Monroe County - B - Biographies


 

 


 

BAKER

HARVEY BAKER was born in Washington Township, Morgan Co., Ind., April 11, 1840. His parents, John C. and Elizabeth (McDaniel) Baker, natives of Kentucky, were married in Morgan County, and settled on a farm in Washington Township, where they lived until 1843, when the mother died. The father then married Mrs. McKinney, and removed to a farm in Jefferson Township, whence, in 1852, he went to Baker Township, where he died in December, 1866. The subject of this sketch was the eldest son and child, and was reared in Morgan County, where he was educated in the district schools. August 26, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty-third Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. James E. Burton, and served for more than two years. He took part in the engagements at Wild Cat, Ely., and Cumberland Gap, and at the battle of Thompson's Station, Tenn.; on March 5,1863, was wounded in the right leg; was captured and placed in prison in Columbia, Tenn., from whence he escaped August 6, 1863, and on account of disability he was mustered out of service September 11. On December 24, 1866, he was married to Martha Holler, daughter of Jacob B. Lafaver, Methodist preacher. They had three children, two of whom are living—Newton D. and Jacob O. He engaged in farming in Baker Township until in 1872, when he removed to a farm in Monroe County, remaining for seven years. He then removed to Bloomington, and was appointed Tax Collector, which position he filled for three years. In March, 1883, he was appointed Deputy Sheriff", and is at present in the discharge of his duties. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Paragon Lodge, No. 406. He is a member of the Christian Church, his wife of the Methodist Church. Politically, he is a Republican. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Pages 551 - 552

 

WILLIAM B. BAKER, born October 22, 1834, in Van Buren Township, Monroe Co., Ind., is the second son and the sixth child of Absalom and Harriet (Gentry) Baker. He was reared in his native township, where he acquired the rudiments of a good education in the district schools. When twenty years of age, he purchased a farm of eighty acres in the same township, continuing for about eight years. In September, 1865, he sold his farm, and removing to Stanford he opened a general merchandise store, under the firm name of Baker Bros., which was continued until in 1872, when they sold out, one year later repurchasing the same stock. In July, 1881, he moved to Bloomington. He has been County Commissioner for three years, which position he fills with credit. August 6, 1883, he formed a partnership with C. S. Neeld in the furniture business, and they are at present doing a lucrative business under the firm name of Baker & Neeld. He served as Postmaster at Stanford for several years, and as Township Assessor for two years. He was married October 5, 1857, to Harriet R. Denny, daughter of James H. Denny, a citizen of Warrick County, Ind. By this union there were four children, three of whom are living—Florence G., Mary H. and Thomas A. His wife died November 10, 1865, and he was next married, on September 27, 1866. to Miss Hannah Yoho, daughter of Samuel Yoho, at present a citizen of Indian Creek Township, this county. By this union there has been one child—Birdie O. Mrs. Baker is a member of the Baptist Church. Politically, he is a Republican, and a very prominent and influential member of that party. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 552

BLAIR

JOHN BLAIR, farmer, was born in Lincoln County, Tenn., on July 15, 1819. James Blair, his father, was born in South Carolina October 25, 1789, and on October 3, 1811, married Jane (Neill) Smith, who was born in South Carolina in 1780. They came to Monroe County, and here he farmed until his death, March 26, 1849. Mrs. Blair died April 5, 1854. They had six children. John Blair's paternal grandfather was a soldier of the Revolution. John was fairly educated, and since 1825 has resided on the same farm. On October 28, 1843, Mr. Blair married Hannah, daughter of Robert and Martha (Small,) Fullerton. She was born May 17, 1819. In 1837, her father died, and her mother in 1872. They were of Irish lineage.  Mr. Blair has six children, Martha J. (Owens), Euphemia (Crabb), James N., Emma (Strong), William S. and Addie . Mr. and Mrs. Blair belong to the United Presbyterian Church, and are respected by all who know them. Mr. Blair was at one time a Whig, but now votes with the Republicans. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Pages 552 - 553

 

W. T. BLAIR, born May 1, 1855, in Bloomington, Monroe Co., Ind., is the third son and sixth child born to John and Hannah (Fullerton) Blair, natives of Tennessee and Ireland respectively. The parents came to Monroe County in May, 1825, and located on a farm in Bloomington Township, where they at present reside. The subject of this sketch obtained the rudiments of a good English education in the district schools. In September, 1876, he entered the State University at Bloomington, whence he graduated in June, 1880. After he had completed his education, he entered the employ of W. J. Allen, a hardware merchant, with whom he remained for three years. On March 31,1883, he purchased the stock of boots and shoes owned by C. R. Perdue, and is at present doing a lucrative business. He was married October 5, 1882, to Miss Julia A. Waldron, daughter of John and Ann Waldron, old and respected pioneers of Monroe County. They have one child, William J., born July 9,1883. They are members of the United Presbyterian Church. Politically, he is a Republican. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 553

BOLENBACHER

PETER BOLENBACHER, farmer, was born in Germany May 4, 1814, and is the son of Peter and Margaret (Fairrence) Bolenbacher, natives of Germany. They came to America in 1832, located first in Maryland, and about 1850 came to Monroe County, where they died, at the ages respectively of eighty-nine and seventy-eight years. Peter Bolenbacher came to Maryland with his parents, and there learned the trade of stonemason and bricklayer, which business he followed for a number of years in that State, and resumed it again after he came to Monroe County. After some years, he was obliged to retire from active business. He then settled on eighty acres of land, which he purchased near Bloomington. He is a member of the Christian Church, a member of the Masonic fraternity, and liberal in politics. Mr. Bolenbacher is strictly temperate in all his habits. In 1855, he married Rebecca Whisnand, who was born in 1815, and is a member of the Methodist Church. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 553

 

GEORGE BOLENBACHER was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 17, 1825. He is the third son in a family of six children born to Peter and Margaret (Fairrence) Bollenbacher. In 1832, he came with his parents to America, and located in Maryland. In the public schools of his native village, and the schools of his neighborhood in Maryland, he obtained the rudiments of a good English education. When thirteen years of age, he began learning shoemaking with J. B. Sherer, in Fredericktown, Md., and remained with him seven years. In April, 1846, he came to Bloomington, Ind., and soon after opened a shoe shop. In 1859, he built a tannery, which at that time was one of the most extensive business interests in Bloomington. In 1874, he quit shoemaking, and purchased a one third interest with J. H. Ryors and George P. Bollenbacher in their spoke factory. In 1881, J. H. Ryors sold his interest to them, and the business is in a nourishing condition under the firm name of Bollenbacher & Sons, manufacturers of wagon and carriage spokes and dealers in hardwood lumber. They have branch factories at Gosport and Guthrie, Ind., and employ about eighty men. They have a capital of about $60,000 invested, and their factories have a capacity of about 13,000 spokes per day.    Mr. B. is also the proprietor of a large shoe store in Bloomington. In 1848, he was married to Margaret Shawver, daughter of Christopher Shawver, one of the earliest settlers in Monroe County. The issue of this marriage has been thirteen children, twelve yet living—Lizzie, George W., Mary, Kate, Julia, Martin C, William P., Caroline, Sallie, Samuel N., Jacob I. and Fannie. He is a member of the Bloomington Lodge, A., F. & A. M., and of the Lutheran Church. Politically, he is a Democrat. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Pages 553 - 554

BORLAND

JOHN E. BORLAND was born in Perry Township, Monroe Co., Ind., on August 7, 1834. His parents, Edward and Margaret (Caldwell) Borland, natives of "Washington County, Penn., immigrated to Indiana in 1819, and settled in Bloomington, where the father followed the carpenter's trade for about five years, and then entered a farm of 320 acres in Perry Township. February 8, 1865, he died. The mother's death occurred in August, 1877. The subject of this sketch was the third son and sixth child in a family of ten children, and was reared in his native county, where he received a good education. When eighteen years of age, he entered the State University, at Bloomington, remaining a portion of each of four years. In 1856, he began farming for himself in Perry Township, and by perseverance and industry has secured a com­petence. September 4, 1872, he married Emma L. McClellan, daughter of Alexander McClellan, an early settler, and a prominent citizen of Bloomington. His wife is an active worker in the Presbyterian Church. He was for two years Trustee of Perry Township, and for six years Road Supervisor of Perry Township. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 554

BRADFUTE

S. WALTER BRADFUTE is second son in family, and was born May 18, 1862, near Xeaia, Greene Co., Ohio, where he lived until twelve years of age, and was there educated. His parents were John and Maggie J. (Collins) Bradfute, the former dying in 1864. When fourteen years of age, he started the Bloomington Telephone, in partnership with Frank G. Arnott, and six months later purchased his partner's half interest, and has continued to run it up to the present writing, having enlarged from the size of note paper to that of six, column quarto. He attended the high school in Bloomington, as far as Senior class, the last four years of which time he was conducting his paper. Since fifteen years of age, he has corresponded for the Cincinnati Commercial, Gazette, and is at present also representing the Indianapolis Journal, St. Louis Democrat, Chicago Tribune, the Inter Ocean, Indianapolis Times and the Louisville Commercial, in Monroe County. He is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, and is corresponding member of the Phi Delta Theta. Politically, he is a Republican. He was married, November 1, 1883, to Flora Wallingford, daughter of Samuel Wallingford. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 554

BRYANT

REV. JEFFERSON E. BRANT was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, February 27, 1837, and is the second child born to Seth and Rachel (Jackson Brant, natives of West Virginia. In 1853, he came to Owen County, Ind., and for two years afterward assisted his father to clear the wilderness. He then earned enough money to enter Asbury University, at Greencastle, whence he graduated in 1860, having" two years previously preached his first sermon. In 1860, he was appointed by the Indiana Conference to a mission in Clay County, for one year, afterward serving for about ten months near Terre Haute. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Eighty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, and was commissioned Captain one year later. He took part in several important   encounters,  among which  were Resaca,   Kingston,  Marietta, Dallas Woods, etc., and was in command of the regiment when Atlanta was captured. On September 1, 1864, he was, for meritorious conduct, promoted to Major, afterward participating in the engagements at Bentonville. Goldsboro and Averysboro, and at Savannah was commissioned Lieutenant Colonel, January 1, 1865. Five months later, he was mustered out of service, immediately re-entering the conference and ministry. He has been actively engaged since, and at present has in charge the Methodist Episcopal Church at Bloomington, where he has been located since September, 1882. On August 8, 1858, he was married to Mary A. Mc­Allister, daughter of Dr. McAllister, of Owen County. By this union there are nine children, four of whom are living, Anna, Emma, Claude and Arthur. Rev. J. E. Brant is a member of the A., F. & A. M., the L O. O. F. and of the G. A. R.    Politically, he is a Republican. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Pages 554 - 555

BRYAN

DR. G. W. BRYAN, second son of John and Mary (McCorinick) Bryan, was born October 1, 1825, in Beaver County, Penn., where he lived until fifteen years of age. His educational facilities were very poor, but by perseverance and studiousness he acquired a good English education. He commenced the tailor's trade with a half brother, who died two years later. He then went to Clifton. Allegheny County, and completed the trade with George T. Hice, remaining three years. He then worked as journeyman for about one year in Pennsylvania and Ohio; then came to Indiana, and opened a shop in Carroll County, continuing about two years. Returning to Beaver County, Penn., he attended an academy at Hookstown for about three years; then taught school and studied medicine with Dr. R. A. Moon, for two years. In 1850 and 1851, he attended a course of lectures, at Cleveland, in the Western Reserve Medical College, and entered the regular practice in Fayette, Allegheny Co., Penn., where he remained for two years, at which he took a second journal of lectures at Cleveland, Ohio, in 1853 and 1854; then went to Knoxville, Jefferson Co., Ohio, and formed a partnership with Dr. Hamilton, in the regular practice, continuing with him for one year. Coming thence to Bloomington in 1855, he entered practice here, and is at present doing a good business, and is considered one of her best practitioners. In December, 1862, he was appointed Assistant Surgeon of the Sixty seventh Indiana Volunteers, which position he was compelled to resign on account of ill health. On October 15, 1849, he was married to Miss Alice Calhoun, daughter of Joseph Calhoun, of Beaver County, Penn. They have had seven children, three of whom are living, Florence, Mary and Minnie. Dr. Bryan is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, and he is politically a Republican. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 555

BUSKIRK

JOHN B. BUSKIRK, a native of Kentucky, was born September 5, 1815, in Shelby County. He is eldest son of Abram and Mary A. (Boswell) Buskirk, natives of Pennsylvania and Virginia respectively. They came to Indiana in 1817, and lived in New Albany until 1820, when they came to Monroe County and settled on a farm near Blooming­ton. The father was a stonemason, and, removing to Bloomington in 1881, followed his trade for a number of years. He was Associate Judge of the Bloomington courts for some time. He served as Postmaster for four years, and was Justice of the Peace for several years. He died in October, 1853. The mother died in 1850. The subject was reared at home until seventeen years of age, when he began learning the cabinetmaker's trade with William McCollough. In 1833, he went to New Albany, and worked at his trade for two years, when he returned to Bloomington for some time. Removing thence to Bedford, he remained for nearly twenty years; he then went to Orange County, where he engaged in the general merchandise business for eighteen years, the greater part of which time he acted as Postmaster. Removing thence to Paola, Ind., he edited the Paola News. In 1878, he returned to Bloomington, where he at present resides, sixty-nine years of age. On January 2, 1840, he was married to Maria H. Bitter, daughter of John Ritcher, a citizen of Kentucky. They have had six children, five of. whom are living, Thomas B., John "W., Caroline L., Margaret B. and George A. Mr. Buskirk is a member of the A., F. & A. M. and of the I. O. O. F. He is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Church. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Pages 555 - 556

 

GEORGE A. BUSKIRK: (deceased) was born August 10, 1829, in Monroe County, Ind. He was the son of Abram and Mary A. Buskirk, who came to Bloomington in 1831. Having finished his education in the public schools of Bloomington, while yet a lad he was taken into the office of David Browning, Clerk of Monroe County Circuit Court. He had entered the Preparatory Department of the State University, and had just completed the Freshman year, when the Mexican war broke out. He enlisted in First Indiana Regiment, at La Fayette, but was soon afterward transferred to the Third Indiana, under Col. James H. Lane, and served till the close of the war, being a participant in the battle of Buena Vista. On his return to Bloomington, he served in the office of Jesse Brandon (editor of a Democratic paper), for two years, thus acquiring a practical knowledge of the details of the printing business. In 1848, he began the study of law with Samuel H. Buskirk, soon after which he entered the Law Department of the State University, graduating in 1850. He was soon after elected Justice of the Peace, serving for several years. In 1856, he was elected Judge of the Court for the district embracing Morgan, Monroe and Brown Counties, and re-elected in I860, the counties of Shelby and Johnson having been added. In 1867, he was selected by the Legislature as Agent of State, and assumed the control of the funds set aside by the State for the payment of the State debt, managing the trust with skill and fidelity. In 1868, he was elected Representative of Monroe County in the Lower House of General Assembly, and at the regular session in 1869 he was elected Speaker, presiding with signal ability over the deliberations of that body. In 1871, he organized the First National Bank of 'Bloomington, and was chosen President by the Board of Directors. During the last three or four years of his life, he withdrew from public affairs, devoting himself entirely to private interests. He was married, August 5, 1854, to Martha Hardesty, daughter of Samuel and Susanna Hardesty, early pioneers of Bloomington. ' His death, which occurred July 21, 1874, caused by a severe stroke of apoplexy, was greatly mourned by the citizens of Bloomington. He was an active member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Knights of Pythias. His valuable services during the war were so appreciated by Gov. Morton that he was appointed Colonel of the Indiana Legion. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 556

 

JOHN W. BUSKIRK, second son and third child of John B. and Maria H. (Hitter) Buskirk, natives of Kentucky, was born on November 20, 1845. in Bedford, Lawrence Co., Ind. His parents at present reside in Bloomington, and are spoken of elsewhere in this work. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county until eight years of age, when he went with his parents to Orange County, and lived until 1859. He then entered the State University at Bloomington, remaining for two years. He enlisted in Company G, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, under Col. John W. Bay. He served until Jane,. 1863, and took part in the engagements at Chickasaw Bluffs and Arkansas Post He then received an honorable discharge on account of disability, and in the fall of that year he again entered college, remaining for two years, and then went to North America, where be began the study of law with the Hon. James L. Collins. He continued for two years, then formed a partnership and practiced for one year. He then removed to Paola, and became partner of his brother, continuing until the spring of 1869, when he moved to Bloomington, remaining there for two years with his uncle. He then went into partnership with Lester L. Norton, and two years later became the partner of H. C. Duncan, which firm is at present doing a good, lucrative practice, and it is considered one of Monroe County's best law firms. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney for District 8 (Orange, Du Bois, Crawford, Perry and Spencer), which position he resigned on coming to Bloomington. In 1869, he was married to Ella A. Broadwell, daughter of Jonathan P. Broadwell, a prominent citizen of Tippecanoe County, Ind. They had three children, one of whom is living, —Ella A. His wife died April 30, 1878. Mr. Buskirk is a member of the I. O. O. R, and of the Democratic State Central Committee. H. C. Duncan was born January 16, 1845, in Lawrence County, Ind. His parents, William and Mary (Malott) Duncan, were natives of Jef­ferson County, Ky., where they were married in 1824, and two years later moved to Lawrence County, Ind., where the father died March 1, 1875; the mother still resides in Lawrence County. The subject of this sketch is the youngest of eight children, and was reared in his native county, where he obtained the rudiments of a good English education. January 1, 1864, he entered the State University, and after remaining for about three months he enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Indiana Volunteers, under Col. John "W. Foster, and was mustered out about October 1, 1864. He re-entered college, whence he graduated in June, 1868. He then began reading law with Moses F. Dunn, of Bed­ford. In 1869, he was appointed Enrolling Clerk in the Indiana Legislature. In 1872, he formed a partnership with Mr. Dunn in the regular practice of law. Two years later, he came to Bloomington, and went into partnership with John W. Buskirk. In 1880, he was elected Prosecuting Attorney for the district comprising Monroe, Lawrence, Orange and Martin Counties. He served for two years In December, 1872, he was married to Sadie Cummings, daughter of Dr. Cummings, of Blooming­ton. They had three children, two of whom are living, Frank and Mary A. Mr. Duncan is politically a Republican. He is a Mason and a member of the Christian Church. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Pages 557 - 558


                                                                               

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