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Miami County Indiana
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BROWN, Paul Winthrop, editor-in-charge the Republic; born, Peru, Ind., 1870; son of Henry L. and Mary Osborne (Ballantine) Brown; privately educated, receiving six weeks of school training since age of thirteen; married, Lyons, Kan., Aug. 14, 1894, Alma Johnston; children: Hugh F., aged seventeen, and Neil W., aged sixteen. Ordained to Presbyterian ministry, 1892; editorial contributor to Kansas City Journal while assistant pastor (under Rev. Dr. Henry Hopkins) of First Congregational Church, Kansas City, 1898-99; resigned from pastorate of First Congregational Church of Moline, ILL., to become special correspondent on waterways, Chicago Record-Herald, Jan. 1, 1909; became editorial writer St Louis Republic, Mar. 17, 1909; editor-in-charge since May 5, 1912. Democrat. Member First Presbyterian Church. Clubs: City, Public Question, Artists' Guild. Recreations: rowing, riding, mountain climbing. Office: The Republic. Residence: 4414 Delmar Boulevard.
(Source: The Book of St. Louisans, Publ. 1912. Transcribed by Charlotte Slater)

CHARLES L. ARMSTRONG was born December 14, 1833, in Highland County, Virginia, the only son of James and Mariah (Hiner) Armstrong, natives of Pennsylvania and Virginia, respectively. They emigrated to Miami County and settled at Peru in 1846. Charles L. was reared on a farm, receiving a common school education. In 1858 he was married to Mary C. Leas, born in Preble County, Ohio, who died in 1870 or 1871. Three children were born to this union: Laura, Jesse and Claude. He was again united in marriage in April, 1874, to Mrs. R. A. Remine Vance, a native of Washington County, Virginia. He now owns land adjoining Peru, and his principal business is dairy farming. His politics are Republican, and he affiliates with the Masonic Order.

JOHN CLIFTON, Sr., a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, was born February 2, 1826. He is the fourth son of Henry and Rhoda (Nichols) Clifton, natives of Virginia, and of English and Dutch origin. They emigrated to Ohio in 1808 or 1809. John Clifton was reared in Dayton, receiving an education at the common schools. When eighteen years of age he learned brick-making, and December 24, 1844, was united in marriage with Miss Martha Addis, a native of Mississippi, but who was reared in Kentucky. To them these children were born: George, John and Amos. They located in Peru, Miami County, April, 1855. In 1862 he entered his country's service in the 29th Indiana Volunteers, and was mustered out in 1863. He now holds membership in the Grand Army of the Republic, and politically is a Republican.

ISAAC CRANE, a native of Warren County, Ohio, was born near Lebanon, January 26, 1811, the eldest son of Abner and Huldah (Robertson) Crane, natives of New York and Ohio. The subject was reared on a farm in his native County; came to Miami County in 1843, and located in Washington Township, having bought eighty acres of land in 1840, at five dollars per acre. He was married in 1862, to Miss Margaret J. (Logan) James, of Ohio. He owns eighty acres of land in Washington, and 120 in Clay Township. He is an anti-mason and is opposed to absolute prohibition. When young he received a common school education, and in later years has been grasping for a knowledge of chemistry and natural philosophy.

JOSEPH S. GORDON was born in Frederick County, Maryland, July 3, 1834, and is a son of John and Margaret (McClain) Gordon, natives of Maryland. Our subject received his early training on a farm in Maryland, and received a common school education. Came to Miami County in 1861, and located in Washington Township. In 1862 he entered the army in the Eighty-seventh Regiment of Indiana Infantry, and was mustered in, in 1865. He participated in the battles of Chickamangua, Mission Ridge and Atlanta. Was married on January 22, 1867, to Miss Anna M. Snider, of Burks County, Pennsylvania, a union blessed with the birth of two children—Charles Albert, born January 26, 1870, and Howard O., born December 6, 1878. Mr. Gordon owns eighty acres of land located five miles from Peru, which is well improved. He votes the Republican ticket.

CHRISTOPHER C. HAUKS, a native of Germany, was born on the 20th day of April, 1848, and is the sixth son of Christopher and Margaret Hauks, natives of Germany. The parents came to Miami County in 1846, and located on a farm in Washington Township. The father was born in 1801, and died in 1875. The mother died in 1846. Our subject was reared on a farm and now owns 113 acres of well improved land and is a practical farmer. In August, 1862, he volunteered his services to his country, and entered the service in the 87th Indiana Infantry, and with which he served until mustered out June 10, 1865. He was wounded at Chickamangua, and returned to his farm in 1865. He was first married, September 4,1866, to Miss Rhoda Jameson, of Jefferson Township. Her death occurred February 4, 1880. To this union were born six children, four of whom are living: Charles N., Mattie, Frank A. and Elmer E.; and John P. and an infant, deceased. He was again married, June 2, 1881, to Miss Ella Bell, a native of Jefferson County, Indiana. Mr. Hauks is a Democrat.

ALFRED I. JONES is a native of North Carolina, born June 1, 1830. He is the eldest son of William M. and Elizabeth (Wood) Jones, natives of South Carolina. They left North Carolina in the early part of 1833 and located in Rush County, where they remained until 1852, and then came to Miami County. They now reside in Wabash County. The subject was reared on the farm, and secured a fair education. He is the owner of 113 acres of land. He was married in the spring of 1853 to Miss Mary Jameson, a native of Kentucky, whose father came to Miami County in an early day. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are parents of seven children, five of whom are living. Their names are: Martha, William H., Frances, Emma and Mary, living, and Amanda and an infant, deceased.

WILLIAM McGREW, a native of Washington County, Maryland, was born the 10th of April, 1813, and is the son of Henry and Sarah (Huckwell) McGrew, both natives of Maryland. They emigrated to Montgomery County in 1819. The mother died in 1820, and the father in 1852. William McGrew received his early training on a farm in Montgomery County, Ohio. On the 4th of April, 1838, he was married to Miss Sophia Cramer, who was born in Huntington County, Pennsylvania. To Mr. and Mrs. McGrew were born eight children, four of whom are living, viz: Francis, Henry, William H. and Uraniah. Mr. McGrew has nineteen grandchildren and two great-grand-children. Mr. McGrew possesses eighty acres of land in Washington Township, where he located in 1852. He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church at Peru, a Royal Arch Mason, and a Democrat.

JOHN A. MELCHER was born in Germany, May 1, 1845, and is a son of John A. Melcher, who emigrated to Cleveland in 1846. The subject was reared and educated there in the common schools, and afterwards entered a college at that place, and in 1865, came to Peru, where he engaged in cigar-making. He ran a factory at Michigan City for about two years. In 1880, he started a saloon and billiard hall. In November, 1867, he was married to Miss Liddie J. Holman, daughter of Solomon Holman, an old settler of Miami County. This union was blessed with the birth of six children, whose names are, Sol. A., Author E., Willie, Emma, Lottie and Jessie. Mr. M. is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is also a staunch Republican.

ORLANDO MOSELEY, a native of Washington Township, born April 8, 1851, and is the youngest of seven sons born to Eben and Mariah (Bush) Moseley, natives respectively of Connecticut and New York. Eben Moseley, the father, came to Miami County about 1844, and followed the occupation of a farmer. He was born in 1799 and died in 1876. The mother is still living. Our subject was reared on the farm, and now owns 160 acres of well improved land in Washington Township. Was married April 7, 1872, to Miss Sarah Bohn, daughter of John Bohn (deceased), of Washington Township. Mr. and Mrs. Moseley are the parents of two children—John and Ida. Mr. Moseley is engaged in the manufacture of the " Excelsior " fencing machine, the patent for which is applied for. Mr. Moseley is a Republican, and is identified with the Masonic fraternity.

FREDERICK RADEL, a native of Germany, was born May 15, 1815. He came direct from the place of his birth to Peru, Indiana, in 1846, where he located and worked in a warehouse for about eight years. He is a shoemaker by trade. In the year 1862 he located on a farm of eighty acres, in Washington Township. In October, 1837, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Beck, of Germany, to which union six children have been born, viz: Elizabeth Tracy (deceased), Frank, Adam, Fred, Frances and Peter. His wife died in November, 1877. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and are strong believers of that faith. In political affairs he adheres to the teachings of the Democratic party.

JONAH SULLIVAN is a native of Mason County Kentucky, born June 30, 1817, the third son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Bennett) Sullivan, also natives of Kentucky, and whose ancestors were Irish and German, respectively. At the age of seventeen our subject left his native State for Fayette County, Ohio, in company with his mother, his father having died in 1820. They located on a farm, he receiving a fair common school education. They remained in Ohio until 1841, and then came to Peru, having purchased land in Miami County in 1840. He now owns 340 acres in Miami and Wabash Counties. He was married in July, 1841, to Miss Louisa Smith, of Ohio, to which union six children were born; William, Sarah E., James L., George and Lyman B. This wife died in 1862, and in 1863, he was again married to Lizzie A. Cox, a native of Ohio, to whom one child was born, named John M. Mr. Sullivan and wife are members of the Baptist Church, and politically he is a Republican.

WILLIAM A. SUTTON, a native of Champaign County, Ohio, was born on the 14th day of February, 1843, the second son of John D. and Mary (Long) Sutton, of Westmoreland County, Virginia, who went to Pennsylvania in 1847, and came to Miami County, Indiana, in 1848, and established themselves on a farm where the subject grew to manhood. In 1861 he answered to the country's first call for volunteers and entered the 13th Indiana Regiment. He was mustered out in four years and six months— in the fall of 1865. Was wounded in the leg at the battle of Bull Run. In 1867 he and Miss Rebecca Kesler, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Kesler, were married, which marriage has been blessed by the birth of six children, viz: Minnie M., Charles H., David, Ursula, Edith and John. Was elected to the office of County Coroner in 1876 on the Republican ticket, but did not make out a bond. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and Masonic fraternity, and in politics votes the Republican ticket.

ALEXANDER B. WICKLER was born in Washington Township, January 7, 1851, and is the youngest son of Peter and Barbara (Keller) Wickler, of Germany, who came from Ohio to this township about 1838, and were among the early settlers. Our subject received his primary instructions in life while living on a farm, and received a common school education. He is now the possessor of 320 acres of fine farming land which he has placed under a high state of cultivation. In September, 1875, he married Miss Rebecca A. Ford, of Ohio, and to them have been born three children, viz: Ora, Georgia and Mary. In political matters he advocates the Republican doctrine, and is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.

AZRO WILKINSON is a native of Allen Township, Miami County, Indiana, and was born January 20, 1856, the youngest son of Anderson and Martha (Bond) Wilkinson, natives of Ohio and Kentucky, respectively. The father located in Miami County, in 1836, and is now living in Allen Township. Our subject received a common school education, and until he reached the age of twenty one worked on the farm. He then engaged in the mercantile business with Ovis Case, at Macy, in 1879, and continued until 1884. Two years previous to 1879 he was railroad agent at Macy. In 1883, while in business, he came to Peru, and was Deputy County Treasurer under E. Humrickhouse, deceased, and also occupied the same position under J. C. Clymer. United with Miss Ella Lambert in marriage, November 20, 1879, to whom were born three children: Josephine, Glenn A. and Constance. Belongs to the Masonic and I. O. O. F. Fraternities, having represented the local Odd Fellows' Lodge in the Grand Lodge of the State on two occasions. In matters political he is Democratic.

GEORGE W. WILSON came to Miami County in 1834 from Cass County, where he was born August 16, 1832. He was the second son born to Alexander and Matilda (Thorp) Wilson, respective natives of Indiana and Maine, and who were of Scottish descendancy. The father located in Pennsylvania in 1834, and was engaged in the mercantile business. Had represented his county in the Legislature several years ago. He was a sutler in the Mexican war, having gone out in 1846, and was killed three days after peace was declared. Our subject was reared in Peru, where he received a common school education. His vocation has been farming and dairying, and owns 115 acres in Washington Township. In November, 1857, he was married to Miss Mary Rettig, and six children have been born to them, whose names are Alexander R., Frank, Louis, Edward, Mary and Elizabeth. Was once elected Justice of the Peace of Washington Township, and was once Township Trustee by appointment, and in the spring of 1886 was elected to the office on the Republican ticket.

HON. LEWIS D. ADKISON, a prominent citizen and pioneer of Peru, is a native of Fayette County, Indiana, born about eight miles west of Connersville, May 26th, 1816. His parents, Robert and Rebecca (Henderson) Adkison, were born in North and South Carolina respectively, of Irish lineage. The father in 1829 moved to Fountain County, where his death occurred one year, later. The mother was born in the year 1776, and departed this life on the 27th of August, 1846. Lewis D. Adkison, when thirteen years of age, accompanied his parents to Fountain County, where for two years he worked on his father's farm. His early educational advantages were limited, being only those derived from attendance at the indifferent county schools of that period for about three months each year, until he arrived at the age of eighteen. He left home in the spring of 1835, and went to Logansport, were he worked at brick making until the following Fall, at which time he came to Peru and secured employment on the Wabash and Erie Canal, then in progress of construction. After one year spent as workman on the canal Mr. Adkison accepted a clerkship in the mercantile house of D. R. Bearss, and later was engaged in the same capacity by Mr. Bearss' successor, Jacob Lindsey, acting as clerk in all about three years. In 1838, he was appointed by Governor Wallace Sheriff of Miami County to fill the unexpired term of Asa Leonard, who died in office, and at the ensuing election in 1840 was chosen Sheriff, the duties of which position he discharged for about four years. On leaving the office he -engaged in the plasters' and brick laying trades and after continuing the same for some four years, opened a general store in Peru, which he conducted with good success for sometime. He subsequently abandoned that line of trade and for some years was engaged in the lumber business, which he carried on quite extensively in connection with a general hardware trade. In 1855 he disposed of his mercantile interests in Peru and emigrating to California opened a general store at Oak Valley, in the mines. He was subsequently elected Supervisor of Yuba County, that State, an office similar to that of County Commissioner in Indiana, and after serving one and a half years was chosen Sheriff, the duties of which office he discharged for about four years. In 1868 he returned to Indiana and settled in Fulton County, where, until 1874, he was engaged in agricultural pursuits, disposing of his farm at the end of that time and returning to Peru. In 1874-5 he was Assistant Doorkeeper of the Indiana State Senate, and in 1882 was elected State Senator from the counties of Miami and Howard. He took an active part in the deliberations of that body and served on some of the most important committees, among which were these: Banks and Banking, Public Printing, Public Buildings, Swamp Lands, Fees and Salaries, etc. Since the expiration of his term as legislator, Mr. Adkison has been engaged in the insurance business and loaning money at Peru. On December 16th, 1840, he married Mrs. Lucy Davis, daughter of the late Judge Albert Cole, of Peru, by whom he had four children, only one of whom, Lucy A., wife of James H. Fetter, is living. Mrs. Adkison was born in the year 1820, and died March 11th, 1885. Mr. Adkison was originally a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party, he has been an ardent supporter of its principles. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and belongs to the Odd Fellows fraternity.

NOTT N. ANTRIM, a prominent member of the Miami County bar and fourth son of Benjamin and Frances (Grey) Antrim, was born in Cass County, Indiana, on the 25th day of March, 1847. Left motherless at the age of four years and fatherless at ten, he was early in life obliged to rely almost wholly upon his own resources, and until attaining his majority worked on the farm, obtaining a common school education in the meantime. Possessing a desire to make law his life work, Mr. Antrim, in 1872, began his legal studies with Messrs. Mitchell & Shirk, of Peru, under whose instructions he continued until his admission to the bar in 1873. He began the active practice of his profession, April, 1874, and within a short time thereafter won for himself a conspicuous place among the lawyers of Miami and adjoining counties, having been elected the same year to the office of State's Attorney for the circuit composed of Miami and Wabash counties. He was re-elected to the same position in 1876, and in 1882 was chosen to represent Miami County in the General Assembly of Indiana. In 1881 he effected a co partnership in the practice with James M. Brown, Esq., and the firm thus formed still continues. As a lawyer, Mr. Antrim is painstaking and methodical, and has already an extensive and lucrative practice in the courts of Miami and other counties of Northern Indiana. His official, as well as private life is above reproach, and he enjoys in a marked degree the esteem and confidence of the community around him. In politics, he is a Republican, and, as such, has rendered valuable service to his party in this county. Mr. Antrim on the 11th day of February, 1875, was united in marriage with Miss S. Marilda Adkisson, of Crawford County, Illinois.

DANIEL R. BEARSS (deceased) was born . August 23, 1809, in Geneseo, Livingston County, New York. His parents were Truman and Sabrina (Roberts) Bearss. His grandfather was a major in the Revolutionary Army, under General Washington, and his father served in the war of 1812. About the year 1811, the family removed to Painesville, Ohio, and in 1815 to Detroit, Michigan. Mr. Bearss' boyhood was spent on a farm and his education was acquired in a log school house. In 1828 he went to Ft. Wayne where he became a clerk for W. G. and G. W. Ewing. His employers soon opened a branch store in Logansport in which Mr. Bearss was engaged until 1832. He then spent two years in mercantile business on his own account in Goshen. In August 1834 with his young wife he settled in Peru where he resided the rest of his life. During his first year's residence here he carried on a general mercantile business in partnership with his father-in-law, Judge Albert Cole, whose biography appears elsewhere. This connection being dissolved Mr. Bearss continued the business until 1844, when he formed a co-partnership with Charles Spencer under the firm name of Bearss and Spencer. Mr. Bearss being occupied with outside matters, Mr. Spencer took charge of the business. In 1849, Mr. Bearss sold his interest in the store and finally retired from mercantile life, after a prosperous business career of about twenty-one years. With perhaps one exception Mr. Bearss was the largest tax payer in Peru. He owned considerable city property among which were the Broadway Hotel and a number of business blocks. He also owned several valuable farms one of which just north of Peru he made his home. Mr. Bearss was one of the leading politicians of his county but was never known to resort to political trickery in order that his party might triumph. No one in his locality labored more earnestly for the promotion of Henry Clay to the Presidency. From the organization of the Republican party he was one of its warmest friends and through his great popularity succeeded in carrying many elections when said party was in the minority. Through his influence Hon. Schuyler Colfax was first placed before the people as a candidate for Congress. Mr. Bearss served his county in various minor public offices. He was in the state Legislature twenty years, eight years as Representative and twelve as Senator. During the memorable and exciting period of the late civil war when many legislators seemingly in sympathy with the south sought to tie the hands of Governor Morton and prevent the state from furnishing support to the Union, no member of the Senate was more faithful to his country than Mr. Bearss. *His age prevented him from entering the army but he did his duty in the halls of Legislation. He took an active part in the railroad enterprises of the county and for a while served as director of the I. P. & C. and Wabash roads. With his family he attended the Congregational church and gave liberally towards its support. Mr. Bearss was a man of commanding stature and in his prime possessed great physical strength and endurance. Few men were more favorably or better known not only in the county but throughout the state. He died April 18, 1884 at Hot Springs, Arkansas, where he had gone for the benefit of his health. January 14, 1834, at Goshen, Indiana, he married Emma A. Cole, daughter of the late Judge Albert Cole. The following are the names of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bearss: George R., William, Albert, Oliver, Homer, Frank, Emma and Ella.

ALBERT C. BEARSS, a native of Peru, was born April 1, 1838, and is the third son of Daniel R. and Emma A. (Cole) Bearss, the sketches of whom appear elsewhere. Receiving his primary education in the city schools of Peru, at the age of 14 he entered the preparatory department of Kenyon College at Gamfier, Ohio, where he pursued the studies of that institution for a period of four years, and then returned to Peru. In 1859 he traveled westward and located in California, where he secured the position of salesman for a firm in the northern part of that State, and in 1862 he returned east as far as Nevada, where he engaged principally in silver mining and politics. In the year 1867 he came back to his native State and established himself in the mercantile business in the town of Rochester, Fulton County, where he continued until 1875, and then again made Peru his home continually since that time, devoting his attention to farming and also to public affairs. During his stay in Nevada he was three times elected to the lower house of the Legislature, and when he returned to Indiana, received the nomination on the Republican ticket for the same position and was elected in 1878, and in 1879, was by his very intimate friend, James N. Tyner, postmaster general, appointed post office inspector, which he filled in a creditable manner until his resignation took place—March, 1885— and since that time has been looking after his farm of 550 acres, situated in Peru township. Mr. Bearss was married to Miss Madeline V. Lamb, of Coshocton, Ohio, March 20, 1867. This union has been blessed with two children, Fannie Emma and Nellie Cole. Our subject is a staunch Republican, and believes ' in the Jacksonian motto: "To the victors belong the spoils." He was made Chairman of the Republican central committee of Miami county, and at present occupies that position.

JOHN H BECK, City Treasurer, was born in Miami county, Indiana, October 23, 1845, and is the eldest son of Adam and Teresa Beck, parents natives of Germany. Adam Beck was born in 1816; was united in marriage with Miss Teresa Trefferd in 1844, and the year following emigrated to the United States, coming direct to the city of Peru. John H. Beck was raised in Peru, obtained a practical education in the city schools and at the age of 16 commenced the tinner's trade, at which he served a three year's apprenticeship. In 1879, in partnership with Edward E. Riley, he opened out in the business for himself. He still carries on the business in connection with the retail hardware trade, and is one of the successful merchants of the city. In 1883 he was elected City Treasurer, re-elected in 1885 and is the present incumbent of the office. He was married April, 1866, to Miss Catherine Silberman of Peru, a daughter of F. B. Silberman.

NER. BLACK was born in Peru township May 3, 1837, and is the eldest son of Samuel and Mary (Haines) Black, natives of Virginia and Connecticut, who were of English descent. His father came to Peru township in 1834, and followed farming the whole of his life. Born in 1800 and died in 1880. The subject was raised on the farm and has always pursued the occupation of farming. His wife was Margaret Honan, daughter of Solomon and Mary Honan, who came to this country in 1832 or 1833, and remained until death, which occurred in 1852. The subject was the father of four children, whose names are Nellie A., Charles E., Milton W., and Fred G. He adheres to the principles of the Republican party.

EDMUND BLOOMFIELD, M. D., prominent physician and surgeon of Peru, is a native of Ohio, born near the city of Eaton on the 29th day of December, 1841. His father, Reuben Bloomfield, was born in Preble County, Ohio, in the year 1809, and his mother, Ann (Hopkins) Bloomfield, was a native of the same state also, and died there about the year 1856. Dr. Bloomfield's early educational training was received in the schools of his native city, supplemented by a course in the Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, in which institution he pursued his literary studies for nearly two years, making substantial progress during that period. His early tastes leading him to a choice of the medical profession, the Doctor, in 1866, commenced preparing for the same by a course of reading with A. L. Dunham, M. D., of Eaton, under whose instruction he continued until the fall of the following year. He then entered the medical department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, completing the prescribed course in 1869, and graduating the summer of the same year in Pharmaceutical chemistry. Having thus thoroughly familiarized himself with the profession, he began the active practice in 1870 at Peru, Indiana, where his superior professional ability soon won for him a conspicuous place among the successful medical men of the county. Dr. Bloomfield, as a skillful physician and surgeon takes high rank, possessing many of the elements of popularity, and, since locating in Peru, his practice has been eminently successful, both professionally and financially. His extensive acquaintance in this and adjoining counties, together with his well known integrity and ability, has brought him a large and lucrative business, while his standing as a citizen is such as to make him popular with a large circle of friends and acquaintances. In politics he is a Democrat, but in no sense of the word a partisan; although firm in his convictions and intellectually qualified to fill official position he avoids the strife of political contests, preferring to give his entire time to his profession. Dr. Bloomfield's marriage with Miss Helen Davenport, of Peru, was solemnized April 26, 1871. They have three children, viz: Mary G., Guy D., and-Nellie B. Bloomfield. Mrs. Bloomfield is a member of the Episcopal Church of the city. Dr. Bloomfield is a member of State Medical Society, American Medical Association and County Medical Society.

JOHN P. BOWMAN, a native of Montgomery County. Virginia, was born September 2, 1826, to John and Mary (Cromer) Bowman, natives of Virginia, but of German descent. His father emigrated from Virginia to Tippecanoe County when the subject was only about twelve years old, and they then came to Peru Township. John C. was reared on the farm and received a medium education. His occupation has always been that of a farmer. He was married in 1848 to Miss Catharine Meyers, a daughter of Nicholas Meyers. To them were born ten children, viz: Sarah J., Emeline, William R., Julia A., Noah, Amanda, Daniel, Phoebe, Charles and George W. (deceased). Mr. Bowman is the proprietor of 277 acres of fine land in Peru Township, and also 291 acres in Cass County, all of which is under good cultivation. His politics are Democratic.

PHILIP H. BOYNTON, the immediate subject of this sketch is a native of Miami and son of Joseph D. and Hannah Boynton. Captain Joseph Boynton, the paternal grandfather, was a son of Joseph and Sallie (Goss) Boynton, who were early residents of Ne,w Hampshire, the former born in Stratham and the latter in the town of Greenland, that State. Captain Joseph Boynton was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, was at the capture of Burgoyne and Cornwallis, and also took part in the celebrated campaign against Quebec under General Arnold. He was two years adjutant of the New Hampshire Division—died June 25, 1831, aged 76 years. Joseph D. Boynton was born in Cornish, Maine, June 4, 1793; was raised a farmer and while young familiarized himself with several trades, among which were those of shoe making, carpentering, tanning, plastering, etc., in all of which he became a skillful workman. He married November 30, 1815, Hannah Chick, daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Lord) Chick, who were members of one of the oldest and most respectable families of Maine. Mrs. Boynton was born at the town of Parsonsfield, Maine, January 24, 1794, and died at Freeport, the same State, February 12, 1882. Mr. Boynton departed this life early in the eighties, exact date unknown. The following are the names of the children born to Joseph D. and Hannah Boynton, to-wit: Mary P. (deceased), Hannah, Frances A., Ammi L. (deceased), Alvira P., Harriet O., Lucy A., Joseph W., Elizabeth B., Caroline N., Philip H. and Martha E. S. Boynton. Philip H. Boynton was raised to agricultural pursuits, received in the district schools the rudiments of an English education, and later attended the Cornish high school where he acquired a knowledge of the higher branches of learning. When nineteen years of age he accepted a position in a cotton factory at Saco, Maine, and after working at the same for one year, went to Rochester, New York, and engaged as repairer of track on the Rochester & Niagara Falls railroad. In August, 1852, he came to Indiana, and for three years thereafter was engaged in the construction of what is now the Wabash railroad. At the end of that time he went to Indianapolis where, for a limited period, he worked in the freight office of the I., P. & C. railroad, and later engaged as brakeman for the same company. For about one year he had charge of the freight office in Peru, Indiana, and then took charge of an engine, running freight and construction trains for about three years. In December, 1862, he began running a passenger engine on the I., P. & C., a position he has since filled, being at this time one of the oldest and most reliable engineers in Indiana. An estimate of his mileage since engaging as engineer would be difficult to determine, but an approximation of the distance traversed in his engine would be equivalent to over forty trips around the earth. Mr. Boynton has been twice married, the first time on the 4th day of July, 1860, to Miss Elizabeth Livesay, of Virginia, who died July 16th of the following year. He married his present wife, Mary J. Todd, daughter of H. S. and Agnes Todd, of Rockville, Indiana, in January 1863, a union blessed with one child, Charles J. Boynton. Mr. Boynton is a member of the Masonic and K. of H. fraternities and belongs to the Baptist church. Mrs. Boynton is a member of the Presbyterian church of Peru.

DR. WILLIAM H. BRENTON, M. D., eldest son of Francis and Mary (Giltner) Brenton, is a native of Clarke County, Indiana, born May 2, 1828. His grandfather, William Brenton, was one of the pioneers of Indiana, moving as early as the beginning of the present century to Clarke County, of which part of the State Francis and Mary Brenton were natives. The Doctor was raised on a farm and his early educational privileges were such as the public schools of that day and locality afforded. During the progress of this primary course he decided upon the medical profession for a life work, and at the age of 16 began preparing for the same, under the able instruction of Dr. Frank Taylor of Westport, Kentucky. He subsequently took a course of lectures in Memphis, Tennessee, and in 1852 graduated from the medical department of the Indiana Asbury University. Prior to that time (in 1849) he engaged in the practice of his profession at Taylorville, Indiana, and after having completed his collegiate course went to Metropolis, Southern Illinois, where he continued until 1857. In the meantime, with a laudable ambition to increase his knowledge of the profession he, in 1853 and '54 attended the St. Louis medical college, and subsequently in 1866 graduated with honor from Bellevue Hospital medical college, New York, one of the largest and most thorough medical institutions in the United States. In 1862 he joined the Seventy third Indiana volunteer infantry as first assistant surgeon, in which capacity he continued until his resignation in 1863, acting as surgeon during the greater part of his period of service. He came to Miami County, Indiana, in 1857 and on leaving the army resumed his professional duties in Peru, where he has continued to enjoy a well merited reputation in his calling. He is a member of the county and district medical societies, and also belongs to the State and American Medical Associations. His professional career has been singularly successful, the reputation being awarded him as one of the most skillful surgeons and thorough practitioners in Miami County. Although a Democrat in his political affiliations, the Doctor has not been an aspirant for official honors, preferring to give his entire attention to the practice of his chosen profession. He was married December, 1851, to Miss Elizabeth T. Bills, a native of Louisiana, but at that time a resident of Bartholomew County, Indiana, by whom he had two children, both deceased. Mrs. Brenton died September, 1856. In 1858 he married his second wife, Lucinda Marsh, who bore him two children, viz., Effie M., deceased, and William M., who is at present in the employ of the Wabash railroad company at Peru. The Doctor's third marriage was solemnized in the year 1879 with Miss Loantha Search, of Peru, a union blessed with the birth of three children, viz., Emma E., Mary M., and John H. Brenton.

JAMES M. BROWN, prominent member of the Miami County bar, is a native of Union County, Indiana, born October 16, 1826. He is the son of Walter Brown who was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, and Keziah (Laboyseaux) Brown, a native of New Jersey. His paternal ancestors were English and on the mother's side he is descended from the French. Walter Brown was a prominent pioneer of Union County, moving to that part of the State in 1820, where he was widely and favorably known for his many excellent qualities. James M. Brown was reared on a farm, and in early life attended the common schools. At the age of eighteen he entered Beech Grove Academy, an institution under the control of the Friends and conducted at that time by one William Haughton. Until he was twenty-two Mr. Brown was variously occupied in attending school, farming and teaching. In the fall of 1848 he married Emily C. Willis, also a native of Union County. For five years he continued teaching, farming and studying, spending eighteen months of the time in preparing to enter upon the practice of the law. In the meantime he held the office of Township Trustee for one year in Preble County, Ohio. . He removed to Connersville, Indiana, in 1854 for the purpose of completing his studies, and there entered the law office of Hon. Nelson Trusler and was soon after admitted to the bar. In October, 1855, Mr. Brown removed to Peru, Indiana, where he began the practice of his profession, and one year later effected a co-partnership in the law with Orris Blake, Esq. From 1859 unto 1862, with some intermission, he was associated in a law partnership with Hon. James N. Tyner, ex-Postmaster-General. In the spring of 1860, Mr. Brown was elected Mayor of Peru, and being three times re-elected served for four successive terms. Immediately after he was elected City Engineer, the duties of which position he discharged for a period of about eight years. He also served as School Trustee two years, and from 1877 until 1879 was a member of the Peru City Council. He has always been identified with the Republican party, and in 1868 was connected with G. I. Reed as part owner of the Peru Republican, continuing as associate editor of the same the greater part of the succeeding three years. Mr. Brown is recognized by all who know him, as one of the most useful and upright citizens of the community in which he lives. Possessing an extraordinary fund of exact information on many subjects, his qualifications to discharge with ability the duties of each official trust to which he has been called are unquestioned. A close student of history, science and ancient literature, he is also a genial, companionable gentleman, beloved by his family, and honored and respected by his friends. His marriage has been blessed with the birth of two children, viz: Benjamin and Mary E. Brown.

GEORGE W. CHAMBERLAIN, contractor and builder and son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Johnson) Chamberlain, natives of New Jersey, was born in that state on the 13th day of June, 1822. He was reared in the state of his nativity until his fourteenth year, at which time (1836) he removed with his parents to Seneca County, Ohio, where one year later he began working at the carpenter's trade. He soon acquired great proficiency in his chosen calling and worked at the same at different places until 1851, when he came to Peru, where he has since followed the trade with success and financial profit. He is at this time engaged in contracting and building principally in Peru and Miami County, and some of the most elegant residences and business houses in the city and adjacent country were erected under his personal supervision. Mr. Chamberlain is an intelligent mechanic, and, with his family, possesses in an eminent degree the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens. His marriage with Miss Margaret Morrison, of Pennsylvania the State of Pennsylvania, has been blessed with the birth of two children, viz: George R., and Nellie Chamberlain.

GEORGE R. CHAMBERLAIN, teller First National Bank, was born in Peru, Indiana, August 4, 1854, son of George W. and Margaret (Morrison) Chamberlain. He was educated in the city schools, which he attended until his sixteenth year, completing the High School course in 1870. He then engaged as clerk in the mercantile house of J. S. Hale, Peru, in which capacity he continued one year, severing his connection with the dry goods business at the end of that time and engaging February 17, 1872, as book-keeper in the First National Bank. In May, 1881, he was promoted teller, the duties of which responsible position he has since discharged in a manner eminently satisfactory to his employers. Mr. Chamberlain is an accomplished business man, enjoys the, confidence and respect of all with whom he comes in contact, and has before him a future fraught with much promise. He is a member of the K. of P. order, and politically votes with the Republican party.

DAVID CHARTERS (deceased) was a native of Lewiston, Pennsylvania, and son of William and Elizabeth (Comfort) Charters, parents natives of the same state. The family moved to Miami County, Indiana, in 1846 and settled on a farm two miles west of Peru, where the mother died in 1873 and the father in 1865. David Charters was born, January 24, 1821, was reared a farmer and followed agricultural pursuits all his life. He came to Miami County in 1846 and from that time until his death lived upon the beautiful home place west of Peru. He was a man of much more than ordinary intelligence as is attested by the fact that he was several times chosen by the people of Miami to positions of trust, in all of which he acquitted himself with such commendable fidelity that no one was ever known to utter a breath of suspicion against his official record. During the war and for several years thereafter, he served as County Commissioner and in 1874 was elected to represent Miami in the State Legislature. In his business transactions he was uniformly successful and as a farmer he stood among the first in the county. On the 24th day of October, 1852 he was married to Eliza Long, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Tingle) Long, of Delaware. Mrs. Charters was born in Eaton, Preble County, Ohio, and is the mother of nine children, seven of whom are living, to-wit: William, Juniata, Mifflin, Emmet, Margaret, Lafayette and Charles Charters. The deceased members of the family were Sarah and Catharine. Mr. Charters died on the 11th day of March, 1882. His widow and several of the children still reside upon the home place, which is one of the best improved farms in Peru Township.

JOSEPH C. CLYMER, County Treasurer, was born in Jefferson Township, Miami County, March 15, 1847. His paternal ancestors were Pennsylvanians, his grandfather, Christian Clymer, emigrating from that State in an early day to Warren County, Ohio, where he lived until his removal to Miami County, about the year 1834. He, with his son Levi Clymer, father of subject, settled near Mexico, Jefferson Township, and was among the earliest pioneers of that section. He was a farmer by occupation and died sometime in the latter part of the forties. Levi Clymer was born in Warren County, Ohio, January 15, 1811. He was a resident of Jefferson Township, this county, until the year 1848, at which time he removed to Clay Township, where he has since resided. He is one of Miami County's representative farmers and a man widely and favorably known for his many sterling qualities. Subject's mother, Elizabeth Clymer, was the daughter of Henry Kirby, one of the early and substantial citizens of Warren County, Ohio. She departed this life at her home in Clay Township, in the year 1876. Mr. and Mrs. Clymer, were the parents of nine children, four of whom are living, Joseph C., being the youngest son of the family. He was reared on his father's farm in Clay Township, acquired in the common schools a practical education and subsequently attended the Peru High School and the Valparaiso Normal College. He began life as a farmer and followed agricultural pursuits until 1881, at which time he accepted the position of Deputy County Treasurer, under E. Humrickhouse, and continued in that capacity for a period of four years. In the meantime, 1884, he was nominated by the Democratic party as a candidate for that office, and at the ensuing election received a large majority of the county vote, a fact which attested his great popularity with the people. He having discharged the duties of the responsible trust in a manner highly satisfactory to all he was in 1886 re-elected and is now entering upon upon his second term. Mr. Clymer is an intelligent, thoroughly well posted business man, and his career has been a marked success. He was married January 21, 1885, to Miss Emma, daughter of Isaac and Maria Miller, of Miami County.

JUDGE ALBERT COLE (deceased) was born May 13, 1790, at Berlin Connecticut. He was the son of Stephen and Lucy (Deming) Cole. His father was a farmer and died in 1801. Albert, then eleven years old, went to live with his oldest brother, who was also a farmer, and until the age of fifteen attended the district schools during the winters. He spent the interval between fifteen and twenty in learning tanning and shoe-making at Meriden, Connecticut. Illness obliging him to give up his trade, he engaged one year in selling notions through the country. In 1812, he decided to go to Mississippi, where he had an older brother living. He having reached his destination he remained one year, a part of the time assisting his brother in a saw mill—on account of sickness, which he could not throw off, he purchased a pony at New Orleans and started North by land—-there being at that time only one steamer on the Western Waters. After a long and tedious journey, during which he passed through the possessions of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, he reached a white settlement near Columbia, Tennessee, where, owing to a severe illness, he was obliged to remain four weeks. In the fall of 1813, he reached Cincinnati, Ohio, and remained there until the following spring. In the meantime news came that peace had been declared between the United States and Great Britain. After leaving Cincinnati Mr. Cole returned to Connecticut. There in September, 1814, he married Mary Galpin, and started for the west. He purchased a farm of eighty acres in Zanesville, Ohio, where as a farmer, tanner and shoemaker, he remained until 1833. That year by means of a four horse wagon—probable among the first seen in that section, he transferred his family first to Goshen, Indiana, and afterwards, July, 1834, to Peru, in the same State. Miami County had then been recently organized and Peru selected as the County Seat. Considerable enterprise had, however, been manifested in the construction of the Wabash and Erie canal, the laying out of town lots, etc. Soon after going to Peru Mr. Cole . formed a partnership with Mr. D. R. Bearss, carried on a general mercantile business for one year and erected a store house. At the rend of that time the firm dissolved. Mr. Cole taking his share of the goods to Lewisburg on the canal where he put up some log buildings, and sold goods for another year. He then returned to Peru and was engaged in mercantile pursuits for about six years, after which in 1848 he was elected postmaster, which office he held till 1851 and then retired to a farm which he purchased in an early day just north of the city. After the death of his wife who had been a faithful companion for forty years, he returned to Peru, having disposed of his farm, and invested his capital in city property. Judge Cole was a Whig during the existence of that party and after its dissolution identified himself in the Republican party, voting the latter ticket until his death. He was elected Judge at the August election in 1840, when the circuit was composed of a President judge, elected by the Legislature and two associate judges, from each county, chosen by the people. He was United States Commissioner under President Harrison, for distribution of Surplus Revenue. In 1857 he married Mrs. McCleary, of Zanesville, Ohio. Judge Cole had six children by his first wife, namely: Emma A., now Mrs. D. R. Bearss, Alphonso A., deceased, Lucy, wife of Lewis D. Adkison, Mary L., the late Mrs. James T. Miller, James O., and Ellen, wife of H. G. Fetter. Mr. Cole died November, 1878.

RICHARD H. COLE, of the Miami County Sentinel and one of the proprietors of the Cole Block, was born in this city, Nov. 26, 1853; son of Hon. Alphonso and Sarah H. (Henton) Cole, and is of English extraction. His father was born near Oberlin, Ohio, December, 25, 1818. He came to Miami County in 1834. By occupation he was a lawyer and one of the early members of the Miami County Bar. In 1847 and '48, and in 1849 and '50, he represented this county in the Indiana Legislature. He was one of the early prominent men of this county. His death occurred August 4, 1862. Our subject is the elder of two living children. After graduating at the Peru High School, he was a student for two years at the University of Illinois, located at Champaign. In 1876 he was elected Surveyor of Miami County, and in 1881 was elected City Engineer of Peru. In 1879 he purchased a half interest in the Miami County Sentinel, and with which he is now connected. In politics he is a Democrat and is a member of the K. of P. fraternity of this city. He was married November 15, 1882, to Miss Belle M. Talbot, of this city, born March 15, i860. Mr. Cole is a representative of one of the early families of this county.

HARVEY COMER, gunsmith, was born in Allen County Indiana, May, 30, 1846 and is the fifth child of James and Sarah E. (Somers) Comer, natives of Virginia. James Comer moved to Indiana in an early day and settled in Allen County prior to the founding of the City of Ft. Wayne. He was a cooper by trade but after moving to Indiana engaged in farming which he carried on until his death in 1875. Mrs. Comer is still living on the home place in Allen County having reached a ripe old age. Harvey Comer was raised on a farm, enjoyed such educational advantages as were afforded by the common schools and at the age of nineteen began life for himself in the employ of the I. P. & C. rail road company at Peru. He worked in the shops here until 1873 at which time he took up his present trade, that of gunsmith and after following the same for some time in Peru, went to Terre Haute. He soon returned to Peru, where, since 1874, he had been actively engaged at his vocation, and is now in the enjoyment of a very prosperous business. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and National Union Orders and is in every respect an honorable and trustworthy citizen. On the 15th day of April, 1877, he was united in marriage with Miss Emma Marshall, daughter of John Marshall, of Peru.

GODLOVE CONRADT, native of Wurtemburg, Germany, and son of Henry and Catherine Conradt, was born on the 10th day of July, 1834. When four years of age he was brought by his parents to the United States, and from 1840 until 1845 lived in Springfield, Columbiana County, Ohio. The family moved to Miami County, Indiana, the latter year, and settled in Peru, where the father for a number of years carried on a successful tannery business. The parents both departed this life in the year 1870. Godlove Conradt received in the common schools a practical education, and at an early age learned the tanning trade, which he followed until his twentieth year. He then engaged in the mercantile business, opening a leather and shoe-findings store in Peru, which he carried on in connection with the tannery, operating the latter with encouraging success until 1884. In addition to his private enterprises, Mr. Conradt has at different times been called to fill positions of trust, the first of which was that of Township Clerk, to which he was elected in 1860. He was subsequently chosen a member of the City School Board, the duties of which position he discharged in a manner highly satisfactory to all concerned for a period of nine years. In his business ventures Mr. Conradt has been successful, and at this time, in addition to other property, owns a valuable tract of 200 acres of land in Deer Creek township. On the 27th day of December, 1857, he married Miss Mary Smith, daughter of Christopher Smith, of Germany, a marriage blessed with the birth of four children, three of whom, Matilda, Fred and Albert, are living. Mr. Conradt is liberal in his political views in State and National affairs, voting the principles of the Democratic party, and in local matters voting for the man best qualified for the position. Mrs. Conradt is a member of the Lutheran Church of Peru.

JONATHAN D. COX, was born in Butler County, Ohio, December 9, 1818, being the third son of David J. and Rosina (Bake) Cox, native of Monmouth County, New Jersey. The father of Mr. Cox emigrated to Ohio, and in 1826 came to Decatur County, Indiana. He was born in 1792 and died in 1837. The mother of Mr. Cox died in 1836. The subject of this biography, received a common school education. He came to Miami County in 1837, and for some years worked on a farm and later clerked in a store. In 1840 he, in partnership with Richard Miller, started a general store at Pawpaw. He continued this business for four years and then engaged in farming. February 2, 1842, he married the daughter of Richard Miller, who died in 1848. By that marriage were born two children, Wm. H. and Alphonso C. Mr. Cox was married again February 12, 1850 to Miss Caroline, daughter of Col. William M. Reyburn, (deceased), who was one of the pioneers of Miami County. They have two children, viz: Charles R. and Horace G. Mrs. Cox died in 1856. Mr. Cox was married again in 1859 to Miss Jennie Thornburg, a native of Wayne County. Indiana. By this union they have one child, Jessie B. Mr. Cox removed to Peru in 1856. In 1857 he engaged in the stove, tinware and lumber business. This business he continued one year and then again engaged in the agricultural pursuits which he continued until 1885, when he retired from active life. In 1867 he was appointed Assessor for Miami County of Internal Revenue. In 1868 he was elected to represent Miami County in the General Assembly of Indiana. He was re-elected to the same office in 1870. He is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

HON. JABEZ T. COX. The gentleman whose biographical sketch is herewith presented, was born in Clinton County, Ohio, January 27, 1846. His parents, Aaron and.Mary (Skeggs) Cox, were natives respectively of Ohio and Kentucky, the father of English-Welsh, and the mother of German lineage. Jabez T. Cox, in early life attended the common schools and subsequently entered the Westfield Academy, an educational institution under charge of the Society of Friends at Westfield, Ind., in which he pursued his literary studies for a period of four years. Having early decided upon the legal profession as his life work, he, in 1865 entered the law office of the late Hon. N. R. Overman, of Tipton, Indiana, under whose instructions he continued until his admission to the bar, a little later, and with whom he formed a partnership in the practice which lasted from 1867 till 1869. In the latter year he abandoned the law for a time and entered the field of journalism as editor of the Frankfort Crescent, of which paper he was proprietor until 1871, when he returned to Tipton and again took up the legal profession with his former partner, Judge Overman. From 1871, till 1875 he practiced with marked success in the courts of Tipton and adjoining counties, but in the latter year owing to his wife's ill health disposed of his interests^ in Indiana and removed to Hutchinson, Kansas, In that state he soon acquired more than a local reputation, as is attested by the fact that in 1878 he was nominated on the Democratic state ticket for the office of Attorney General. Although defeated at the ensuing election, the* Democratic party in Kansas being in a hopeless minority, yet, when the vote was canvassed it was found that he had run 3,50o ahead of his ticket. Owing to continued ill heath of his wife he shortly afterward left Kansas and went to Colorado where he remained until 1883 when he returned to Indiana and located in Peru, where he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. In politics Mr. Cox has always been a pronounced Democrat, believing earnestly in his political convictions. In 1886 he received the nomination for Representative to the Lower House of the State Legislature and after a brilliant canvass defeated his competitor by a very decided majority. Mr. Cox's legal career presents a series of continual successes and his acknowledged familiarity with the principles of law, and thoroughly independent cast of his mind make him a safe and trusted counselor. He has a military as well professional career, entering the service of his country in 1864 as private in Company B, 136th Indiana Infantry, and serving with the same until honorably discharged at the close of the war. He is prominently identified with the G. A. R. and the Odd Fellows fraternities. He married his first wife, Miss Jennie Price, of Tipton, Indiana, in 1867. She died in Colorado in the spring of 1882. Two children were born to the marriage, viz: Edward E. and Inez. His second marriage was solemnized in the year 1884 with Miss Lizzie Meinhardt, of Peru, who has borne him one child, Carl M. Cox.

GEORGE A. CROWELL, retired business man and prominent citizen of Peru, is a native of Jefferson. County, Virginia, born there June 25, 1820, the son of Samuel and Mary (Link) Crowell, natives of Pennsylvania and Virginia, respectively, and of English Scotch and Irish-German ancestry. His early school experience embraced the studies appertaining to the educational course presented by the usages of those days in Sandusky County, Ohio, to which he moved with his parents when but seven years of age. He was raised to agricultural pursuits and remained with his parents on the farm until after attaining his majority, when he began life for himself as clerk in a mercantile house in the town of Fremont, Ohio. He continued in the capacity of salesman at the above place until 1843 and in 1845 came to Peru, Indiana, to take charge of a stock of goods for Sanford E. Main, in whose employ he remained for a period of about one and a half years. From the time of severing his connection with Mr. Main, up to 1850, he clerked for different parties, but in the latter year effected a co-partnership in the general mercantile business with William Smith, which lasted until 1855. He purchased his partner's stock that year and conducted a successful business until 1876, at which date he retired from active life, having by diligent and judicious management accumulated a handsome competence in the meantime. In addition to his large business interests, Mr. Crowell always took an active part in all the enterprises for the city's welfare and was several times elected its treasurer, the duties of which position he discharged in an eminently satisfactory manner. He was largely instrumental in inaugurating the street improvements of Peru, in which he encountered much opposition, and also brought the first plate glass store front to the city, besides introducing a number of other modern improvements. He took an active interest in the internal improvement of the country, and to him, more than to any other man, is due the credit of securing and building up of the present efficient turnpike system of Miami County. At this time he is Superintendent of the following roads, to-wit: Peru and Mexico, Peru and Santa Fe, and Peru and Mississinewa Turnpikes, and their present superior condition is largely owing to his careful and judicious management. In the year 1869 he was appointed special Indian agent for the Miamis of Indiana and the Eel River bands of Miamis, and discharged the duties of the same until 1876. Mr. Crowell was married in May 1851, to Mary A. Steele, daughter of Joseph S. Steele, one of the pioneers of Miami County. Mrs. Crowell was born in the State of Ohio, and is still living. Of the four children born to Mr. and Mrs. Crowell, but one, Alice O., is living at this time. The following are names of the of the children, deceased, to-wit: Mary C., George G. and Byron F. Throughout a long and active life, during which he passed through many vicissitudes, Mr. Crowell's ruling elements have been industry and honesty, qualities which have made themselves apparent to all with whom he has been associated in a business capacity or otherwise. And now in the sixty-seventh year of his age, he is still an energetic, wide awake citizen, in possession of all his faculties and enjoying the full confidence and respect of all his friends and acquaintances. His portrait will be found elsewhere in this volume.

PHILIP Q. CURRAN, merchant tailor, was born in the City of Quebec, Canada, July 12, 1829, and is the third son of Patrick and Mary Curran, natives respectively of Ireland, and Scotland. Mr. Curran's early life was passed in his native city, in the schools of which he received the rudiments of an English education. It may be said with propriety that he is not an educated man in the accepted meaning of that term, yet thoroughly skilled in the details of practical business, such as is acquired only by the experience of years and the active observations of well developed common sense. At the age of twelve he apprenticed himself to learn the tailor's trade, and after serving for a period of three years, during which time he acquired great proficiency, began working for himself in the city of Troy, New York. From there in 1848 he went to Massachusetts, and located at the city of Cheshire, where he opened his first shop, and where he continued with encouraging success for a period of three years. He subsequently worked in various places, and, in 1854, experiencing a desire to move beyond the boundaries of the Eastern States, went to Detroit. Michigan, in which city he was cutter in a large tailoring establishment until the spring of 1858. He then removed to Peoria, Illinois, where he followed cutting principally until 1866, at which time he located in Anderson, Indiana, where he carried on a successful business until he removed to Peru in 1873. On locating in this city he at once took high rank as a cutter, and continued that branch of the trade until 1878, in the spring of which year he opened a business of his own, which he has since successfully operated. Mr. Curran is a wide-awake, energetic man, always alive to the interests of his business and the general prosperity of the city. He has a large and lucrative patronage, and the business, now conducted under the firm name of Curran & Co., is the leading tailoring establishment in the city. Mr. Curran has a military as well as a business record, of which he feels deservedly proud. He entered the army August, 1861, enlisting in the Forty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and served with the same until honorably discharged October, 1864. He went into the service as first sergeant, but early in 1864 was promoted captain, a position he held at the time of his discharge. In politics Mr. Curran is an ardent supporter of the Republican party, but has never asked official position at the hands of his fellow-citizens. He belongs to the I. 0. O. F. and Masonic fraternities, having taken a number of degrees in the latter, including that of Sir Knight. On the 30th day of April, 1850, was solemnized his marriage with Miss Ellen Brazee, of Canada, a union blessed with the birth of six children, only two of whom—Philip H. and James W.—are living. Mr. and Mrs. Curran are members of the Methodist Church of Peru.

WILLIAM F. DALY, lumber inspector for Indiana Manufacturing Company, was born in North Bridgeport, Fairfield County, Connecticut, on the 25th day of September, 1842. His father, Dennis Daly, was a native of North Ireland, and his mother, Alvira (French) Daly, was born in the State of Connecticut. Mr. Daly's parents dying when he was quite young, early threw him upon his own resources and he made his first start in life as a boot black. This employment he subsequently abandoned for mechanical pursuits, engaging at the age of fifteen, to learn the trade of carriage making, which he followed in his native city until the breaking out of the war. In September, 1861, he entered the army, enlisting in Company I, Sixth Regiment Connecticut Infantry, with which he served until honorably discharged three years later. During his period of service Mr. Daly took part in a number of engagements, among which were the following: Fort Wagner, Mackey's Point, siege of Port Pulaski, sieges of Forts Walker and Beauregard, all the battles around Charleston, Alosta, Fla., and Drury Bluff, City Point, Deep Bottom, Pittsburgh and others of the Virginia campaigns. On leaving the army he returned to Bridgeport and resumed his trade until 1866, when he accepted a position with the Wheeler & Wilson sewing machine company, in their shops in that city. Two years later he took charge of the wood-work department in the Howe machine shops at Bridgeport, and continued as foreman of the same until promoted superintendent of the company's shops at Peru, Indiana, in 1871. He was identified with the shops here until 1875, when he became foreman of the Muhlfield wagon and dimension works, Peru, the duties of which position he discharged until 1880. In the latter year he engaged with the Indiana manufacturing company, with which he has since been identified, holding at this time the responsible position of lumber inspector. Mr. Daly is a public spirited citizen, takes an active interest in politics, and has been his party's candidate for different official positions. He served in the Common Council of Peru, and in the deliberations of that body bore a conspicuous part. He belongs to the G. A. R., Masonic, Royal Arcanum, and K. of H. orders; in politics, votes the Republican ticket. On the 25th of September, 1873, he married Miss Hattie M. Scott, daughter of Aaron B. Scott, a union blessed with the birth of two children, one of which, Nellie, born September 23, 1877, is living.

GEORGE W. DEIBERT, assistant general foreman of the Wabash shops, came to Miami County in May, 1854. Was born October 28,1833, in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, and is the second son of Jacob and Rosanna (Zimmerman) Deibert, natives of Pennsylvania, who migrated to Indiana in 1854 and located in Peru. The father, who was by trade a carpenter, died in March, 1881, and the mother and brother—Albert—in 1854, soon after their arrival in Indiana. The subject returned to his native county, and on the 14th of February, 1857, was married to Miss Henrietta Wervert, a native of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, of German origin. They were blessed by the birth of five children, four of whom are now living— John, Frank, Florence, Georgie (girl), and Philip (deceased). In May, 1867, the subject returned to Peru and worked at the carpenter trade, which he learned when a boy. In the fall of 1868, engaged with the I., P. & C. R. R. in the car department, and continued until June, 1872, when he assumed charge of that department. He is a Knight of Pythias and also an Encampment Odd Fellow, and was elected by the Republicans to the City Council, serving from 1880 to 1884.

REV. HERMAN H. DIEMER, pastor St. John's Lutheran Church, Peru, and son of Christian Diemer, is a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, born on the 26th day of October, 1851. When he was ten years of age his parents left their native country for America, but before the completion of the voyage the mother died and was buried in the waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The father died shortly after reaching the United States, and Herman, thus early left an orphan, was sent to Perry County, Missouri, where, until his thirteenth year, he attended school at the town of Attenburgh. In 1869, he entered Concordia College, at Fort Wayne, Indiana, in which institution he pursued his studies for a period of six years with the object of the ministry in view. After securing a thoroughly classical education he entered Concordia Theological Seminary, St. Louis, Missouri, which he attended three years, completing the prescribed course in that time. In 1874 he entered upon the active duties of his sacred calling at Elkhart, Indiana, being the first minister of the Lutheran Church to proclaim the gospel in that city. He remained at Elkhart until 1877, at which time he went to Fulton County, Ohio, where he was actively engaged in pastoral work until 1883, moving to Pomeroy, Ohio, the latter year and remaining there until the spring of 1884, when he accepted the pastorate of St. John's Church, Peru, Indiana. Rev. Mr. Diemer is a popular pastor and eloquent and forcible pulpit orator, and since locating in this city has made many warm friends irrespective of church and creed. He was married July 6th, 1876, to Margaret Schuster, a union blessed with four children, viz.: Emma, Gerhart, Paul and Martin.

AARON N. DUKES. The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch is a native of Randolph County, Indiana, and son of William and Matilda (McKim) Dukes, the father born in Maryland, and the mother in the State of Ohio. On the father's side he is descended from English ancestors, his grandfather, Isaac Dukes, emigrating from England to the United States in an early day and settling in Maryland.. William Dukes in early life moved to Randolph County, Indiana, where for a number of years he was alternately engaged in merchandising, milling and agricultural pursuits. He subsequently disposed of his interests in that part of the State, and in 1846 moved to Miami County, locating near the village of Gilead, where he lived until he removed to a beautiful farm adjoining the city of Peru, several years later. He was a prominent farmer and stock raiser, and deserves mention as one of the successful men of his adopted county. His death occurred in the year 1878. His wife, Matilda Dukes, was the daughter of William and Jarte McKim, who came to the United States from Ireland about the beginning of the present century. It is related that on the voyage to the new world, the vessel on which they sailed encountered a terrific storm, which for a time threatened the complete destruction of all on board. The sails were riddled and torn by the fierce gale, and in order to mend them Mrs. McKim spun threads on a little spinning wheel which she was bringing over with her, the Captain holding the wheel and Mr. McKim holding the chair in which she sat. By this means the sails were repaired, and in due time the vessel was enabled to proceed on its course in safety. William McKim settled near Chillicothe, Ohio, but subsequently emigrated to Randolph County, Indiana, where he lived until his removal to Miami County, about the year 1855. He was a farmer by occupation and died in the county in 1862. His wife survived him about eight years, departing this life in 1870. Mrs. Dukes, the mother of our subject, died at her home near Peru in 1874. The following are the names of the children born to William and Matilda Dukes, viz: A. N., Levi, Lydia, wife of Oliver Wilson, Jane, wife of John McRea, Mary, wife of Mr. Parmley, Emma, wife of James Pugh, John, and Priscilla, wife of Dr. Frank Black. Aaron N. Dukes was born on the 27th day of October, 1834; accompanied his parents to Miami County in 1846, and has been one of its most successful and highly esteemed citizens ever since. He attended the public schools during winter seasons, where he acquired a good practical education, and when out of school improved his time working on the farm, early acquainting himself with the details of that useful occupation. He remained with his parents until his seventeenth year, at which time he abandoned agricultural pursuits and accepted the position of salesman in the mercantile house of E. H. Shirk, Peru, in which capacity he continued one year, effecting a co-partnership with his employer at the end of that time, in a general store at the town of Gilead. After remaining in the latter place about two years he disposed of his interest; and in 1856 removed to Mankato, Minnesota, where until 1862 he was engaged in merchandising, milling and dealing in real estate, retaining his connection with Mr. Shirk in the meantime. He returned to Peru, Ind.. in the latter year and from that date until 1865 was a partner of Mr. Shirk in the general mercantile business, their house during that period being one of the largest and most successful of the kind in Northern Indiana. He withdrew from the firm in 1865, and in partnership with J. H. Jamison engaged in the grocery and pork packing business, which branches of industry were conducted with financial profit until 1868, Mr. Dukes purchasing his partner's interest that year. Two years later he sold out and purchased what is known as the Holman farm, adjoining the city of Peru, a part of which he subsequently laid off in town lots, known as Dukes' first and second additions. In the meantime he began dealing in real estate, a business he carried on quite extensively until 1881. In 1877 he was appointed assignee of the Ulrich wagon works of Peru, the duties of which position required the greater part of his time, until the satisfactory arrangement of the business in 1881. In the latter year he was appointed receiver of the Indiana Manufacturing company of Peru, one of the largest manufacturing enterprises of the State, to which he has since devoted his entire attention. Mr. Dukes took an active part in the Sioux war of Minnesota in 1862, having been for some time in command of the military post of Mankato. His has been a very active business life, throughout which he has discharged his duty with commendable fidelity, proving himself worthy the confidence of his fellow citizens and competent to fill responsible positions intrusted to him. He is a Republican in politics, and a consistent member of the Presbyterian church, with which he has been identified since about the year 1854. In September, 1859, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary A. Thompson, daughter of Rev. James Thompson, the projector and one of the founders of Wabash College, at Crawfordsville. Mr. Thompson was a man of deep piety and scholarly attainments, and was actively engaged in the work of the Master for over half a century. He died in Minnesota in the year 1876. To Mr. and Mrs. Dukes have been born two children, to-wit: Elbert, born in 1860, and William, born in 1862, died in 1871.

JAMES S. DURET, Deputy Auditor Miami County, was born in Logansport, Indiana, March 9, 1841, and is the second son of John B. and Elizabeth (Bell) Duret, natives respectively of Canada and Kentucky. John B. Duret accompanied General Louis Cass from Michigan to Indiana about the year 1824, and subsequently in 1827 located permanently in Logansport. He took an active part in the organization of Cass County, and at the first election was chosen Clerk of the same, the duties of which position he discharged for a period of twenty-nine years, or until his death in 1855. He was married in 1828 to a daughter of Major Daniel Bell, who was the first person to make permanent settlement on the present site of Logansport, locating there as early as the year 1826. John B. Duret was a man of fine ability, and is remembered as one of the most accomplished officials of the county, in the welfare of which he took such an active interest. James S. Duret passed the years of his youth and early manhood in Logansport, attended the schools there until twelve years of age, when he entered Notre Dame University, in which institution he pursued his studies for a period of two years. Subsequently in 1857 and in 1858 he studied telegraphy, and for two years thereafter worked at the same. In May, 1863, he entered the army, enlisting in Company H, Eighty seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and in August of the same year was commissioned second lieutenant of his company, and as such served until honorably discharged. Previous to the war in 1859 he came to Peru, and subsequently, in 1863, was appointed Deputy Treasurer of Miami County, the duties of which position he discharged for a period of six years. Then for a number of years he was employed in the railroad business, and held several important positions in that capacity until his appointment as Deputy County Auditor in 1881. He is still connected with the office, and being deservedly popular and possessing unusual abilitv, may yet serve the public in a wider and more extensive sphere. He has led a remarkably industrious life, full of energy and of great force of character, and as an accomplished business man none in Peru stand higher than he. In January, 1861, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Miller, adopted daughter of James T. Miller, of Peru. He is a Democrat in polities, and in religion adheres to the creed of the Roman Catholic Church.

HENRY DUTTON, was a native of Schoharie County, NY.; was born June 25,1824, and was a son of Julius Dutton, a native of Connecticut. At the age of fifteen he came to Fort Wayne and secured an engagement as clerk in a dry goods store, where he secured the greater part of his education. He then engaged in the retail dry goods business, in which he continued until the latter part of his life, when he emerged into the business of private banker and broker, which avocation he pursued during the eighteen years preceding his death, which sad event occurred in July, 1877. Mr. Dutton was elected County Treasurer on the Democratic ticket and was re-elected to the same office. He manifested a deep interest in the success of his party. Remaining at Fort Wayne for a number of years, he then came to Peru and resumed his former occupation—the dry goods business—in 1847. Was married in New York City July 20, 1847, to Miss Nancy M. Moore, daughter of John and Nancy (Wicks) Moore, natives of Duchess County, N. Y. To this union there were born four children, two of whom are living, viz: Mrs. Emma McWhinney, now residing at Richmond, Henry D. D., born November 9, 1855, now a resident of St. Joseph, Missouri. Those deceased are: Mary M., born September 9, 1849, and died in 1877; Lillie D., born February 10, 1868, and died 1877. Mrs. Dutton was born in Schoharie County, N. Y. The subject of this sketch was a delegate to the National Convention at Baltimore which nominated Stephen A. Douglas for the Presidency, and was also for many years chairman of the Democratic Central Committee for the County of Miami.

RICHARD A. EDWARDS, cashier First National Bank, son of Prof. Richard and Betsey (Sampson) Edwards, was born in Bridgewater, Massachusetts, November 9, 1851. Richard Edwards, Sr., was born in Wales, and came to the United States in 1832, settling originally in Ohio. He subsequently moved to Massachusetts, where for a number of years he was principal of the State Normal School at Salem, in the organization of which institution he took an active part. In 1859 he went to St. Louis, Missouri, to take charge of the City Normal School, a position he retained until 1862, at which time he accepted the presidency of the Illinois State University. He held the latter position for a period of sixteen or eighteen years, and was for some time pastor of the First Congregational Church at Princeton, Illinois. In 1886 he was elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction of Illinois, and is the present incumbent of that office. Prof. Edwards is a man of brilliant attainments, and as an educator ranks among the first in the country. He is the father of eleven children, nine of whom are living, the subject of this sketch being the second in number. Richard A. Edwards received his elementary education at Normal, Illinois, and subsequently attended Princeton and Dartmouth Colleges, graduating from the latter in 1876. His literary education then completed, he accepted the position as instructor of Latin and Greek in the Rock River Seminary, Morris, Illinois, and two years later became Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature in Knox College, Galesburg. He held the latter position three years, and at the end of that time severed his connection with the college, and in 1881 came to Peru, Indiana. He entered the First National Bank in this city as assistant cashier in 1882, and in June, 1886, became cashier, a position he holds at this time. On the 1st of June, 1880, he married Miss Alice Shirk, daughter of the late E. H. Shirk, of Peru. Mr. and Mrs. Edwards have four children, viz.—Richard E., Milton A., Mary A. and Clara E. Politically, Mr. Edwards votes with the Republican party, and in religion adheres to the creed of the Congregational Church. Mrs. Edwards is an active member of the Baptist Church of Peru.

WALTER H. EMSWILER. Mr. Emswiler was born in the city of Peru, May 10, 1858 and is the second son of John H. and Sarah E. (Miller) Emswiler, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Indiana. The father came to Miami County in a very early day, was for many years one of the leading physicians and surgeons of Peru and departed this life September, 1884. Walter Emswiler received a good practical education in the city schools and at the age of twenty began life for himself as clerk for his brother Charles, in the mercantile business, with whom he remained until his twenty-fourth year. In 1883 he became a partner with Schuyler Mercer in the livery business and subsequently purchased the entire interest which he still controls. Mr. Emswiler has already a well established business reputation and is meeting with encouraging success as a liveryman. He was married March 2, 1881 to Miss Rose Fisher, daughter of Joseph Fisher, one of the substantial residents of Jefferson Township, this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Emswiler have been born one child, Joseph, whose birth occurred September 2, 1883.

JOHN J. ENGLISH. The subject of this biography is a native of Miami County, born in Peru Township on the 6th day of April, 1848, and is the eldest son of Benjamin and Mary E. (Baker) English, of Licking County, Ohio. The father came to Miami County in 1846, settled in Peru Township, but subsequently lived in Pipe Creek and Erie Townships, and finally purchased a home in Richland Township, where he is at this time living. John J. English remained at home until his mother's death, which occurred when he was eighteen years of age, at which time he abandoned the farm and took up the carpenter's trade. He served a four years apprenticeship at the same under W. D. Allen, of Richland, after which he began working for himself, and subsequently, August 27, 1877, accepted a position as skilled mechanic in the coach department of the railroad shops (I., P. & C.) at Peru, which he still retains. He is one of the substantial employees of the company with which he is identified, and ranks among the best mechanics of Peru. His marriage with Miss Mary C. Analogously, daughter of R. Analogously, of this city, was solemnized on the 29th day of October, 1878, a union blessed with three children, viz.: Nellie D., Hazel B. and John W. English. Mr. English is a Democrat in politics, but in no sense of the word a partisan.

JOHN L. FARRAR, prominent member of the Miami County bar, was born in Jefferson County, New York, April 29, 1824, and is the eldest son of Lloyd and Rachel Farrar, natives respectively of Vermont and Rhode Island. The family came to Miami County, Indiana, in 1847 and settled in Butler township, where for a number of years the father engaged in agricultural pursuits. Lloyd Farrar was a man of local prominence, served as Justice of the Peace for Butler Township for a series of years and died in 1860. Mrs. Farrar survived her husband four years, departing this life in 1864. John L. Farrar spent the years of his youth and early manhood as a farmer, and received in the common schools the elements of an English education, supplemented by a course in a college at Kalamazoo, Michigan where he pursued his studies for a limited period. At the age of twenty he engaged in teaching, and during the time he continued at that profession, read law under the able instruction of Hon. Charles E. Stuart, of Kalamazoo, who at one time represented the State of Michigan in the Senate of the United States. After acquiring a partial knowledge of the legal profession, Mr. Farrar was admitted to the bar in 1852 and at once entered upon the active practice in the courts of Miami County, where his real ability as a criminal lawyer soon won for him a conspicuous place. He has practiced his profession in Peru continuously since 1852, and in addition to his large and lucrative business in Miami County, is frequently employed in important cases in various parts of the State. He is, without doubt, the most successful criminal lawyer in northern Indiana, and few attorneys in the State have presented the result of more labor and research in behalf of their clients than he. As a public speaker Mr. Farrar is forcible and logical, bringing his cases before the court with much skill, and in his addresses to the jury analyzing the testimony and conducting it upon the point at issue. In early life he was not favored with any peculiar advantages and his professional success must be attributed to the indomitable will and energy which he has displayed in all his undertakings. He takes an active interest in politics, voting in conformity with the Democratic party, but is not a partisan in the sense of seeking official position. Mr. Farrar was married on the 26th day of March 1848 to Miss Everisa Foster, of Vermont. The issue of this union was one child, Arnold, born May 29, 1857. Arnold Farrar was a young man of much more than ordinary intelligence. He received a good literary education, early began the study of law with his father and subsequently graduated from the law department of the State University at Bloomington. Before commencing the practice, however, he met with a violent death, having been accidentally shot in the year 1877.

JOSIAH FARRAR, a leading lawyer of Peru, is a native of Jefferson County, New York, and second son of Lloyd and Rachel Farrar, He was born September 25, 1826, and grew to manhood on a farm in his native county, receiving his early education and training in the common school from which he was subsequently promoted to the academic grade. He took an academic course in which he acquired the knowledge of the higher branches of learning and while thus engaged decided upon the legal profession for a life work. In 1846 he came to Miami County, Indiana and selected in Butler Township a tract of land to which his father's family removed and settled the following year. For some time after coming here he was engaged in teaching school and in the meantime pursued his legal studies as opportunities would permit. Actuated by a laudable desire to increase his knowledge of the profession, Mr. Farrar, at the age of twenty-three went to Rochester, New York, where he read for some time under the able instruction of Lysander Farrar, one of the leading attorneys of the city, In this county he read in the office of H. J. Shirk in 1849 and the following year returned to Rochester, where he was similarly engaged until 1852. Having thus completed his preparatory reading, during which he made substantial progress in his profession, Mr. Farrar, in 1852, engaged in the practice at Peru, Indiana, in partnership with his brother John L. Farrar, and the firm thus constituted still continues. In 1856, he was elected on the Democratic ticket, prosecutor for the counties of Miami and Cass, and in 1867, against his wishes, was elected mayor of the city of Peru. Since his admission to the bar Mr. Farrar has, by close application to business and commendable studiousness gradually surmounted the obstacles in the course of every professional man and won for himself a fine reputation as a successful practitioner. In 1862 he closed his office and tendered his services to his country recruiting in May of that year, Company D., 99th Indiana Infantry, of which he was chosen captain. He accompanied his command through all its varied experiences in the southwestern campaigns of the Mississippi department, and at the battle of Atlanta, July 22,1864. was in command of the brigade of skirmishers, a duty fraught with a great deal of danger. At the battle of July 28th, of the same year, he was second in command of the regiment, and while his Colonel was sick during the siege of Atlanta, he commanded the regiment one week when the duty was very difficult to perform. The confidence which the line officers reposed in his ability is attested by the fact that they frequently requested him to take command on trying occasions, and it is also a conceded fact that in nearly every hotly contested battle in which the 99th was engaged he was at its head. He commanded the regiment during the reconnaissance toward Dalton and Rocky Face Gap, in February, 1864, and subsequently on the arrival at Savannah, being the ranking officer succeeded to the command which he held until mustered out of the service. On May 20, 1865 he was mustered as Lieutenant Colonel, and on the mustering out of the regiment received a commission as Colonel. Among the battles in which he participated were the following: Vicksburg, capture of Jackson, Mississippi, Mission Ridge, the numerous engagements in the advance upon Atlanta, the battle of the 2 2d of July, when General McPherson was killed, battle of the 28th, same month west of Atlanta, flank movement which resulted in the capture of that city, and battles consequent, Sherman's march to the sea and up through the Carolinas, and to the battle of Bentonville, the last fight in which the Ninety-ninth was engaged. At the close of the war his regiment marched to Washington City, and after participating in the " Grand Review," he was honorably discharged. Col. Farrar was a brave and honorable soldier, and his military record is bright with duty intelligently and faithfully performed. In him were combined those qualities of mind which display under the most trying circumstances the possession of great executive ability, added to a personal courage, that made him the trusted leader on many bloody battle fields. Returning, after an absence of three years, to the quiet of civil life, he resumed the practice of his profession, which he has since successfully continued in Peru. He is an able lawyer, thoroughly acquainted with the methods and principles of legal jurisprudence, and stands high among his professional associates of the Miami County bar. He is and always has been a Democrat in politics. Though he adheres to his political faith with tenacity and expresses his sentiments fearlessly, he is far removed from partisan intolerance, and on several occasions has followed his convictions rather than the dictates of party. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and takes an active interest in the G. A. R. post in the city. He married on the 13th day of November, 1856, Miss Emma Gould, daughter of Solomon and Eliza Gould, of Peru. Mr. and Mrs. Farrar have three children, viz: William C., Ada and Maude Farrar.

H. G. FETTER was born in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1828. His father, Samuel Fetter, was a carpenter and contractor. His mother's maiden name was Mary Wise. The parents were both of German descent. While the subject was quite young his father removed to Sunbury, Pennsylvania, where he erected a number of the churches and principal buildings still standing in that city. H. G. Fetter, at the age of sixteen, went to Danville and learned the printer's trade, remaining in the office four years. His health then failing, he learned the art of daguerreotyping, then in its infancy and conducted mostly by traveling artists in tents. For the next four years with a short interruption he pursued the art of picture making in West Virginia, Ohio and Indiana, locating in Peru in 1853. For a number of years he operated two galleries. In 1861 he was appointed postmaster of Peru two weeks after Lincoln's inauguration, and held that position four years and a half, being succeeded by his brother, J. H. Fetter. In 1867 he removed to Logansport, and conducted a gallery there about ten years, when he returned to Peru, where he has since resided.

JAMES H. FETTER, dealer in furniture, is a native of Sunbury, Pennsylvania, and the eleventh of a family of twelve children born to Samuel and Mary (Wise) Fetter, of the same State. He was born on the 28th day of February, 1842, and after receiving a liberal education engaged, at the age of sixteen, as a salesman in a dry goods house in his native town. He continued in that capacity until his nineteenth year, at which time, October 14, 1861, he came to Miami County, Indiana, and became deputy postmaster at Peru, under his brother, H. G. Fetter. Subsequently, August 6, 1865, he succeeded his brother as postmaster, and discharged the duties of the office continuously till April 1, 1879, when he effected a co partnership in the furniture and undertaking business with L. C. Gould. He is still engaged in that branch of the trade, carries a large stock of all kinds of furniture, and leads the business in Peru. Mr. Fetter's marriage with Miss Lucy Adkison, daughter of Hon. Lewis D. Adkison, of Peru, was solemnized March 9, 1873. They have two children—Robert A., born March 28, 1874, and Thomas C., born on the 26th day of August, 1883. Mr. Fetter is an active member of the I. O. O. F., belonging to the Encampment, and with his wife belongs to the Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Republican.

JAMES B. FULWILER was born in Perry County, Pennsylvania, on the 6th day of September, 1812. Was educated at Hopewell Academy and Gettysburg Gymnasium, now Pennsylvania College. His father, Abraham Fulwiler, was one of the early graduates of Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he was born and reared, and died in 1830, leaving a large estate. His paternal ancestry is traceable through centuries into Switzerland, where the inevitable millions are said to be awaiting identification of the descendants. His mother was a cousin of the late Jeremiah S. Black, a Cabinet officer of President Buchanan, and a daughter of the Rev. James Black, of Pennsylvania, a Scottish aged by him, as editor and proprietor until 1861, when he sold out and retired from the editorial chair. In 1850 Mr. Graham was a delegate to the State Convention to form a new State Constitution. In 1870 he was elected clerk of the Miami Circuit Court and at different times served as a member of the town and city council. He was special agent of the United States to pay the Miamis in the years 1857 and 1859 and has held many other positions of trust. In 1881 he was elected Mayor of the City of Peru, a position he holds at the present time. He has been a life long Democrat and in religion is a Roman Catholic. He was married to Caroline A. Avaline in Peru, June 28, 1842; a family of three sons and six daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Graham. Mr. Graham is below the average height but is heavily and compactly built. He possesses a strong constitution and although having reached the allotted three score and ten years, many years of usefulness and honor may yet remain to him. His opportunities for an education were limited , but he has been a constant reader and has a wonderful memory. He is recognized as the "Historian of Miami." As a writer he is fluent precise as to dates and figures, and full of humor. Few men possess the confidence of the community in a more eminent degree.

EDWARD T. GRAY, Sheriff of Miami County, is a native of Markham, Canada, and the son of Thomas and Margaret (Hines) Gray, the father born in Canada and the mother in Southampton, England. Mr. Gray was born on the 24th of May, 1836, and at the age of sixteen commenced to learn the blacksmithing and carriage making trades, at Norwich, Canada. At the age of twenty-five he came to Miami County, Indiana, and began working at his trade in the city of Peru, where he has since resided. In 1872 he purchased an interest in the firm of II. Armantrout & Co., manufacturers of carriages, after which the name was changed to that of Armantrout & Gray, under which title they continued business until 1878. In that year Mr. Gray purchased the entire interest, and under his efficient management, the concern soon became one of the leading manufacturing establishments of its kind in the city. Mr. Gray has always taken an active interest in local politics, and in 1884 was elected on the Democratic ticket Sheriff of Miami County^ the duties of which position he has since discharged, having been re-elected in 1886. As a citizen Mr. Gray has the respect and confidence of all who know him, and as an official he is faithful and diligent discharging the duties of his position in a manner highly satisfactory to all concerned. He is a man of conscientious scruples and is ever ready to do what he can to promote the interest of the public welfare. He is prominently identified with the Masonic fraternity, being a Royal Arch Mason, and in religion holds to the creed of the Episcopal church. On the 31st of December, 1863, he married Miss Kate M. Wilson, of Peru, who has borne him three children, viz.: Alice, Nellie and Lewis Gray.

WILLARD GRISWOLD, of the firm of Griswold & Geves, livery stable, was born in Watertown, New York, August 8, 1833, the third son of Daniel and Sarah (Barry) Griswold; parents natives of Vermont and of English ancestry. Daniel Griswold moved to Miami County in 1844 and settled at the village of Mexico, where he followed the plasterer's trade a number of years and later engaged in the mercantile business. He was a man of considerable local prominence; took an active part in the early growth of his adopted town, and departed this life in the year 1858. Mrs. Griswold survived her husband fourteen years, dying in 1872. Willard Griswold received the advantages of a common school education in his native State, and shortly after coming to Indiana engaged as salesman in a store at Mexico, where he remained for a number of years. At the breaking out of the war he tendered his service to his country, and in September, 1861, enlisted in Co. B, 40th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until honorably discharged on the 21st day of December, 1865. He shared with his regiment the vicissitudes of war in many of the bloodiest battles of the southwestern campaigns, and was twice severely wounded, the first time at Stone River and later near Kenesaw Mountain. He entered the service as private, at the time of his discharge was adjutant of his regiment, and a short time after being mustered out was commissioned captain. Mr. Griswold's military record is one of which he feels justly proud, and in all the battles where his command was engaged he took an active and gallant part. His military career thus being completed he returned to Mexico, and engaged in the general goods business, which he continued until his election to the office of Sheriff, in 1872, when he moved to the county seat. He discharged his official duties in a manner highly creditable to the people, who in 1874 re-elected him by a decided vote, a fact which showed his popularity in the county, which had previously given decided Democratic majorities, he being a Republican. In 1878, in partnership with R. H. Segar, he engaged in the livery business, which he has since successfully continued, being at this time a partner with H. Geves, in the largest stable in the city. Mr. Griswold is a public spirited citizen, and deserves mention as one of the representative business en of Miami County. He belongs to the G. A. R. and Masonic fraternities, is a decided Republican in politics, and as such has rendered valuable service to his party. He was married in 1867 to Miss Harriet Graft, daughter of Benjamin Graft, of Mexico, a union blessed with the birth of one child, Charles Griswold.

HENRY HAUPT, foreman wood machine department, Indiana Manufacturing Company, is a native of Germany and dates his birth from the 19th day of May, 1835. He was raised on a farm, received in the schools of his native country the advantages of a good education, and at the age of fifteen commenced to learn the saddler's trade at the town of Barken, where he served a three years' apprenticeship. After becoming proficient in his chosen vocation he worked at the same at different places in Germany until 1856, at which time thinking the new world offered a more remunerative field, sailed to the United States and located in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Here he worked at his trade until 1861, where being infected with the war spirit he enlisted in the First Connecticut Infantry, with which he served until August of the same year. He then reentered the service, volunteering in the Sixth Connecticut regiment, with which he shared the fortunes and vicissitudes of war until honorably discharged in 1865. He participated in a number of bloody battles in one of which, Fort Fisher, North Carolina, he received a severe wound. At the expiration of his term of service Mr. Haupt returned to Bridgeport, and engaged with the Howe Machine Company in that city, where he remained until sent by the company to Peru, Indiana, where for sometime he acted in the capacity of contractor and later as foreman. He subsequently severed his connection with the company and from 1880 until 1883 was superintendent of Muhlfield's variety works. He engaged the latter year with the Indiana Manufacturing Company, and at this time holds the position of foreman of the wood machine department. Mr. Haupt's marriage on the 1st of May, 1873, with Anna M. E. Kranzman, of Germany, has been blessed with the birth of two children, both deceased.

JOHN H. HELM, M. D., of Peru, is one of the ablest physicians in Northern Indiana. His early life was not like that of many here chronicled—a struggle with poverty—but was characterized by the possession of ample means, and for some years by travel and adventure. Having previously acquired a literary and professional education, he was able to improve his opportunities for travel by intelligent observation. Both physical and mental, he bears evidence of descent from superior stock. His paternal grandfather was a well educated German, who having settled in America, helped in the Revolutionary war to defend the land of his adoption. His father, Dr. John C. Helm, an early settler of Miami County, and one of its most wealthy and influential citizens, was a man of vigorous intellect and iron will, and his mother, Amy (Hampton) Helm, was the daughter of Major John Hampton, of South Carolina, who served with General Jackson in the war of 1812, and a second cousin of the noted Wade Hampton of the present day. Dr. John C. Helm was born at Charleston, in what is now West Virginia, November 7, 1800. Two years later the family removed to Washington County, Tennessee. At eleven years of age he entered Washington College, and during the course walked every day to and from school, a distance of three and-a-half miles. He embraced the medical profession, and pursuing it with characteristic zeal and energy, became a well qualified physician. In 1821 he married Amy Hampton, above mentioned, by whom he had eight children. In 1835 he removed to Preble County, Ohio, and there practiced medicine until 1844, when he came to Miami County, Indiana, built a large flouring mill at Peru, and afterward another at Peoria, in the same county, where he finally established his home. There he continued the duties of his profession, and so invested the receipts as to amass a fortune. In 1865 occurred the death of his intelligent and devoted wife. After this severe affliction he divided most of his real estate among his three sons, giving to each property of much value. These sons are John H., Henry T., a prominent lawyer of Chicago, and David B., a farmer, who are respected wherever known. Sometime after making this liberal provision for his children, Doctor Helm married in Chicago, his son Henry's mother-in-law, an estimable lady, but she soon died, and he did not long survive her. On the 7th of September, 1847, the strong man, who had never known weakness or defeat, yielded to the resistless enemy, death. He was a man of wonderful energy- and tenacity of purpose. He had made and lost fortune after fortune, but no adversity could wholly overcome him, and finally, as if victorious over adverse fate, he died in the possession of wealth. His son, Doctor John H. Helm, the principal subject of this sketch, was born at Elizabethtown, Carter County, Tennessee, April 23, 1826. His education was gained chiefly through private instruction. Having inherited in some respects his father's tastes,, he studied medicine, first under Doctor Pliny M. Crume, at Eaton, Ohio, and with Doctor Charles L. Avery. In 1844 he entered the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, from which he graduated in 1847 and immediately commenced practice in partnership with Doctor Crume, at Eaton. In the meantime, in the spring of 1846, he was mustered into the United States service under General Wool, and served one year in the war with Mexico. The years 1848-'49 and 1850 were spent in traveling through California, Oregon, Mexico, the West Indies and Central America, and a portion of South America. In 1851 he married Mary Henkle, daughter of Rev. Andrew Henkle, of Germantown, Ohio, but she died only about a year later. Having resumed the duties of his profession with Doctor Crume, he remained at Eaton until 1860, when he removed to Peru, Indiana. ' There he soon 4 established himself in the confidence and esteem of the people and gained a large and lucrative practice. In 1854 he married his second wife, Margaret Ridenour, of Preble County, Ohio. They have three children, one daughter and two sons, living. He still resides in Peru and intends to abide there the remainder of his days. Besides attending to his patients Doctor Helm directs the management of his farms in Miami County, Indiana, and Champaign County, Illinois. Though he possesses good business qualifications and has acquired considerable wealth, his chief ambition has been to excel in the medical profession, and he has lent his best energies in that direction. In this laudable purpose he has not failed, as shown in part by the honors conferred upon him by various medical societies. The Indiana State Medical Society, of which he is a member, made him in 1876 their president. In 1872 he was elected president of the Miami County Medical Society. He organized the Peru Board of Health and has ever since been its president. He is a member also of the American Medical Association. Dr. Helm has contributed various able articles to these societies and to medical journals. He was one of the company of 173 physicians who crossed the continent to San Francisco to attend the meeting of the American Association in that city in 1871, and an honorary membership in the California Medical was there conferred upon him. Having been absorbed in the labors of his profession, Dr. Helm has neither sought nor accepted any political distinction, though his talents and acquirements would have enabled him to succeed in that field. He was a Democrat in early life, but in later years he has voted for those candidates he deemed most eligible, regardless of their party connection. He is a member of the Catholic church. Tall, powerful and possessing much personal magnetism, Dr. Helm is fitted to influence men by these qualities alone, and, uniting with them talent, culture and experience, he cannot fail to be a leader in every enterprise he undertakes. His lot seems enviable, and it is hoped he may long live in the enjoyment of his family, his medical reputation and the material blessings with which he is surrounded.

COLEMAN HENTON came to Miami County in 1837, and is a native of Washington, Fayette County, Ohio,. He was born March 7, 1822, and is the eldest son of Benjamin and Rachel (Stinson) Henton, natives of Rockingham County, Virginia, and Ross County, Ohio, respectively, the former being born in 1793 and the latter in 1801. They came to Peru in 1837, where the husband followed the practice of medicine until March, 1863, when his death occurred. He was elected to the Legislature in 1846 and to the State Senate in 1852, serving one term in each house. The subject was reared principally in Peru where he secured a very good education, He was elected Sheriff on the Democratic ticket in 1847 and served two terms, and was a mail agent from 1856 to 1860, running over the I., P. & C. route. In 1854 he held! the responsible position of cashier of the State Stock Bank of Peru, which he held for one year, and he then moved on a farm of 120 acres a short distance north of Peru. His marriage to Miss Caroline Skinner was solemnized November 1, 1855, she being a daughter of Corsen C. Skinner (deceased), of this county. Three children were born as the result of this union. Mr. Henton's political views are Democratic.

CARTER B. HIGGINS, M. D., is a native of Preble County, Ohio, born December 15, 1843, being the eldest of the family of Jesse and Ann M. (Rodebaugh) Higgins, natives respectively of Montgomery County, Ohio, and Albany, New York. The family is of English extraction. The father of our subject came to Miami County in 1846 and settled in Peru. He first took charge of the Peru Mills and subsequently dealt in real estate. From 1858 to to 1860, he was Deputy Treasurer of Miami County. Later he was Mayor of Peru. He was a prominent man and held many positions of trust with credit to himself. His death took place January 17, 1879, having been born in 1806. His marriage was solemnized December 27, 1841. Of five children born, only two survive; Harriet M. Logue, of Chicago, and the subject of this biography, who was educated at the Peru High School and Earlham College. At eighteen years of age he began the study of medicine in the office of Drs. Constant and Walker, of this city, and in October, 1865, he entered the Rush Medical College at Chicago and graduated from that institution in 1866, and then returned to Peru, and engaged in the practice of his profession in partnership with Dr. Walker, one of his preceptors. This union practice continued until 1869, when Dr. Higgins removed to Rochester, Indiana, where he remained a short time and then returned to Peru and this has since been his residence. He still continues the active practice and is one of the leading physicians of Miami County. He was married January 22, 1868, to Miss Sarah E. Jay, of Miami County, daughter of Thomas Jay, deceased. To this issue are three children; Clara, Jesse and Alice. Dr. Higgins is Secretary of the Miami Medical Society, and Treasurer of the State Society and a member of the American Association. He also holds the position of consulting surgeon of the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Hospital located at Peru. He is a Mason and a man of prominence and honor.

JOSEPH HOLMAN. Prominent among the pioneers of Miami County was Joseph Holman, a name familiar to all the early residents of the city of Peru. He was a native of Kentucky and son of George Holman, who figured conspicuously in the early annals of the "Dark and Bloody Ground," locating there many years ago when the country was in the possession of the Indians. When quite young he was stolen by the savages who kept him a prisoner until his seventeenth year, in the meantime becoming habituated to all the modes and customs of the tribe, with the majority of which he appears to have been on terms of greatest friendship. He left Kentucky in an early day emigrating to Indiana and settling in Wayne County, where his death occurred a number of years ago at the advanced age of one hundred and seven years. Joseph Holman came to Indiana about the year 1820 and located in Wayne County, where he continued to reside until 1836. In the latter year removed to Miami County and settling in Miamisport, purchased a tract of 640 acres of land on the Wabash, upon the eastern half of which the original plat of Peru was subsequently laid out by William N. Hood. A large portion of the western half is included in the city limits, and the entire tract now represents a value of several million dollars. Mr. Holman traded extensively in lands and all kinds of real estate and was prominently associated with the early growth of Peru and Miami County. He was land commissioner at Fort Wayne, during the administration of John Quincy Adams, but soon after the inauguration of Andrew Jackson was relieved of the office for political reasons. He was a man of recognized ability in the various spheres of life, an active politician, and took part in the convention which framed the present constitution of Indiana, having been elected a delegate to the same. He married Lydia Overman by whom he had the following children: Mary, Soloman, Martha and Elizabeth, deceased, and Rachel, Margaret,' William and George, living. In about the year 1839 he disposed of his interests in Miami County and returned to Wayne County, where his death occurred in 1872 at the age of eighty-four years.

SOLOMON HOLMAN, second child and oldest son of Jos. Holman, was born 1813 in Wayne County. In early life he learned civil engineering and assisted on many public works of Indiana, having been for sometime employed in surveying the White Water Canal, and subsequently was assistant superintendent under Jesse Williams in the construction of the Wabash and Erie Canal. He located permanently in Miami County in 1836, and in addition to his duties as civil engineer, carried on a farm west of Peru, now in the corporation limits of the city. He was a prominent citizen of Miami County, a leading Mason, and his funeral in August, 1852, was the occasion of one of the largest Masonic pageants ever witnessed in Peru. He married about the year 1835 Mary Forgy, daughter of Stewart and Margaret Forgy, of Ohio, but early settlers of this county, moving here early in the thirties. The following are the names of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Holman, viz.: Margaret, wife of N. Black; Lewis P., Lydia J., wife of John Melcher; William, Emma (deceased), wife of N. Balantine; Joseph and Edgar (deceased).

. LEWIS P. HOLMAN, the gentleman whose biographical sketch is herewith presented, is the eldest son of Solomon and Mary E. (Forgy) Holman, natives respectively of Indiana, and Ohio. The father was a pioneer of Miami County, emigrating here as early as the year 1836 and settling a short distance from the City of Peru, where he engaged in agricultural pursuits which he carried on for a number of years in connection with his profession of civil engineer. He bore a a conspicuous part in the early development of the county, was a man of much more than ordinary powers of mind, and departed this life about the year 1852. Lewis P. Holman was born on the paternal homestead, in Miami County, on the 24th day of May 1841. He spent the greater portion of his early life as a farmer securing in the public schools an education, which, although not of the highest scholastic order, was of a character that has since enabled him to participate successfully in the details of an active business life. Upon the breaking out of the rebellion, when but little more than twenty years of age, with the spirit that actuated the movements of all patriotic young men and old, throughout the entire North, he volunteered in the service of his country to do battle for the maintenance of her rights. In October, 1861, he enlisted in company G, 51st Indiana infantry and shared the vicissitudes and fortunes of war with the same until honorably discharged from the service on the 13th day of January, 1866. His military record is one of which he feels justly proud, and during his term of service, he participated in many of the bloodiest battles of the war, among which were Perrysville, Stone River, Shiloh, Chickamauga, Franklin, Nashville and numbers- of lesser engagements. Immediately after enlistment he was promoted corporal, later to 4th duty sergeant and from that to orderly sergeant. On the 2d day of April, 1865, he was promoted to 2d lieutenant, which commission he held until the close of the war. Having thus completed his military career, he returned to Miami County and engaged in the pursuit of agriculture which he carried on successfully until 1878, at which time he abandoned the farm and began the lumber business in the City of Indianapolis where he remained until 1882. In th,e latter year he again returned to Miami County and engaged in the real estate and insurance business in Peru, which he has since continued successfully and with financial profit. Mr. Holman is a man of liberal views, and while taking an active part in political affairs has never been a partisan in the sense of seeking official position. He votes the Republican ticket and is an active member of the G. A. R. and the Masonic fraternities. On the 20th of February, 1866, was solemnized his marriage with Miss Emily Blake, daughter of Samuel Blake, one of the early settlers of Miami County. Mr. and Mrs. Holman have two children, namely: Roxella and Lou Emma.

WILLIAM N. HOOD, one of the original proprietors of of Peru, was a native of Ohio, born about the year 1791 or '92. His father, Andrew Hood, emigrated from Kentucky in an early day and was one of the first residents in the vicinity of Dayton, near which city the subject of this biography passed his youth and early manhood. In 1819 William Hood came to Indiana and located in Fort Wayne, where, for a number of years, he carried on a successful mercantile business, dealing extensively with the Indians during the period of his residence there. He moved to Miami County in 1831 and purchased of Mr. Holman a large tract of land on the Wabash River, including that upon which the City of Peru now stands. In 1834, m partnership with Richard L. Britton and Hon. Jesse L. Williams, he laid out the original plat of the city for the ostensible purpose of securing the county seat. After locating the town Mr. Hood engaged in speculating in lands and real estate, which he followed until his death, and in which he was very successful, accumulating a valuable property and becoming quite wealthy. While a resident of Fort Wayne he became acquainted with and married Sophia C. Ewing, daughter of Alexander and Charlotte E. Ewing, who were among the early prominent residents of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Hood raised a family of five children, viz: Andrew A. (deceased), Richard B. (deceased), William E., David B., living at this time in Peru, and Susan W., wife of Howard Huggins, of New York City. Mr. Hood*was a man of fine abilities, and in 1836 was elected to represent Miami County in the State Legislature. He served one term and in 1838 was re-elected to the same position, but did not live to enter the second time upon the discharge of his official duties, dying on the 9th day of July of the latter year. Mrs. Hood survived her husband about thirty-one years, dying in 1869.

MICHAEL HORAN is a native of the County of Roscommon, Ireland, and was born September 22, 1841. His parents are Michael and Margaret (Byrne) Horan, also natives of Ireland, who emigrated to the United States in 1847 and located in Sandusky City, Ohio. The subject was reared in Hamilton, Ohio, where he received a common school education. He came to Miami County in 1861, where he has since resided. He was elected County Surveyor in 1880 on the Democratic ticket, and was the candidate for the fourth time. Previous to his election he was engaged at his trade—painting—which he learned when a boy. On the 23d of September, 1886, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Campbell.

JACOB HOSTETLER came to Miami County in the year 1847 from Tuscarawas County, Ohio, where he was born January 8, 1826, the youngest son of twelve children born to Benjamin and Catharine (Miller) Hostetler, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. Our subject was reared on a farm in his native county, and then settled on a farm in Erie Township, where he remained until 1883, when he came to Peru Township. He has held the offices of Assessor and Trustee of Erie Township, and is the possessor of 280 acres of fine land situated in these townships. June 25, 1846, he and Miss Elizabeth Shetler were united in holy matrimonial bonds, and to them eleven children have been born, ten of whom are living: Mary E., Benjamin, John, Caroline, Gideon, Frank, Jacob H., Elizabeth, Ulysses G., Edward and Laura. He and family are members of the U. B. Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.

REV. WALTER L. HUFFMAN, one of the pioneer ministers of the Methodist Church in Northern Indiana, was born in Tioga County, New York, on the 5th day of June 1816. When about three years of age, his parents removed to Livingston County and settled near Genessee, the same State. Here young Walter was sent to the district school in a little deserted cabin that had been vacated by some previous occupant. This primitive building was fitted up with rail seats and other furniture in keeping, and here the young student was required to study until both head and back were almost racked with pain. When he had arrived at sufficient age he worked on the farm in summer and attended school at intervals during the winter seasons. • Subsequently his parents heard of the far west, which was then Ohio, and possessed of an ardent desire to move to a place where cheap lands could be obtained they sold out after the lapse of a few years, and emigrating to Northern Ohio, settled near Florence, in Huron County. Here Walter, being now a young man, took charge of his father's farm and while thus employed, snatched what time he could from his daily toil to study. By a thorough course of reading, the greater part of which was done by the flickering light of the old lard lamp stuck in the jamb of the chimney, he soon became well informed on all the current topics of the day, besides making substantial progress in history and some of the higher branches of learning. As he advanced in his studies, he sought an opportunity to recite to an instructor which was soon gratified in the person of Rev. J. F. Chaplin, a minister of much learning and piety, then stationed at Elyria, Ohio. In 1828, before leaving his native state, in a revival meeting near Brook's Grove, conducted by Rev. A. Haywood, he, with a number of others, gave his young heart to Christ and connected himself with the Methodist Episcopal church. At the same time and place he felt that he was called to the work of the ministry, to which end he directed his education and all his mental and moral nature that he might become, as he afterwards did, a successful preacher of the gospel. In the winter of 1837 he came to Indiana and settled at Crawfordsville where he was licensed to preach, and during the interim of the session of the Annual Conference in 1839, taught school in various parts of the country. He was subsequently requested by Major J. C. Elston, at the time postmaster at Crawfordsville, to take charge of the post office, which position he accepted and filled to the entire satisfaction of the people and his employer. In the fall of 1839, he was recommended as a suitable candidate to be received into traveling ministry, and at the Annual Conference held that year at Lawrenceburgh, he was duly received and sent to Covington circuit as junior preacher, the Rev. James L. Thompson being preacher in charge. In the fall of 1840 he was sent to the Rensselaer circuit and the fall of 1841 to Williamsport, where he remained for only a short time. As the preacher sent to Logansport had by reason of poor health resigned, the Presiding Elder changed him from Williamsport to Logansport to fill out the unexpired term. The following year he was sent to South Bend, from the latter place to LaPorte, thence to Crawfordsville station, and from the latter place to Centreville, in Wayne County. At the close of his second year at this station he was appointed agent for the Asbury University, now DuPauw, in which capacity he continued for a period of two years. Severing his connection with the agency, he was sent to Peru station, and during his two years' pastorate he built the Main Street Church, which still stands an eloquent monument to his untiring energy and industry. At the close of his pastoral labors in this city he was appointed Presiding Elder of the Peru District, the duties of which responsible position he discharged for two years. Near the expiration of his term in the district it was but too plainly seen by his many friends that his health was giving way, and that lighter work and less exposure to the rigor of the weather was absolutely necessary. The Bishop sent him the second time to take charge of the Logansport station. It was during his second pastorate in that city that he commenced the erection of that beautiful stone temple of worship on Broadway, one of the most commodious church edifices in Northern Indiana. He closed his labors in Logansport at the end of one year, and, although strongly solicited to return, saw fit on account of rapidly failing health to decline, and it was at his request that that year was granted by the conference a certificate of location. Since then he has been an earnest laborer in the local ranks, and, as such, has done as much work for the Master as he could possibly have done as traveling minister, having had and still has more calls to preach than he can find time to fill. His popularity as a minister is attested by the fact that the people, who have had the privilege of once hearing him, always desire to attend his meetings the second time, and scores of persons, noted for their deep piety and active Christian experience, were induced to abandon the ways of sin for the better way leading to Life and Holiness, through the effect of his eloquent and powerful appeals. As a pulpit orator he is always clear and logical in his statements, eloquent and impressive in application, and well calculated in his manner to effectually reach the hearts of the people. During the half century of his ministry he has united in marriage over eleven hundred couples, and in the dark hours of bereavement, has officiated at the funerals of more than twelve hundred persons. The companion of his youth died in 1871. The children, one son and a daughter are still living. This venerable and highly honored servant of God is now in his seventy-first year, and although the frosts and snows of many winters have been scattered upon his brow-—eloquent of the rapidly passing time—yet life's evening is full of hope and the promise of a brighter day to come.

NICHOLAS A. HULL, the subject of this biography, is a native of Sweden, and dates his birth from the 25th day of April, 1848, a son of Magnus and Thoa Hull. During his boyhood and early youth he attended the schools of his native country and laid the foundation for a good education, which, aided by travel and experience, has developed into a fund of practical knowledge. Having early manifested decided taste for mechanical pursuits he, at the age of twelve, began to learn the cabinet maker's trade, in which he soon acquired considerable proficiency. Thinking that the New World afforded better opportunities for a young man than his native land, he left the latter in 1861, and emigrated to the United States; located in New York City, where he found employment as a skilled workman in the manufacture of piano-fortes. In the fall of 1863 he joined the United States navy as a carpenter's mate, and subsequently (1866) went to the City of Chicago, where he worked at his trade until he removed to Peru in the year 1872. Upon reaching the city he engaged with the Indiana manufacturing company, and at this time holds the responsible position of superintendent of the cabinet department for the manufacture of sewing machine wood work. Mr. Hull is a skillful mechanic, thoroughly conversant with all the details of the trade, and has the confidence of his employers. Politically he is a supporter of the Democratic party, though he has never figured as a partisan or office seeker. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, in the deliberations of which order he takes an active part. He was united in marriage with Miss Cecelia Lawson, of Chicago, on October 16, 1868.

DAVID IRWIN was born January 27, 1847, in Peru, and is the eldest son of Hezekiah and Matilda (Coughenour) Irwin, natives of Huntington County, Pennsylvania, who came to Miami County in 1845, and located in Peru, where our subject was reared. At the age of fifteen he began to learn the butcher's trade with Mr. Henry Mack (deceased), and in 1867 commenced the business for himself. November 13, 1870 he was united in marriage to Miss Nellie H. Pierce, a native of this State. To them has been born one child, Harry, January 27, 1872. He was again married September 28, 1876, to Miss Emma N. Stigleman, of Peru, daughter of Samuel M. Stigleman. Our subject's father was married in 1845, and became the parent of four children, viz: David, Caroline, William (deceased), and Samuel. David, the subject of this biographical sketch, is an Odd Fellow, this being the only secret society of which he is a member, and in politics is a Democrat. He received a very fair education, and all in all is a most worthy citizen.

ELI J. JAMISON was born in Frederick County, Maryland, November 24, 1820, and is the fourth son of John and Sarah (Harris) Jamison, both natives of Maryland and of English-Scotch origin. The subject of the biography remained on the Maryland farm until 1837, when he came to Indiana and located in Wayne County, where for three years he served as an apprentice at the cabinet maker's trade. In 1848 he engaged in the general furniture and undertaking business in Muncie, in partnership with his brother John Jamison. In 1856 he came to Peru, where he continued the business until 1880, when he sold the furniture department and is now only engaged in the undertaking business. He has been a member of the Town Council for more than ten years. The marriage of Mr. Jamison occurred 1841, to Miss Sarah Dinwiddie, a native of Peru. They have two children, viz.: Henry B. and Elizabeth L. Mrs. Jamison died in 1846. In 1848 Mr. Jamison was married to Miss Mary S. Marshall of Kentucky. He is a member of the Democratic party and of the Masonic fraternity, and also an Odd Fellow.

JAMES J. KEYES is a native of Pickaway County, near Circleville, Ohio, and was born November 6, 1846. He is a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Oman) Keyes, natives of the same county in Ohio. The father came to Butler Township, this county, in 1847; was a farmer, died September 18, 1868; was at one time township assessor of Butler Township. The mother's death occurred September 4, 1879. The Person  whose name appears at the commencement of this sketch was reared on the farm in Butler Township, and at the age of twenty secured employment with a Mr. Whittenberger, grocer, as clerk, and afterwards engaged with Mr. N. C. Brower, boot and shoe dealer, where he remained until 1876, when he formed a co-partnership with Alexander Keyes and started a general store at Xenia, where they continued until 1882, when he purchased a shoe store in Logansport and moved the stock to Peru, and since 1883 has been transacting business at that place. In June, 1885, Wm. M. Trout became his business partner. Mr. Keyes was married to Miss Ida Jacobs, daughter of Samuel Jacobs of Logansport, June 10, 1880, to whom were born two children; Evelyn, born December 9, 1883, and Clarence L:, born October 29, 1885. He is an ardent adherent of the principles and practices of the Republican party, and is a member of the Knights of Honor. Mr. Keyes is an honest, upright citizen and commands the respect of the entire community in which he resides.

RICHARD KILGORE, editor and proprietor of the Evening Journal, was born in Peru, Indiana, December 18, 1866, and is the second child of W. W. and Jane (Kinsley) Kilgore, natives of Kentucky. W. W. Kilgore came to Miami County Indiana, in 1868 and for some years was in partnership with E. H. Shirk in the mercantile business. Richard Kilgore received a rudimentary education in the schools of Peru, supplemented by a course in Wabash College, which institution he attended for some time. He served a four years apprenticeship in the Republican office, under Reed and Lockwood and after acquiring proficiency in the printer's trade, worked at the same in various places, having been one year employed on The Enterprise, published at Michigan City. In June, 1885, he accepted a position in the office of The Chicago Tribune which he held until March, 1886, when he returned to Peru, Indiana and purchased the Evening Journal, of which he has since been editor and proprietor. He has displayed fine ability in Journalism and at this time is perhaps the youngest editor in the State. He He was married September 7, 1886 to Miss Gertrude Canrode, daughter of T. W. and Jenny Canrode, of Kokomo, Indiana.

FRED A. KISSELL, Deputy Clerk Miami Circuit Court, was born in Peru, Indiana, May 17, 1858; the only son of George H. and Sallie T. (Tracy) Kissell. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, born February 26, 1833. He came to Indiana in 1853, and was for a number of years express messenger on the I. P. & C. railroad, having run on the first train from Indianapolis to Peru. He subsequently abandoned the road and located in Peru, and later moved to a farm near the city. He operated a large stone quarry for a period of about ten years, and died June 22, 1886. Mrs. Kissell was the daughter of Carleton Tracy, who was one of the earliest pioneers of Miami County, settling here when Peru was but a niche in the surrounding forest. He was prominently identified with the early history of the county, held many positions of trust, and departed this life about the year 1865. Mrs. Kissell was born in Peru January 7, 1834, and died August 22. 1882. Fred A. Kissell was reared to manhood in Miami County, received a liberal education in the country and city schools, and at the early age of sixteen accepted a position in the Circuit Clerk's office under Jesse S. Zern. At the expiration of that official's term of service he was appointed deputy by the present clerk, Charles A. Parsons, a position he still retains. Mr. Kissell is a careful business man and an accomplished penman, and his records are among the neatest and best kept of those in any of the public offices. He votes the Republican ticket and is a member of the Masonic fraternity. On the 5th of November, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie D. Deniston, a union blessed with two children, Nellie M., born July 26, 1880, and Jessie F., born August 13, 1883. Mrs. Kissell was born July 5, 1860, in the city of New York.

JULIUS KOHLS is a native of Prussia, Germany, was born November 3, 1851, and is the son of Wilhelm and Catharine Kohls. He emigrated to the United States in 1872, and came direct to Peru. In December, 1885, J. M. Garver, his step-father, came to America and located in Peru. He is engaged in business in connection with Mr. Albert Moesk. In April, 1876, he was united in marriage with Miss Louisa Conradt, a daughter of Mr. Charles Conradt (deceased), of this county. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kohls, viz: Otto, Hulda, Hedwig and Catharine. Mr. Kohls has been an energetic citizen since his advent to this country, and by his judicious management has acquired a pleasant home and comfortable surroundings. He and his family are members of the German Luthern Church and he is a Democrat.

JOHN C. KRATZER, a native of Switzerland, born March 23, 1833, son of Christian and Elizabeth Kratzer. The family emigrated to America in 1849, and settled near Wooster, Ohio, and remaining there one year came to Miami County in 1850 and settled on a farm in Clay Township and here the father of Mr. Kratzer died February 11, 1883, the mother preceding him December 19, 1881. The subject of this biography had the advantages of fine schools and received a classical education. At the age of ten he began serving an apprenticeship at the jeweler's trade at his birthplace, Cheux-de-Fonds, Switzerland. He came to Peru in 1852, since which time he has been engaged in the jewelry business in this city. By industry and energy he has succeeded, and is now one of the best business men in his line in this county. He was married November 10, 1857, to Miss Eliza Rettig, a native of Ohio. By that union two children, were born. Mrs. Kratzer died April 2, 1879, and May 25, 1881 he married Mrs. Sarah Rettig, widow of John Rettig. Mr. Kratzer has been a member of the Peru City Council. He is a K. of P. and an Odd Fellow. He is a good citizen and an honorable man. He erected Odd Fellows Hall in this city. He is a Democrat. Mrs. Kratzer has one daughter by her first husband.

JOSEPH H. LARIMER, Clerk elect of Miami Circuit Court. Conspicuous among the self-made men of Miami County, is the gentleman whose name introduces this biographical sketch. Mr. Larimer was born in Deer Creek Township, this county, on the 3rd day of February, 1854, and is the fourth son of Joseph D. and Mary A. (Miller) Larimer, natives of Fairfield and Perry Counties, Ohio, respectively. Joseph D. Larimer was born in the year 1826, emigrated to Indiana in 1846, and settled on a farm in Deer Creek Township, where his death occurred August 11, 1877. Joseph H. Larimer was reared to agricultural pursuits, received in the common schools a good English education, and at the age of twenty-one abandoned the farm, and commenced reading law with Messrs. Farrar & Carpenter, of Peru. He was admitted to the bar, October, 1880, but did not at once engage in the active practice of his profession, taking charge of the Bunkerhill Press, a weekly paper published at Bunker Hill, of which he was editor and proprietor, for about one year. Severing his connection with said paper, he returned to Peru and entered upon the active practice of the law, which he has since successfully continued. He early took an active interest in political affairs and developed considerable ability as a successful politician and organizer. He is an unflinching Democrat, and in 1886 was nominated by his party for the office of Circuit Clerk. He made the race against one of the most popular candidates the opposition could put in the field, and after a very close and exciting contest, was elected by a decided majority. As a business man and attorney, Mr. Larimer is straightforward, upright and honorable, and as a citizen, he enjoys the respect and confidence of all who know him. On the 21st day of November, 1882, was solemnized his marriage with Miss Lillie M. Bliler, of Cass County, Indiana, to which union one child, Edna, has been born.

ABRAHAM LEHMAN. The subject of this sketch is a native of Germany, born in Wurtemburg on the 19th of May, 1845. He enjoyed superior educational advantages in his youth, attending first the common and high schools of his native country and subsequently the Kumzelan College, from which he graduated after a four»years course. His literary education being completed Mr. Lehman, at the age of nineteen sailed for the United States and on reaching his destination came direct to Peru, Indiana, where he engaged as clerk with the mercantile firm of the Levi Brothers. He continued in that capacity for only a limited period; engaging in 1867 with David Adler in the dry goods business at Attica, Indiana, where he carried on that branch of trade until 1870. He returned to Peru, the latter year and opened out in the clothing business, which he continued with success and financial profit until 1879. He then engaged in the flax bagging and tow manufacturing, in partnership with the Rosenthal Bros., and in 1881 became a member of a stock company of which in 1882 he was elected President. This company operate the large flax mills just west of the city, one of the leading industries of the county and do an extensive and prosperous business. Mr. Lehman was married October 29, 1884 to Miss Ada Rosenfield, of Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Lehman have two children, viz: Bernard and Minnie F.

WILLIAM W. LOCKWOOD, editor of the Peru Republican, was born in Preble County, Ohio, December 24, 1835. His father, George W. Lockwood, was born in Sussex County, Delaware, in 1809, and was accidentally killed in 1837. The mother of Mr. Lockwood was Belinda Lockwood, whose maiden name was Jackson. She died in Preble County, Ohio, in 1840, having been born in that county in 1813. The paternal grandfather of our subject was William Lockwood, who was born in Delaware in 1776; emigrated to Preble County, Ohio, in 1826, and died there the following year. The grandmother of Mr. Lockwood was Phoebe (Dingle) Lockwood, born in Delaware in 1775, and died in Ohio in 1840. The Lockwood family is of English origin, though the family has been known in America for more than a century. The subject of this sketch is the elder of two sons and because of the early death of his parents, was reared by his kindred, and in the tenth year of his age came to Miami County with his uncle, Daniel D. Lockwood. He first attended the common schools and subsequently was a student at Wabash College. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, Eighty-sixth Indiana Volunteers, and was honorably discharged at the close of the conflict between the States. From 1865 to 1867 he was an employee in the Indianapolis post office. In the latter part of 1867 he engaged in teaching school, which occupation he continued without interruption until 1878. As a teacher he was a pronounced success, and is yet an uncompromising friend of the public schools and extended education. In 1878 he came to Peru and purchased a half interest in the Peru Republican, and in this connection continues, and is a leading newspaper man of this portion of Indiana. Politically, he is an ardent Republican, and ever on the alert for the-best interests of his party. His first right of suffrage was exercised for Lincoln for President. In 1867 he was made a Mason, and is also a charter member of the K. of P. lodge of this city and also G. A. R. post. December 28, 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Waite, daughter of the late Sullivan and Margaret (Woods) Waite of this county. Mrs. Lockwood was born in Allen Township, this county, February 24, 1848. To this union are five sons and two daughters, viz.: Charles W., George B., Margaret H., William W., Florence B., Arthur S., and Albert L. He and wife are members of the M. E. church, and are among the best people of this city or county.

EBENEZER P. LOVELAND, late prominent lawyer of Peru, was born# at West Rutland, Vermont, November 25, 1817. His parents were Col. Joseph and Beulah (Pratt) Loveland. When he was ten years of age his parents moved to Granville, Ohio, at which place he attended school until his sixteenth year. His father dying at that time obliged him to rely in a great measure upon his own resources, and shortly afterward he engaged in teaching, which he continued several years, pursuing his literary studies when not thus employed. He early chose the profession of law for a life work, and began his preparatory reading of the same under competent instructors at Richmond, Indiana, where he remained until the year 1840. He removed to Miami County that year and began the practice of his profession in Peru, where his high legal abilities soon won for him a conspicuous place. He continued in the active practice at the Miami bar for a period of fifteen years, during which period he achieved the record of never having lost an important case entrusted to his management. During the time he was practicing he was associated with Mr. Beal, under the firm name of Loveland & Beal, and Judge N. O. Ross, under the title of Loveland & Ross, the latter having been one of the strongest law firms in Miami County. In 1856 Mr. Loveland entered the field of journalism and founded the Peru Republican, which was the first successful effort to run a newspaper in opposition to the Democracy in Miami County. The early success of this enterprise was such as to cause, for a time, the suspension of the opposing paper. From the year 1863 to 1867 he was engaged as assistant paymaster, Indiana Legion, with headquarters at Indianapolis, and at the time the Democratic members of the Indiana Legislature resigned their seats in order to prevent the adoption of the Fifteenth Amendment, was the Republican candidate for the Legislature, but was defeated by a very small majority. In addition to his extensive professional business Mr. Loveland always took a conspicuous part in the internal improvement of the county and was largely instrumental in inaugurating the present efficient turnpike system of Miami. He also took an active interest in all measures having for their object the welfare of Peru, and while editor of the Republican persistently urged upon the citizens the propriety of improving and beautifying their premises and improving and keeping in repair the streets of the city. He early took a decided stand in favor of temperance reform in Indiana, and was an active member of the "Sons of Temperance" (having been a total abstainer from the time he signed the Washingtonian pledge when quite a small boy in Vermont), and in 1851 was a delegate to the Grand Division of that organization for this State, which met at Indianapolis. While in attendance at this meeting he was chosen a delegate to the National Division, which convened at Richmond, Virginia, in the summer of 1852. In 1853 he was made vice president of the railroad then in process of construction between the cities of Laporte and Peru. He was active in his endeavors to secure the location of the Howe Sewing Machine works in this city, and it was while trying to save the company's property in the great fire of February 10, 1876, that he met with a violent death by being crushed beneath a burning building. This sad event cast a shade of deepest gloom over the entire city and county, for his death was not only looked upon as a public calamity, but as a personal loss to the many with whom he came in contact in social and business relations. Mr. Loveland was an ardent supporter of the Republican party, honest in his political convictions and opposed to everything seeming like dishonesty and trickery. He was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church to which nearly all of his family also belonged. On the 12th day of October, 1842, at Fort Wayne, Indiana, he was united in marriage to Miss Jane Hood, by whom he had seven children, namely: Henry C. (deceased), Celia, wife of A. Faling; Alice, wife of L. Morrill; Clara, wife of B. R. Graham; Hood P., Robert J. and Irene (deceased

ROBERT J. LOVELAND, attorney at law, and youngest son of Ebenezer P. and Jane Loveland, is a native of Miami County, Indiana, born in the city of Peru, January 17, 1858. He attended the city schools until his thirteenth year and subsequently, 1873, entered Central College, Franklin County, Ohio, where he pursued his studies for a period of four years completing the prescribed course in that time. He then became a student of Wabash College, Indiana, and attended the same from 1877 till 1879, returning to Peru the latter year, and taking up the study of law in the office of Shirk & Mitchell. He pursued his legal studies under the above able instructors, until the spring of 1880, but prior to that time during his vocations, was engaged in teaching in Ohio, and Miami County, Indiana. He was admitted to the bar in 1880, but did not engage in the active practice of his profession until the spring of the following year, at which time he effected a co-partnership with E. T. Reasoner under the firm name of Reasoner and Loveland which lasted until 1884. Since June, 1884 he has been associated in the practice with R. P. Effinger one of the leading lawyers of Peru, and the firm thus constituted has a large and lucrative practice in the courts of Miami and other counties. From his boyhood Mr. Loveland has been a dilligent student, and that he has succeeded in his chosen profession is evinced by the reputation he enjoys among his brethren of the Miami County bar. He mastered the principles of the law in a short time, soon became familiar with its practice, and is now one of the best young lawyers in the city of Peru. He is an active member of the I. O. 0. F. fraternity. Votes in confirmity with the Republican party and since his thirteenth year has belonged to the Presbyterian Church.

HENRY MEINHARDT, merchant, is a native of Breslau, Germany, and only son of Henry and Elizabeth (Franke) Meinhardt. He was born March 14, 1852, and at the age of three years was brought to the United States, and for ten years thereafter resided in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1865, he removed with his parents to Columbus and three years later came to Peru, Indiana, and engaged as salesman with the mercantile firm of Kilgore & Shirk, in which capacitv he continued until 1884. In March, 1885, he engaged in the drv goods business on his own responsibilitv, and in October of the same year, effected a copartnership with Oscar L. Minor, which still continues. Mr. Meinhardt is a notable example of what energy and determination can accomplish in the face of adverse circumstances. Commencing life with little capital, save a desire to succeed, he has by diligent attention to business and strict probity of character, won for himself a place in the confidence of the people, and the house which he so recently established has already become one of the well known business places of the city. Mr. Meinhardt is Independent, so far as politics are concerned, and in religion belongs to the Methodist church. His marriage was solemnized on the 11th day of February, 1880, with Miss Missouri Hazzard, daughter of John Hazzard, of Kokomo, a union blessed with the birth of one child. Mrs. Meinhardt is also a member of the Methodist church.

REV. HENRY MEISSNER is a native of Munster, in the province of Westphalia, and the capital of that province. He was born on the 3d of December, 1842. His parents, August and Catharine (Brohmeyer) Meissner, both died when he was quite young, casting him upon his own resources and compelling him to fight the battles of early life, without the assistance of paternal care, in which he succeeded admirably, as the following brief review will indicate: After the death of his parents his nearer relatives desired that he should learn the carpenter trade, but his strong desire for knowledge prompted him otherwise, and, at the age of sixteen, he. entered the gymnasium or college in his native town, where he remained until twenty-one years of age, when he graduated in Latin, Greek, mathematics, sciences and classics. He procured money sufficient to pay his tuition and purchase books, etc., by giving private instructions to his associates, and by his superiority in examinations accomplished that which he had most desired. However, not satisfied with the amount of knowledge he already possessed, after he had attained his majority he entered the university and embraced the studies of theology, law, philosophy, etc., and continued there for three years, or until 1866, when he graduated with degree in most branches as "excellent." In 1866 he embarked for America. About this time the Austrian-Prussian war broke out, lasting only about six months, and his country was about to be involved with France. He landed at New York, going direct to Baltimore, where he finished his studies in St. Mary's Seminary. Our subject was ordained priest June 30, 1868, and then went to the Diocese of Fort Wayne, which comprises the Northern portion of Indiana. Here he had charge of the parish at Goshen, Elkhart County, for two and one-half years, and, in the beginning of 1871, took control of the Crown Point charge, in which place he was continued for a period of nearly five years, and in September, 1875, came to Peru, where he has since had charge of the parish at this place. While at Crown Point, by his indomitable will and energy, he built a school house and church, which are both creditable reminders of his perseverance. At Peru he found the congregation encumbered with indebtedness to the amount of $16,000, which obligations have all been discharged. In 1884 he returned on a visit to the land of his birth, and while on his trip visited many of the cities of France and Italy, making a stay of about four months. In 1880 he completed a volume. of poems in the Low German entitled, "Knaffeln," or in English, "Biscuits," which was a youthful production, and also a volume in High German, the title of which is " Orgeltoene," the English of which is "Organ Strains." He was advanced in 1880 by the Bishop to the position of Examiner and Visitor of the Fort Wayne Diocese. His territory as Examiner only extends over one district, viz: Peru. He is also one of three of the Board of Theolgians for the Diocese of Fort Wayne.

MOSES MERCER, a native of Muskingum County, Ohio, was born September 5, 1827, and is the eldest son of Aaron and Mahala (Oliver) Mercer, natives of Rockingham and Tiger's Valley, Va., and who are of English origin. The father moved from Virginia in 1815 to Muskingum County, Ohio, and moved to Peru in 1845, and is now a resident of Newton County, Indiana. He was born in 1802, and is still living and enjoying a reasonable share of nature's blessing. The subject was reared in Muskingum and Putnam Counties, Ohio, on a farm, until at the age of twelve he commenced to learn the trade of mill-wrighting, which he completed at eighteen and soon after abandoning it, adopted the occupation of carpentering, at which he worked until 1866. In 1845 he was located in the town of Peru. He was engaged by the Indianapolis, Peru & Chicago Railway Company in 1865, to work in their shops, and then went with the Wabash Company, where he worked in the wood department. He married Miss Ann J. Long on March 9, 1886. Miss Long was an accomplished daughter of Mr. John Long, a Cass County pioneer, who resided in the city of Logansport. Mr. and Mrs. Mercer are the parents of five children, Ada J., May, William S., Georgie (girl), and Robert E., deceased. Her death occurred in March, 1886. Our subject is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and politically clings to the faith of the Republican party. The family are members of the Baptist church, and are regular attendants at public worship. GEORGE C. MILLER, of the mercantile firm of Shirk & Miller, was born in Cass County, Indiana, January 2, 1845, and is the eldest son of John L. and Mary (Long) Miller, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Delaware. John L. Miller was one of the pioneers of Cass County, and for some years carried on the mercantile business in Logansport, having been one of the first merchants of that city. He was a man widely and favorably known and departed this life about the year 1851. George C. Miller was raised in Cass and Miami Counties, received a practical education in the common schools, and began life for himself as salesman in the mercantile house of Kilgore & Shirk, in Peru. He continued in the capacity of clerk until 1873, at which time he become a partner, and subsequently, 1880, when Mr. Kilgore retired he purchased that gentleman's interests, thus changing the style of the firm to that of Shirk & Miller, by which title it has since been known. To describe in detail the vast amount of business transacted by this house would far transcend the limits of this sketch, but suffice it to say, that in dry goods, hardware, agricultural implements, and, in fact, all kinds of general merchandise, it is one of the largest and most successful mercantile firms in Northern Indiana, affording employment throughout the entire year to about twenty clerks and salesmen. Mr. Miller, as manager of the immense business, displays ability of a high order and a merchant thoroughly conversant with all the details of the trade, and, as a successful financier, he is, perhaps, without a peer in the city of Peru. He is withal a very popular citizen, and his success in addition to his thorough knowledge of the business, is largely due to his industry and fidelity and that courtesy which marks the well bred gentleman. He was married March, 1870, to Miss Ella Leebrick, of Wayne County, Indiana, who has borne him the following children, viz: Harry L., Charles W., Elbert S. and George C. Miller.

WILLIAM B. MILLER, Auditor of Miami County, and son of George B. and Margaret (Columbia) Miller, was born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, February 20, 1845. George B. Miller was born in Columbus, Ohio, about the year 1816, of German-Scotch ancestry, his parents being natives of Pennsylvania. He came to Indiana in 1836, settling in Fort Wayne, where he worked at the plasterer's trade, and where he resided until his removal to the town of Wabash in 1846. From there, in the year 1852 he came to Peru, where he still resides. Margaret Miller was born in the City of Fort Wayne, of French parentage, and died there on the 13th day of April, 1845. By a subsequent marriage with Mary Ross, sister of Judge N. O. Ross, of Peru, Mr. Miller has three children, all of whom are living at this time. William B. Miller was reared in Peru, moving to this city with his father when about seven years of age. He attended the city schools at intervals until his fifteenth year, at which early age he entered the army enlisting in June, 1861, in Company A., 20th Indiana Infantry, with which he shared the viscissitudes and fortunes of war in many of the bloodiest battles of the Eastern Campaigns, including among others the expedition from Fortress Monroe to Fort Hatteras. Seven days fight before Richmond and retreat to Harrison's Landing. Bull Run, Gettysburg, Frederickburg, Chancellorsville, The Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor and Petersburgh. His term of service expiring immediately after the engagement last named, he was honorably discharged at Indianapolis on the 18th of July, 1864. On leaving the army he returned to Peru, but the following October he again tendered his services to the country and joined Company K., i42d Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served till honorably discharged, August 5, 1865, spending the greater part of the time in Nashville, Tennessee. His military record thus completed, he returned home and after remaining with his friends in Peru until April, 1866, went to Kansas City, Mo., at which place he worked at the plasterer's trade until 1872. He returned to Indiana that year and worked at his vocation in Logansport, until 1875, at which time he came back to Peru, where he has since resided. In 1883 he was elected a member of the City Council of Peru and in the fall of 1886, was nominated on the Republican ticket for Auditor of Miami County; an office to which he was elected after a spirited contest, overcoming a previous Democratic majority of 350 votes. Mr. Milller's record both as soldier and civilian is one of which he feels justly proud and his triumphant election over so much opposition attests his great personal popularity, with the people of the County. He is and has been since his twenty-first year an ardent supporter of the Republican party and at this time is an active member of the G. A. R. and K. of H. orders. He was married July 18, 1872, in Cass County, Indiana, to Miss Julia, daughter of George and Mary St. Clair, of the same county and State.

OSCAR L. MINOR, of the mercantile firm of Meinhardt & Minor, was born in Rush County, Indiana, February 8, 1856, son of Constantine and Mary (Gates) Minor; both parents natives of the same State. Mr. Minor, when quite young, was taken by his parents to Rochester, Indiana, in which city he passed the years of his youth and early manhood, acquiring in the meantime from the public schools a practical English education. He came to Peru in 1872 and engaged as salesman in the mercantile house of Kilgore & Shirk, where he remained until 1855, at which time, in partnership with Henry Meinhardt, he engaged in business for himself. The firm of Meinhardt & Minor, although but recently established, has already won a conspicuous place among the successful business houses of the city, and has a reputation more than local. Mr. Minor has passed the greater part of his life in the dry goods business, and is thoroughly well posted in all the details of the trade. He was married October 13, 1881, to Mrs. Susan (Culbertson) Bearss, of Peru.

JUDGE JOHN MITCHELL, Peru. The subject of our sketch is a native of Great Britain. He was born in the city of Bristol, England, September 24, 1829. His father was a native of Prussia, and his mother a native of~England. In November, 1833, he emigrated, with his parents, to the United States, arriving at the city of Philadelphia. He lived in Delaware and Chester Counties, Pennsylvania, until ten years of age. He then removed with his parents to Wayne County, Indiana, where he remained four years. His parents then removed to Peru, Indiana, bringing their family with them, arriving on the second day of October, 1843. Mr. Mitchell attended the public school, where he received a good primary education. After completing his course of study in this department, he was sent to a seminary at Cambridge City, Indiana, where he continued his studies one year, under the supervision of Prof. Hoshour, now of the Northwestern Christian University. At the age of 14 he learned the tailor's trade with his father, who was engaged in that occupation. This trade he followed in the city of Peru for a number of years, devoting his spare moments to the acquisition of legal knowledge, in which pursuit he made rapid progress, under the instruction of the late Alphonso A. Cole. In 1861, he was elected Justice of the Peace, when he abandoned the tailor's trade, devoting his entire time to the study of law. In December, 1863, he was admitted to the bar of Miami County, and entered into partnership with Hon. H. J. Shirk, with whom he has since been associated, excepting a short interval in the winter of 1872. He was elected Justice of the Peace three terms, without opposition. He rose rapidly in his profession, taking rank with the older members of the bar. In October, 1872, less than nine years after he commenced practice, he was elected Common Pleas Judge of the Twenty-fifth Judicial District of Indiana, composed of the Counties of Miami, Cass and Pulaski. To this office he was also elected without opposition. This was a high honor to confer upon him; and more particularly so, as he is the only member of the Miami County Bar who was elevated to that position. In this capacity he served his constituents, until the Legislature abolished the court, when he resumed the practice of law with his former partner, Mr. Shirk. At the close of his brief judicial career, Judge Mitchell retired from the high position awarded him by his fellow citizens, with an enviable reputation as a jurist, and a record of which he may justly be proud. The annals of the Twenty-fifth Judicial District Court present no brighter example of integrity and dignity. He is a logical and impressive speaker, and is known throughout the county as a conscientious adviser and successful practitioner. Though a self-made man, he is one of marked ability. His name will stand out prominently, in the years to come, as an example of what may be accomplished by application and perseverance in the difficult profession of the law. Judge Mitchell was married February 24, 1859, to Miss Caroline R. Foote, of Paynesville, Ohio, who bore him several children, the following of whom are living, namely: Emily M., Samuel C. and Mary F. Mitchell. Mrs. Mitchell died on the 16th day of September, 1883. EDDMORE S. MORRIS, a native of Chillicothe, Rush County, Ohio, was born August 5, 1829, and is the eldest son of Carvil and Elizabeth (Beale) Morris, who were natives of Ohio and Virginia respectively. Eddmore S. was reared on the farm until he reached the age of eighteen, when his youthful patriotism grew so strong that he entered the service of his country in the Mexican war in the Second Ohio regiment in 1847, and remained about one year, and he then returned to the farm, there continuing until reaching his majority, 1850, when he came to Peru, and in a short time thereafter was to be found in Logansport learning the trade of a stone-cutter, and after a time, when his eanings would permit, he would attend school, applying his surplus earnings to the payment of tuition until his education was so complete that he finally engaged in school teaching,, at which he continued alternately with his trade until 1857, then returned to Peru and engaged exclusively at his business until 1862. He then purchased the Brownell farm which he managed for three years and then disposed of it and embarked in the mercantile business, in which he did not prove to be successful, losing his entire investment, $15,000. Although luck was not his companion, in 1869 he again re-opened his business, having secured the aid of some eastern capitalist, which again' re-established him, and since which time he has been doing a thriving trade in the grocery and bakery business. The 19th of January, 1857, his marriage was solemnized, he taking as a life partner Miss Nancy Johnson Grant, a native of Butler County, Ohio, and to them seven children were born. Their names are Nellie B., Jennie F., Elmer S., Wilbur G., Schuyler M., Lizzie, lea E., and Anna (deceased). In 1853 he was made a Mason and also an Odd fellow. Politically he is a Republican. His son Elmer S., is an attorney at law, born in November, 1861, and commenced practicing in 1883. He is a graduate of the High Schools of Peru, as are also Wilbur S., Schuyler M., Jennie and Nellie.

JOSEPH D. OATES, a native of New Buffalo, Berrian County, Michigan; born June 30, 1851, and is the second son of Joseph D. and Hannah (Austin) Oates. His father was born in England and his mother in Indiana. In childhood the subject removed with his parents to Lake County, Indiana. At nine years of age he went to LaPorte to live with an aunt. In 1865 he began working on a farm in Porter County. Here he was accorded the privilege of attending school during the winter months. In 1868 he returned to LaPorte and began learning the cabinet maker's trade. He came to Peru in 1871 and from that time until 1883 he was employed in the sewing machine factory of this city. Since 1883 he has been engaged in the insurance and real estate business. Mr. Oates was united in marriage to Miss Indiana E. Snively, in 1878, a daughter of John M. Snively of this city. To this union are four children, viz: Fred M., Alice E., Arlie M., and Indiana M. Mrs. Oates died May 31, 1886. In politics our subject is a Republican. In 1882 he was elected Councilman from the second ward, and reelected to the same office in 1884, and elected to the same office in 1886. He is an honorable citizen and a man greatly respected.

ANDREW J. PARKS. The subject of this biography is a native of Miami County, bornjn Richland Township on the 22nd of June, 1843. His parents, James and Jane (Watson) Parks, were born in Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. The father came to Miami County in his early manhood—about the year 1839—and purchased land in Richland Township, upon which he lived until his death, in 1860. Andrew J. Parks was raised a farmer, received a practical education in the common schools, and followed agricultural pursuits.in his native township until 188o. In that year he was elected Sheriff of Miami County, and in order to conveniently discharge his official duties, moved to Peru, where he has since resided. His official record having been one highly satisfactory to his party and the people at large throughout the county, he was re-elected in 1882 and served until 1884. At the expiration of his term of office, Mr. Parks opened out in his present business, viz.: dealing in harness, trunks and buggies, and has already met with well earned success in the enterprise. In 1865 he entered the service of his country as private in Company K, 134th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, but the war closing soon after, he was in the army for a period of only four months. He is prominently identified with the I. O. O. F., K. of P. and Masonic fraternities, and also belongs to the G. A. R. His marriage in 1866 to Miss Sarah E. Monteith, daughter of Watson Monteith, of Richland Township, has been blessed with the birth of three children, viz: Emma (deceased), Louie and Watson Parks. Politically, Mr. Parks is an ardent supporter of the Democratic party.

CHARLES A. PARSONS, Clerk of the Miami Circuit Court, was born in the city of Lockport, N. Y., July 11, 1839, and is the youngest son of Aaron and Emily (Stowe) Parsons, natives respectively of Massachusetts and Connecticut. The subject spent his youth on a farm, received in the common schools a practical education and at the age of fourteen accepted a position with the Great Western railroad company, in the employ of which he remained until he removed to Peru in 1859. In the latter year he received a position in the freight department of the I., P. & C. Railroad with headquarters in Indianapolis, and in 1861 became passenger conductor, in which capacity he continued until taking charge of the office at Kokomo one year later. He served as local agent at Kokomo until January, 1865, at which time he abandoned railroading and engaged with the American Express Company, Indianapolis, in which city he subsequently became agent for the Merchants Union Express company, remaining with the latter for a period of ten years. At the end of that time he returned to Peru and again engaged in railroading, accepting the position of roadmaster with the I., P. & C., and continuing in that capacity until 1872. In that year he became identified with the Howe Machine Company with which he remained until 1873, when he accepted the position of Deputy Clerk, Miami Circuit Court, under Jesse Zern, the duties of which position he discharged in an eminently satisfactory manner until elected to the office in 1878. Mr. Parsons was elected on the Republican ticket by a majority vote of 404, a fact which attests his great personal popularity in a reliably Democratic county. He was re-elected by a decided majority in 1882 aud is the present incumbent of the office. Mr. Parsons life has been a very active one and against his official record no breath of snspicion has ever been uttered. He is a public spirited citizen, takes a live interest in all measures having for their object the public good and is an active member of the Masonic fraternity. On the 8th day of May, 1862, was solemnized his marriage with Miss Mary A. Ferris, of Niagara Falls, N. Y., a union blessed with the birth of four children of whom the following are now living, to-wit: Anna H., Fred A., and Ella G.

JACOB PAULY, is a native of Baden, Germany, and was born January 18, 1824. He is a son of Jacob and Mary Pauly, natives of Germany. He came to this country in 1851, and his parents followed ten years latter, he having been reared on a farm and received a good German education. On coming to this country he went to Cinciunati and worked at the shoemaker's trade, at which he had served an apprenticship of three years, and then came to Peru and worked at the tailor's business for about nine years, having abandoned the shoe trade on account of his eyes. In 1869 he opened his present business in Peru, at which he has been quite successful and has succeeded in accumulating considerable property. He was married in May, 1848, to Miss Mary Weltman, a native of Germany, who are now the parents of seven children, all of whom are dead. He passed through all the chairs of a subordinate lodge of Odd Fellows, is a Republican and cast his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont.

ADAM RADER came to Miami County in the fall of 1840, from Rockingham County, Virginia. His birth occurred on the 8th of March, 1822, being the eldest son of Henry and Sarah (Hoover) Rader, natives of the same county. The father came west at the same time and located on a farm in Peru Township, where he remained until death, April 9, 1872. In 1835 the subject of this sketch came to Clinton County. He was principally reared in Montgomery County, Ohio, where he received his education. He now owns eighty acres of land in Peru Township. He was married to Miss Harriet M. Wallace June 2, 1853, a native of Highland County, Virginia, to whom were born nine children: William, Henry, Edward, Lewis, Anna M., Sarah, Elsie, Martha and Pearley. Mr. Rader is an ardent Republican.

WILLIAM RASSNER, the subject of this biography, was born in Germany on the 23d of April, 1823, and is a son of Albert and Elizabeth Rassner. He remained in his native country until nine years of age, at which time, 1832, his parents emigrated to the United States, landing at the City of Baltimore in September of the above year. From there they removed to Chambersburgh, Pennsylvania, and thence in 1835 to Dayton, Ohio, in which city the subject grew to manhood. His educational privileges were fair, the best his opportunities afforded, yet of that practical nature which enabled him at the age of fourteen to commence his business career as a druggist, at which profession he served about six years, acquiring great proficiency in the meantime. Severing his connection with his preceptor in 1846, he enlisted in the ist Ohio Regiment for the' Mexican war, and continued with the same for about one year, serving part of the time as a private soldier, and a part in the capacity of hospital steward. On leaving the army he returned to Dayton, and, in 1849, came  to Peru, Indiana, where he opened a drug house and where he has since resided. He continued the drug business with encouraging success until 1873, at which time he retired from active life, and is now enjoying that quiet which only those who have battled with the world for over a half century know how to appreciate. Mr. Rassner has taken an active interest in the welfare of his adopted city, and all measures for the public good find in him an ardent and energetic supporter. He deserves mention for his efforts in the city's interest as a member of the Common Council, to which he was elected several times, and in the deliberations of which he displayed wisdom and rare executive ability. He is at this time one of the trustees of the city water works. He was married August, 1848, to Miss Anna Raabe, of Germany, who bore him three children, viz: Matilda, Catharine and Amelia R. Mrs. Rassner died early in 1857. The latter part of the same year was solemnized his second marriage with Magdalene Springer, of Peru, a union blessed with the birth of two children, Emma and Frances. His second wife died in 1864. He married his present wife, Mary A. Stepler, in 1864, to which marriage four children have been born, viz.: Lizzie, Louisa, Elvira R., and David H. Mr. Rassner votes in conformity with the principles of the Democratic party, and has been an active participant in local politics.

JOHN H. REAM is a native of Shanesville, Tuscarawas County, Ohio, and the eldest son of William" and Harriet A. (Shultz) Ream, natives of Pennsylvania, who are of German descent, and came to Miami County in 1847 and located in Peru, the former being a blacksmith by trade. John H. was born December 10, 1838, and in 1853 commenced learning the trade of harness-making under J. M. Stutesman, serving an apprenticeship of nearly three years. Not being satisfied with his chosen vocation he secured the position of "news-butcher" on the railroad which he retained for some time, after which he worked in many departments of railroad service, and was finally promoted to that of Master of Transportation of the Grand Rapids and Indiana R. R. (northern division) in which he was retained for about three years, with headquarters at Grand Rapids, Mich., In the year 1877, with Thomas, a brother, he engaged in the grocery and bakery business, and afterwards purchased his brother's interest in July 1886. In April, 1861, he entered the service of his country in the 13th Indiana Regiment, Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered out July 2, 1864, as Sergeant, having then served over three years in this noble cause. He was wounded at the battle of the Deserted Farm, near Suffolk, Virginia. In 1865 he reentered the service as Captain of Company H., of the 151st Indiana Volunteer Infantry, at the re-organization of that regimeut, and continued until the close of the war or until the disbanding of the troops. Mr. Ream's marriage to Miss Lottie C. Covelle, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, was solemnized February 21, 1873, and to them one child—Anna M.—was born. Politically he is a Republican. He is also prominently identified with the Grand Army of the Republic, Masonic Fraternity, and Royal Arcanum, in all of which he is a highly respected and much esteemed member. He conducts, at present, the leading grocery and bakery business of Peru.

GEORGE I. REED, editor Peru Republican, was born in Cass County, Indiana, December 14, 1838; son of James and Margaret (Cox) Reed. His father was a pioneer settler of Cass County, having moved there in an early day from Ohio. His mother was a native of Tennessee; her father served in the war of 1812. Mr. Reed was educated in the district schools, at the Cass County Seminary and the Union Christian College at Merom, where he graduated in 1866. As a student he excelled in the languages and during the last three years he taught the Latin classes. In July, 1866, he accepted the position of Superintendent of the Peru city schools, which he was obliged to resign, on account of ill health, at the end of six months. After recuperating about one year, Mr. Reed, in connection with J. M. Brown, Esq., purchased the Peru Republican, with which he has since been identified. The firm of Reed & Brown continued as such for about one year, when Mr. Reed purchased Mr. Brown's interest and remained sole proprietor until 1873. Mr. M. R. Sinks was then received as partner and he took charge of the mechanical part of the business. In May, 1878, he sold his share to W. W. Lockwood, Esq., of Odell, Illinois, since which time the firm has been Reed & Lockwood. Under Mr. Reed's management the Republican has become the leading newspaper in Miami County and it is universally recognized as one of the oldest and most influential journals of Northern Indiana. From 1867 to 1871 Mr. Reed occupied the position of School Examiner, and subsequently served as President of the City School Board of Peru. In 1878 he was elected a Representative to the Legislature. The Republican is open for articles written in the interest of education, and few men have done more than he has toward developing the present effective educational system of his county. An earnest Republican, the columns of his paper are devoted during political campaigns to advocating the principles of his party. Mr. Reed is a member of the Christian Church and an active Mason. During the war he enlisted in the 21st Indiana Volunteers, ist Heavy Artillery, but was at once detailed for clerical duties in which he continued until peace was declared. He has been foremost in supporting all enterprises for the public good. He is of medium size and build, has genial, pleasant manners and stands deservedly high as a conscientious, intelligent, public spirited citizen. January 13, 1870, he married Maggie Bell, daughter of N. Bell, Esq., a prominent citizen of Kokomo. They have one child.

WILLIAM C. H. REEDER, a native of Massillon, Stark County, Ohio, was born to Daniel and Sarah (Dames) Reeder, November 3, 1839, natives of Pennsylvania and England, respectively. The father's ancestors are of German descent. Mr. Daniel Reeder came to Miami County in the year 1854, and settled in Peru. The father was born in 1808 and the mother in 1821. The person whose name heads this sketch, is a cabinet maker, having commenced to learn the trade at the age of eighteen under Messrs. West & Jamison, and served an apprenticeship of three years. In July, 1861, he answered the country's call and enlisted in the service for its preservation, in the 20th Indiana, Company A, and was mustered out in July, 1864. Was wounded twice at the battle of Peach Orchard, Va., June 25, 1862. He came back to Peru and and was employed by his former employers, West & Jamison, with whom he again labored at his trade for about two years, after which he was employed by the I., P. & C. Railroad Company, in their wood department and is their pattern builder, at which he has been employed ever since. Our subject was united in matrimony with Miss Agnes Weist, of Huntington, Indiana, October 21, 1869, and they have been blest with the birth of six children, named Charles, Emma, Edward, Robert and Anna, who are still living, and John E., deceased. Mr. Reeder and family are very much respected citizens in the vicinity in which they reside. He is a Republican.

JOHN C. REYBURN was born in Peru, August 28, 1838; the eldest son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Timberlake) Reyburn, who hailed from Ohio and Virginia, respectively. The father of this subject came to Miami County about the year 1836, a carpenter by trade, and was, in an early day, elected Justice of the Peace. He died May 21, 1846, and the mother, May 6, 1850. John C. was also a carpenter, having learned the trade under a Mr. Timberlake, his uncle, and in 1879 commenced to work for Mr. Lenhart, who does a general furniture and undertaker's business. Near the close of the late war, March, 1865, he enlisted in the 155th Indiana Regiment, and was in the service about six months. His marriage to Miss Elizabeth Detamore was solemnized on the 18th day of August, 1859, and they are now the parents of five children, four of whom are still" living—Charles, Luella, Lillie, Emma, and Mary E. (deceased). His education was that usually received at the common schools. Our subject is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and also represents his ward in the Council of the city.

JOSEPH REYBURN was born in Miami County, Ind.' May 5, 1833, son of Rev. William M. and Sarah (Black) Reyburn. William M. Reyburn was born in Virginia Oct. 21, 1792, and when quite young emigrated to Ohio, settling near the City of Lewisburgh, where he grew to manhood's estate. He was raised a farmer, but early entered the ministry of the Methodist Church, receiving his license to preach about the year 1829 or '30. In October, 1831, he came to Miami County, Indiana, and settled on land adjoining the City of Peru, where he opened a farm, which was his home the rest of his life. He was one of the first preachers in Miami County, and, in addition to the duties of his sacred calling, took an active interest in the political affairs of the county, having been elected- a member of the Board of Commissioners in 1835, Representative in 1841, and State Senator in 1843. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and while a resident of Ohio held the office of Major in the Militia of that State. His marriage with Sarah Black, of Ohio, was solemnized June 13, 1816, a union blessed with the birth of the following children: Eliza J., James M., Caroline, Sobieski, John C., Margaret, Sarah, William B., Joseph and Sarah, all dead but the subject of this sketch. Mrs. Reyburn died Jan. 28, 1849. Mr. Reyburn's second marriage was celebrated Sept. 26, 1850, with Ann S. Wood word, who is still living. His death occurred June 1, 1854. Joseph Reyburn was raised in Miami County, and has spent all his life on the paternal estate west of Peru. He was educated in the early schools of the city, which he attended at intervals until attaining his majority, when he began life upon his own responsibility, choosing agriculture as a vocation. He has led a quiet and ueventful life, and belongs to that substantial class of citizens whose recommendations to the confidence of the people are actions instead of words. He affiliates with the Republican party, and is a zealous Christian, having been born and raised in the Methodist Church, to which his family also belongs. On the 25th of March, 1856, in St. Joseph County, Ind., he married Rachel L., daughter of George and Hannah Deacon, of Ohio, to which marriage the following children have been born, to-wit: William A., Edwin C., Joseph S. and Marv Reyburn.

"HENRY REYNOLDS was born in the city of Ithaca, New York, May 21, 1837, and is the son of Abraham and Amanda (Purdy) Reynolds. His ancestors were English people, and several representatives of the family came to the New World in the first vessel that landed at the mouth of the Delaware River early in the 17th century. The subject's grandfather, Samuel Reynolds, was a native of New York, and for many years a prominent business man of New York City, where he carried on the banking business. The grandfather, on the mother side, Monmouth Purdy, was born in New York also, and was a large farmer and stock raiser of Cayuga Count}-. Abraham Reynolds was born in New York City about the year 1809, was farmer and stock raiser by occupation, and died in his native State in the year 1854. Amanda Reynolds was born in Cayuga County, New York, and died there in 1864. Henry Reynolds was raised on a farm in Cayuga County and received a liberal education in the Courtland Academy, from which he graduated in 1859. He engaged in business for himself as a machinist, in Poplar Ridge, in which place and near by he operated shops for a period of about twelve or fifteen years. Disposing of his interests at the end of that time he went to Ithaca, New York, and accepted the position of superintendent of the Cayuga Lake Railroad shops in that city, in which capacity he continued for a number of years. He resided at Ithaca until the spring of 1886, at which time he came to Miami County, Indiana, and purchased an interest in the general foundry and machine shops, formerly operated by E. S. Hackley and later by Thomas Lovett. He is at this time a partner with A. J. Ross, and the firm thus constituted do a general foundry and machine business, giving employment to about fifteen men. Mr. Reynolds was married July, 1864, to Miss Elizabeth Tuthill, of Pennsvlvania. Mr. Revnolds is a Republican in politics, andvith his wife belongs to the Presbvterian Church.

CHARLES B. ROBINSON, JR., second son of C. B. and Mary E. (Boynton) Robinson, natives of Maine, was born at the City of Farmington, New Hampshire, on the 9th day of April, 1850. His parents came to Indiana in 1851, and located in Peru, where Charles R. spent the years of his youth and early manhood, and in the public schools of which he enjoyed the advantages of an English education. At the age of fifteen he engaged as fireman on the Pan Handle Railroad, subsequently worked in the same capacitv on the "Big Four" line, and still later, accepted a similar position on the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe road, for which company he was soon promoted engineer. In 1877 he engaged with the I., P. & C. road as engineer, running between Peru and Michigan City, and still retains this place, being at this time in the employ of the Wabash Company. Mr. Robinson is a skillful railroad man, and has the confidence of the large corporation with which he has for so many years been identified. He belongs to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, Royal Arcanum, and is besides an active member of the K. of P. and I. O. O. F. fraternities. He votes in conformitv with the principles of the Republican party, but is in no sense of the word a partisan. In January, 1872, Miss Sarah M. Apperson, of Clinton County, Indiana, became his wife, and to their marriage have been born three children, viz: Neil, Stella and Edith.

RICHARD B. RUNYAN, ex-Auditor of Miami County, is a native of Trenton, New Jersey, born October 16, 1824. His father, Lewis Run} an, was a New Jersey merchant, and lived and died in that State. The mother of Mr. Runyan was Mary Runyan, whose maiden name was Britton. The subject of this sketch was educated in the State of his nativity. In 1844 he came to Miami County and settled in Peru. Some years afterward he removed to his present place of residence, just outside the present northwest city limits. Here he owns a fine farm of one hundred and seventy acres, and has in addition valuable property in the city of Peru. Politically he has always been identified with the interests of the Democratic party. In October 1878 he was elected Auditor of Miami County and was re-elected to the same office in 1882. He is a public man in whom the people of this county have implicit confidence. He is one of the most efficient county officials, the county has ever had. Mr. Runyan was married in November 1853 to Miss Maria McGregor, the only child of John McGregor, a man famous in the pioneer history of Miami County and this city. He was born in Buckley County, Virginia, January 11, 1798, and died August 26, 1835. Mrs. Runyan was born May 1, 1834, and was the first white child born in what was then known as Miamisport, now a part of Peru. They have one son, Britton L. Mr. Runyan is one of the representative citizens of this county. He and wife are members of the Episcopal church.

JOHN SHAFER, a native of Ohio, was born July 10, 1842, the second son of George and Catharine (Naucle) Shafer, of Germany, who came to Miami County in 1850 and located in Peru Township, the father always following farming for a livelihood. The subject was reared on a farm, and when the war broke out he enlisted in the 52nd Indiana Infantry, Company E., March, 1864, and was mustered out in May, 1865; was wounded during the fight at Nashville, and was in several other engagements. His education was very limited. His marriage to Miss Sarah B. Bell was solemnized November 15, 1867, and to them five children were born: Francis M., Walter L., Marv G., James O., and Otto P. His wife died in 1880, and in 1882 he was again married to Lurinda Crosley, and two children were the result of this second union. John Willard, and Charles. He is a member of the G. A. R. and is a Republican.

DAVID L SHEARER, grain dealer and prominent business man, of Peru, is a native of Preble County, Ohio, born May 24, 1820. His parents, David and Mary R. (L'aRose) Shearer, were natives of North Carolina, which State they left in an early day, emigrating to Ohio about the year 1804. David Shearer, senior, was descended from German ancestors and died in the year 1857. The mother's ancestors were French people and among the early residents of the Carolinas. She preceded her husband to the grave departing this life in 1852. They both lie buried at Huntington, Indiana, to which city they removed in the year 1840. The subject, at the age of eight years, was taken to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, in the common schools of which he obtained the elements of a practical education. When thirteen years old he accepted a clerkship in a mercantile house at Shanesville, Ohio, where he remained until 1840, at which time he took service in the same capacity in Huntington, Indiana, in which city he subsequently (1846) engaged in the goods business on his own responsibility. He remained at Huntington until 1866, at which time he disposed of his interests there and came to Peru and engaged in the grain business, a branch of trade he has carried on with success and financial profit ever since. He erected the large elevator in this city which has a capacity of 40,000 bushels, and is one of the largest and most successful grain dealers in Northern Indiana. Mr. Shearer is a marked example of a self-made man, and from an humble beginning has by dint of perseverance and a large share of well developed business sense, succeeded in accummulating a comfortable competence. He is prominently identified with the Masonic Fraternity, having taken the degree of Sir Knight, and in religion holds to the creed of the Presbyterian Church. His marriage on the 7th of June, 1846, with Miss Harriet Wiest, of York County, Pennsylvania, has been blessed with the birth of these children, viz: Mary D., B. F., George W., H. W., Louisa and Charles F. (deceased).

E. H. SHIRK (deceased). Elbert Hamilton Shirk was born in Franklin County, Indiana, February 14, 1818. He was the second son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Stout) Shirk, natives of Georgia and Kentucky, respectively. His boyhood was spent on his father's farm, where he enjoyed the limited advantages afforded by the public schools during the winter months On arriving at manhood, he attended college two years in Miami University, at Oxford, Ohio, where he studied Latin, French and Mathematics. After leaving the University he was employed as teacher in the County Seminary, at Rushville, Indiana, for two years, and immediately thereafter located in Peru, arriving here in the summer of 1844 and forming a partnership with the late John Harlan in the mercantile business. June 18, 1845, he was married to Mary Wright, of Franklin County, a lady of English descent, who returned with her young husband to the new and strange home in Peru. They came the old-fashioned way, bringing all of their goods in a two-horse wagon. A year later the firm of Harlan & Shirk was dissolved and Mr. Shirk continued the business alone. He was very successful as a merchant and accumulated wealth very rapidly. From 1850 to 1855 he invested largely in Mexican war land warrants, which he laid judiciously in Iowa and other western States, which in turn were exchanged for improved farms in Miami County. This was the beginning of operations in real estate which laid the foundation for a colossal fortune, equal in magrfitude to that amassed in his commercial pursuits. The most profitable of these deals was the purchase of a large number of lots in Evansville and lands in southwestern counties of the State, in 1862, that had been forfeited as donations to a railroad company; the purchase of large tracts in Kansas in 1868, and in Michigan in 1867; and the securing of equities in unencumbered Chicago real estate in 1874-75. In 1857 he established a private bank and received deposits from farmers and others who had a surplus. In 1860 he resumed mercantile business, which he had dropped for a few years previous. Under the national banking act Mr. Shirk procured a charter and proceeded to organize the First National Bank of Peru, taking for himself one-half the stock, and subsequently, by purchase, acquiring over nine-tenths. He was elected president of the bank and was re-elected annually from that time until his death. This bank has been a remarkable financial success, having already invested three hundred thousand dollars of its surplus earnings in government bonds, and having accumulated an additional surplus of two hundred thousand. At the beginning of 1867 the firm of Kilgore & Shirk, in general merchandise, was formed, to which George C. Miller was admitted as partner, some years later, and from which Mr. Kilgore withdrew in 1880, leaving the firm Shirk & Miller, as it stands to-day. In politics, Mr. Shirk had strong convictions on which he always acted, first as a Whig and afterwards as a Republican, though he never took a prominent part in partisan contests. In early manhood he professed Christianity and united with the Baptist church before locating in Peru. He was one of the eleven original members of the Baptist church of this city in 1867, and continued one of its devoted members till his death, contributing liberally of his means towards its support. Mr. Shirk was of medium height, erect and quite slender. His life was clean and free from vicious habits, which weaken and destroy the physical system. He was therefore clear headed: able to utilize all his tremendous energy, and accomplished the purpose of his will, even though it required long continued, unremitting effort. The probity of his character was the foundation of persistent honestv and commercial integrity that stood unimpeached and unchallenged through a business life of "more than forty years in this community. This was the inspiration of that universal confidence which selected him as the reliable custodian of the accumulations of others, a confidence which insured his success as a banker. Measured by the most practical standard known—the results accomplished—Mr. Shirk's life was a most conspicuous success. He was a financier of transcendant ability, endowed with wise foresight, intuitive perceptions, broad comprehension, accurate judgment, and his death left a vacuum in commercial affairs, felt as a personal bereavement by a large number of persons in the community with whom he had relations of a business character. He was a conspicuous example of the successful self-made man, and the acquisition of his immense fortune, by honest business methods in an agricultural community, was something akin to the marvelous. He owned at the time of his death valuable property in various cities of Indiana, Illinois, and other States, immense tracts of real estate and fine farms in various States, the larger share of stock in the banks at Monticello, Delphi and Tipton, and was in fact the wealthiest man in northern Indiana, and one of the wealthiest in the State. He died at his home in Peru on the 8th day of April, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Shirk have had four children, three of whom (two sons and one daughter) are at this time living; Milton, the eldest, is President of the First National Bank of Peru; Elbert W. Vice President of the same; and Alice, wife of Richard A. Edwards, Cashier of the bank.

MILTON SHIRK, President of the First National Bank, and eldest son of E. H. and Mary Shirk, is a native of Miami County, Indiana, born in Peru on the 21st day of November 1849. His educational advantages were those afforded by the city schools, which, supplemented by a thorough business training under his father, have enabled him to successfully discharge the duties of a very active business life. In the year 1867, when but seventeen years of age, he entered the First National Bank, of which he was, in a couple of months, promoted cashier, and on the death of his father in the spring of 1886, succeeded to the presidency of the same, a position he holds at this time. Thoroughly familiar with all the details of the business. Mr. Shirk on the death of his father hecame president not only of the First National Bank in the city, but also of banks in Monticello, Delphi and Tipton, and their present successful condition is largely due to his superior management. He is a worthy successor to his distinguished father, and has already carried financial success into all his business enterprises, including in addition to the banks referred to, large transactions in real estate, and also the mercantile business, having at this time a one-third interest in the large goods house of Shirk & Miller, in Peru. He is a marked example of those sound, practical business qualifications which secure the confidence of the people and those personal qualities that win and retain the public esteem. As a successful financier, he has few, if any superiors in the State, and as a public spirited and courteous gentleman, he occupies a conspicuous place among the representative citizens of Peru and Miami County. On the 6th day of June, 1868, was solemnized his marriage with Miss Ellen Walker, of Worcester, Massachuetts. Mr. and Mrs. Shirk have two children, viz: Elbert W., born November 9, 1879, and Joseph H., born January 6, 1881.

HARVEY J. SHIRK, prominent lawyer of Miami County, and for thirty-six years a resident of Peru, was born in Franklin County, Indiana, January 20, 1826. His father was Samuel Shirk, a native of Georgia, and his mother Elizabeth (Stout) Shirk was born in Kentucky. His paternal grandfather, Andrew Shirk, was a native of Pennsylvania, a Revolutionary soldier and an early pioneer of the floosier State, moving to the same about the beginning of the present century. Samuel Shirk came at the same time and settled in what is now Franklin County. Harvey J. Shirk was reared amid the active scenes of farm life until his sixteenth year, when he became a student at Oxford College, Ohio, from which institution he graduated in 1846. His literary education being thus completed, he engaged for a time in teaching school, but abandoned that profession after a limited period and began reading law in the office of John D. Howland, at Brookville, Indiana. Having, by diligent application acquired a knowledge of the profesion, he was admitted to the bar and began the practice at Peru, in 1850, where he early won a conspicuous place among the successful lawyers of Miami County. Mr. Shirk is a man of high legal ability, thoroughly devoted to his profession and has a large and lucrative practice in the courts of Miami and a number of other counties in the state. As an adviser he is trustworthy, and as a close logical reasoner clear in his comprehension and correct in his application of legal principles. He handles the facts of a case with wonderful power and effect. A methodical and painstaking industry has been one of his marked characteristics through life, and with his mental endowments unimpaired, and a well preserved physical constitution, he apparently has before him many years of usefulness and honor. He is and has been since 1865 associated in the practice with Hon. John Mitchell, under the name of Shirk and Mitchell, a law firm having a wide and honorable reputation throughout the State of Indiana. Mr. Shirk, in 1851 was married to Catharine Remy, of Brookville, Indiana, who died the following year. His second marriage was solemnized in 1852 with Eliza M. Cole, of New York. A union blessed with these children, viz: Winona, wife of Wm. McClintic, Elizabeth, wife of Charles C. Cole, Martha and Charles. The result of the first marriage was one daughter, Catharine Shirk. In politics Mr. Shirk was originally a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party he has been an earnest supporter of its principles.

JOSEPH SHROCK, JR., a native of Holmes County, Ohio, was born August 28, 1833, and is the eldest son of David and Susanna (Hostetler) Shrock, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Miami County in 1841 and located in Peru Township. The father was a farmer and died in 1860. Joseph, Jr., remained upon the farm during the most of his life and received a common school education, and now owns eighty-three acres of fine farming land. On March 8, 1859, he was married to Miss Caroline Working, a daughter of Mr. Jacob Working (deceased). They are the parents of five children, whose names are Laura B., Dewitt C., Stella, Pearl and Bertha. Our subject is the owner of a saw-mill in the north part of the township, which he has managed for several years. He was elected Justice of the Peace on the Democratic ticket in 1876, and is the present incumbent of the office. He and wife are members of the M. E. Church.

WILLIAM SMITH, a native of Bedford County, Pennsylvania, was born March 15, 1811, the eldest son of Peter and Barbara (Knowles) Smith, who both had their origin in the State of Pennsylvania. His father died wheq he, the subject, was but nine years old. Until about 1834 our subject remained on the farm when he emigrated to Peru, and since that event his time has been divided in- the various occupations of farming, buying and selling grain, and retailing goods. Was married to Miss Mary Runyan, in 1845, who was a native of New York. Twelve children were the result of this marriage, seven of whom are now living, and whose names are: Harriet, Alice, Caroline, William, Lillie, Lincoln and Joseph. He followed selling goods for about twenty years, thereby amassing a handsome fortune. His education was such as is generally received in the common schools. In the years 1859-60-61 he was a member of the Legislature, having been elected to that responsible position on the Republican ticket.

GILES W. SMITH was born in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, April 3, 1830, and is the eldest son of William C. and Phoebe T. (King) Smith, natives of Wayne County and of New York, respectively. His grandfather, George Smith, came from North Carolina to Wayne County in the year 1807. The subject of this biography was partly reared in the same county, but his father being a Methodist minister, the family were constantly shifting from place to place, and in consequence he received but a common school education. Until he was eighteen years of age he followed farming and then commenced to learn the trade of a printer at Madison, Indiana, at which he worked until 1849 when he purchased a one-half interest in the Bloomington Herald. In the spring of 1851, he started the Orleans Commercial Review, the management of which he controlled until 1853, when he disposed of his interest and procured an engagement on the New Albany & Chicago R. R. in the engineering corps, in which he continued until the road was in running order, after which he became a train conductor for the same company. He and Benjamin R. Prosser superintended the construction of twenty-four miles of the road, and he continued in the corporation until 1857, and he then located at Peru, employed by the Indianapolis, Peru & Chicago Company as freight and ticket agent, which position he held for about eighteen months. He was next to be found in the occupation of farming on the Eel river. At this occupation he was not successful but continued until 1870, when he returned to Peru and engaged with the Howe Machine Company, for which he became general agent, traveling through Indiana and Illinois. In 1876 Mr. Smith began selling farm implements, and was in the employ of Messrs. Shirk & Miller in that department of their store for more than six years, when he, with Frank O. Rettig, opened an implement store in Peru. This co-partnership existed until 1885 when Mr. B. W. Matthews came in as a partner, and since this change they have added the retail of hardware to their business. Our subject was united in matrimonial bonds on January 15, 1852, to Martha A. Prosser, of Orange County, Indiana, and to this union six children were born, three of whom are now living, whose names are as follows: Lora M., Martha and Mary D. He and his wife are members of the M. E. Church, and he is prominently identified with the F. & A. M. and I. O. O. F. fraternities. "Politically, he adheres to the principles of the Republican party.

M. F. SMITH, the gentleman whose biographical sketch is herewith presented, was born in the town of Madrid, New York, February 7, 1838, son of Ferdinand and Elvira (Peck) Smith, natives of the State of Vermont. He was reared in his native State, and early evincing decided taste for mechanical pursuits, entered at the age of thirteen the locomotive and machine shops of an eastern railroad and continued at the trade until attaining his majority. At the age of twenty-one he located in the City of St. Albans, Vermont, and three years later, in April 1861, entered the army, enlisting in the 16th New York Volunteer Infantry, one of the first regiments from that State mustered out of the service. He subsequently joined the 13th New York Heavy Artilery, with which he served until near the close of the war and with which he was engaged in some of the bloodiest battles of the Virginia campaigns. He was wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg and for some months was in the hospital in New York. On leaving the army he returned to St. Albans, Vermont, and shortly afterwards, 1865, came to Peru, Indiana, where he engaged in the locomotive department of the I., P. & C. Railroad, with which he was identified until 1872. Severing his connection with the road he, in 1873, established the foundry and machine shops of which he is at this time manager and proprietor. Mr. Smith has been an active business man, and as a mechanic takes high rank. He is an active member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities and one of Peru's representative men. In August, 1866, he was united in marriage with Miss Martha Beaty, of St. Albans, Vermont, to which union two children have been born, viz: Wyan Everett and Louis F.

WILLIAM SMITH, Jr. is a native of Peru Township and was born the 11th of October, 1856, the eldest son of. William Smith, whose biography appears elsewhere. He is the proprietor of two pieces of land containing seventy-eight and thirty-three acres respectively, or a total of i1 1 acres. His education was but ordinary. The 16th of March, 1886, he was married to Miss Mary Everly, daughter of Mr. John Everly. He has been reasonably successful in life and has bright prospects before him.

ABRAHAM L. SMITH, a native of Peru Township, was born in September, 1860, and is the youngest son of William and Mary Smith, natives of Pennsylvania and New York, who came to Miami County about the year 1834. Our subject received a common school education. In the month of October, 1884, he married Miss Nellie Rettig, daughter of John Rettig (deceased). He owns and has under a high state of cultivation about 190 acres of fine farming land, which has reached that state of productiveness which affords a handsome yearly remuneration. Mr. Smith is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, having advanced to the Royal Arcanum degree. In political matters he is a Republican.

JOHN T. STEVENS, the subject of this biography, was born in the City of Indianapolis on the 14th day of March, 1828, and is the son of Isaac and Sarah (Tracy) Stevens, parents natives of Vermont. Mr. Stevens' paternal ancestors were natives of England, his grandfather emigrating from that country many years ago and settling in one of the Eastern States. Isaac Stevens came to Indiana in the year 1822, and for some years resided in Indianapolis, moving from that city to Greenfield about the year 1830. He was a merchant and in his store at the latter place, the subject took his first lesson in practical business life, serving in the capacity of salesman there until his removal to Miami County, Indiana, in the year 1845. On reaching this city he engaged as clerk in the mercantile house of Carlton R. Tracy, and later accepted a position of the same kind in the dry goods store of Henry Dutton, with whom he subsequently severed his connection and took service with the firm of Smith & Foote. In 1852 he went to California where he accepted a clerkship with John and Silas Atchison, general merchants at Foster's Bar, where he remained until engaging in the goods and mining business with J. O. Cole in Oak Valley, one year later. The firm thus constituted continued until 1867, at which time both partners returned to Indiana and engaged in farming and stock raising in Miami County. Mr. Stevens for some time has made a specialty of breeding and selling fine horses, in which branch of business he has met with the most encouraging success. He owns at this time, besides other property a valuable farm of 168 acres in Peru Township, and is justly considered one of the successful business men of the county. On the 17th day of April, 1856, he married Miss Indiana Wilson, a daughter of Alexander Wilson, who was killed by guerrillas immediately after the Mexican war. He was a trader in that struggle and was on his return home when killed. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens have two children. Nellie, wife of F. O. Rettig, and Grant I. Stevens.

JAMES M. STUTESMAN, retired business man and prominent citizen of Peru, is a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, born August 3, 1819. His paternal grandfather, David Stutesman, was a native of Germany, but early came to the United States and settled at Hagerstown, Maryland. He subsequently moved to Pennsylvania, from which State in the year 1808 he emigrated to Montgomery County, "Ohio, where he followed his trade, that of weaver, until his death in 1820. His son, Nathaniel Stutesman, father of James M., was born at Hagerstown, Maryland. He left that city about the year 1795, and with his father moved to Brownsville, Pennsylvania, where he subsequently married Miss Sarah Flynn, and in 1808 located in Montgomery County, Ohio, which was his home until he removed to Miami County, Indiana, in 1866. He followed agricultural pursuits all his life, and died in Peru about 1880, at the advanced age of ninety-five years. Mrs. Stutesman was born in Hagerstown, Maryland, of Scotch parentage, and departed this life in Montgomery County, Ohio in the year 1839. Nathaniel and Sarah Stutesman were the parents of the children, whose names are as follows, to-wit: Catharine, wife of Henry Stauffer; Amy A., deceased: Jonathan, David, deceased; James M., Ellis, deceased: Nathaniel, Daniel, deceased: Perry, deceased; Robert, and Marietta, wife of Lyman Baldwin, of Chicago. James M. Stutesman spent the first sixteen years of his life as a farmer, and enjoyed during that time such educational advantages as the country afforded. In 1835 he commenced learning the trade of saddlery and harness-making in the city of Dayton, and after serving a five years' apprenticeship and acquiring great proficiency, began working at the same at Lewisburgh, Preble County, Ohio, where he continued until 1842. In that year in company with his brother, Jonathan Stutesman, he came to Miami County, Indiana, and opened a saddlery and harness shop in Peru, which he carried on with success and financial profit until 1858, dealing extensively with the Indians a portion of the time, and also supplying many of the trading houses along the Wabash river from Fort Wayne to Peru. He abandoned the trade the above year, and in partnership with W. W. Kilgore, under the firm name of Stutesman & Kilgore, engaged in the general hardware and agriculture implement business, which was continued until he sold out to his partner in 1864. He then purchased the hardware stock of Palmer & Deniston, ran a very successful business until 1871, when the Puterbaugh Bros, bought an interest, and the wellknown firm of Stutesman & Puterbaugh continued, until Mr. Stutesman sold out to his partners and retired from active life in 1881. In his various business enterprises Mr. Stutesman was eminently successful, and as a public-spirited and popular citizen, few men in Peru stand higher in the estimation of the people than he. On the 31st of March, 1831, Miss Elizabeth Shields, daughter of John and Mary Shields, of Vincennes, Indiana, became his wife, and toUhis union has been born the following children, to-wit: Mary A., deceased; Harriet, wife of John S. Hale; Edwin H., deceased; Frank M., Clara E., wife of W. V. Spinning, and James F. Mr. Stutesman is a member of the Presbyterian Church, with which he has been identified since 1845, and with his wife and family belongs to the Peru congregation. In politics he was originally a Whig, and in 184o cast his first vote for General William Henry Harrison. On the dissolution of that party he joined the Republican party, and has since been an earnest supporter of its principles and measures. WILLIAM W. SULLIVAN, Lawyer, was born in Butler Township, Miami County, March 19, 1843, and is the eldest son of Jonah and Louisa (Smith) Sullivan, natives of Kentucky and Delaware respectivly, the father of German-Irish extraction and the mother descended from English-Irish ancestors. Jonah Sullivan came to Miami County in 1840 and purchased land in Butler Township, to which he moved his family the following year. He was prominently identified with the growth and development of that part of the county and resided upon his original purchase until 1876 at which time he retired from active life and moved to South Peru where he now resides. William W. Sullivan was raised on a farm and in addition to agricultural pursuits, worked for some years at the carpenter's trade. He received a liberal education in the schools of Peru and in 1864 accepted a clerkship in the mercantile house of George A. Crowell, in which capacity he continued for one year. The profession of law having more charms for him than any other, he severed his connection with the mercantile business and in 1865 entered the office of Shirk & Mitchell where he pursued his legal studies until September of the same year when he became a student in the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. He attended this institution until 1867 at which time he graduated with the degree of B. L. and immediately thereafter engaged in the practice of his profession in the courts of Miami County, Indiana In 1872 he was elected County Surveyor and by re-election in 1874, held the office until 1876. Since the latter year he has given his attention to his profession having at this time a large and lucrative practice in the courts of Miami and other counties, besides an extensive real-estate business which he has conducted with success and financial profit. Mr. Sullivan, while taking an active interest in political affairs, supporting the principles of the Republican party, is not a partisan in the sense of seeking official honors at the hands of his fellow citiizens. He is a courteous gentlemen, honored and respected by a large circle of friends and occupies a conspicuous place among the attorneys of the Miami County bar. In October, 1867, he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah A. Savers, of Missouri. Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan have two children, viz: Nannie L. and William W. Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan are members of the Presbyterian Church of Peru.

FRANK M. TALBOT, proprietor of the Peru Basket Factory, was born in Epping, N. H., April 3, 1849, son of Ezekiel M. and Nancy W. Talbot, both of whom were natives of Turner, Maine. Ezekiel M. Talbott was for many years engaged as civil engineer in the construction of railroads, first on the Grand Trunk, then on the New York Central, and came to Indiana as Resident Engineer of the Wabash Railway, spending some time at Fort Wayne, and ten years as a prominent citizen of Peru. In 1870 he moved to Lafayette, taking charge of the construction of the Lafayette, Muncie & Bloomington R. R. as Chief Engineer. In 1874 he became a member of the Kankakee Ice Company, managing their business and at the same time serving as City Civil Engineer for the City of Lafayette till 1884, when he suffered a stroke of paralysis which caused his death. Frank M. Talbot's mother dying when he was three years old, he, with his sister, Nancy W., lived with their grandparents in Turner, Maine, until 1859, when they came to Peru, where he has since resided. • He attended the public schools, being only absent one term, at Cincinnati and one at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. In 1868 he obtained employment of Rettig & Cole, at the brewery, and remained with them the greater part of the time as book-keeper until 1882, when he, in partnership with Frank Henton, engaged in the manufacture of baskets, taking charge of the large factory in the western part of the city erected in 1870 by Gardner, Blish & Co. He purchased his partner's interest in 1884, and at this time controls the entire business, which is large and constantly increasing. Mr. Talbot's factory produces more baskets and a greater variety than any other factory, and is one of the leading industries of Peru. It is represented on the road by three competent salesmen, who dispose of an immense number of baskets in all parts of the United States. Mr. Talbot was married February 10, 1875, to Lorena M., daughter of George Rettig, a prominent citizen of Peru. Mr. and Mrs. Talbot have two children, George W., born February 8, 1876, and Frank M., born April 3, 1879.

JACOB THEOBALD, contractor and builder, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, born there on the 19th of August, 1839, son of Peter and Catharine (Licht) Theobald. He passed the first two years of his life in his native country, and at the end of that time, in 1849, accompanied his parents to the United States and settled in Washington County, Wisconsin, where the father died in 1875. Mrs. Theobald survived her husband five years, departing this life in 1880. Jacob Theobald received his early education in Wisconsin, and in that State took his first lessons in the science of agriculture, in the pursuit of which he continued until attaining his majority. He then abandoned the farm and commenced working at the carpenter trade, and after following the same for a period of three years, engaged in contracting which he has since successfully continued, his principal business being confined to Miami County, having moved to Peru in the year 1861. Mr. Theobald is a man of great energy and industry, and since locating in Peru has taken an active interest in all that appertains to the city's welfare, having been elected a member of the Common Council in 1880 and 1886. In March, 1865, he was united in marriage with Miss Mary Shireman, of Germany, who died in 1873. Two children were born to this marriage, viz: Katie and Mary Theobald. Mr. Theobald's second marriage was celebrated August 27, 1874, with Martha C. Keyl, of Monroe, Michigan, who has borne him four children, viz.: Ernest, Oscar, Clara and Martha. Mr. Theobald is a Democrat in politics, and with his wife belongs to the Lutheran Church, of Peru.

OLIVER TILLETT, born May 1, 1831, is a native of Wayne County, and is the fifth son of James and Susanna (Buck) Tillett, who hailed from Virginia and Pennsylvania, and came to Peru Township in the year 1833. The father held the position of County Commissioner in an early day. The gentleman whose name heads this sketch was reared on the farm, and only received a common school education. He was married in the fall of 1873 to Anna Duncan, daughter of James Duncan. They became the parents of three children: John, born in 1874; James, born in 1876, and Harry, born in 1881. Mr. Tillett is the owner of 377 acres of nicely improved land, in Peru Township, and belongs to the I. O. O. F., also to the Democratic party.

JOSEPH TILLETT (deceased), a native of Miami County, was born in October, 1839, and died April 30, 1880. He was a son of James and Susanna (Buck) Tillett, natives of Virginia. Our subject was reared in Miami County and always followed farming. His marriage with Miss Sarah E. Townsend, daughter of George and Susanna (Dingman) Townsend, former residents of Ohio, who came to Peru Township in the year 1832 and purchased his land from the government. He was once Township Trustee and built the first corn mill ever constructed in the township. He was born in 1810 and died in 1855. and his wife died in 1870. The widow of our subject was born in Peru Township. She is the mother of four children: Carrie A., Dora A., Emma P., and Joseph G. She owns 217 acres of land in Peru Township, which is under a high state of cultivation.

JOHN. W. TIMBER LAKE, is a native of Campbell County, Virginia, born February 1, 1810, eldest son of Christopher and Polly (Farley) Timberlake, both natives of Virginia and of English descent. His father emigrated to Jay County, Indiana, about 1838, where he remained until his death, which occurred during the war. Our subject was engaged in farming until his twenty-first year when he came to Highland County, Ohio. There he learned the carpenter trade, and there continued until 183$, when he removed to Miami County, Indiana. Mr. Timberlake was married in 1833 to Miss Mary Sanders, a native of Highland County. Ohio. To this union were born two children, now deceased. Mrs. Timberlake died in 1836. Our subject was again married in 1839 to Miss Mary Hussey, also a native of Highland County. To this marriage were born six children, all of whom are deceased. In 1858, in partnership with Aaron H. Gregg, he engaged in general merchandising. In an early day he was township trustee and overseer of the poor. Mr. and Mrs. Timberlake are members of the M. E. Church. He was one of the company who went out to remove the Miami Indians. He is one of the directors of the Citizens' Bank, and a man of wealth and prominence.

WILLIAM S. TODD. The subject of this biographical sketch is a native of Kentucky, born in Jessamine County on the 13th day of March, 1814. His parents, David and Sallie D. (Smith) Todd, were natives of Tennessee, and his paternal grandfather, John Todd, one of the pioneers of that State, served with distinction in the war for American Independence. When the subject was about seven years of age his parents emigrated to Indiana and located in Parke County, about eight miles from Rockville, having been among the earliest settlers in that section of the country. Here on a farm William S. Todd passed his youthful years, and in the common schools, which he attended under many difficulties, he obtained the rudiments of an English education. By coming in contact with business men in after years, and by always taking an active interest in literary matters, he became in time the possessor of a fund of valuable information which has enabled him to successfully fill positions of trust at different times. He began life for himself at the age of nineteen, as clerk in a mercantile house at Rockville, in which capacity he continued until about the year 1843. In 1837, July 13th, while at Rockville, he was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Christian, a native of Virginia, by whom he had eight children, to-wit: Mary D., born April 15, 1838; Sarah E., born January 6, 1840; William B., born July 31, 1841; Margaret, born August 18, 1843, died June 6, 1871;. Martha E., born October 9, 1845; David R., born March 1, 1848; Lucy A., born April 18, 1850, and Lewis C., born April 21, 1852. In 1845 he moved to Jefferson County, Iowa, where for eight years he was engaged in the pursuits of agriculture. He left Iowa in the fall of 1853, and returning to Indiana, located in Peru, where he accepted the position of salesman in the mercantile house of Blake & Todd, continuing in that capacity until elected to the office of County Recorder in 1862. He took charge of the office in 1863 and served for a period of eight years, during which time he transacted the business of the position in a manner satisfactory to his friend and political opponents. Since the termination of his official career Mr. Todd has been actively engaged in preparing a complete abstract of the real estate of Miami County. His first wife died November 3, 1854, and in 1860, March 1, was solemnized his second marriage with Mrs. Mary Ann (Oldshue) Brownell, who departed this life August 15, 1884, leaving him the second time a widower. Mr. Todd is a Democrat in politics, and a consistent member of the Masonic fraternity.

HON. JAMES N. TYNER, of Peru, was born at Brookville, Indiana, January 17, 1826. He is the eldest of eleven children of Richard and Martha S. W. S. (Noble) Tyner. His father, a native of South Carolina, was a pioneer of Indiana, and for forty years a leading merchant of the south-eastern portion of the State. His mother's brothers were men of ability and prominence. Noah Noble was Governor of Indiana, James Noble was elected to the United States Senate about the time Indiana was admitted to the Union, serving fourteen years, and was a member of that body at the time of his death. Lazarus Noble was at one time Register of the Land Office at Indianapolis, and George T. Noble for a number of years held various local positions in Wayne County. James N. Tyner was educated in the Brookville Academy, and in 1846 removed to Cambridge City, where for five years he was engaged in selling goods and in carrying on an extensive grain and provision trade. In June, 1851, he established himself permanently in Peru and there continued for some time in the same business. Subsequently he entered upon the practice of law in the firm of Brown & Tyner, a partnership which, with occasional intermissions, was maintained until recently. Mr. Tyner was at first a Whig, and since the organization of the Republican party has been one of its most faithful supporters. In 1856 he was the Republican candidate for Representative to the Indiana Legislature, but was defeated by a small majority on a strictly party vote. He served four sessions—from 1856 to 1862—as one of the secretaries of the State Senate. In 1861 he was appointed special agent of the post office department, having charge of the postal service of Indiana and Illinois, and during part of the time of the entire country. In 1866 he was removed by an order from President Johnson. In 1869 Mr. Tyner was elected Representative to Congress from the Eighth Indiana district and by re-election served in this position three terms, during two of which he was one of the committee on post offices and post roads. He was considered the best informed member on postal affairs. The increased mail facilities received by him for his district, with every portion of which he was perfectly familiar, were highly appreciated by his intelligent constituents. He was also acting Chairman of the Committee on Public Grounds and Public Buildings during his second term, and many important repairs in the capitol building and furniture were made under his supervision. During his third term he served on the Committee of Appropriations, the most important and powerful of the House committees. At the expiration of his term as Congressman, on the urgent solicitation of President Grant and Governor Jewell, Postmaster General, Mr. Tyner accepted the position of Second Assistant Postmaster General, and for sixteen months had full charge of all the mail contracts of the United States. Upon the retirement of Mr. Jewell Mr. Tyner was appointed Postmaster General, and served as such from July, 1876, to March, 1877, the expiration of Grant's administration. Upon the inauguration of President Hayes and the appointment of David M. Key as Postmaster General, by the continuous solicitation of these gentlemen, Mr. Tyner was induced to return to the Post office Department as First-Assistant Postmaster General, to take entire charge of the business of the Department and of the appointments in the postal service of the Northern and border States. This position he filled to the entire satisfaction of his superior in office and of the country at large, his long experience and excellent executive ability, especially qualifying him for the office. Postmaster General Blair's expressed opinion that an energetic and efficient special agent could do the public greater service by expediting the transportation and delivering the military mails, than by serving either as a private or commissioned officer in the Volunteer Army, prevented Mr. Tyner from resigning his position in the postal service and entering the army during the late civil war. Mr. Tyner was brought up in the Methodist Episcopal Church but is not now connected with any religious denomination. He married his first wife, Dena L. Humiston, daughter of Lewis Humiston, of Cambridge City, November 8, 1848. This estimable lady died in 1870, leaving one son, Albert H. Tyner, and one daughter. December 24, 1872, Mr. Tyner was married to Christine Hinds, daughter of John P. Hinds, late of Washington, District of Columbia.

HENRY F. UNDERWOOD—A native of Fairfield County, Ohio, born, October 3, 1843; son of Henry and Maria (Brandt) Underwood, both natives of Pennsylvania and of German extraction. The subject of this sketch was raised on the farm and received a common school education. In 1861 he enlisted in Company I., 43d Ohio Volunteers. He served one year and then came home, being honorably discharged in 1862 on account of wounds received at the battle of Corinth, Mississippi. In January, 1864, he went again to the front and remained until the close of the war. He came to Miami County in 1866 and in 1868 entered the law office of Shirk and Mitchell and in 1869 began the practice of his profession. Previous to 1869 he began the pension claim business, which he has since continued. During 1879 and I88o he was a law partner of Nott N. Antrim. He was married October 3,1871, to Miss Nannie Hollipeter, of Wabash County, and daughter of Elizabeth Hollipeter. They have seven children as follows: William E., Charles H., Lyman M., Viola M., Nancy E., Frank I., and Edith Floy. He is a Republican. In 1868 was elected a Justice of the Peace. He is a member of the G. A. R. and Secretary of Canton, Peru, No. 20 P. M., I. O. O. F., and of the K. of P. Order.

LYMAN WALKER, ex-Judge of the Twenty-seventh Judicial Circuit, was born at Peacham, Vermont, January 26, 1837. He is the son of Lyman and Elmira G. Walker. Soon after Judge Walker's birth, the family removed to Thetford, Vermont, where the father engaged in mercantile pursuits. Here he laid the foundation of his education in the district schools and fitted for college at the Thetford Academy. He was early thrown upon his own resources, and in order to obtain the means for a complete education, engaged in teaching. He entered Dartmouth College in 1854, and after remaining there two years entered Middlebury College from which he graduated in 1856. Thus did he in early life manifest a spirit of determination to succeed in whatever he undertook, and by his own unaided efforts succeeded in gaining a classical education. The years 1859 and 1860 were occupied in teaching and in studying law in the office of Messrs. Cruss & Topliff, Manchester, New Hampshire. Early in 1861, Mr. Walker took charge of the public schools of Peru, Indiana, and to him belongs the honor of establishing the first graded school there. After remaining about one year in that position he began to practice law in connection with Harvey J. Shirk. This partnership was continued two years, after which Mr. Walker went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where for the next four years he was in practice with Hon. R. M. Corwine. He then returned to Peru, where he has since enjoyed a large and lucrative business in the County, State and United States Courts. Mr. Walker is an honored member of the Masonic Fraternity of the Knight Templar degree. In politics he is a Republican, and takes an active interest in all public measures brought before the people for their consideration. He has usually preferred the quietude of private life, but such talents as he possesses being needed and demanded by the public, he was elected October, 1878, Judge of the Twenty seventh Judicial Circuit, entering upon the discharge of his official duties 1879. His eminent legal abilities enabled him to perform the duties of this office faithfully and efficiently, and his record as a Judge is one of which he and his many friends may justly feel proud. Since the expiration of his term of office in 1885, Mr. Walker has been busily engaged in the practice of his profession. In personal appearance, Judge Walker is rather above the average in height and build and of commanding presence. Although still in the prime of life, he has by integrity and persistent industry won in an eminent degree the respect and confidence of the community.

CAPTAIN WILLIAM WALLICK. The gentleman whose name introduces this sketch was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, November 4, 1832, the eldest son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Shalter) Wallick, of the same State. The paternal grandfather, Benjamin Wallick, senior, was a native of Pennsylvania and an early settler of Tuscarawas County, where he lived until his removal to Miami County, Indiana, in the winter of 1840. He died in this county about the year 1855-6. Benjamin Wallick, junior, father of William, was born in Tuscarawas County, and in early life worked at the carpenter's trade. He came to Indiana in 1840, and locating in Peru worked at his trade for a time, and then erected a planing mill on Little Pipe Creek, a short distance southwest of the city, which he operated with good success for a number of years. He died in 1883. Elizabeth Wallick was also a native of Ohio, and departed this life in Miami County, Indiana, in the year 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Wallick had a family of six children whose names are as follows, to-wit: William, the subject of the biography; Joseph (deceased), James M. (deceased), John W., Charles F. and Emma, wife of Jackson Ewing, Esq. William Wallick grew to manhood in Miami County moving here with his parents in 1840, when but eight years of age. His early educational advantages were limited, attending only the county district schools irregularly until his seventeenth year. During this period his time when out of school was spent at farm labor, but at the age of eighteen he abandoned agricultural pursuits and began the carpenter's trade. He was thus engaged till the fall of 1861, when the drum and fife (music still familiar to his ears) was heard throughout the North, calling the friends of the Federal Union to organize and rally in its support. The loyal sons of Indiana responded nobly to that call and early took steps to the music for the Union. Among them William Wallick was found on the muster roll of Company G., 51st Regiment Volunteer Infantry, which company he was largely instrumental in organizing. He enlisted on the 8th day of October, 1861, entering the service as Second Lieutenant, and with his regiment soon after proceeded to the front, where in a number of the bloodiest battle of the war he bore an active and conspicuous part. The 51st was attached to the 4th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, and in common with other regiments that participated in the southwestern campaigns suffered extreme hardships and endurance. Among the most important battles in which Captain Wallick was engaged were Murfreesboro, Nashville, Shiloh, Franklin, besides lesser engagements, in all about twenty-nine. At an encounter near Rome, Georgia, on the 8th of May, 1863, the entire command to which the 51st belonged was captured, and the prisoners first taken to Rome and later to Atlanta. Captain Wallick with many of his comrades were subsequently incarcerated in the Libby Prison at Richmond, Virginia, where for a period of nine months, exposed to all the hardships and horrors of that notorious pen, he lived with the one object in view—that of regaining his liberty. Among the many thrilling experiences of the Captain's prison life was that, when with seventy other unfortunate comrades he was obliged to take his chances in drawing lots to determine which two of their number should be executed in retaliation for the death of a couple of Confederate officers captured and hanged by General Burn side He, with twenty-four others, among whom was Col. A. D. Streight, of Indianapolis, all sworn to secrecy on penalty of death, matured and finally succeeded, in carrying into successful effect a plan of escape by excavating a tunnel under the prison walls. Through this aperture one hundred and nine persons made their escape, fifty-seven of whom were recaptured and taken back. The Captain, in common with those who succeeded in reaching the Union lines, narrates with thrilling interest the many adventures he encountered during the two days and nights spent in making his way to Williamsburgh, Virginia, the nearest available point in possession of the Federal forces. To escape observation he was compelled to secrete himself during the day in swamps, thickets, etc., and to travel wholly by night, suffering intensely during the trip from hunger, exposure and cold, the time being early in the month of February, 1864. On reaching Williamsburgh he at once procured a furlough, and after a short time spent with his family and friends in Peru, again returned to the front rejoining his regiment in Tennessee, where he found a Captain's commission awaiting him having been promoted to the command of the company while a prisoner in Libby. He was with his regiment in the campaign of central Tennessee, and the day succeeding the bloody battle of Nashville, in which engagement he took an active part, his term of service expired and he once more became an private citizen. Immediately after his discharge he returned to Peru and resumed his trade which he has since followed, principally in the city and Miami County. Captain Wallick has recently prepared an interesting lecture entitled, Libby Prison, in which are narrated in detail the sufferings, privations and death of union prisoners and prison life in general, with a full account of his wonderful and almost miraculous escape. He is delivering this lecture in various parts of the country and has already won many encomiums from the press and those who have heard him. Mr. Wallick was married June 11, 1855, to Miss Mary E. Burns, of Tuscarawas County, Ohio. To this marriage was born one child, Flora M. Wallick, deceased.

WILLIAM WEESNER. Conspicuous among the self-made men of Peru is the gentleman whose name introduces this biographical sketch. Mr. Weesner was born in Wayne Counts, this State, on the 16th of May, 1836, and is the only son of Micajah and Elizabeth (Mendenhall) Weesner, natives of North Carolina and early settlers of Southern Indiana. He passed the years of his youth upon a farm, with the rugged duties of which he early became familiar, and in 1850, when but fourteen years of age, came to Miami County and located at the village of Peoria, where he subsequently engaged in the blacksmithing business. He worked at his trade in Peoria until 1871, at which time he removed to Peru, where for eight years he followed his chosen vocation with success and financial profit. He then began dealing in pine lumber, which he has since handled on quite an extensive scale, and in connection with that branch of business deals in coal, buying and shipping for many of the leading cities of the State. Mr. Weesner is a man of great energy and industry. Believing idleness a crime, he has devoted all his life to active labor, and while this principle has been valuable as a precept, it has redounded to his own financial advantage. He has met with deserved success in his various undertakings, and is now in the enjoyment of a comfortable competence, including a fine farm of 160 acres in Butler township, Mr. Weesner politically votes with the Republican party. On the 1st day of October, 1856, he was united in marriage with Miss Minerva Hiatt, of Jay County, Indiana, a union blessed with one child—Alvina Roscoe Weesner, born May, 29, 1863.

DANIEL WILKINSON was born in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, July 26, 1830. He migrated to this county in the year 1861. His father and mother, John and Hannah (Sharp) Wilkinson, natives of Yorkshire, England, emigrated to this country in 1819 and located in Ohio. Our subject was reared in Zanesville. At sixteen years of age he began to learn the machinists trade, at which he worked in all about seventeen years, when he engaged in saw-milling, following this business for about seven years. In 1868 he opened a planing mill in Peru, and was burned out in 1872, but which was immediately rebuilt. The enterprise was converted into the use of manufacturing doors, sash, blinds, and everything of that order in first-class style, and which gave employment to from ten to twelve workmen. In 1882 Mr. Walter Wilkinson came into the establishment as a partner. Our subject is a member of the F. & A. M., and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and in politics i» a Republican.

PERRY BERTDELL WILSON
Perry Bertdell Wilson, a resident at Keno, Klamath County, Oregon, nearly 22 years, is an energetic individual whose hobbies even denote ambition. Fanning has been his main pursuit but in 50 years he has acquired interesting experiences in other fields that have served him in good stead. Mr. Wilson was born near Peru, Miami County, Indiana, November 9, 1889, one of the four children of James Henry and Mary Wilson. His father, a corn and grain farmer, was a native of Indiana, born in Miami County, Indiana, in 1854, and died in November, 1916, at Peru, Indiana ; his mother was born at Watseka, Illinois, in 1856, and died in 1892, in Miami County. As a young man of 22, Perry Wilson went from Indiana, where he had attended schools, to Montana, and took up a 320-acre homestead in Mussel Shell County to raise grain, having had experience in this line of farming under the direction of his father. It was in 1918 that he came from Montana to Keno where he operated a farm for his uncle, Charles V. Nelson, for about eight years. This was followed by six years of prospecting and mining in Trinity County, California, but about 1930 he returned to Keno to again work for his uncle, remaining until the farm was sold two years later. During this period, Mr. Wilson, a Democrat, served as constable in Keno for three years, 1930 through 1932. During the past few years, in addition to improving his own home and place that he bought, Mr. Wilson has been driving the school bus from the Round Lake district to Keno. Perry Wilson and Georgie Lester were married in Peru, Indiana, February 22, 1912. Mrs. Wilson was born in Wabash, Indiana, August 22, 1892. To them were born three children: Eileen Lois, a resident of Keno, August 7, 1916; Doris May (Mrs. Rollin Roberts), August 12,1918, a resident of Klamath County, both born in Mussel Shell County, Montana; and Lester, born March 26,1920, at Keno. Mr. Wilson's two hobbies, carpentry and bees, have proved good financial ventures as well as pursuits for relaxation. His skill as a carpenter not only enabled him to make a living but has proved useful in the construction of his own home. His interest in bees was a factor in his starting an apiary that has also been successful. [Source: "History of Klamath County, Oregon : its resources and its people, illustrated" Klamath Falls, Or.: Linsy Sisemore and  Rachel Applegate Good, 1941
Contributed by Kim Torp

ASHER WILLIAMSON, Superintendent of the Peru Water Works, is a native of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the eldest son of Levi D. and Elizabeth (Musser) Williamson, parents born in England and Pennsylvania, respectively. He was born on the 19th day of August, 1844, and when but four years of age was taken by his parents to Indianapolis, in which city he passed the years of his youth and early manhood. At the age of thirteen he entered upon an apprenticeship to learn the machinist trade, at which he served three years, and, after becoming proficient in the same, commenced working at Indianapolis. At the breaking out of the war he entered the employ of the Government, working in various capacities, and in 1864 enlisted in the 2 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery, with which he served one year, taking an active part in the Southwestern Campaigns during that time. He was with Banks in his celebrated expedition up the Red River, and participated in ail the battles of that unfortunate raid and several others. At the close of the war he returned to Indianapolis and resumed his trade, working at the same in that city until 1871, at which time he came to Peru and accepted a position with the Indiana Manufacturing Company, with which he was identified until 1878. In that year he severed his connection with the company in order to take charge, as Superintendent, of the city water works, a position he has since retained. Mr. Williamson ranks high as a skillful mechanic, and, since taking charge of the water works, has demonstrated his peculiar fitness for the position. He is an active member of the Masonic, K. of L., K. of H. and Red Men fraternities, and in politics generally votes with the Republican party. His marriage with Miss Caroline Berryman, of Hamilton County, Indiana, was celebrated on the 31st day of May, 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Williamson have three children, viz.: Cora, Maude and Gordon Williamson.

ALBERT T. ZERN, a native of Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, was born November 28, 1828, the eldest son of Henry and Deborah (Shepherd) Zern, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to this county in 1837 and located in Peru. His father built the Peru Flouring Mills about the year 1838. He was one of the early Commissioners of the county, and was deceased at the age of sixty-three, January 21, 1868. His wife died in December, 1876, aged seventy eight. Our subject was reared in the Town of Peru and received a fair education. At the age of seventeen he began to learn the art of chair-making and painting, which occupations he pursued jointly for twelve years. In November, 1854, he and Miss Rachel Bell, a daughter of Thomas Bell, who came to the county in 1834, were united in marriage. She is a native of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. To them was born but one child, Liddie, the wife of William Kunkle, of this county. Mr. Zern is a Democrat, and belongs to the subordinate lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and also to the Encampment.

History of Miami County, Indiana: From the earliest time to the present ... By Brant & Fuller, Chicago

 



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