceased) and Frank B. Reared at Portland, to which place, as noted above, he had moved .with his parents when but three years of age, Alonzo L. Jaqua received his schooling in the schools of that city, completing the same at the old Liber College. When twenty-five years of age he became engaged at Portland in the manufacture of brick and was thus engaged for several years, at the end of which time he became engaged in the retail lumber business, his lumber yards occupying the site at present occupied by the Jay County Lumber Company. After four years he retired from the lumber business, but several years later again became engaged in that line and was for four years again thus occupied. In 1885 Mr. Jaqua sold his lumber yard and became engaged in the real estate business, which line he ever since has followed and in which he has been quite successful, long having been regarded as one of the leading realty dealers in this part of the state, his offices in South Meridian street having been the scene of many an important realty transfer. On September 5, 1893, Alonzo L. Jaqua was united in marriage to Louelle Oswald, who was born at Ft. Recovery, Ohio, but who was reared in Portland, where she completed her schooling in the old normal school, her parents having moved to Portland from Ohio when she was a child. Mrs. Jaqua is a daughter of Louis and Jane (Curtis) Oswald, the former of whom was for years a merchant at Portland. Louis Oswald and wife were the parents of six children, three of whom are still living, Mrs. Jaqua and her sisters, Magdalena and Sarah. Her brother, Louis G. Oswald, formerly well known in Portland, died at San Antonio, Tex., at the age of thirty-nine years.

HOMER TEETERS, county surveyor of Jay county and formerly and for years engaged hereabout in the road and bridge contracting line, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. He is a member of one of the real pioneer families of this county, his great-grandfather, David Teeters, having settled here with his family about the time Jay county was erected as a separate civic unit in the group of counties which go to make up the state of Indiana. David Teeters settled on a tract of Government land in Noble township, where he established his home. One of his sons, John H. Teeters, grandfather of Homer Teeters, also became a landowner in that township and reared his family there, one of his sons, Hiram Teeters, father of Homer Teeters, in turn establishing his home there after his marriage. Hiram Teeters married Sarah A. Houndeshell, who also was born in Noble township, a member of one of the pioneer families there, and became one of the substantial members of that community, the owner of an excellent farm of 160 acres. He and his wife had nine children, those besides the subject of this sketch— the fourth in order of birth—being Dora, Pearl, Margaret, Orville, Russell, Elmer, Glenn and Fred. Homer Teeters was born on the home farm in Noble township, August 29, 1882, and was reared there, receiving his schooling in the Metzner school. He remained at home, an assistant to his father in the operations of the farm, until he had attained his majority when he became engaged in the road and bridge building business, becoming a general contractor and continuing in that line for twelve years, or until his election in 1916 to the office of surveyor of Jay county. When about twenty-four years of age Mr. Teeters had entered upon a three-years course in surveying and mapmaking with the International Correspondence School and was graduated from that institution, thereafter giving considerable attention to surveying in connection with his other work. He was the first surveyor to occupy that office in the new court house and so admirably has he discharged the duties of the office that by successive re-elections he is now serving his third term in office. Mr. Teeters is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the United Brethren church at Portland. On June 9, 1904, Homer Teeters was united in marriage to Lolah E. Thornton, who also was born in Noble township, and to this union three children have been born, Edna, James and Mary, the first named of whom is a member of the class of 1924, Portland high school. Mrs. Teeters is a daughter of James and Mary (Arnold) Thornton, also members of pioneer families in this county. James Thornton is a landowner in Noble township and has also for years been engaged in ditch contracting. He and his wife have had five children, four of whom are living, those besides Mrs. Teeters being Sylvia, Charles and Harley.

MARION JACK, former representative from Jay county in the lower house of the Indiana General Assembly, former deputy treasurer of Jay county and in other ways actively identified with public affairs, a substantial landowner of Wayne township, now living retired in Portland, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life. Mr. Jack was born on a farm in the near vicinity of Ridgeville, in the neighboring county of Randolph, March 25, 1851, and is a son of Robert M. and Asenath (Odle) Jack, who later became residents of Jay county, but whose last days were spent at Ridgeville. Robert M. Jack was born in Warren county, Ohio, and was twelve years of age when his parents, Robert L. and Sarah Elizabeth (Ferris) Jack, left Ohio and came over to take up some of the newer lands in Indiana. Robert L. Jack entered a tract of 400 acres in the vicinity of Ridgeville in Randolph county. On this place he established his home, cleared the tract and became one of the substantial and influential pioneers of that neighborhood. On that pioneer farm Robert M. Jack grew to manhood and when twenty-one years of age was eiven a 100-acre farm by his father, on which place he established his home after his marriage and continued to live there for about ten years, at the end of which time, in the middle '50s, he contracted a severe case of "Kansas fever" and with his family moved to the Sunflower state, which had just about that time been organized as a separate territory, though it was not admitted as a state until 1861, but after a year's experience amid the turbulence which then marked that territory was content to return to Indiana and settle down on his father-in-law's farm near Deerfield. Two years later he came up into Jay county and bought a farm of 130 acres in the neighborhood of Collett, settling there on March 1, 1861. He cleared that place and remained there until 1874, when he sold his farm and moved to Ridgeville. He later went to Oregon, where he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there in 1894, he then being seventy-five years of age. Robert M. Jack and wife were the parents of seven children, all of whom are living save two—Harry, who died on December 26„ 1907, and Elizabeth, who died on September 3, 1911, those besides the subject of this sketch being Edna, Cora Alice, Elmer R. and Rebecca Jane. Reared on the farm, Marion Tack completed his schooling in Ridgeville College and early began teaching school, a vocation he followed during the winters for a period of thirty-eight years, his summers being occupied on his father's farm in Pike township, where he made his home after his marriage in 1874, his father retiring from the farm in that year. In the meantime Mr. Jack was giving his thoughtful attention to local civic affairs and was coming to be recognized as one of the leaders in the Republican party in this county. In 1900 he was elected to represent this county in the state Legislature and in 1902 was his party's nominee for the office of county recorder, but was defeated along with the rest of the ticket in that year. In 1903 he bought a place in Wayne township and moved from his Pike township farm, accepting the position of deputy to the county treasurer, and served in that position until 1907. Upon leaving the court house Mr. Jack gave his full attention to the affairs of his Wayne township farm and remained there until his retirement from the farm in 1914 and removal to Portland, where he has since resided and where he and his wife are very comfortably situated. They are members of the United Brethren church at Portland. It was on March 8, 1874, that Marion Jack was united in marriage to Elma Rhodes, of New Mt. Pleasant, and to this union five sons were born, Oren Leroy, who died on December 12, 1888; Forest A., Harry, Merle R. and Ivan R. Forest A. Jack has been twice married. To his union with Letta Ayres one child was born, a daughter, Dona. His wife and daughter both died and he married his deceased wife's sister, Margaret Ayres. Harry Jack, who is living in Wayne township, married Thetis Frazee, also of this county, and has two children, Gerald and Marion. Merle R. Jack, who is now living in Canton, Ohio, married Pearl Waters, also of this county, and has three children, Elma, Iona R. and Ralph. Ivan R. Jack married Mabel George, of this county, and has three children, Ivan Robert, Maxine L. and Dorothy M., it thus being noted that Mr. and Mrs. Jack have eight grandchildren, in all of whom they take much delight. Mrs. Jack is a member of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county, her parents, John and Susanna Rhodes, having settled in Jefferson township in 1837. Both were born in Columbiana county, Ohio, the former in 1815 and the latter in 1819. Upon coming to this county Tohn Rhodes entered a "forty" in Jefferson township and there established his home. Besides farming, he also was a carpenter and did much of the early building thereabouts. He also was active in public affairs and for years served as justice of the peace in and for his home township. He and his wife had eight children, of whom four are still living, those besides Mrs. Jack being Mrs. Elizabeth J. Kidder, Mrs. Lydia C. Finch and John A. Rhodes.

REV. WILLIAM E. HOGAN, D. D., pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church at Portland and one of the best known clergymen in that city, is a native Hoosier and has lived in Indiana all his life. He was born at Oakland City, Ind., February 28, 1882, and is a son of the Rev. George W. and Lucy E. (Hopper) Hogan, the latter of whom was born in Kentucky. The Rev. George W. Hogan was a Virginian by birth and was reared in Virginia, where he received his schooling. When a young man he entered the ministry and was active in that profession until his death. During the early days of his ministry he came to Indiana and was for a time located at Salem, later moving to Oakland City, where he established his permanent home. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, six of whom are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch having been John W., Amanda B., Junius, Aaron, Montrea L. and Owen E. (deceased). Reared at Oakland City, William E. Hogan received his schooling in the excellent schools of that city and early gave his attention to study for the gospel ministry, in due time being ordained to the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church. His first charge was at Merom, where he remained for two years and then was sent to Newburg, where he served as pastor of the church at that place for a year; thence to Washington, Ind.; thence to Valentine, in Lagrange county; thence to Inwood, from there to Syracuse and thence to Knightstown, from which latter city he was sent by the Conference to Portland in 1920 and has since been pastor of the Methodist church at that place. Mr. Hogan is a Freemason and has long given his thoughtful attention to Masonic affairs. In 1904 the Rev. William E. Hogan was united in marriage to Lily M. Williams, who was born at Mt. Carmel, 11l., and to this union three children have been born, Esther Marie, Hugh C. and Harlan F., the first named of whom, born on Tune 22, 1905, died on October 2, 1919, she then being in her fifteenth year.

SELMA FINCH, a well known grocer, of the firm of Finch & Brosher, proprietors of the Central grocery and shoe store at Portland, one of the best stores of the kind in eastern Indiana, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all of his life. Mr. Finch was born in Greene township on March 8, 1872, and is a son of Adam H. and Eliza J. (Allen) Finch, the latter of whom was born in Preble county, Ohio, but was reared and educated in Indiana. Adam H. Finch was born in Wayne county, Indiana, and was for many years a well known farmer and merchant at Collett, the pleasant little village south of Portland. He and his wife were the parents of two children, Lillie M. and Selma. They had besides an adopted son, Joseph. When Selma Finch was eight years of age his parents moved to Pike township, this county, and there he completed his schooling. As a young man he worked with his father in the latter's store at Collett and later he started in business for himself at Collett and was thus engaged there for ten years, at the end of which time he sold his store there and bought an eighty-acre farm in Wayne township on which he established his home and which he farmed for three years. He then moved to College Corner, where he opened a grocery store, meantime retaining possession of his farm, and was in business at College Corner for about five years, at the end of which time he traded his farm for the Southside grocery at Portland and returned to the latter city, where he has ever since been in business and where he has done well. Mr. Finch continued to operate the Southside grocery for about four years and then, in association with Sherman Brubaker and Albert H. Brubaker, bought the Central grocery, where he is now located. About a year later Messrs. Finch and Brosher bought the Brubaker interest in the store and have since been proprietors of the place, which is one of the best stocked and most admirable equipped stores in Portland. On the second floor of the establishment they conduct a shoe department. They also carry on a general retail meat business, and have eighteen persons employed in the establishment. Mr. Finch is a Democrat and is a member of Red Cross Lodge No. 88, Knights of Pythias, at Portland. On March 29, 1902, Selma Finch was united in marriage to Ella Bockoven, who also was born in Jay county, daughter of Louis and Mary (Devor) Bockoven, and to this union four children have been born, Mary, Sharon Lea, Glen and Frank, the first named of whom is now a student at Earlham College. The Finches have a pleasant home at Portland and have ever taken an interested part in.the city's general social activities.

VERNON E. METZ, who is widely known throughout the counties of Jay, Adams, Randolph and Wayne as a salesman of "made to measure" clothing for men, with headquarters at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. Metz was born on a farm in Wayne township on March 22, 1889, and is a son of Thomas J. and Margaret (Bickle) Metz, both members of old families here, the former born in Wayne township and the latter in Pike township. Thomas J. Metz is a landowner in Pike township, where he has farmed for years, and he and his wife have had six children, four of whom are living, those besides the subject of this sketch being Hazel, Glicie and Juanita. Reared on the home farm, Vernon E. Metz received his schooling in the district school in the neighborhood of his boyhood home and after leaving school continued farming. He married before he was twenty years of age and for four or five years thereafter was variously occupied until he was made manager of the grain elevator at Blaine, a position he continued to occupy for eighteen months, at the end of which time he became engaged in his present line, selling men's clothing by sample and on made-to-measure lines, his territory covering the four counties above enumerated, and has done well. For about nine months during the time of America's participation in the World war Mr. Metz was occunied in the more "essential" occupation of fireman on the Pennsylvania railroad, but upon the return of normal conditions resumed his clothing business, making his headquarters at Portland, where he has established an excellent business. Mr. Metz is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodges of the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Improved Order of Redmen at Portland. On September 26, 1908, Vernon E. Metz was united in marriage to Nellie E. Dunmoyer, who was born in Pike township, this county, daughter of William H. and Rosa E. (Brown) Dunmoyer, and to this union two children have been born, Millard and Noel. Mrs. Metz's schooling was completed in the Portland high school. Her father, William H. Dunmoyer, is the owner of a farm of 115 acres in Greene township, this county, and he and his wife have had six children, four of whom are living, Mrs. Metz having three sisters, Elsie, Bernice and Dolores.

WILLIAM GRIEST, formerly and for many years secretary and general manager of the old Portland Natural Gas and Oil Company, the first assessor of Jay county, formerly and for years deputy to the treasurer of Jay county, a former justice of the peace in and for Penn township—the township in which he was reared, and later engaged in the insurance business at Portland, where he is now living retired, is a native of the old Keystone state, but has been a resident of Jay county since he was four years of age and few there are who have a wider acquaintance throughout the county than he. Mr. Griest was born on a farm in York county, Pennsylvania, June 5, 1846, and is a son of John and Hannah (Edmundson) Griest, both natives of that same county and both of colonial Quaker stock, whose last days were spent in Jay county, where they had established their home more than seventy years ago. John Griest, who died at his home in the Balbec neighborhood in 1874, was born on June 26, 1806, and was a son of John Griest, the son of Daniel Griest, who was a son of John Griest, who was of the family of Griests who had come to this country from England in 1685, joining their fortunes with those of the Quaker colonists in and about Philadelphia, this last-named John Griest, the progenitor of the line from which William Griest takes descent, settling in 1737 near the York county line in Adams county, Pennsylvania, and William Griest has a record of the lineal descent from that line down to the present generation, as well as a walking stick brought by the Griest family from England in 1685, which he greatly prizes. The Edmundsons are descended from William Edmundson, the so-called Quaker Apostle, who was an officer in Cromwell's army, but later joined the Friends and was a contemporary of Fox and Penn and active in promulgating the Friendly faith, establishing his home in Ireland about 1660. He reared a considerable family, some of the members of which came to America early in the eighteenth century, the line from which Mr. Griest springs dating from Caleb Edmundson, who was living in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1760 and who was the grandfather of Thomas Edmundson, the Jay county pioneer, who moved with his family here from Pennsylvania in 1837, the year following the organization of Jay county, and became one of the most substantial and influential pioneers of Penn township. Mr. Griest has the marriage certificate of his Edmundson grandparents, made out after the quaint and interesting form of the Friends discipline. John Griest was reared in the firm faith of the Friends and was given a sound education, for some years in the period of his young manhood being a school teacher. He was trained in the technical details of woolen mill operation under the direction of an uncle and in time became the proprietor of a woolen mill, but about the time of his marriage in 1833 to Hannah Edmundson disposed of his factory and became engaged in farming, a vocation he followed in his home county until. 1850. when in response to the good reports which his father-in-law, Thomas Edmundson, had been writing back concerning conditions in Indiana, he disposed of his farm and with his wife and ten chil' dren came to Jay county, the family driving through with their household goods and some essential farm equipment, the journey consuming four weeks. It was in April that the Griests made their trip out here and they settled on land adjoining the Edmundson homestead in the Balbec neighborhood in Penn township, put up a log cabin and proceeded to clear a farm from out the unbroken forest. On that pioneer farm John and Hannah Griest spent the remainder of their lives, their deaths occurring within a year of each other, the latter dying in 1873 and the former in 1874. As stated above, William Griest was but four years of age when he came here with his parents in 1850 and he grew to manhood on the home farm, helpful in the arduous labors of effecting a clearing and developing the place. Though the school facilities of that time and place were meager, he had the advantage of home education, and after a supplementary course at Liber College began teaching school, a profession he followed from 1866 with but one interruption for twenty years, this interruption being a year he spent in the court house as deputy county treasurer during the incumbency of Albert Grissell. After his marriage in 1874 Mr. Griest continued to make his home on the old home place at Balbec and presently bought the farm, which he continued to operate, meanwhile teaching during the winters, until 1886 when David Hoover, county treasurer, employed him as deputy treasurer and he moved to Portland, occupying this deputyship during the two terms of the Hoover incumbency. In 1891, when under legislative enactment the office of county assessor was created, Mr. Griest was appointed assessor, the first to hold this office in Jay county, and served in the interim preceding ihe next election. It was in this same year, following his retirement from the treasurer's office, that Mr. Griest became engaged in the office of the old Portland Natural Gas and Oil Company as a bookkeeper. In 1904, he was elected secretary and general manager of this company and he continued to serve in that capacity until, after the failure of the natural gas supply, the company sold out and the plant was dismantled, as is narrated elsewhere in this work. Upon leaving the gas office Mr. Griest became engaged in the insurance business in association with John W. Holmes and so continued until his retirement from active service on January 1, 1921, since which time he has been giving his attention largely to the collection and preservation of data for the archives of the Jay County Historical Society, of which he is one of the most active members and in the affairs of which organization he has for years been deeply interested. Mr. Griest is a birthright member of the Society of Friends at Pennville, to the simple and quaint forms and mystical views of which society he is devotedly attached, and is an active member of the Pennville Meeting. Mr. Griest is a Republican and has for many years been recognized as among the local leaders in that party's councils. During his long residence in Penn township he for eight years served as justice of the peace in and for that township and as 'Squire Griest became widely known throughout that section for the soundness and equity of his judgments in such cases as came before his court. He has retained the interest in school work acquired during the two decades in which he served as a member of Jay county's teaching staff and for seven years served as a member of the school board in Portland. For forty-four years Mr. Griest has been an Odd Fellow and is now (1921) district deputy of the Encampment branch of that popular order. William Griest has been twice married. In 1874 he was united in marriage to Frances Bourne, who was born in Franklin county, this state, and who died in 1899. In 1910 Mr. Griest married Jessie Riley, who was born in Ohio, a cousin of the beloved Hoosier poet, James Whitcomb Riley, and daughter of Davis Riley, a veteran of the Civil war and formerly and for years one of Jay county's best known citizens, who came here with his family from Ohio and located at Pennville, later moving to Portland, where his last days were spent. Mrs. Griest was reared in this county, having been but a young girl when her parents came here, and she completed her schooling in the old Portland Normal School. For thirty-five years she was a teacher in the schools of this county, the last twenty-five years of this long term of service being spent in the Portland public schools, and she thus has for years been recognized as one of the leaders in the general cultural activities of the community. She is the present (1921) regent of Mississinewa Chapter, No. 185, of the Daughters of the American Revolution, is a charter member of Alpha Lodge, Daughters of Rebekah (I. O. O. F.), an officer of the Presbyterian Sunday school and a member of the Twentieth Century Club.

WILLIAM P. SMITH, D. C, a well known young doctor of chiropractic at Portland, was born in that city and has lived there all his life. Doctor Smith was born on July 20, 1899, and is a son of W. Leo and Bessie J. (Hoddupp) Smith, both of whom also were born in Jay county, members of old families here. W. Leo Smith, who has for years been salesmanager in the big establishment of the Hood wholesale grocery at Portland, was born at Redkey, but has been a resident of Portland since his youth. He and his wife have two children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Mary. Upon completing the course in the Portland high school, William P. Smith was for about nine months engaged in the shipping department of the Hood wholesale house and then entered the eastern Indiana branch of the State Normal School at Muncie, where from September to December, 1918, he served in the Student Army Training Camp for service in the army during the time of this country's participation in the World war. In the meantime he had been giving his thoughtful attention to the study of chiropractic and upon leaving the normal school entered the Ross College of Chiropractic at Fort Wayne and on April 27, 1921, was graduated from that institution. Upon receiving his diploma Doctor Smith returned to Portland and opened there an office for the practice of his profession and has since been thus engaged. On May 27, 1920, Dr. William P. Smith was united in marriage to Geraldine Ohmart, daughter of James E. and Emma (Goehler) Ohmart, the former of whom is a well known real estate dealer at Portland. Mrs. Smith was born at Laketon, Ind., but her schooling was completed in the high school at Portland, to which place her parents moved when she was a child. Doctor and Mrs. Smith are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and are Democrats. The Doctor is a member of Delta Chapter of the Phi Delta Kappa fraternity at Portland.

JACOB M. SPADE, a veteran grocer at Portland and the proprietor of the oldest continuous grocery store in Jay county, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life, well known in business circles in Portland since the days of his young manhood. Mr. Spade was born on a farm in Wayne township, this county, and was reared there, a son of Daniel and Mary Spade, both of whom were born in the state of Maryland, the former a son of John Spade, who became one of the pioneer settlers in Wayne township. Daniel Spade and wife were the parents of six children, three of whom are still living, Jacob M. Spade having two brothers, Alexander and Horace M. Spade. Jacob M. Spade supplemented the schooling received in the public schools of this county by a course in the Indiana State Normal School and then became engaged in telephone work at Portland, helping to install the first telephone system in that city. He then became engaged in the lumber business there, associated with the firm of Wilt & Spade, and was the bookkeeper and buyer for that firm for nine years, at; the end of which time, in 1892, he became engaged at Portland in the grocery business and has ever since been thus engaged. Mr. Spade's first store was in the room now (1921) occupied by the Iholt wall paper store, but he long since moved into the room now occupied by him as a grocery in North Meridian street, and there has a well established business. On December 27, 1882, Jacob M. Spade was united in marriage to Olive Bowen, who was born in Wayne county, Indiana, and to this union were born six children, Maud, Ethel, Frank, Keith, Emily and Dorothy, all of whom are married save the last named, who is attending school at Roanoke, Va. Frank Spade, who was born on September 23, 1889, is engaged with his father in the grocery business. Keith Spade is the secretary-manager of the local commercial association, or chamber of commerce at Portland, with offices in the court house. Jacob M. Spade is a Republican. He is the treasurer of the Rotary Club and is affiliated with the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

BENJAMIN E. SEARS, proprietor of the Sears Insurance Agency at Portland and one of the best known young business men in that city has been a resident of Portland since 1912 and has established himself firmly in the business life of that city. Mr. Sears is a native Hoosier and has resided in this state all his life. He was born on a farm in Daviess county on June 13, 1887, and is a son of Tohn R. and Eveline (Cummings) Sears, both of whom were born in that same county, the former a farmer and carpenter and the owner of a farm in that county, and who were the parents of six children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Homer, Elza, Cora, Walter and Sarah. Benjamin E. Sears was reared on the home farm in Daviess county and received his schooling in the schools of that county. He was married when twenty years of age and continued making his home on the farm until he was twenty-five years of age, when, in 1912, he moved to Portland and was for about eighteen months thereafter engaged in traveling out of that city for the S. F. Baker company of Keokuk, Iowa. He then became engaged as an agent for the Prudential Life Insurance Company and continued thus engaged for eighteen months, at the end of which time he entered upon business for himself, opening at Portland the Sears Insurance Agency, which he has since been operating quite successfully. It was on July 10, 1907, in Daviess county, Indiana, that Benjamin E. Sears was united in marriage to Lora E. Myers, who also was born in that county, daughter of Frank P. and Nancy Myers, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Florice Fontella. Mr. and Mrs. Sears are members of the Christian church and are Republicans. Mr. Sears, is a member of the local lodges of the Modern Woodmen and of the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

HARRY H. SHUCK, proprietor of a gasoline filling station, automobile accessory store and vulcanizing plant in North Meridian street at Portland has only been a resident of this county for the past five or six years, but there are few men in the county who have a wider acquaintance than he. Mr. Shuck was born in Ripley county, Indiana, March 18, 1883, and is a son of James H. and Anna (Rochat) Shuck, who are now living at North Vernon, this state, fames H. Shuck was born in Switzerland county, Indiana. When he was a child he moved with his parents to, Ripley county, where he grew to manhood, learning there the blacksmith trade. In time he set up a shop of his own and was thus engaged at Marble Corner and at New Marion, later moving to North Vernon, where he is now living retired. He and his wife were the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch is now the only survivor. Harry H. Shuck was but a child when his parents moved from Ripley county to Jennings county. When he was eight years of age he went to Johnson county, where he made his home with his uncle, and in the schools of this latter county he received his schooling. He early turned to commercial pursuits and presently became engaged as a salesman in a hardware store at Franklin, Ind., where he remained until 1916, in which year he came to Jay county and became engaged as a clerk in the hardware store at Pennville. Two years later he went to Portland, where he became engaged as a clerk in a hardware store. A year later he bought the Crown filling station in North Meridian street and has since been engaged in business at that point. In addition to his filling station Mr. Shuck carries a full line of automobile accessories and has also added to his establihment a well equipped vulcanizing plant. On July 27, 1904, Harry H. Shuck was united in marriage to Bonnie Patterson, who was born in Johnson county, Indiana, a daughter of Benjamin and Mollie Patterson, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Mary Evelyn, who is now attending the Portland schools. Mr. and Mrs. Shuck are members of the Christian church and are Republicans. Mr. Shuck is a Freemason, affiliated with the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons (No. 107) at Franklin.

CLARENCE N. NICHOLS, president of the city school board, junior member of the firm of Reinhard & Nichols, clothing merchants at Portland and one of the best known young business men of that city, has been a resident of Portland since he was four years of age. He was born in the neighboring county of Randolph on April 24, 1888, and is the son and only child of William A. and Laura Belle (Ulsh) Nichols. William A. Nichols also was born in Randolph county and there became engaged in the railway service, remaining there until 1892 when he was appointed local agent of the G. R. & I. Railroad Company at Portland and moved to that city, which has since been his home. As noted above, Clarence N. Nichols was but four years of age when he came to this county with his parents in 1892 and he grew up at Portland. During his course in high school he specialized in commercial forms and for a year after leaving school was employed as a stenographer in the office of the Portland Drain Tile Company. He then decided to become engaged in business on his own account and in association with W. G. Reinhard became engaged in the clothing and men's furnishing business at Portland, under the firm style of Reinhard & Nichols, and has ever since been thus engaged, the firm doing business at 110 North Meridian street. Mr. Nichols is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, of which he is the secretary, and the Fraternal Order of Eagles; is affiliated with the local chapter of Phi Delta Kappa and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Nichols is a Republican and has long given his studious attention to local civic affairs. For some time he has been a member of the city school board and in August, 1921, was elected president of that body. For years he has been one of the leading spirits in the Greek letter fraternity Phi Delta Kappa and for the past five or six years has been the secretary-treasurer of the national organization of that body. In 1910 Clarence N. Nichols was united in marriage to Hilda M. Tudor, of Portland, and to this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, William A. and Elizabeth A.

WILLIAM H. MCLAUGHLIN, trustee of Wayne township and one of the best known citizens of Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the pioneer families here, and has lived in this county all of his life. Mr. McLaughlin was born on a farm in Madison township on May 8, 1864, and is a son of Hugh and Sarah A. (Lehmer) McLaughlin, both of whom were members of pioneer families there. Hugh McLaughlin was born in Ohio and was about ten years of age when his parents, John and Barbara McLaughlin, came over into Indiana with their family and settled on a farm in Madison township, this county, where they established their home. Tohn McLaughlin, the pioneer, and his wife were the parents of eight children, of whom three are still living, Francis M., Anna and Rebecca. Hugh McLaughlin grew to manhood on the old home farm in Madison township and after his marriage to Sarah A. Lehmer became engaged in farming on his own account and was long recognized as one of the substantial farmers of that community. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, three of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Barbara, and a brother, Wiley A. McLaughlin. William H. McLaughlin received his schooling in the district schools of this county and for three years after reaching manhood's estate farmed with his father. He then became engaged in blacksmithing and was thus engaged for nine years, at the end of which time he bought a general store at College Corner and was for thirteen years engaged in business at that place. Selling his store at College Corner, Mr. McLaughlin resumed farming for one year and then became engaged at Portland in operating a shoe repair shop. In 1918 he was elected trustee of Wayne township and is still serving the public in that capacity. Mr. McLaughlin is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Congregational church. In 1894 William H. McLaughlin was united in marriage to Anna M. Weber, who also was born in this county, a daughter of Benjamin and Mary A. Weber, and to this union eight children have been born, Harrison Emerson (deceased), Harriet R., Mary L.r Lula, Walter L., Byron and Gerald.

WILLIAM F. MILLIGAN, head of the firm of Milligan & Company, real estate and loans, at Portland, secretary of the Jay County Farm Loan Company, president of the Milligan Finance Company of Ft. Wayne, and for years regarded as one of the active and influential business men of this county, is a native of Ohio, born in Darke county on April 17, 1865, and is a son of John and Rominia (Carter) Milligan, the latter of whom was born at Cincinnati. John Milligan was born in Pennsylvania and grew to manhood in that state. He moved to Ohio and thence to Indiana, where he married Rominia Carter. He later established his home on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, and there became a substantial farmer and landowner. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, four of whom are still living, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Martha, wife of George Denney, of Mercer county, Ohio, and Ellen, wife of Ernest Lowry, of New Madison, Ohio, and a brother, J. Wesley Milligan. Reared on the home farm in Darke county, William F. Milligan received his early schooling in the schools of that county and supplemented this by a course of eighteen months in the Normal School at Portland, after which he was employed as a bookkeeper in his home county for four years, at the end of which time he went to Chicago and was there for two years engaged as a shipping clerk in a wholesale concern. He then moved to Selma, Ind., where for two vears he was in the retail meat business. Disposing of his interests at Selma he then became a resident of Portland, where for about four years he was engaged as a collector for the mercantile firm of Cartwright & Headington, acquiring thus a form of experience which presently prompted him. to go into the collection business on his own account. With this end in view he formed a partnership and for two years conducted a collection agency, with offices at Portland and Muncie. In 1906 Mr. Milligan disposed of his interest in that concern and became engaged at Portland in the real estate and loan business, which business he since has maintained, his business being incorporated under the firm name of Milligan & Company, he being the head of the concern, and has been quite successful. Mr. Milligan also is secretary of the Jay County Farm Loan Association and in other ways has been active in the business concerns of the, community in which he resides. He is a Democrat and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Milligan has been twice married. In 1904 he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Peden, who was born in Randolph county, this state, daughter of Thomas and Martha Peden, and to this union were born two children, Arah, who married Bernard Hiatt, of Portland, and Luella, who is now (1921) a student in the Portland high school. Following the death of the mother of these daughters Mr. Milligan married Mrs. Dora E. (Woods) Cable, who was a friend of his youth in his old home neighborhood in Darke county, Ohio, where she also was born, a member of one of the old families of that section of the state. Mr. and Mrs. Milligan have a pleasant home at Portland and take an interested part in the general social activities of their home town.

MORTON GARRISON, a well known insurance underwriter at Portland, is a native Hoosier and has lived in this state all his life, a resident of Portland since 1912. He was born on a farm in Wabash county on January 16, 1862, a son of Elihu and Mary B. (Shell) Garrison, both of whom were born in Ohio, but who spent the most of their lives in Indiana. Elihu Garrison was but a child when he came to Indiana with his parents in 1839, the family settling in Wabash county, where he completed his schooling. After his marriage to Mary B. Shell, who was born in Miami county, Ohio, he established his home on a farm in the vicinity of Wabash and became a substantial citizen of that community. He and his wife were the parents of three children, all of whom are living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Kenton Garrison, who married Jennie V. Smith and is living at Converse, Ind., and a sister, Rosa M., who married M. L. Ray and is living at Peru, Ind. Reared on the home farm in Wabash county, Morton Garrison received his schooling in the schools of Wabash, going through the high school course, and upon leaving school took up the work of the home farm, continuing thus engaged for five years, at the end of which time he became engaged in railroad work, first employed by the Wabash Railroad Company as a brakeman and presently was promoted to conductor. He transferred his services to the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company and by this latter company was employed as a conductor. He continued-thus employed until 1893, in which year he became engaged in association with his brother in the grain and milling business at Converse, this state. In 1904 he took up a special line of promotion work in behalf of the shippers of this state, in an effort to secure a more equitable regulation of. the rates of transportation, and was for several months thus engaged, the movement in which he had thus interested himself eventually leading to legislation which brought about what is now known as the state railroad commission. In addition to their other line, the Garrison brothers also were engaged in the real estate business at Converse and so continued until Kenton Garrison's retirement from business in 1912, after which Morton Garrison moved to Portland, where he since has been quite successfully engaged in the insurance business. In 1887 Morton Garrison was united in marriage to Lola M. Fink, who was born in Dekalb county, Indiana, and to this union two children have been born, namely: Hugh Garrison, who married Edith Catterson, of Martin county, Indiana, and Bessie, who married Rollin W. Harman, of Jay county and has three children, Harry, Robert and Ruth. Mr. Garrison is a Freemason. In his political views he is "independent."

WILLIAM DANIEL SCHWARTZ, M. D., former secretary of the board of health for Jay county and a practicing physician at Portland for nearly a quarter of a century, one of the best known physicians and surgeons in this section of Indiana, is one of Jay county's native sons who has ever taken an interest and pride in the advancement of the general cultural activities of the county and of his home town, and has thus for years been accounted one of the leaders in such activities hereabout. Doctor Schwartz was born on a farm in Pike township on February 21, 1870, and is a son of Charles B. and Fredericka Anna (Rowls) Schwartz, the former a veteran of the Civil war, who had come over here from Hamilton county in 1866 and settled in the beautiful valley of the Butternut, where they reared their family and became useful and influential factors in the development of that section of the county. Charles B. Schwartz was the owner of a good farm of 120 acres and he and his wife were the parents of seven children, all of whom became teachers in the schools of this county and all of whom are living save Jacob, the first born, the others besides Doctor Schwartz being John H. Schwartz, the Portland photographer; Charles F. Schwartz, a Portland lawyer, George S. and Oliver F. Schwartz and Caroline, wife of John Hudson. Reared on the home farm, William D. Schwartz received his early schooling in the schools of Jefferson township and at the age of nineteen began teaching school, a profession he followed for five years, his last service in that connection having been as principal of the Bryant schools, and an older chronicle narrates that "it is stated upon good authority that he held the best marked certificate in Jay county and that he was one of the most thorough students and systematic up-to-date teachers in the state." During this period of service as a teacher he had been continuing his studies and attended successively the old Eastern Indiana Normal School at Portland, the normal school at Covington, Ind., and the Marion (Ind.) Normal School, from which latter he was graduated in 1892. In the meantime he had been pursuing preparatory studies in medicine under the able preceptorship of Dr. J. T. Dickes and in 1893 entered the medical college of Indiana University at Indianapolis, from which he was graduated in 1896, second in honors in a class of fifty-three. Following a spirited competitive examination Doctor Schwartz received an appointment as an interne in the Indianapolis City Hospital and after fifteen months of intensive practical experience there spent six months at the Post-Graduate Hospital in New York city, where he specialized on nose and throat surgery and diseases of women and children. Thus thoroughly equipped for the practice of the profession to which he had devoted his life, Doctor Schwartz returned home and opened an office at Portland, where he ever since has been engaged in practice. In 1901 he made a trip to Europe for further post-graduate work and in the great hospitals of London, Paris and Berlin acquired further and practical knowledge of the advanced methods of European surgery. The Doctor is a member of the Jay County Medical Society, the Indiana State Medical Society, the Eighth District Medical Society, of which he is a past president, and the American Medical Association, in the affairs and deliberations of which organizations he takes a keen interest, and it is his practice annually to take additional post-graduate work with a view to keeping fully abreast of modern advancement in surgical and medical science. For some time he served as secretary of the county board of health and has done much to advance the public health service in this county. The Doctor is a Democrat. He is a Freemason and a member of the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Loyal Order of Moose and the Modern Woodmen of America, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the Doctor being a member of the board of trustees of the church. During the time of America's participation in the World war Doctor Schwartz rendered local service as the examining surgeon for the Jay county conscription board, examining all registrants under the operation of the selective draft law between the ages of 18 and 45 years. The Doctor passed the examination for army surgeon at Ft. Benjamin Harrison and was accepted for service with the rank of captain, the commission to become effective as soon as his work on the conscription boa'rd should have been completed. The armistice was signed about the time the board completed its work, however, and he never was called. Doctor Schwartz is interested in several of the more important commercial and industrial enterprises of the city and has done much to help promote the general business interests of the community. He is a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank of Portland and chairman of the loaning board of that institution. He also is a member of the board of directors and vice president of the Home Telephone Company of Portland and the vice president and a member of the board of directors of the Bimel Spoke and Auto Wheel Company, as well as having other interests. On October 14, 1897, the vear following his graduation from medical college, Dr. William D. Schwartz was united in marriage to Belle V. Moon, daughter of Sidney R. Moon, former reporter of the Indiana Supreme court, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Geraldine. Mrs. Schwartz was born at Rochester, Ind., and her schooling was completed in the Indianapolis high school. Miss Geraldine Schwartz, who is now (1921) a student in Miss Maderia's private school for girls at Washington, D. C, was graduated from the Portland high school and then entered Butler College at Indianapolis, during the same period taking a course of instruction at the John Herron Art Institute in that city. Miss Schwartz has made a specialty of dramatic expression and has been an important contributing factor in the presentation of plays by the local Dramatic Club at Portland. She was a member of the dramatic society of Butler College during the time of her attendance at that college and in 1920 enacted the leading female role in "Stop Thief," the college play of that year.

ROBERT S. FITCH, district agent for the Prudential Life Insurance Company at Portland and one of the active business men of that city, is a native of the old Blue Grass state, but has been a resident of Indiana for years, having moved to Portland from Marion. Mr. Fitch was born at Flemingsburg, Ky., December 23, 1876, and is a son of David R. and Katherine (Cooper) Fitch, the former of whom was born at Fitchburg, Mass., which town was named for his grandfather. David R. Fitch was for years engaged in the general mercantile business at Flemingsburg. He and his wife were the parents of four children, but two of whom are living, the subject of this sketch and his brother, D. Wall Fitch, who is engaged in the insurance business at Anderson, Ind., those deceased having been Amanda and Benjamin C. Fitch. Reared at Flemingsburg, Robert S. Fitch completed the high school course there and was for ten years thereafter engaged in the dry goods business there. He then went to Cincinnati, where he took employment as a city salesman with the Tohn Shileto Company. A year or more later he transferred his connection to the firm of Lansburg & Son and was engaged with that concern when two years later the death of his brother necessitated his return home. Not long afterward he became engaged in the newspaper business4 at Brookville, Ky., where he remained thus engaged for two years and a half, at the end of which time he disposed of his interests there and moved to Litchfield, Ky., where for two years thereafter he published a newspaper. He then accepted a position with the Osborn Paper Company at Marion, Ind., and moved to the latter city. Six years later he transferred his connection from this concern to the Prudential Life Insurance Company, his connection being with the Marion office of this company, and was engaged there in that line for three years, at the end of which time he had established a record for service with the Prudential which warranted his advancement and he was made a district agent, being given charge of four counties, including Jay, and has since made his home in Portland. In 1905 Robert S. Fitch was united in marriage to Minnie S. Walton, who was born in Grange City, Ky., and to this union have been born three children, Rollo W., Annie Helen and Clyde R., the latter of whom died in March, 1913, at the age of three months. Mr. and Mrs. Fitch are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Fitch is a Democrat. He is a Royal Arch Mason, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias, is a member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and also is affiliated with the local Kiwanis Club.

THOMAS C. STEPHENSON, a substantial landowner of Wayne township and formerly and for years a progressive farmer of that township, now living retired at Portland, where he and his family are very pleasantly situated, is a native of Ohio but has been a resident of Jay county since he was ten years of age. Mr. Stephenson was born in Jackson county, Ohio, December 22, 1852, and is a son of Richard M. and Anna (Dempsey) Stephenson, who came to Jay county in 1862 and here spent the remainder of their lives. Richard M. Stephenson was a Virginian, bom in Cabell county, that state, in 1812, and was but a lad when his parents, James I. and Margaret V. (McCollister) Stephenson, moved from Virginia to Ohio and settled in Jackson county in the latter state. James I. Stephenson was a son of a substantial landowner of Virginia, living in that section of the Old Dominion now comprised within the borders of West Virginia, who had early shown his aversion to the institution of human slavery by freeing his slaves and providing for their support on land which he gave them. His hatred for slavery caused him to leave Virginia and move into Ohio, where he established himself in a substantial manner. His son, James I. Stephenson became one of the prominent citizens of Jackson county and for some time served as an associate judge of the court there. Richard M. Stephenson, son of Judge Stephenson and father of Thomas C. Stephenson, received his schooling in Jackson county, Ohio, and upon' reaching manhood's estate was started going by his father, who gave him an eighty-acre farm, on which he established his home after his marriage and where he resided until 1862, when he disposed of his interests in Ohio and came over into Indiana, buying a tract of 320 acres of land in Wayne township, this county, where he and his wife spent their last days. They were the parents of eight children, of whom but three survive, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Tohn Stephenson, of Wayne township, and a sister, Mrs. Hulda Snyder, widow of Perry Snyder, of this county. The deceased members of this family were James, William J., Ira, Douglas and Jeremiah. As noted above, Thomas C. Stephenson was but ten years of age when he came to Jay county with his parents in 1862 and he grew to manhood on the home farm in Wayne township. He completed his schooling in Ridgeville College and for about eight years thereafter taught school in this county, farming during the summers. His father gave him a tract of eighty acres in the Westchester neighborhood and he began his farming operations there in 1876. Two vears later he disposed of that place and bought a tract of 200 acres in Wayne township on which he established his home after his marriage in 1881 and there he continued to make his home until 1912 when he retired from the active operation of the farm and moved to Portland, where he has since resided. In addition to his general farming operations Mr. Stephenson was for years quite extensively engaged in raising live stock and did well in his operations, increasing his land holdings until he was the owner of 400 acres. Since his retirement from the farm he has rented his land. Mr. Stephenson is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. As above noted, it was in 1881 that Thomas C. Stephenson was united in marriage to Amanda C. Giffe, who was born in this county, daughter of William and Deborah Giffe, members of pioneer families here, and to this union have been born three children, Chester E., Giffe and Anna May. Dr. Chester E. Stephenson, now a resident of Indianapolis, married Blanche Miller, of Adams county, this state, and has one child, a daughter, Helen. Giffe Stephenson married Nellie Weist, who also was born in this county, a daughter of Noah Weist, and is now living in Wayne township. Anna May Stephenson married Carl B. Anderson.

GEORGE W. ADAMS, proprietor of a feed store at Portland and for years one of the best known business men of that city, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here nearly all his life. Mr. Adams was born on a farm in Wabash township on March 21, 1861, and is a son of William Thompson and Margaret (Arbaugh) Adams, both members of pioneer families in that section of the county. William Thompson Adams was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, and was but a child when he came to Indiana with his parents, David Adams and wife, who settled on a quarter section of land which the former had "entered" in Wabash township, this county, and became influential pioneers of that neighborhood. Of the eight children born to the pioneer David Adams and wife, three are still living, John and Joseph Adams and their sister, Sarah. William Thompson Adams grew to manhood on the home farm in Wabash township, completed his schooling in the old academy at College Corner and had been for several years engaged in teaching school in addition to his farm work, when the Civil war broke out. Despite the family obligations he meanwhile had assumed he enlisted for service in the Union army and went to the front as a member of the Thirty-ninth regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served for more than three years. Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Adams returned home and resumed his farming operations, also for some time thereafter continuing to teach school during the winters, his total term of service as a teacher in the schools of his home township covering nearly ten years. He acquired a good farm in Wabash township and remained there until 1883, when he moved to Portland and there engaged in the lumber business, continuing thus engaged for four years, at the end of which time he disposed of his interests here and went to Kansas. Three years later he went to New Orleans, but after a year's experience in that city returned to Indiana and located at Columbus, where his last days were spent, his death occurring there in 1918, he then being eighty-four years of age. George W. Adams grew up on the home farm in Wabash township and received his schooling in the neighboring schools. He was married at the age of twenty-one and the year following became engaged with his father in the lumber business at Portland. When that business was disposed of he went with his father to Kansas, but after several years returned to Portland and became connected with the operation of the old Centennial' mills at that place, remaining with that concern for fifteen years, at the end of which time he was made manager of the Holmes grain elevator. Four years later he gave up the elevator business and in 1910 became engaged in the general feed business at Portland, the line he has since followed with considerable success. Mr. and Mrs. Adams are members of the First Christian church and are Republicans. It was in 1882 that George W. Adams was united in marriage to Sarah R. Wells, who was born in Noble township, this county, and to this union three children have been born, Dessie, Lula and Ray V. (deceased). Dessie Adams married Cloyce Badders and has nine children, Donald, Diana, Mary, Margaret, Deloris, Harold, James, George and Lula. Lula Adams married William Weller and has had two children, Troyla and Tod (deceased).

MAURICE ELBERSON, a well known garage owner and local agent for the Overland and Cleveland automobiles at Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. Mr. Elberson was born on a farm in the vicinity of Westchester on December 25, 1890, and is a son of William H. and Jennie (Brookheart) Elberson, who are now living in Portland. William H. Elberson was born in Ohio, son of Samuel H. and Sarah Elberson and was reared in that state, where he received his schooling and early became engaged in farming. He married in that state and continued to reside there until he was thirty years of age when he came over into Indiana and rented a farm of eighty acres in the Westchester neighborhood in this county. Some time later he gave up farming and moved to the village of Bryant, where he became engaged in the hardware and drug business, and was so engaged at that point for twenty-seven years, at the end of which time he retired from business and moved to Portland, where he is now residing, associated with his son Maurice in the management of the automobile establishment which they maintain in that city. To William H. Elberson and wife were born three children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Bonnie, and a brother, James Elberson. Maurice Elberson was reared at Bryant and upon completing the course in the high school there went to Portland, where he became engaged in the automobile business in association with James Rupel. In 1914 he became engaged in business alone and so continued until the partnership with his father was contracted in 1920. The Elbersons have an attractive place of business on Main street. They hold the local agency for the Overland and Cleveland automobiles and the Pennsylvania and Ajax tires and have done well in their line, handling also a general line of auto accessories. On May 29, 1911, Maurice Elberson was united in marriage to Della E. Rupel, who was born in this county, daughter of James and Ara Rupel, members of old families here, and to this union one child has been born, a son, Robert. Mr. Elberson is a Democrat. He is an active member of the Portland Chamber of Commerce and is affiliated with the local lodges of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

C. HARRY AYERS, former mayor of Portland and for years actively engaged in the real estate business in that city, is a native of the old Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his boyhood. He was born in Auglaize county, Ohio, Tune 24, 1868, and was thirteen years of age when he came into Indiana and became a resident of Pike township, this county. He completed his schooling in district school No. 2 in that township and early became engaged in buying and hauling timber, a line he followed for eight years or more, or until about 1898, when he moved to Portland and became engaged there as custodian of the high school building. From the time of his arrival in Portland Mr. Ayers took an active interest in local civic affairs and in 1903 was elected mayor of the city for a term of two years. So satisfactory were his services in this capacity that in 1905 he was re-elected for a term of four years and thus served as mayor of the city for a period of six years, at the end of which term of service he became engaged in the real estate business in Portland and has ever since been thus engaged, one of the most active factors in the realty market in this section of the state. Mr. Ayers is a Republican and has long been recognized as one of the leaders of that party in this county. He is a member of the local lodges of the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Woodmen and the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Christian church. On July 11, 1890, C. Harry Ayers was united in marriage to Nora Silvers, who was born in the neighboring county of Randolph, and to this union have been born two daughters, Goldie M., who married Russell Bergman, of this county, and has one child, a son, Jack, and Marie, who is at home with her parents.

FRANK ALBERSON, proprietor of the Alberson hotel and cafe in West Main street, Portland, and one of the best known residents of that city, has been a resident of Jay county since the days of his childhood. He was born at Champaign, 11l., in January, 1875, and is the son and only child of James and Catherine (Williamson) Alberson, the former of whom was born and reared in Adams county, this state, later becoming a resident of Orange county, where he is the owner of a farm of 120 acres. Frank Alberson was reared at Bryant, this county, and received his schooling in the schools of that village. From the days of his boyhood he had been a fancier of fine horses and as a young man became engaged in the work of training horses for the track, a vocation he followed for years, becoming one of the best known figures in racing circles in this part of the state. In 1905 Mr. Alberson gave up the work which had for so many years interested him and bought the hotel and cafe which he since has been operating at Portland. In 1907 Frank Alberson was united in marriage to Edith Hanks, who was born in Jay county, daughter of Frank and Ella (Journay) Hanks, and who died on September 12, 1920. Mr. Alberson is a member of the Portland Lodge of the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

JOHN W. McCOY, a retired baker of Portland, former member of the firm of Thomas, Huey & McCoy, and one of the best known men in the city, was born in Missouri but has been a resident of Portland practically all his life, his parents having been but temporary residents of Missouri at the time of his birth, their permanent home having been at Portland. It was on April 17, 1868, that Mr. McCoy was born and the place of his birth was Stockton, Mo. His parents were William and Catherine (Leonard) McCoy, the former of whom was born in Jay county and was for years a lawyer, practicing at Portland. Catherine Leonard was born in Ireland, but had been a resident of Portland since the days of her girlhood, her parents having come here with their family many years ago. William McCoy and Catherine Leonard were married in Portland and were the parents of two children, of whom the subject of this sketch alone survives. Reared at Portland, John W. McCoy received his schooling there and as a young man became engaged as a clerk in the Eyman grocery store, where he remainder for about three years, at the end of which time he transferred his services to the Wilson grocery store and was there engaged as a clerk for a number of years. He then for several years was connected with the operation of a restaurant in Portland and while thus engaged was attracted to the possibilities of the bakery business and presently became engaged in that line, a member of the firm of Thomas, Huey & McCoy, this connection continuing until his recent disposal of his interest in the business and retirement. On September 5, 1909, John W. McCoy was united in marriage to Jane Tourney and to this union three children have been born, John, Mary Catherine and Margaret Jane. Mr. and Mrs. McCoy are members of the Methodist church. Mr. McCoy is a Democrat and is a member of the local lodges of the Loyal Order of Moose and of the Fraternal Order of Eagles at Portland. Mrs. McCoy was born on a farm in Darke county, Ohio, daughter of Jeremiah and Margaret (Heis) Tourney, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Germany, who have been residents of this country since the days of their childhood, having accompanied their respective parents to America many years ago. Jeremiah Toumey and wifa are the parents of seven children, Mrs. McCoy having five brothers, Sylvester, William, Frederick, John and Leonard, and. a sister, Mary.

HERBERT LONG, a well known sporting goods merchant at Portland, who formerly was engaged in the drug business in that city, is a native Hoosier and has been a resident of Portland with the exception of some years spent in prospecting and homesteading in the West ever since he was a child, his parents having moved to that city when he was eight years of age. He was born in Kosciusko county, this state, December 5, 1867, son of John A. Long and wife, and was this command took a turn down the Tennessee river to Eastport, Miss., presently going thence to New Orleans, where they were held three weeks, at the end of which time they went by gulf boats to Mobile, Ala., and took part in the siege and capture of Ft. Blakeley, April 9, 1865. While between Greenville and Ft. Blakeley the command received word of Lee's surrender. The remainder of the regiment's service was rendered at Mobile, where it was kept on patrol duty until July 19, when it was mustered out and returned to Jeffersonville, Ind., thence to Indianapolis, where it received its final discharge on August 8, Mr. Corwin being mustered out as a corporal.

WESLEY T. METZNER, a well known and substantial retired building contractor of Portland, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life, an important factor in the county's general development, for his building operations have been carried on in all parts of the county. He was born on a farm in Noble township on November 9, 1855, son of John and Catherine (Young) Metzner, the former a native of Germany, born in the kingdom of Saxony, October 2, 1805, a son of Jasper and Hannah (Reisenberg) Metzner; and the latter a native of France, born on July 18, 1819, daughter of Nicholas and Salome (Young) Young, who were among the early settlers in Jay county and whose last days were spent here. John Metzner was twenty-three years of age when he came to this country in 1838 and on November 4, 1839, at Newark, Ohio, he married Catherine Young, who had come to this country two years prior to that date. For twelve years after his marriage John Metzner worked at his trade, that of a wagon maker, at Louisville, Ohio, and then, in 1851, came over into Indiana and located on a farm of eighty acres in section 7 of Noble township, this county, where he and his wife established their home and spent their last days, well known and influential residents of that community. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom four are still living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, William F. Metzner, and two sisters, Catherine E., wife of George Stolz, of Portland, and Mary A., wife of Harvey A. Huey. Reared on the home farm in Noble township, Wesley T. Metzner received his schooling in the old Metzner schoolhouse, so named because it occupied a site at the cross-roads on a corner of his father's farm. From the days of his boyhoood he was a valued assistant to his father in the labors of the farm and for several years after his school days were over continued farming, at the same time being more or less engaged working at the carpenter's trade and thus acquired an early skill as a builder. He married at the age of thirty and then bought a forty-acre farm in Wayne township, establishing his home there. It was then that Mr. Metzner entered upon his career as a building contractor, a line which he followed with success until his retirement in 1920, for many years having been regarded as one of the county's leading contractor his operations covering a wide territory hereabout. Years ago Mr. Metzner left his farm home in Wayne township and moved to Portland, where he since has made his residence. He sold the place in Wayne township and is now the owner of a well developed farm of something more than 102 acres in Pike township. Mr. Metzner is a Republican and for some years during the time of his residence in Wayne township (1894-99) served as assessor of that township. He is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias at Portland and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. It was on November 15, 1885, that Wesley T. Metzner was united in marriage to Mary Emma Roser, who also was born in this county, and to this union were born four children: Ethel C, Jay E., Mabel E. and Mary V., the last named of whom died on May 13, 1920. Ethel C. Metzner married John McDaniel, of Portland, and has three children, John, Max M. and Lee A. Jay E. Metzner, who is unmarried, is now living at Muncie, Ind., where he is employed as a bookkeeper in the offices of Ball Bros. During the World war he served as clerk of the draft board of Delaware county. Mrs. Metzner was born in Noble township, a daughter of Evan and Catherine (Sprecher) Roser, natives of Pennsylvania, who had located in this county about the year 1860. Evan Roser was a substantial farmer of Nbble township and he and his wife spent their last days there. They were the parents of five children, of whom but two are now living, Mrs. Metzner and her brother, Edwin Roser.

EMERY N. SPAHR, of the firm of McConochy & Spahr, proprietors of a popular garage and automobile accessory shop in North Meridian street, Portland, is a native son of Jay county, a member of one of the county's pioneer families, and has lived here all his life. Mr. Spahr was born on a farm in Greene township on February 12, 1893, and is a son of Morris H. and Anna B. (Miller) Spahr, both of whom also were born in this county, the latter a daughter of David T. and Jane (Pratt) Miller, early residents of this county, as is set out elsewhere in this volume. Morris H. Spahr, proprietor of a half section of land in Greene township, is a representative of one of the real pioneer families of Jay county, a son of John O. and Experiences (Hildreth) Spahr, who came over here from Greene county, Ohio, in pioneer days and became influential factors in the development of Greene township, which was given its name in honor of the numerous Greene county people who settled there in the days when lands in that section were being taken up, as is noted elsewhere. To Morris H. Spahr and wife were born five children, of whom three are living, the subject of this sketch having a brother, Oliver Spahr, and a sister, Alta. Reared on the home farm in Greene township, Emery N. Spahr received his schooling in the old Union school (district No. 8) and from the days of his boyhood was a valued assistant in the labors of the farm. He married at the age of twenty-two and for five" years thereafter continued to reside on the home place, renting a portion of the same from his father and farming it. He then moved to the village of Blaine, where he was engaged in business for a year or more, at the end of which time, in April, 1921, he formed his present partnership with H. J. McConochy in the garage business at Portland and has since resided in that city. This garage, located at 414-416 North Meridian street, has a capacity for about sixty cars and has become one of the best known service stations in eastern Indiana. The proprietors of the same also have a well equipped general accessory store and are likewise agents for the sale of the Studebaker, the Oldsmobile and the Chevrolet automobiles. On April 4, 1915, Emery N. Spahr was united in marriage to Helen Hudson, who also was born in Greene township. Mr. and Mrs. Spahr are Republicans and Mr. Spahr is a member of the Masonic lodge at Portland. Mrs. Spahr also is a member of one of Jay county's pioneer families, she being a representative of the fifth generation of Hudsons who have resided in this county, the family here dating back to 1839 when Benjamin and Ruth (Dodd) Hudson came over here with their family from Ohio and settled in the woods in section 19 of Pike township. Mrs. Spahr is a daughter of Selby E. and Jessie (Shoup) Hudson, of Greene township. Selby E. Hudson, proprietor of a farm of 240 acres in that township, is a son of William and Ocy Ann (Collins) Hudson, the former of whom was a son of Aaron D. and Mary (Matts) Hudson, the latter of whom was a daughter of William G. and Hannah Matts, who came here from New Jersey with their family in 1836, the year in which Jay county was organized, and settled in Wayne township. Aaron D. Hudson, who was a son of the pioneer Benjamin Hudson mentioned above, became a substantial landowner in Pike township and served for one term as sheriff of Jay county.

BERT LOCKER, a well known blacksmith and welder at Portland, where he has been in business for years, is a native son of Jay county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Madison township on September 9, 1878, and is a son of Jacob D. and Leara (Freemyer) Locker, both of whom were born in that same township, members of pioneer families, and who are still living there. Jacob D. Locker is the proprietor of a well kept farm of forty acres and is one of the well known men in his community. To him and his wife have been born eleven children, all of whom are living save two, Oliver and Ethel, the others besides the subject of this sketch being Jesse, Andrew, Vernie, Leo, Blanche, Minnie, Elsa and Vera. Reared on the home farm, Bert Locker received his schooling in the old Center school in Madison township and in the schools of Portland and as a young man left the farm and began working in the Bimel factory at Portland, continuing there for about six months, at the end of which time he begae to learn the blacksmith trade under Lewis Cook and perfected himself in the details of that craft. After about eight years of service for others in this line Mr. Locker decided to begin operations on his own behalf and bought the Doctor Culbert blacksmith shop on East Main street and started in business for himself. He remained at that location for about seven years and then bought the shop he has since been operating at 121 East North street, where he has one of the best equipped blacksmith and welding shops in this part of the state. His machinery is electrically equipped and he has his own generator for the acetylene welding done in his place. Mr. Locker is a Democrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs. On November 17, 1900, Bert Locker was united in marriage to Anna Gowdy, who was born in Iowa, daughter of Aldon and Eliza (Kreamer) Gowdy, and to this union two children have been born, Gladys, born on December 25, 1901, and John, June 14, 1904.

JESSE L. PETERS, manager of the Equity Exchange elevator at Portland, councilman-at-large for that city and for years one of the best known grain men in this part of the state, is a native of the Buckeye state, but has been a resident of Indiana since the days of his childhood. He was born in Darke county, Ohio, December 13, 1877, and is a son of Newton and Rachel (Light) Peters, both of whom were born in thaf same county, who came over into Indiana and located at Portland in the early '80s. The Rev. Newton Peters was a farmer and a minister of the gospel. He and his wife had four children, the subject of this sketch having a sister, Gertrude L., wife of George W. Myers, of Portland, and two brothers, George M. Peters and Harry D. Peters, of Wayne township. Jesse L. Peters grew to manhood at Portland, completing his schooling in the old normal school there and in the Indiana State Normal School at Terre Haute, and was for some years engaged as a teacher, principal of the General Shanks school at Portland. In 1908 he purchased the elevator and general store at Collett and was there engaged in business for eight years, or until 1916, when, on the organization of the Portland Equity Exchange, he was made manager of the same. Not long afterward he resigned this position and became engaged in the mercantile business at Alexandria, Ind., and later at Burlington, Ind., continuing thus engaged until 1921, when he returned to Portland to resume the management of the Equity Exchange elevator and has since occupied that position. The Equity Exchange started in a small way but it was not long until it had so firmly established itself in the confidence of the farmers hereabout that it has grown to be the most extensive grain elevator in Jay county, its operations providing an outlet for a wide market. Mr. Peters is a Democrat and for some time served as a member of the local board of health at Portland. In 1921 he was elected councilman-at-large and is now serving in this latter capacity. In 1902 Jesse L. Peters was united in marriage to Myrtle E. Crouch, who was born in Mercer county, Ohio, but who had been a resident of Portland since the days of her girlhood, and to this union have been born two children, Madonna and Ivy R.

WILLIAM H. LUDY, telegraph operator for the G. R. & I. Railway Company at Portland, Ind., was born at Winchester, Ind., September 16, 1868, the son of John W. and Olive (Roosa) Ludy, both of whom were born in that same county, members of old families in that section of the state. John W. Ludy was reared in Randolph county and early became inclined to the mechanical trades, becoming both a cabinet maker and a machinist. He later became a farmer and still later became engaged in the real estate business at Winchester, which latter business he maintained until his death in 1905. William H. Ludy received his schooling at Winchester and early learned telegraphy, his first employment in that line being secured in the office of the Big Four Railroad Company at Winchester. For about two years Mr. Ludy served as operator there and then he became engaged in the contracting business, a line which he followed at Winchester for about a year, at the end of which time he became employed in a furniture factory, where he remained two years. He then became engaged with his father in farming, but after three years of farming, returned to the telegraph key and went to work as operator for the G. R. & I. at Winchester. In 1907 Mr. Ludy was transferred from the Winchester office of this company to the office of Portland and has since been engaged as operator at the local station. Mr. Ludy is a Freemason and he and his family are members of the Friends church. On January 20, 1891, William H. Ludy was united in marriage to Flora L. Stanley, who also was born at Winchester, and to this union have been born six children, John, Roger, Charles S., Mildred, Martha and Mary, the last two of whom are twins. Roger Ludy married Lucile Figel, who was born in this county. During the period of America's participation in the World war he went out with the first line of selective service men from Jay county and was sent to Camp Taylor, where he presently was made a corporal. Charles Ludy enlisted for service in the aviation corps and was sent to the field at San Antonio, Tex. He was mustered out as a sergeant.

JACK WILKINS, a well known young business man at Portland, proprietor of a well equipped tinshop and general sheet metal works as well as a dealer in furnaces and general supplies along that line, was born in Portland and has lived there all his life. Mr. Wilkins was born on May 16, 1889, and is a son of James and Martha E. (Smith) Wilkins, both of whom were born at St. Marys, Ohio, from which place they moved to Portland after their marriage. Tames Wilkins was thirty-five years of age when he located at Portland, where he became engaged in the live stock business, later taking up the harness business and also became a dealer in agricultural implements. His wife died on May 5, 1894, and he survived until March 11, 1921. They were the parents of four children, those besides the subject of this sketch being Grace, who married Bert Harruff and has two children, Dorothy and Jeannette; Roy, who married Cora Polly and has two children, Roy and Ray, and Lillian, who married Harley Weymouth and has two children, Ned and James. Reared at Portland, Jack Wilkins completed his schooling in the high school there and then became an apprentice in a tinshop. He learned the trade thoroughly and in 1914 became engaged in business on his own account, opening a completely equipped tinshop, with equipment for general sheet metal work, and also prepared for furnace installation and general service along that line, and has done well in his business. On June 14, 1911, Jack Wilkins was united in marriage to Frances C. McCoid, who was born in Logan county, Ohio, and to this union one child has been born, a daughter, Mary C. Mr. and Mrs. Wilkins are members of the Presbyterian church and in their political views are "independent." Mr. Wilkins is a member of the local lodges of the Free and Accepted Masons and of the Knights of Pythias at Portland and in the affairs of these organizations takes a proper interest.
History of Jay County, Indiana: including its World War record and ..., Volume 2

HAWES, Mrs. Flora Harrod, postmaster, born in Salem, Ind., in 1863, where she was educated. Her maiden name was Flora New Harrod. She is a daughter of the late Dr. Sandford H. Harrod, a physician well known throughout southern Indiana. The Harrods, after whom Harrodsburg, Ky., was named, went to that State with the pioneer, Daniel Boone. Miss Harrod, at an early age, became the wife of Professor Edgar P. Hawes, of Louisville, Ky. After a brief married life, her husband died, and she was left upon her own resources. She turned to teaching, and became a successful instructor in elocution, an art in which she excelled and had earned the honors in her school-days. She applied to President Harrison for the post-office in Hot Springs, Ark., going in person to urge her own appointment. She received the commission 16th August, 1889. took charge of the office 15th September, 1889, and was confirmed by the Senate 19th December of the same year. Mrs. Hawes receives a salary of $2,600 a year and has a force of thirteen employes, four of whom are women. As postmaster, she is a rigid disciplinarian, and she keeps the business of her office in the most satisfactory shape in every department.  She is the youngest woman in the United States holding so important a position, and her office is the second largest one in the Union controlled by a woman.  Her administration has been thoroughly satisfactory and successful.
(Source: American Women, by Frances Elizabeth Willard, Mary Ashton Rice Livermore, Vol 1, 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)


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