ADAMS TOWNSHIP BIOGRAPHIES
TRANSCRIBED FROM THE BOOK COUNTIES OF MORGAN, MONROE & BROWN,
INDIANA. HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL


JOHN W. ALEXANDER, farmer, was born in Putnam County, Ind., March 4, 1830, and is the fifth child in a family of twelve children born to William and Jane (Wallace) Alexander, the former of whom was a native of the "Old Dominion," and the latter of East Tennessee.  They were of English and Irish descent respectively.  William Alexander received his early education in his native State.
While yet a young man, he removed with his parents to East Tennessee, where he was afterward married, and engaged in agricultural pursuits for several years.
From Tennessee, he removed to Kentucky, and from thence, in about 1827, to Putnam County, Ind., where he bought a partially improved farm, and resided until about 1838.  He then removed to that part of Morgan County, Ind., which has since become Mill Creek Township, Putnam County.  Here, he farmed for several years;  then opened a small country store, and was engaged in merchandising until his death, which occurred February 8, 1881, in his eighty second year.  From early life, until his first wife's death, which occurred in 1868, both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  After that event, he joined the Christian Church.  He was Justice of Peace in Putnam and Morgan Counties for some thirty years.  During this time, he was robbed of some $400, which he afterward recovered, and sent the thief to penitentiary.  John W. Alexander, the subject, received only a limited common school education, but has acquired a fair practical business education by his own exertions since he became a man.
He was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty one years old.  He then farmed on shares in Putnam County, Ind., for several years.  In 1860, he  bought a farm in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., and has since been engaged in farming, threshing and stock dealing.  He was for two years Trustee of Adams Township, and has held various lesser offices.  He was married, August 27, 1850, to Miss Martha J. Patrick, a native of Putnam County, Ind. Twelve children were the fruit of this union, nine of whom:: five sons and four daughters are yet living.  He is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A. F.& A. M., where he has held various official positions.  Mrs. Alexander is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  In politics, Mr. Alexander is a Democrat.

THOMAS S. AREND, harness maker, was born in Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., April 5, 1857, and is a son of Christopher J. and Rebecca F. (Russell) Arend, the former a native of Bavaria, Germany, and the latter of Johnson County, Ind., but of English descent.  Christopher J. Arend received a good common school education in Bavaria.  At the age of fifteen, in 1846, he emigrated to the United States, accomplishing the journey alone.
He first settled in Monmouth County, N. J., where he learned the tanner's trade, serving an apprenticeship of three years.  He then followed his trade as a journeyman for several years, and in 1854, located at Martinsville, Ind.  where he took charge of a shop, receiving half the profits for conducting the business.  Here he was married, and resided for a short time.  He then removed to Ashland Township, same county, where he started a tannery,  and is still engaged in that business.   Mrs. Arend departed this life May 18, 1883.  She was a member of the Christian Church, to which Mr. Arend also belongs.  Thomas S. Arend, the subject, received a fair common school education, and taught for a time.  At the age of twenty three, he commenced to learn the harness maker's trade, and has followed that business ever since, now owning a shop in Eminence, where he has a good trade.  He was married January 14, 1883, to Amanda J. Modrell, a native of Putnam County, Ind.  Mr. Arend is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 317, I. O. O. F., of which lodge he is at present N. G.  In politics, he is a Republican.

COL. WILLIAM C. BANTA, M. D., was born in Hendricks County, Ind., August 31, 1839, and is one of ten children born to Cornelius and Rebecca (Eckles) Banta;  both natives of Kentucky.  The ancestors of the former were of Italian and Scotch extraction.  Cornelius Banta came to Madison County, Ind., at a date prior to the organization of the State.  After a few years, he removed to what was known as the Brick Tavern, near Stilesville, Hendricks  Co., Ind.  His place was a regular stopping place for stage-coaches over the old National pike, running between St. Louis and Cincinnati.  In 1838, he removed to Belleville, where he remained until 1850, when he removed to Whitley County, Ind., where he bought a farm and resided two years;   then returned to Belleville, where he again engaged in mercantile pursuits and resided until his death, which occurred in 1857.  Mr. Banta and wife were members of the Christian Church.  William C. Banta, the subject, received a good common school and academic education, and was employed in his father's store until the latter's death, after which the support of the family devolved upon him.  When in his eighteenth year, he commenced teaching school and studying medicine under the instruction of Drs. Moor and Kennedy, of Belleville.  In April, 1861, he resigned his school, went to Indianapolis and enrolled in Company A, Seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, the first Indiana regiment recruited for the three months' service.
They participated in the battle of Philippi.  At the close of the three months' service, in August, 1861, Col. Banta reorganized and filled up his company, A, from seventy to one hundred men, in a day and night, for the three years' service, and was chosen Captain.  After about one year, he was promoted to Major, and soon after to Lieutenant Colonel.  The Colonel of the regiment, I. G. Grover, was captured in the battle of the Wilderness, after which Col. Banta commanded until the regiment was mustered out.  He also, for a short time, commanded the First Brigade, of the First Division, of the First Army Corps.  Col. Banta participated in all the principal battles in which the Armies of West Virginia and the Potomac were engaged to the fall of 1864.  In 1862, at the battle of Port Republic he was severely wounded
in the right shoulder by a shell, and was mustered out with his regiment at Indianapolis, in September, 1864.  He then engaged in the drug trade at Belleville, Ind. and continued  the same some five years;   he also resumed his medical studies.  In the spring of 1870, he graduated from "The Indiana Medical College," at Indianapolis, and in June of the same year came to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he has since practiced his profession with excellent success.  He was married, August 25, 1861, to Elizabeth May, a native of Montgomery County, Ind.  Eight children, three sons and five daughters, blessed their union, all of whom are yet living.  The Doctor and wife are members of the Christian Church.  He is a member of the Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and has been a member of the Grand Lodge of the State in both orders.  In politics, Col. Banta is a stanch Republican, and is one of the leading and representative men of the county.

JOSEPH BLUNK, stock raiser and farmer, is the son of Goldsby and Elizabeth (Pritchett) Blunk, the former a native of Indiana, the latter of Kentucky. The paternal grandfather of our subject was a Virginian and a soldier of the Revolution.  He was known as Aaron Blount, which surname has been since change to Blunk.  Goldsby Blunk was a farmer, but labored as a steamboat man on the Lower Mississippi River for several years, and in 1827 married and began farming where our subject now resides, having entered eighty acres of timber.  He cleared his land, and was the first settler in that part of this township.  He was an expert hunter and marksman, a man of strong will, owner of 237 1/2 acres, and died February 4, 1857, aged fifty eight.  Mrs. Blunk died in 1871, aged sixty three years.  They were parents of five sons and five daughters, and members of the Christian Church.  Joseph Blunk was born February 14, 1841.  He received but a fraction of schooling, yet by well directed study he has obtained a fair education.  When he was sixteen years old, his father died, and he remained with his mother until he was of age.  April 10, 1862, he married Elizabeth Cown, a native of Illinois, born November 9, 1840, which union gave being to nine children, of whom six sons and two daughters are living.   After marriage, Mr. Blunk located near his present home, to which he removed in 1874.  This farm comprises fifty three acres, valued at about $60 per acre, is well improved and supplied with good stock, and the yield of his industry and care.  Mr. Blunk is a progressive citizen, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

ELISHA A. BOURN, teacher and farmer, was born June 23, 1859, and is a son of Henry Bourn, of whose family he is the eldest.  He was reared to the hard but honest labor of a farmer's life, and attended school considerably in early life, thus laying the foundation for a life of usefulness as an instructor of youth.  Mr. Bourn also attended the State Normal School for a time in furtherance of his purpose, and has qualified himself thoroughly.  
He has the happy faculty of imparting knowledge to his pupils, and has been very successful, having taught seven school years in succession, in alternation with farming, in which he is also engaged, and also in raising the ordinary grades of stock.  March 7, 1882, he married Miss Clara E., daughter of James Wallace, and born in this township February 27, 1862.  To this union has been born one daughter; Mamie E.  Mr. Bourn is a practical farmer, an energetic and promising gentleman, and a Republican in political faith.

HENRY BOURN, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Ray Township, Morgan Co., Ind., January 29, 1837, and is the fourth child in a family of ten children born to Elijah and Nancy (Alexander) Bourn, the former a native of Jessamine County, Ky., and the latter of Owen County, Ind., where her father, Abner Alexander, was one of the earliest pioneers.  Our subject received a fair common school education;  and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty one years old.  He then came to Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind.,  where he bought the farm of 160 acres upon which he still resides, adding to it until he has now some 400 acres, well improved, making one of the best farms in Adams Township.  He was married, September 23, 1858, to Miss Milla S. McGinnis, a native of Owen County, Ind.  Seven children blessed this union, five of whom, three sons and two daughters, are yet living.  Mr. Bourn and wife are consistent members of the Christian Church, in which he is and has been for several years a Ruling Elder.  Mr. Bourn is a stanch Republican.

POWEL S. BRASIER,  dentist, was born in Owen County, Ind., March 9, 1850, and is one of four living children born to Gideon and Sarah (Jones) Brasier, both natives of Kentucky, and of English, Welsh and Irish descent. Gideon Brasier received no education in youth, there being no school of any kind on the Indiana frontier at that time.  He was employed on the home farm until twenty one years old, then learned the carpenter trade, and has followed the same part of the time ever since.  In early manhood, he followed flat boating from Gosport to New Orleans, having made nineteen trips.  In March, 1865, he enlisted in Company F, Eleventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until the following August.  In the fall of 1865, he came to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he was engaged in the hotel business until March, 1883, when he moved to New Winchester, Hendricks Co., Ind., where he now resides.  He was married February 3, 1840.  Mr. Brasier and wife are members of the Baptist Church.  In politics, he is a stanch Democrat, and is one of the pioneers of Morgan County.  Powel S. Brasier, our subject, received a fair common school education.  At the age of fourteen, he went to learn the harness maker's trade, afterward learning the carpenter trade and dentist profession, which latter he is still following at Eminence, Ind.
He has had some eight years' experience in the fruit tree business, and intends to resume that occupation in a short time.  He also clerked for a time in both a dry goods and drug store. Mr. Brasier is yet unmarried;  is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A. F. & A. M.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

ATLAS BRAY, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Chatham County, N. C., July 7, 1826, and is the second child of seven sons and three daughters born to James and Sarah (Edwards) Bray, the former a native of North Carolina, born 1796, the latter of the same State, born 1802.  James Bray was a farmer, who located in Hendricks County, Ind., about 1834; farmed on rented land;  then removed to this county, where he secured land.  This he afterward sold and went to Missouri about 1853, and to Kansas in 1869, where he now enjoys a retired life.  Mrs. Bray is also living, aged eighty two years.  They are long established members of the Baptist Church.  Atlas Bray remained at home until he was of age, when he worked at farming in jobs at 37 cents per day.  Notwithstanding this poor labor, he was enabled after a time to purchase forty acres of timberland, which he set about to clear and improve;  afterward sold the same and purchased 280 acres in Iowa, and finally exchanged for the farm on which he now resides, combining 153 acres.  He likewise possesses a good farm in Monroe Township.  In July, 1849, he married Emily Craven, by  which union were born to them seven children, John F. (deceased), Enos, Mary, Sarah, Clara, Oscar and Luther.  Mr. Bray has been a successful farmer and is a worthy citizen.  He and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JAMES K. BURGESS, druggist, was born in Putnam County, Ind., October 12, 1844, and is the third child in a family of seven children born to Dawson and Catherine (Holbert) Burgess, natives of Kentucky, the former of German and the latter of Irish descent.  Dawson Burgess received his early education in his native State.  While yet a young man, he removed to Putnam County,  Ind.  Here he bought 100 acres of wild land, and improved a farm, upon which he resided until December, 1868, when he removed to Stilesville, Hendricks Co., Ind., where his death occurred August 12, 1878, in his sixty fourth year. James K. Burgess, the subject of our sketch, received a fair common school education, and was employed on the home farm until he was twenty years old.
In October, 1864, he enlisted in Company H, Forty third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until the close of the war, being mustered out at Indianapolis in June, 1865. After his return from the army, he farmed the home place on shares, and ran a threshing machine for three years.  He then removed to Hendricks County, Ind., near Stilesville, where he remained one year, then returned to Putnam County, and engaged in agricultural pursuits until March, 1880.  He then came to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he has since engaged in the drug trade.  He was married, October 14, 1869, to Elizabeth Dobbs, a native of Putnam County, Ind.  Two daughters have blessed their union, viz., Dora and Claudia.  In politics, Mr. Burgess is a Democrat.

STEPHEN H. CHENOWETH, blacksmith, and Justice of the Peace, was born in what is now Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., July 8, 1837, and is a son of Ephraim B. and Mariah (Risinger) Chenoweth, the former a native of the "Old Dominion," and the latter of Kentucky.  They were both of German descent.  When three years old, Ephraim B. Chenoweth removed with his parents to Jefferson County, Ky., where his early education was received, and where he was afterward married.  Here he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, and followed the same for several years.  Later, he engaged in agricultural pursuits.  In 1835, he came with his wife and family to what is now Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he entered 160 acres of wild land, and improved a farm, to which he added until he was the owner of a farm of 240 acres.  In 1855, he sold this farm, and bought another in Adams Township, same county, where he resided until his death, which occurred May 8, 1875, in his seventieth year.  He was for several years one of the Township Trustees under the old constitution.  He was a member of the Christian, Mrs. Chenoweth of the Baptist Church.  Stephen H. Chenoweth, the subject, received a limited education in the primitive schools of the Indiana frontier, and was employed on his father's farm until he  was twenty one years.  He then farmed on shares until the spring of 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Fifty ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry.  He served with that regiment until the close of the war, being mustered out at Richmond, Va., in May, 1865.  He then farmed for two years, when he commenced blacksmithing at Eminence, Ind., and has followed that business ever since.  He has been three times elected Justice of the Peace, but only qualified once.  He is now holding that office.  He was married, in 1859, to Bena M. Gray, a native of Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind.  Seven children blessed their union, only two of whom, one son and one daughter, are now living.  Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., and of the G. A. R.  In the former order he is a Past Master.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the early settlers of the township and county.

CALVIN CURTIS, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Randolph County, N. C., was born April 26, 1828, and is the eldest of the family. He was nine years of age when his father moved to this county, whom he assisted to make a home in the wilds of nature.  When twenty four years old, he located on eighty acres of timber land, from which he made his present home, having lived in a cabin until 1865, at which time he built a good house.  The farm comprises 220 acres, 160 of which are in full cultivation;  he also possesses a forty acre tract in Gregg Township.  March 24, 1852, he married Miss Rosie York, who died two years later, leaving one daughter, Martha.  November, 1857, he wedded Miss Euphemia Johnson, who also left the world, March 22, 1879, leaving four children; David A. M., Lieudary A., Daniel and Laurena.  Mr. Curtis is a practical farmer, an industrious man and good citizen;  he raises a high breed of geese and turkeys, Plymouth Rocks, Light Brahmas, Golden Spangle chickens, etc.  Mr. Curtis has been a prominent hunter, and is an expert rifle shot.

DAVID A CURTIS (deceased) was born in Randolph County, N. C., September 17, 1806, and was the eldest of the two sons and one daughter of Jesse W. and Judy Curtis, natives of North Carolina and of English extraction.  Our subject was reared to farming with but little education.  He married, after becoming of age, Miss Tabitha Staler, who proved a faithful spouse for fifty six years.  In 1837, Mr. Curtis moved to this State and located on Government land, where he built a cabin and preceded to found a home, in which, after some years of discouragement and toil, he succeeded.  On the morning of February 24, 1883, he arose well, ate a usual breakfast, and died peacefully soon after, his wife and daughter supposing him to be asleep.  He was an industrious and successful man, and at one period owned 1,750 acres.  He was the father of fourteen children, eleven of whom lived to maturity.  He was an upright man and honored citizen, a Democrat in politics, and a Patron of Husbandry. Mrs. Curtis yet survives, aged seventy six.  Mr. Curtis was a member of the Christian Church, and Mrs. Curtis now adheres to the same denomination.

EMEZIRE D. CURTIS, stock raiser and farmer, was born in this township July 27, 1839, a son of D. A. Curtis.  He was practiced in industry, and  kept at home until he was twenty one years old, when he began the labor of life where he is now living, his father having given him eighty acres as a  beginning, on which he has built a good residence, and also variously improved his farm, as well as adding thereto 140 acres, now a desirable home and valuable estate.  He is now raising the better grades of sheep, being well supplied with stock, which he feeds from his own grain.  In 1867, he married Miss Rachel Mosier, with an issue of seven sons.  He is a Democrat, and has held several township offices.  Mr. and Mrs. Curtis are members of the Christian Church.

WESLEY CURTIS, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Randolph County, N. C., was born September 26, 1830, and is the second son of David A. Curtis.  He was reared by his father, a farmer;  received almost no education, and early began to do for himself.   As an aid, he received eighty acres of timber land, on which he toiled while living at home until 1857, at which period he married Miss Elizabeth Jones, of Bartholomew County, and shortly after located on his own land.  He soon built a house, which was burned in 1872, and has now one of the best two story brick houses in the township, having as well cleared and established a desirable farm, which comprises 320 acres, besides sixty acres in Jasper County, Ill., and some town property.  He is a practical farmer, and has a fair supply of horses, cattle, sheep and hogs.  After the decease of his wife, who left two sons and one daughter, Margaret E., Francis M. and George W. Mr. Curtis wedded Miss Jane Carman, an orphan of this county.  Mr. Curtis is a liberal and well intentioned citizen, a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. Mr. Curtis has made a property valued at $30,000, and has in all a yearly
income of $3,000.

SOLOMON DORSETT, farmer, was born in Chatham County, N. C., February 27, 1832, and is a son of Duty and Rachel (Edwards) Dorsett, natives of North Carolina.  The former was of German and the latter of English descent.  Duty Dorsett, was a farmer by occupation, and also followed various mechanical pursuits.  In the fall of 1840, he came with his family to what is now Mill Creek Township, Putnam County, Ind. Here he bought a farm, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred in November, 1844.  Both himself and wife were members of the Baptist Church.  He was a soldier during the war of 1812.  Solomon Dorsett, the subject, received only a very limited education in the schools of the Indiana frontier.  After attaining to manhood, however, he acquired by his own exertions a good practical education, and taught subscription and public schools during the fall and winter for seventeen years.  He was employed on the home farm until he was twenty one years old.  He then farmed on shares for five years, after which he bought a partially improved farm of forty acres in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., to which he afterward added 150 acres.  On this farm he resided until the fall of 1872, when he came to Eminence, same township, and engaged in the general mercantile trade, continuing in that business some sixteen months.  He then bought a residence in Eminence and a farm of 130 acres adjoining the village.  Here he has ever since resided, and has been mainly engaged in agricultural pursuits.  His dwelling burned in January, 1879, which he replaced by one of the best brick residences in the township or county.  Mr. Dorsett has also been engaged in the local practice of law for the past fifteen years, and is now Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for Adams Township.  He was also Trustee of Adams Township for thirteen years, and in 1864 was a candidate for County Treasurer.  He was married, March 8, 1853, to Sylvania C. Marley, a native of Randolph County, N. C. 
To this union were born eight children, only two of whom, both daughters, are still living.  Mrs. Dorsett died April 21, 1874.   She was a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Dorsett was next married October 1, 1874, to Martha W. Parker, a native of Putman County, Ind.  Four children, two sons and two daughters, have blessed their union.  Both Mr. Dorsett and wife are members of the Christian Church.  He is a member of Blue Lodge and Chapter in the Masonic fraternity, being a charter member, and Post Master of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, F. & A. M.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the prominent citizens of the township and county.

THOMAS FELKINS, stock raiser and farmer, is a native of Garrard County, Ky., and is the youngest of the family of eight born to William and Jane (Williams) Felkins, natives respectively of Virginia and Kentucky, and of Irish extraction.  The paternal grandfather of  our subject, John Felkins, was a Revolutionary soldier, and was once taken prisoner by the British. William Felkins was a soldier of the war of 1812, after which he located in Kentucky, married, and farmed until 1852, when he moved to Arkansas and died in 1869, aged seventy two.  He was a Democrat, and a member of the Christian Church.  Thomas Felkins was born November, 1825, and left motherless when eight years of age, and remained at home until he was nineteen, when he faced the world on his own account, and came to this county with $2.50 in cash and one horse.  He made his home with his brother, and worked at farming on shares for some time.  September, 1850, he married Miss Martha Wheeler, of this county, but a native of Kentucky, which union gave birth to eight children, of which number three sons and three daughters survive. After marriage, Mr. Felkins lived in a log cabin on land he had previously entered, and afterward took charge of his father-in-law's farm, where he lived until 1858, at which period he purchased 132 acres known as the "Old Joe Rhodes" farm.  This he has improved and added to until he now owns 218
acres under good cultivation and well stocked.  Mr. and Mrs. Felkins are members of the Christian Church.

SAMUEL G. GASH, farmer, was born in Lincoln County, Ky., January 3, 1828, and is the eldest of five children born to Thomas and Eliza (Wilson) Gash, natives of Kentucky, and of Scotch and Irish descent respectively. Thomas Gash was educated and married in his native State, where in early  life he learned the carpenter's trade, and followed the same, in connection with farming, all his life.  He and his wife were members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.  The death of Mrs. Eliza Gash occurred March 6, 1835, and that of Mr. Gash October 5, 1840.  Samuel G. Gash, the subject, received a fair common school education.  After his father's death, he made his home with his uncle, David R. Wilson, until he attained to his majority, with whom, during that time, he learned the blacksmith's  trade.  After leaving his uncle, he was employed as a laborer on a farm some four years.  He then farmed on shares in Kentucky for one year, after which, in the fall of 1853, he came with his wife and family to Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he bought a partially improved farm of forty acres. In 1846, he enlisted for service in the war with Mexico, but was never engaged in active service.  He was married, August 7, 1852, to Miss Margaret S. Reid, a native of Jefferson County, Ky., and  a daughter of John and Esther (Gilliland) Reid, who were among the early pioneers of Jefferson County, Ky.  One son has blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Gash, viz, John T.  Mr. Gash was at one time Adjutant in the Kentucky militia, and for a time carried the mail from Eminence to Quincy.  Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are earnest advocates of the temperance cause.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

ELERSON GENTRY, farmer and stock raiser, is a native of Hendricks County, Ind.;  was born January 19, 1833, and is the eldest son of Garland and Susan (Stringer) Gentry, natives of Kentucky, and of English extraction.  The grandparents of our subject were natives of Virginia, lived in Kentucky, and removed to and farmed in Indiana.  Garland Gentry moved from Kentucky to this State about 1831, thence to this township, and subsequently to Texas, Arkansas, and again to Indiana, where he now lives in retirement, aged seventy seven years.  He is a Democrat, a member of the Christian Church.  Was twice married, and is the father of three children by the first and nine by the second marriage.  Elerson Gentry was reared a farmer by his father, whom he accompanied to Texas and Arkansas;  resided in Missouri four years;  returned to Hendricks County, Ind., and thence to this county.  When twenty one years of age, he left his father's house to struggle for himself, and worked for three years by the month;  then leased land for several years;  finally purchased eighty acres of his father-in-law's estate, and now owns, in addition, eighty acres west of Mud Creek. December 29, 1855, he married Miss Mary M. Smith, of this county, born February 2, 1838.  This union  produced six children, Theresa A., Franklin A., Susan A., William A., Mary Etta and Thomas A.  Mr. Gentry is a Freemason and a Democrat, and he and wife are worthy members of the Christian Church.

HARRISON GENTRY, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., September 28, 1846, and is the fourth in a family of ten children born to Barry M. and Elizabeth J. (Ludlow) Gentry, both of whom were born near Lexington, Ky., and were of English and German descent respectively. When but five or six years old, in about 1825, Barry M. Gentry came with his parents to what is now Hendricks County, Ind., then a part of Morgan County. Here his father entered 160 acres of land, and improved a farm, upon which young Barry passed his early life.  He received such an education as could be obtained at the subscription schools of that frontier settlement.  He was married at the age of eighteen, and soon after commenced for himself, and farmed on shares for several years.  In about 1850, he came to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., where he bought eighty acres of wild land, and to which he has added, now owning a well improved farm of some 230 acres.  In June, 1872,  he removed to Stilesville, Hendricks County, Ind., where he has since engaged in the dry goods trade.  He was one of the Commissioners of Morgan County for some sixteen years, and has held various township offices.  Mr. G. and wife are members of the Christian Church.  He cast his first vote for William H. Harrison, but, since 1856, has been identified with the Republican party. Harrison Gentry, the subject, received a fair common school education, was employed on the old homestead until he was twenty one years old. He then farmed on shares for some ten years, after which he bought a farm
of sixty acres in Adams Township, Morgan County, upon which he still resides.  The farm is well improved.  He was married, November 10, 1870, to Miss Eliza J. Hubble, a native of Hendricks County, Ind.  Two children, one son and one daughter, have blessed their union, Clara M. and Conrad. In politics, Mr. Gentry is a stanch Republican.

DAVID H. GOSS, farmer and stock raiser, was born in what is now Davie County, N. C., May 28, 1819, and is the sixth in a family of nine children born to Daniel and Martha (Ingram) Goss, the former of whom was a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of North Carolina.  They were of  German and Welsh descent respectively.  When a lad, Daniel Goss removed with his parents to North Carolina, where he received a fair German education, and where he was afterward married, and engaged in agricultural pursuits for a time.  In the spring of 1821, he emigrated with his wife and family to Owen County, Ind., and settled near Gosport, where he entered some 700 acres of wild land, erected a log house and improved a farm, to which he added some 200 acres, and upon which he resided until his death, which occurred February 14, 1834, in about his fiftieth year.  Both himself and wife were members of the Christian Church.  Mrs. Martha Goss departed this life in February, 1835.  David H. Goss, the subject, received his education at the subscription schools of the Indiana frontier.  After the death of his parents, he lived with his guardian, Abner Alexander, until he was married, which was in his twentieth year.  He then farmed on shares for one year, after which he moved on to 160 acres of the old homestead in Owen County, Ind., which had been willed to him by his father.  To this he afterward added other lands, and here he resided until January, 1880, when he sold the farm and bought another in Adams Township, where he now resides. 
He was first married, August 20, 1838, to Miss Marietta Johns, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  To this union were born three children, two of whom, both  sons, are yet living.  Mrs. Goss died May 17, 1843.  She was a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Goss was next married, May 3, 1844, to Miss Zerilda E. Littell, a native of Clarke County, Ind.  Eight children blessed their union, five of whom, three sons and two daughters, are yet living.  Both himself and wife are members of the Christian Church.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A. F. & A. M.;  Gosport Chapter, R. A. M., and of the Council at Gosport of R. & S. M.  Mrs. Goss is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star, and of the W. C. T. A.  In politics, Mr. Goss is identified with the National or Greenback party.  He is also an earnest advocate of the temperance cause, having been from early manhood a member of the old Washington society.

DANIEL N. HOLMES, merchant, was born in Decatur County, Ind., June 10, 1831, and is the fourth child in a family of five children born to Jacob and Frances (Stogsdale) Holmes, natives of Kentucky and of Irish descent.  In early life, Jacob Holmes emigrated to Decatur County, Ind., where he was educated and married, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in 1840.  Himself and wife were members of the Baptist Church.  Daniel N. Holmes, the subject, received a limited common school education.  He has since, however, acquired a fair practical business education by his own exertions.  At the age of thirteen, he went to learn the black-smith's trade, and served an apprenticeship of some six years in Decatur, Shelby and Johnson Counties, Ind.  In 1856, he came to Eminence, Ind., where he followed his trade for some thirteen or fourteen years.  He then bought a farm in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., and was engaged in agricultural pursuits and the stock trade until the spring of 1879, when he rented the farm and returned to Eminence.  Here he opened a general store, and has been successfully engaged in merchandising ever since.  He was first married in February, 1857, to Martha A. Fidler, a native of Kentucky. To this union were born eight children, six of whom, five sons and one daughter, are yet living.  Mrs. Martha A. died May 27, 1877.  She was a member of the Baptist Church.  Mr. Holmes was next married, July 4, 1878,  to Miss Mariah H. Smith, a native of Indiana.  In politics, Mr. H. is a Republican.

ELIAS HUBBARD, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Guilford County, N. C., October 23, 1813, and is a son of George and Nancy (Shield) Hubbard, natives respectively of Virginia and Maryland.  The paternal grand-father of our subject was a Revolutionary soldier.  George Hubbard was a soldier in the war of 1812, and by occupation a farmer.  In 1822, he moved to Wayne County, Ind., purchasing eighty acres, and entering eighty of timber, on which he made a good home for his family and endured the privations of a pioneer.  He died in 1867, aged eighty one, and his wife one year later, at the same age.  They were upright and honored people.  Elias Hubbard was reared a farmer, and in 1828 moved to this county, and after a time began life in earnest.  October 18, 1839, he married Miss Margaret J. Gray, a native of Indiana, whose parents were pioneers of Clarke County.  To this union were bestowed, of whom survive, Mary J., Marilda, Malinda, Margaret, Abigail, David W., Mahala and Anna.  In 1846, Mr. Hubbard purchased forty acres of his present home, and after many struggles and hardships has succeeded in making a comfortable property.  He is a stanch Republican, and he and wife
are members of the Christian Church.

WILLIAM H. JOHNSON, merchant and farmer, is the second son in the family of Hezekiah and Eliza (Green) Johnson, natives of North Carolina. Hezekiah Johnson was a farmer, married in his native State, and emigrated to this county;  entered land in this township, erected a cabin of logs, and resided until 1867, when he moved to Clayton and embarked in mercantile business, in which he continued with his son Elhanon until his death, in 1870, at the age of sixty one.  He was once a Whig, later a Republican, an honored citizen, and about 1840 was licensed to preach in the Methodist Episcopal Church, but later joined the Christian Church, and previous to his death held a large revival at Mount Tabor.  Mrs. Johnson was a Methodist, and died in 1872.  William H. Johnson was born in this township November 12, 1835, and named after President Harrison.  He is a natural mechanic, and when but a boy made from seven to nine flour barrels a day.  He remained under his parents' care until his thirtieth year, looking after the home farm.  March 29, 1859, he married Mary Shoemaker, with an issue of five children; Eliza J., William S., John Edmund, Hezekiah and Miranda F.  After marriage, Mr. Johnson managed his father's homestead for a time, and afterward purchased a $1,200 stock of merchandise at La Clair, and three years later removed to Lake Valley.  He carried a selected and full stock of goods, and is a very popular dealer.  March, 1877, he was made Postmaster at Lake Valley. He has invented a grain tally and other valuable devices.  He is a Republican, a Freemason, and he and wife are members of the Methodist

JOHN W. MAHORNEY, M. D., was born in Hendricks County, Ind., January 13, 1857, and is the only living child born to Morgan D. and  Julia A. S. (Reese) Mahorney, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Hendricks County, Ind., and both of Irish descent.  Morgan D.  Mahorney received his early education in his native State, but when a lad of thirteen  summers removed with his parents to Hendricks County, Ind.  At the age of fifteen, he left home and was employed as a laborer on a railway for some three years, after which he worked on a farm for some three years longer.  At the age of twenty one, he was married, after which he farmed on shares until 1859, when he bought a farm in Franklin Township, Hendricks Co., Ind., upon which he still resides.
John W. Mahorney, the subject our our sketch, received a good common school education.  His mother died when he was only five years old, after which he made his home with an uncle for four years, when his father was again married and he returned home, remaining until he was twenty one years old.  In the spring of 1878, he commenced the study of medicine with Dr. J. N. Green, of Stilesville, Hendricks Co., Ind., and graduated from the Medical College of Indiana, at Indianapolis, in March, 1883.  In the following April, he located at Little Point, Morgan Co., Ind., where he now resides, and is rapidly building up a lucrative practice, and is regarded as one the rising young physicians of the county.  He was married, October 24, 1883, to Miss Mary E. Smith, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Dr. Mahorney and wife are members of the church, he of the Regular Baptist and she of the Christian.  In politics, the Doctor is a liberal Republican.

JOHN R. MANNAN, general merchant, was born in Owen County, Ind., January 16, 1859, and is a son of William C. and Margaret E. (Carter) Mannan, the former a native of Morgan and the latter of Owen County, Ind. Both were of English, Irish and German descent.  William C. Mannan received a good education at the common schools of his native county, and also attended Asbury University, of Greencastle, Ind., for a time.  At the age of nineteen, he left home;  followed various pursuits for some seven years.  He was married in 1856, and soon after bought wild land in Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he improved the farm upon which he still resides.  He is a member of the Baptist Church and of the Patrons of Husbandry.  John R. Mannan, the subject of our sketch, received a good common school education, and was employed on his father's farm until he  was twenty one years old.  He then taught school during the fall and winter in his native county for three years, being employed on a farm during the summer season.  He clerked in a general store at Eminence for one year.  In March, 1883, he bought this store in company with Mrs. H. H. Nicholas.  Mr. Mannan was married, September 7, 1880, to Laura M. Nicholas, a native of Clay County, Ind.  Two sons have blessed their union.  Mr. Mannan is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 317, I. O. O. F., of which lodge he is at present V. G.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

W. H. H. MCCLOUD, farmer, is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., was born February 14, 1841, and is the fourth of the ten children born to George W. and Eunice (Bray) McCloud, natives respectively of Virginia and North Carolina.  Our subject was reared a farmer's boy, with but slender opportunities for education, and was thrown on his own efforts at the age of sixteen, whereupon he worked as an engineer, and also drove cattle for several years.  In 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Thirty third Indiana Volunteers, which formed for a time part of the Army of the Ohio, and was afterward transferred to the Army of the Cumberland.  His first experience as a soldier was at the battle of Wild Cat, then at Richmond (when he was detailed in the artillery), Thompson's Station, Resaca, Marietta, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and was discharged September, 1864.  March 9, 1865, he married Miss Mary Appleby, a union by which  they became parents of eight children, three daughters and five sons.  After marriage, Mr. McCloud engaged in farming, and continued until March, 1879, when he moved to this county, where he has since resided.  Mr. McCloud was one of the first to use the thresher, and has continued the same for sixteen years;  he has also a portable saw-mill, and his whole machine outfit is valued at $2,000. He is a Republican, and a member of the G. A. R.

JOHN T. MILES, blacksmith, was born in Orange County, N. C., August 13, 1849;  is a son of James W. and Nancy N. (Squires) Miles, both born in North Carolina, and were of German and Irish descent.  James W. Miles was educated and married in his native State;  he, in early life, learned the wagon maker's trade, also followed agricultural pursuits and undertaker's business in connection with the same for many years.  In the fall of 1868, he came with his family to Monroe Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he remained for one year;  then moved to Orange County, Ind., and remained some four or five years, after which he returned to Gregg Township, Morgan Co., Ind., residing there until his death, which occurred in the fall of 1879, in his sixty seventh year.  John T. Miles, our subject, received a fair common school education.  At the age of seventeen, he came to Hendricks County, Ind., and commenced to learn the blacksmith's trade, following the same in Missouri and Indiana ever since.  In 1873, he removed to Hall, and in December, 1881, came to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he now resides.  Mr. Miles was married, February 11,1877, to Martha A. Mannan, a native of Owen County, Ind.  Four children bless their union, three of  whom, one son and two daughters, are yet living.  Mrs. Miles is a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Miles is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., having been a member of that order for the past fourteen years.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

MICHAEL E. MILLER, proprietor of Eureka Flouring Mills, was born in Botetourt County, Va., February 10, 1824, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Vinyard) Miller, both natives of the "Old Dominion," and of German descent.  John Miller was educated and married in his native State, where in early life he learned the tanner's trade, and followed the same for several years.  In 1830, he came with his wife and family to Morgan County, Ind., and opened a tannery near where the village of Brooklyn is now situate, and remained some ten years.  He then removed to Hendricks County, Ind., and opened a tannery near Belleville, where he resided until his death, which occurred in February, 1876.  Both himself and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He was a soldier during the war of 1812.
In 1822, he came to Indianapolis, then only a small village, on a prospecting tour. The State was then almost an unbroken wilderness;  there being no roads, they were obliged to make their way by the blazed lines of the Government surveys.  Both the grandfathers of our subject were veterans of the Revolutionary war.  Michael E. Miller, our subject, received such an education as could be obtained in the schools of the Indiana frontier.  He learned the tanner's trade with his father, and followed the same in Hendricks County, Ind., for more than twenty years.  In 1872, he engaged in the saw and planing mill business at Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., which he followed until the fall of 1883, when he bought a half interest in the Eureka Flouring Mills at same place.  He still owns, however, the saw and planing mill.  He was married, August 25, 1849, to Jane Cox, a native of Hendricks County, Ind.  Six children were born to them, five of whom, two sons and three daughters, are yet living.  Mr. Miller was for many years a member of the Methodist Epis- copal Church.  In politics, Mr. Miller is a Democrat, and has been for many years an earnest advocate of the temperance cause.

CYRUS E. NICHOLAS (deceased), was born in Hendricks County, Ind., March 5, 1836, and was the third child in a family of eight children born to John and Parmelia (Huff) Nicholas, the former of whom was a native of Kentucky, and the latter of New York.  They were of Scotch Irish and French descent respectively.  When a lad of some seven or eight summers, the parents of John Nicholas removed to Owen County, Ind.  Here his father's death soon afterward occurred, in about 1815.  His early education was extremely limited.  Afterward, however, by his own exertions and the assistance of his wife, he acquired a fair practical education.  From Owen County, while yet a single man, he came to Monroe Township, Morgan County, Ind., where he entered land and improved a farm.  From thence he removed to Hendricks County, and afterward to Pulaski County, Ind.  In the spring of 1868, he returned to Morgan County, Ind., settling at Eminence, where he was engaged in the general mercantile trade until
his death, which occurred in March, 1870, in his sixty third year.  Himself and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which church he was for some forty years a local preacher.  Mrs. Parmelia is yet living, and resides at Eminence, being now in her eighty first year.
Our subject, Cyrus E. Nicholas, received a fair common school education, and was employed on the home farm until he was twenty one years old. He then learned the brick mason's trade, which he followed for a number of years.  In 1866, he engaged in the general mercantile trade at Eminence,  Ind., and continued the same until his death, which occurred June 7, 1882. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and of the I. O. O. F.  February 6, 1859, he was united in marriage with Hester H. Rhea, a native of Washington County, Va., and a daughter of George G. and  Dorcas (Lowrey) Rhea  Hester H. received a good common school education.  She is and has been through life an extensive and careful reader, being well informed on all the current topics of the time, the current literature of the day as well as ancient and modern history.  Since her husband's death, she has continued his business, that of general merchandising, at Eminence, being now in partnership with her son-in-law, Mr. John R. Mannan.  She is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has been blessed with a family of three children, two of whom, both daughters, are yet living.

LEVI OGLES, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., June 17, 1843, and is the youngest of the ten children born to James and Hannah (Salliers) Ogles, the former of whom was a native of Tennessee, and the latter of the Old Dominion.  They were of German and English descent respectively.  James Ogles was educated and first married in his native State, removing from thence to Washington County, Va., where he lost his wife, and was again married to the mother of our subject.  In 1829, he came to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., entered eighty acres of land and improved the farm upon which he resided until his death, which occurred in February, 1865, in his seventy fifth year.  To his first purchase he added until he was the owner of some 280 acres.  In politics, he was a Whig, until 1856, after which he was identified with the Republican party.   Mrs. Hannah Ogles is yet living, and resides with her son Ira, in Adams Township, being now in her eighty fourth year.  Levi Ogles, the subject of our sketch, received only a limited common school education, and was employed on the home farm until he attained his majority, when his father deeded him a farm of eighty acres, near the old homestead, to which he has added another eighty, and upon which he still resides.  In addition to farming, Mr. Ogles is also quite extensively engaged in  stock raising, and gives special attention to the breeding of Norman horses.
He was married, May 4, 1865, to Miss Margaret E. Summers, a native of Jefferson Co., Ky.  Five sons have blessed their union, viz.:  George W., James G., John L., Orlando E. and Orie D.  In politics, Mr. Ogles is a Democrat.

MARTIN PARKER, merchant, was born in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., October 3, 1834;  is the eldest of ten children born to William H. and Barthenia P. (Dobbs) Parker, the former a native of East Tennessee, and the latter of Kentucky.  They were of English and Scotch Irish descent respectively.  William H. Parker emigrated with his parents from Tennessee to Putnam County, Ind., when only fourteen years old, in 1827.  From thence they came, after about one year, to what is now Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind.  Here the father of William H. entered eighty acres of wild land, and with the help of his son and only heir improved a farm.  This place William H. inherited at his father's death, and to it he added until he was the owner of a well improved farm of some 400 acres.  In this county he was also married.   In 1846 or 1847, he engaged in the general mercantile trade, in connection with farming, and continued the same at Mount Washington and Eminence for some twenty five or twenty six years.  He was one of the Township Trustees, under the old constitution, for several terms, and was also Postmaster.  He was one of the men who helped to grub the right of way of the old National Plank Road, through the present village of Stilesville.  Himself and wife were members of the Baptist Church.  His death occurred in September, 1875, and that of Mrs. Parker in September of the previous year. Martin Parker, the subject, received an education in the subscription schools of the Indiana frontier.  He remained on the farm until he was twenty years old.  He then took a lease of twenty acres, which he cleared and upon which he remained one year.  After this he moved onto a partially improved farm of forty acres belonging to his wife, where he remained another year.  He then farmed the home place on shares for one year.  After this he farmed on shares in Putnam County for four years.  In the spring of 1861, he moved onto 113 acres of wild land in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind.  Here he improved a farm, which he still owns, and here he resided until the fall of 1878, when he rented the farm and came to Eminence, where he owns valuable residence property, and also owns the best two story brick business building in the place, in which he intends opening a general store in the spring of 1884.
Mr. Parker was married, May 21, 1854, to Margaret E. Meek, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Ten children blessed their union, of whom only two sons are now living.  Mr. Parker is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M.  In politics, he is a member of the Greenback or National party, and is one of the earliest pioneers of the township and county.

ENOCH A. PATRICK, carpenter, was born in Putnam County, Ind., August 14, 1837, and is the seventh child in a family of eleven children born to Gabriel and Keziah (Williams) Patrick, the former of whom was a native of Virginia, and the latter of Bath County, Ky.  They were of English and Irish descent, respectively.  Gabriel Patrick received a good common school and academic education in Bath County, Ky., where he married, and soon afterward, in 1826, removed to Putnam County, Ind., where he had the year before entered forty acres of wild land near Greencastle, erected a rude log cabin, and improved a farm.  To this he afterward added forty acres, and erected one of the first brick dwellings in Putnam County.  In 1837, he sold this farm and bought another of 160 acres, in the southeast part of the same county, where he resided until 1847.  He then came to Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., and bought a farm of 211 acres, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred in May, 1864, in his sixtieth year.  Mr. Patrick was also a veteran teacher, having taught for more than twenty consecutive winters.  He and wife were members of the Baptist Church.  Enoch A. Patrick, the subject, received a limited common school education.  At the age of eighteen, he went to learn the carpenter's trade, which, after serving an apprenticeship of one year, he followed for another year.  He then engaged in agricultural pursuits for about six years, when he resumed the carpenter's trade.  In 1873, he was employed as a salesman in a general store, continuing therein until in January, 1881, when he sold out, and
was engaged in the saw mill business for two years.  He then resumed the carpenter's trade, and is still so employed.  In March, 1876, he lost both his store and dwelling house by fire, sustaining a loss of $3,000.  In 1878, he erected a a two story brick store building at Eminence, which he still owns.  He was married, January 8, 1857, to Elizabeth A. Leonard, a native of Putnam County, Ind.  Eleven children have been born to them, only five of whom, three sons and two daughters, are now living.  Mr. Patrick and wife are members of the Baptist Church.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., in which lodge he was the first man raised, and of which lodge he is a Past Master.  He is also a member of Gosport Chapter, R. A. M.   In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the old and representative citizens of the township and county.

NOAH H. PATRICK, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Putnam County, Ind., October 25, 1835, and is the sixth child in a family of eleven children born to Gabriel and Keziah (Williams) Patrick, a sketch of whom will be found in this volume.  Our subject received only a very limited education, but by his own exertions, since he became a man, has acquired a fair business education.  He was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty years old, after which he farmed a part of the home place on shares for some seven years.  In September, 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Fifty ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that regiment until the close of the war, being mustered out at Washington, D. C., in June, 1865.  He participated with his regiment in the battles of Corinth, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, the Atlanta campaign and Sherman's march to the sea, and many other lesser engagements.  After his return from the army, he was employed in agricultural pursuits and the stock trade in Morgan County for several years.  He was then employed as a salesman in a general store at Eminence for some two years, after which he returned to his farm in Adams Township, same county, remaining until the spring of 1884, when he sold the farm and came to Eminence, where he now lives.  He has been for the past five or six years Assessor of Adams Township.  He was married, December 6, 1855, to Pheba A. Allee, a native of what is now Mill Creek Township, Putnam Co., Ind.  Three children, two sons and one daughter, were the fruit of this union.  Mr. Patrick and wife are members of the Baptist Church.  He is also a member of the Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., in which lodge he has filled every station and is a  Past Master.  He is also a member of Gosport Chapter, R. A. M.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

WILLIAM A. POTTORFF, M. D., druggist, was born in Jefferson County, Ky., August 20, 1839, and is a son of Simeon and Eliza A. (McKewen) Pottorff, both natives of Jefferson Co., Ky.  The former was of German and  the latter of Irish descent.  Simeon Pottorff was educated and married in his native State, where in early life he was employed at the carding business in a woolen factory, at Jefferson, Ky.;  afterward he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and continued the same until the spring of 1877, when he came to Eminence, Morgan County, Ind., and made his home with his son, our subject, until his death, which occurred March 23, 1878, in his eightieth year.  Both himself and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he  having been a member for more than seventy years. William A. Pottorff, the subject, received a good common school education in his native State, and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty one years old. He then went to Southern Kentucky, where he was engaged in teaching for two years, and afterward, for a short time, was employed as salesman in a general store.  In the spring of 1864, he commenced the study of medicine, in Jefferson, Ky., with Dr. M. L. Cooper, and graduated from the  Medical Department of the Louisville University in the spring of 1867.  He then commenced the practice of his profession in his native county, where he remained some three years.  In January, 1871, he came to Eminence,  Morgan County, Ind., where he has since practiced his profession with excellent success.  In June, 1883, he bought a drug store at Eminence, and
is now conducting that business in connection with his profession.  The Doctor was married, February 15, 1870, to Mary E. Butler, a native of Louisville, Ky.  Four children, two sons and two daughters, have blessed this union, all of whom rare yet living.  Both himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  The Doctor is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the leading and prominent citizens of the township and county.

DANIEL PRUITT, farmer, brick maker and brick-layer, was born in Oldham County, Ky., December 3, 1823, and is the third child in a family of eleven children born to Eli and Nancy (Williams) Pruitt, the former of whom was a native of North Carolina and the latter of Washington County, Ky. They were of German and English decent respectively.  When but a lad of some four summers, in 1795, Eli Pruitt emigrated with his parents from North Carolina to Kentucky, which was then almost an unbroken wilderness. They settled near the present site of Lexington, where his father, Bright Pruitt, bought some 600 acres of military lands, which he lost in consequence of a defective title.  Afterward he entered 400 acres in what is now Oldham County, Ky., where still later he built and operated a distillery until 1830, when he came to Gregg Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he resided until his death.  Young Eli received a very fair education at the rude log schoolhouses of the Kentucky frontier, and learned the cooper's trade with his father, which he followed for a number of years.  At the age of twenty seven he was married, soon after which he bought a farm in Oldham County, Ky., and was engaged in agricultural pursuits in connection with his trade until the fall of 1835, when he came with his family to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., entered and bought 743 acres of wild land, and improved a farm upon which he resided until his death, which occurred March 28, 1868, in his seventy seventh year.  He was an enrolling officer in Kentucky during the war of 1812, and Township Trustee for one term after he came to Indiana.  Himself and wife were members of the Christian Church.  In politics, he was identified with the Democratic party, and was one of the pioneers of Morgan County.  Daniel Pruitt, the subject, received a fair common school education, and was employed on the home farm until he was twenty one years old.  He then went to Mooresville, where he remained one year, and learned the brick making and brick mason's trades, which he followed in connection with farming for some thirty-five years.  In 1846, his father deeded him forty acres of wild land in Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., to which he added, now owning a well improved farm of 113 acres, upon which he resides.  He was married, December 29, 1846, to Elizabeth Arnold, a native of Harrison County, Ind., and a daughter of Richard and Lovina (Potts) Arnold, who were among the early settlers of Morgan County.  To Mr. and Mrs. Pruitt have been born eleven children, ten of whom, four sons and six daughters, are yet living.  Both himself and  wife are members of the Christian Church.  In politics, he is a stanch Democrat.

REV. ELI  PRUITT, farmer and stock raiser, is the eldest son of James and Polly (Wilhite) Pruitt, natives respectively of South Carolina and Virginia. James Pruitt was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was in the battle of New Orleans.  He moved to Kentucky, there married, and farmed until 1832-33, when he came to this county, and located on land he had previously entered. He built a cabin, but lost his health the first year, and died with consumption in 1846, upward of sixty years old.  He was possessor of nearly 1,000 acres,
was a Democrat and an upright citizen.  Mrs. Pruitt afterward lived with our subject until her decease in 1866, being sixty six years old.  Eli Pruitt was  born in Oldham County, Ky., August 19, 1820, was reared to honest farm toil, and is largely self educated.  When he was twenty two years old, he located where he now resides, having, however, previously entered forty acres adjoining, and beginning with but a horse and a cow, his outfit being of the most primitive kind.  Being an expert with the ax, he soon accumulated, by industry and care, a farm consisting of 200 acres.  September 29, 1842, he married Miss Barbara M. Kivett, a native of North Carolina, by which union were produced two sons and four daughters, of whom are living, John M., Belinda A., Paulina J. and Sarah M.   Mr. Pruitt has been a leader in society, and is a licensed minister of the Christian Church;  he has held several large revivals, made many baptisms and solemnized a
number of marriages.  His conduct proves his professions, and he is greatly esteemed.

JAMES H. RHEA, carpenter, was born in Smith County, Va., November 23, 1842, and is the sixth child in a family of ten children born to Robert H. and Frances G. (Dungan) Rhea.  He received only a very limited education in youth, but has since by his own exertions acquired a fair practical business education.  In June, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty seventh Virginia Volunteer Infantry, the regiment being assigned to Gen. R. E. Lee's army of North Virginia, and to the command of the famous Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson, until the latter's death.  He served with his regiment in all its marches and engagements until the battle of Spottsylvania C. H., May 12, 1864, when he was taken prisoner and confined at Fort Delaware until March 22, 1865, when, through the influence of friends and the recommendation of Gov. Morton, he was released.  He participated in the battles of Petersburg, Fredericksburg, the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, and many other engagements.  After being released from Fort Delaware, he came to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where  he immediately learned the carpenter's trade, and has followed the same ever since.  He landed at Eminence with only $2 in money, and no property of any description, but by industry and economy has since amassed a handsome property.  He was married, September 9, 1866, to Miss Sarah J. Sligar, a native of Owen County, Ind.  Six children blessed their union, five of whom, four sons and one daughter, are yet living.  Both Mr. Rhea and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No.
317,  I. O. O. F., in which lodge he has passed all the chairs, and is now a member of the Grand Lodge of the State.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the enterprising mechanics and prominent citizens of the township and county.

JOHN L. RHEA, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Washington County, Va., February 15, 1847, and is the sixth in a family of ten children born to George G. and Dorcas (Lowrey) Rhea.  Our subject received a fair English education at the common and high schools of Tennessee and Indiana.  He was employed on his father's farm until eighteen years of age, when he went to learn the carpenter's trade, and followed the same until the breaking out of the late civil war.  In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Fifty ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that regiment in all its marches and  engagements until, in March, 1865, when he was discharged at Indianapolis, his term of service having expired.  He participated in the capture of Island No. 10, the siege and battle of Corinth, the battles of the Jackson and Vicksburg campaign, Missionary Ridge and many other lesser engagements.  After his return from the army, he followed his trade for some five or six years.  He then bought a farm of 140 acres, adjoining Eminence on the east, where he was
engaged in farming and the stock trade until 1871.  He then sold this farm and bought another of 160 acres, in same township, one mile west of Eminence, where he is still engaged in the same business.  He was first married in 1861, to Miss Nancy Walters, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Two children were the fruits of this union, only one of whom, viz., Hattie L., is now living. Mrs. Nancy died November 3, 1865.  She was a member of the Baptist Church.  Mr. Rhea was next married, December 17, 1869, to Miss Nancy J. Mugg, a native of Owen County, Ind.  Three children one son and two daughters have blessed their union.  Both Mr. Rhea and wife are members of the church, he of the Methodist Episcopal and she of the Baptist.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., of which  lodge he is a charter member, and was its first Master.  In politics, he is a stanch Republican.

JOSEPH C. RHEA, Postmaster and merchant, was born in Washington County, Va., May 6, 1838, and is the fourth child in a family of ten children born to Robert H. and Frances G. (Dungan) Rhea, both natives of the "Old Dominion," and of Irish descent.  Robert H. Rhea was educated and married in his native State, where in early life he learned the millwright's trade, which he followed in connection with agricultural pursuits all his life.  He owned a farm in both Washington and Smith Counties, Va., and at one time was the owner of three flouring mills.  His death occurred in Washington County, Va., June 27, 1855, in his fifty fifth year.  He was for many years Adjutant General of the Virginia militia, and he and wife were life-long members of the Methodist Church.  Joseph C. Rhea, the subject, received an excellent common school and academic education in youth, and also attended Emory and Henry
College, of Washington County, Va., for a time.  At the age of sixteen, he commenced teaching, and taught three years in his native State.  In the spring of 1861, he fled, a refugee, from Virginia to Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he taught for one term, and then, October 18, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Fifty ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until September, 1862, when he was discharged on account of disability.  He was First Sergeant of his company for a time, and was afterward company Clerk.  In August, 1863, he re-enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until March 25, 1864, when he was mustered out at Indianapolis.  In this company he also served as First or Orderly Sergeant.  After his return from
the army, he again engaged in teaching, and taught for seventeen winters, being employed at the carpenter's trade in the summer season.  In March, 1883, he engaged in the general mercantile trade at Eminence, and is still so engaged.  At the same time, March, 1883, he was appointed Postmaster at Eminence, and is now holding that office.  From 1874 to 1876 inclusive, he served as Commissioner of Morgan County, Ind.  He was married September 21, 1865, to Margaret A. Ogles, a native of Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind.  Mr. Rhea is a member of the Methodist Episcopal, and Mrs. Rhea of the Baptist Church.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., and of Eminence Lodge, No. 317, I. O. O. F.  In the latter order, he has passed all the chairs, and is now D. D. G. M.  In politics, he is a stanch Republican, and is one of the leading and prominent citizens of the township and county.

JOSEPH W. RHEA, farmer and attorney, was born in Washington County, Va., December 28, 1825, and is one of ten children born to George G. and Dorcas (Lowrey) Rhea, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this volume.  Joseph W. Rhea, the subject of our sketch, received a good common school education in youth, and was employed on his father's farm until he was seventeen years old.  He then attended an academy in Washington County, Va., for three years, after which he taught in Virginia for six months.  In the fall of
1847, he removed to Jefferson County, Ky., where he taught continuously for five years, near Louisville.  In the fall of 1852, he came to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., where he built the first dwelling house on the site of the present village of Eminence, which was laid out the following year.   Here he engaged in general merchandising for two years, when he sold the store and  went to East Tennessee to visit his father, whom he brought with him on his return to this township and county.  In the spring of 1855, he moved onto a  partially improved farm of ninety five acres, one half mile north of Eminence, where he has since resided.  To this farm he has added till he now owns some 500 acres.  Soon after he came to Adams Township, he was elected Justice of the Peace, which office he held continuously for thirteen years.  He purchased a law library and commenced the study of law, which profession he has practiced since with excellent success.  He was regularly admitted to the bar in 1874.  He also  taught school nearly every winter from 1855 to 1879.
He was first married in March, 1852, to Sirrintha A. Odair, a native of Jefferson County, Ky.  To this union were born three children, two sons and one daughter.  Mrs. Rhea died in May, 1864.  She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. Rhea was next married in December, 1864, to Elizabeth Shoemaker, a native of this township and county.  Two children, one son and one daughter blessed their union. In politics, Mr. Rhea is a Democrat.  In 1872, he was a candidate for the Lower House of the State Legislature.  Mr. Rhea is one of the pioneers and prominent citizens of the county.  The grand sire of our subject was one of several brothers, who emigrated from Ireland to the United States, all of whom then spelled their name Ray, but he, our subject's grandfather, became acquainted with a certain  school teacher, who advised him to change the spelling of the name to Rhea,
which he did, and so his descendants have spelled it ever since;  but the other  brothers and their descendants still spell the name Ray.

WILLIAM C. RHEA, attorney, was born in Washington County, Va., September 24, 1845, and is a son of George G. and Dorcas (Lowrey) Rhea, both natives of the "Old Dominion".  They were of Irish and Scotch Irish descent respectively.   George G. Rhea removed to Jefferson County, East Tenn., in 1848, where he purchased a farm and resided until 1854.  He came to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., where he bought a farm upon which he resided until his death, which occurred March 29, 1864.  He and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Although reared in a slave State, Mr. Rhea was from his youth an Abolitionist and an ardent advocate of the cause of liberty.  William C. Rhea, the subject, received a fair education at the common schools, and also attended Asbury University for one year.  After this, he taught in this (Morgan) and Johnson Counties for some twelve years during the fall and winter.  During this time, he also commenced the study of law. In 1874, he engaged in general merchandising at Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., and also practiced his profession.  In February, 1883, he sold out his store, and has since been exclusively engaged in the practice of his profession.  In  September, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Seventieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, first commanded by Gen. Benjamin Harrison.  He served with his regiment in all engagements until the close of the war, being mustered out with his regiment at Washington, D. C., in May, 1865.  He was married, June 15, 1875, to Frances A. Watson, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Two daughters have blessed this union, viz., Elma M. and Mary Y.  Mr. Rhea is a member of the Methodist Episcopal, and Mrs. Rhea of the Baptist Church.  He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the old and prominent citizens of the township and county.

JAMES G. RYAN, farmer, was born in Mercer County, Ky., October 11, 1836, and is the fifth child in a family of eight children born to Patrick D. and Permelia A. (Grayham) Ryan, the former a native of the "Old Dominion," and the latter of Kentucky.  They were of Irish and English descent respectively.  Patrick D. Ryan received his education in his native State.  In early life, he removed with his parents to Kentucky, where he was afterward married, and where for twenty years he followed teaming, from Louisville to various points in Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia.  He then engaged in agricultural pursuits, and followed the same in Oldham and Jefferson Counties, Ky., until his death, which occurred June 4, 1852.  James G. Ryan, the subject, received an ordinary education in the common schools of Kentucky and Indiana.  In November, 1852, the family came to Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where they rented a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits.  Our subject remained at home until he was nineteen years old, after which he was employed as a laborer on a farm for some three years.  In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company B, Twenty first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, afterward known as the First Indiana Heavy Artillery.  He served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until April, 1862, when he was discharged by reason of disabilities at Ship Island.  October 23, 1863, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, recruited for the six months service, and served until the expiration of their term of service, being mustered out with the regiment in April, 1864.  October 25, 1864, he again enlisted in Company H, Twenty ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until the close of the war, being mustered out with the regiment at Dalton, Ga., June 23, 1865.  After his return from the army he engaged in agricultural pursuits, and has been so employed ever since in Adams Township, Morgan County, with the exception of two years, from 1867 to 1869, when he resided in Illinois.  For the past three or four years, he has been employed part of the time at blacksmithing. He was married, July 17, 1859, to Marticia Surber, a native of Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind.  One daughter has blessed their union, Luena
G.  In politics, he is a Republican.

WILLIAM A. RYAN, farmer and stock raiser, was born in Campbell County, Tenn., September 26, 1825, and is the second child in a family of six children born to John and Elizabeth (Dagley) Ryan, both of whom were natives of Tennessee, and were of Irish and Holland  descent respectively.  John Ryan was educated and married in his native Tennessee, where he was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits.  In the spring of 1833, he sold the farm in Tennessee, and, with his wife and family, started for Indiana, but died on the way at New Albany, where he was buried, and where he had resided for some eighteen months.  He was a member of no church, but belonged to the Masonic fraternity.  After Mr. Ryan's death, in August, 1835, the family removed to Owen County, Ind., where they were engaged in farming for some four or five years.  They then came to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind.  Here the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Ryan occurred October 3, 1849, in her forty fifth year.  From early life she was a devoted and consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church.  William A. Ryan, the subject of our sketch, received such an education as could be obtained at the subscription schools taught in the primitive log schoolhouses of the Indiana frontier.  He was employed at home with his mother until twenty three years old.  He then settled on a partially improved farm in Adams Township, Morgan County, which had been deeded him and wife by his father-in-law.  He also entered and bought wild land in what is now Ashland Township, same county, which he improved and subsequently sold.  In 1870, he bought a partially improved farm half mile north of Eminence, in Adams Township, Morgan County, upon which he now resides, which is one of the best improved farms in the township.  He continued to add to his real possessions until he was the owner of some 840 acres of well improved land, a part of which he has since deeded to his children.  He was married, October 29, 1848, to Miss Louisa J.  Walters, a native of Owen County, Ind.  Nine children blessed their union, eight of whom four sons and four daughters are yet living.  Mrs. Louisa J. Ryan departed this life October 22, 1883.  She was and had been from childhood a devoted and consistent member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Mr. Ryan also is and has been from early life a member of the same church, having been a Deacon in the same for many years.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 317, I. O. O. F., in which lodge he has passed all the chairs, being a member of the Grand Lodge of the State.  In politics, he is a Republican, and is one of the early settlers, prominent farmers, and respect-
ed citizens of the township and county.

ADAM R. SHAKE, farmer, was born in Jefferson County, Ky., April 25, 1821, and is the youngest in a family of five children born to George and Christian (Donaldson) Shake, natives of Jefferson County, Ky., and of German and Scotch descent respectively.  George Shake was educated and married in his native State, where he owned a small farm, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits until the fall of 1835, when he came with his family to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind.  Here he entered and bought 400 acres of wild land and improved a farm, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred in 1848, in his fifty sixth year.  Mr. S. was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and his wife of the Baptist Church. He was also a member of the Masonic fraternity.  Adam R. Shake, the subject, received only a limited common school education, and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty one years old.  His father then deeded him 160 acres of wild land adjoining the old homestead, which he improved and upon which he still resides, having 240 acres, upon which is the best sugar orchard in the township.  Mr. Shake was married, January 7, 1841, to Miss Martha B. Whitaker, a native of Shelby County, Ky.  Nine children
blessed their union, six of whom two sons and four daughters are yet living.  Mr. Shake and wife are devoted members of the Christian Church. He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., of which lodge he is a Past Master.  In politics, he is a Republican.

LEONARD B. SHAW (deceased farmer and stock dealer) was born in Ohio, June 18, 1832, and was the eldest in a family of eight children born to Upton and Susan (Branam) Shaw, the former a native of the "Old Dominion" and the latter of Ohio, and of English and German descent respectively.  Upton Shaw received his early education in his native State.  When only a lad, he removed with his parents to Ohio, where he was married.  In about 1840, he, with his wife and family, went to Putnam County, Ind., where he bought wild land and improved a farm, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred in 1875.  Mrs. Susan Shaw is yet living and resides on the old homestead in Putnam County.  She is and has been from early life a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Leonard B. Shaw, the subject, received a fair education in youth in Ohio and Indiana. When but a small boy, his parents removed to Putnam County, Ind., where he was afterward married, and where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for a time.  After this he resided in Morgan and Hendricks Counties, Ind., and in Douglas County, Ill., for a time, where he was employed at farming. He then returned to Morgan County, Ind., remaining only a few months. He then moved to Stilesville, Hendricks County, where he was engaged in the milling business for some three years and afterward at farming in the  same county.  In the spring of 1869, he came to Adams Township, Morgan County, where he bought a partially improved farm of eighty acres, to  which he added until he became the owner of 500 acres of well improved land, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred August 26, 1880. He was Postmaster at Little Point for some two or three years.  He was married, March 27, 1855, to Amanda J. Wallace, a native of Tennessee. Eight children blessed their union, five of whom are still living, viz.:  Mary E., James B., William A., Elijah U. and Amber E.  Mrs. Amanda J. Shaw still resides on the old homestead, and with her three of the children, viz.: James B., who was born May 3, 1857;  Elijah U., born August 8, 1861, and Amber E., born May 23, 1866.  James B. has recently started in a  religious life, but has not as yet identified himself with any church.  He is  also a member of Morgan Lodge, No. 211, I. O. O. F.  William A. Shaw was born December 16, 1858, and was married January 5, 1882, to Miss Mary A. Ryan, a native of Morgan County, Ind.;  one son an infant not named has blessed their union.  Mrs. Mary A. is a member of the Baptist  Church, and Mr. Shaw, also, has recently started in the Christian life, but has not as yet identified himself with the church.  The Shaw family have  been and are among the early settlers and prominent citizens of Morgan County.  In politics, they are identified with the Democratic party.

ELLISON SLIGER, cabinet-maker and undertaker, was born in Bullitt County, Ky., October 11, 1822, and is the youngest of ten children born to David and Margaret (Stafford) Sligar, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and Scotch descent respectively.  David Sligar was educated and married in his native State.  In about 1797, he
emigrated to Bullitt County, Ky., then an unbroken wilderness.  Himself and wife, with several other families, came down the Ohio River in flat-boats from Pittsburgh, landing at the present site of Louisville, Ky., which then contained only a few log cabins.  He proceeded immediately to  Bullitt County, where he entered 263 acres of land, which he was obliged to pay for twice in consequence of a defective title.  Here he improved a farm, upon which  he resided until his death, which occurred January 4, 1832, in his seventy fifth year.  Ellison Sligar, the subject of our sketch, received such an education as could be obtained at the primitive log school-houses of the Kentucky frontier.  After his father's death, he resided with
his brother Thomas until he was seventeen years old.  He then went to learn the carpenter's and cabinet-maker's trades, serving an apprenticeship of three years, and has followed one or both of these trades ever since. In 1843, he removed to Gosport, Owen County, Ind., where he resided two years;  thence to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., and settled
near the present site of Eminence, where he still resides.  He erected the first two buildings in the village of Eminence.  In 1851, he bought wild land and has since improved the farm where he now lives, and for the last twenty five years has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in connection with his trade.  He was for a time one of the Trustees of Adams Township under the old constitution.  He was married March 25, 1844, to Margaret Gilliland, a native of Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Stogdal) Gilliland, natives of Ireland, who emigrated to the United States in 1793. They were lifelong members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  The former died in 1825, in his sixty sixth year, and the latter in 1869, in her one hundred and second year.  To our subject and wife have been born one daughter, viz., Sarah J., now Mrs. James H. Rhea.  Mr. and Mrs. Sligar are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  He is also a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., of which lodge he has been Chaplain for some ten years.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

ALFRED M. SMITH, teacher, was born in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., November 24, 1851, and is a son of Hackney and Rebecca T. (Duty) Smith, both natives of North Carolina, and of English descent. Hackney Smith was educated and married in his native State, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until the fall of 1838.  He then removed
with his wife and family to Hendricks County, Ind., and settled near Belleville, where he farmed on shares for some five years.  In 1843, he came to Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., entered a tract of land and improved a farm, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred in 1855.  Both himself and wife were members of the Baptist Church.  Alfred M. Smith, the subject, received a good common school and academic education.  His mother died in 1860, but he remained on the home farm with his sister until 1866, after which he made his home with Solomon Dorsett until the fall of 1871. He then commenced teaching, and has taught during the fall and winter ever since, being employed as a salesman or at farming in the summer.  He was married, in December, 1874, to Nellie J. Ogles, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Three children blessed their union, only one of whom, Lena
F., is now living.  Mrs. Smith died in October, 1880.  She was a member of the Baptist Church, of which church, Mr. Smith is also a member.  He is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows fraternities.  In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the enterprising and respected citizens of the township and county.

ELIAS R. SMITH, farmer, is a native of Chatham County, N. C., was  born June 7, 1834, being the second of three sons born to George and Celia (Paschal) Smith, both natives of North Carolina, and respectively of English and Scotch  descent.  George Smith was a soldier of the war of 1812, and by occupation a farmer.  His father, David Smith, was a
soldier of 1776 and a Quaker.  George Smith was Secretary of a Quaker colony and died in 1857.  He was a Whig and an Abolitionist.  His wife closed her life in 1846, a consistent Baptist.  Elias R. Smith was reared a farmer, obtained but little education except what is self acquired, and when of age reached out for himself.  He took charge of his father's business when said father passed away.  In 1858, he came to this county, mainly because of his anti-slavery predilections, and farmed on rented land.  In 1863, he located where he has since resided, his farm now embracing 138 acres of well improved land.  March 1, 1863, he married Mary, daughter of John and Polly McCollum, a union rich in the birth of
nine children, Mary E., John E., William L., Celia A., Minnie B., Roxanna P., Effie J., Ellen S. and Florence L.  Mr. Smith is a stanch Republican, a member of the great order of Masonry and a Patron of Husbandry.  His youngest brother was a soldier of the Rebellion, and perished in the service.  Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Christian Church.

JOSEPH J. SMITH, farmer, was born in Chatham County, N. C., April 8, 1818, and is one of the family of Jonathan and Martha (Hackney) Smith, also natives of North Carolina.  The grandparents of our subject were  Quakers and natives of Pennsylvania, who soon after the Revolutionary war joined a Friends' colony in North Carolina.  Jonathan Smith was born February 22, 1783, was reared a farmer and had a good education, afterward becoming a teacher.  He was also a Major of cavalry in the war of 1812. In 1837, he settled near Monrovia in this State, soon after locating on the farm where our subject now resides.  He was married in 1807, was a Baptist, a Whig, and died October 24, 1859, his wife February 19, 1867, aged seventy five.  Joseph J. Smith was reared by his parents, received a fair education, and worked as a farm hand for several years.  He came to this township in 1840 and took charge of the homestead.  March 2, 1854, he  married Nancy J. Bray, by which marriage he became the parent of three living sons and four living daughters.  Except an absence of four years, Mr. Smith has resided where he now is, on a farm of 80 1/2 acres, solely acquired by himself.  He raised the first barn in the township, and used the first thresher and the first separator here operated.  He is an active Republican, and has served as Justice twenty four and as Constable four years.  He has likewise held many township offices.  He is a public spirited citizen, and was a member of the Central Committee from 1844 to 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of the Friends' Society.

GEORGE T. SUMMERS, farmer, was born in Jefferson County, Ky., July 27, 1843, and is the second child and eldest son in a family of nine children born to George G. and Diana (Gilliland) Summers, both of whom were natives of Kentucky and of Irish descent.  George G. Summers was educated and married in his native State, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1852, when he came to Adams Township, Morgan County, and bought 200 acres of wild land and improved a farm.  In 1876, he left the old home farm, which he afterward divided among his children, and removed to Eminence, where he resided until his death, which occurred December 24, 1883, in his sixty fourth year.   He was enlisted and mustered for the war with Mexico, but was discharged before going into active service.  He was educated in the Catholic faith, but belonged to no church.  For many years he was a member of the Masonic fraternity.  George T. Summers, the subject, received a fair common school education, and also attended commercial college at Indianapolis.  He was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty years old.  In October, 1863, he enlisted in Company D, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, recruited for the six months' service, and was mustered out with same in April, 1864.  After his return from the army, he engaged in the live stock trade, mainly horses and cattle, for a number of years.  He also taught for three winters, and was employed for a time as a salesman in a notion store at Indianapolis, and still later as a salesman in a general store at Eminence.  He is at present engaged in agricultural pursuits.  He was married, September 15, 1860, to Sarah F. Mosier, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  To this union were born three sons, all of whom are living.  Mrs. S. died in April, 1881.   Mr. Summers was next married, February 1, 1883, to Mrs. Elizabeth E. (Voshell) Miller, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Mrs. Summers is a member of the Baptist Church.  In politics, Mr. Summers is a Democrat, and is one of the early settlers and enterprising citizens of the township and county.

JAMES S. SUMMERS, farmer, was born in Jefferson County, Ky., August 25, 1845, and is the third in a family of nine children born to George G. and Diana (Gilliland) Summers, whose sketch will be found above.  James S. Summers, the subject of this sketch, received a fair common school education.  He was employed on his father's farm until he was of age.  He then farmed on shares for several years, during which time he bought property in Eminence, where he resided three years.  In 1875, he removed back to the old homestead in Adams Township, Morgan County, a part of which he bought and upon which he now resides.  He was married, January 28, 1866, to Cynthia A. Sligar, a native of Bullitt County, Ky., and a daughter of Thomas Sligar, who was also a native of Bullitt County, Ky., where he was born in 1803.  He now lives with the subject of our sketch and is in his eighty first year.  To. Mr. and Mrs. Summers have been born six children three sons and three daughters all of whom are yet living and take a great interest in music.  In politics, Mr. Summers is a Democrat.

WILLIAM E. SUMMERS, farmer, was born in Morgan County, Ind., August 1, 1852, and is the sixth in a family of nine children born to George G. and Diana (Gilliland) Summers.  Our subject received a very fair common school education and was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty one years old.  He then continued to farm the home place on shares for several years.  He now owns a part of the home farm, near Eminence, to which he has added other land.  He was married, February 17, 1878, to Miss Loda A. Skelton, a native of Audrain County, Mo., and a daughter of Thomas and Rachel (McCord) Skelton, natives of Indiana and of Scotch and English descent respectively.  To Mr. and Mrs. Summers have been born three children, viz.:  Nettie M., Charles G., and an infant not named.  Mr. Summers is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A. F. & A. M.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

JOHN H. TWOMEY, proprietor saw mill, and a lumber dealer, was born in New Albany, Ind., December 20, 1848, and is a son of Evan E. and Mary E. (McKinly) Twomey.  Our subject received a good common school and academic education, and at the age of seventeen engaged in the saw mill business in company with his father and others at New Albany, Ind., remaining some two years.  He was then employed in the sheet iron works, at the same city.  In March, 1868, he came to Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind.,  where he farmed for one year, and then again engaged in the saw mill and lumber business in company with his father and brother and has been so employed ever since.  In the fall of 1873, they moved the mill to Adams Township, same county, near Eminence.  Mr. Twomey is at present Constable of Adams Township.  He has been twice married, first, February 9, 1871, to
Lydia E. Spain, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Mrs. Lydia E. died January 9, 1872.  She was a member of the Christian Church.  Mr. Twomey was next married October 21,1873, to Mary J. Shake, a native of Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind.  Three children, one son and two daughters, have blessed their union.  In politics, Mr. Twomey is a stanch Democrat.

WILLIAM E. VARLEY (boots and shoes) was born July 4, 1855, in  Richland County, Ohio, and is a son of Joseph and Lucy (Crawshaw) Varley, both natives of England.  Joseph Varley received a very limited education, but by his own exertions after he became a man, he became well informed.  In about 1848 or 1849, he emigrated to the United States on the Great Eastern, on her first trip.  His family afterward joined him. He first settled in Utica, N. Y., where he worked in a brass foundry for two years.  He then removed to Newcastle, Richland Co., Ohio, remaining about two years, returning to Utica.  After a few years, he moved to Mansfield, thence to Marion, remaining there until 1868.  He then removed
to Clay County, Ind., where he still resides, following his trade, that of watch making.  Mrs. Varley  died in 1873;  was a member of the Baptist Church, of which Mr. Varley is a member also.  William E. Varley, our subject, received a common school education.  At the age of eighteen, he commenced to learn the trade of a shoe-maker, serving an apprenticeship of two and a half years, after which he worked as a journeyman about two years.  In the fall of 1877, he came to Eminence, Ind., and set up a shop of his own, where he is doing a thriving business.  He held the office of Postmaster at Eminence for one year;  was married November 1, 1883, to Sarah J. Hazlette, a native of Morgan County, Ind.  Mr. Varley belongs
to a subordinate Lodge of the I. O. O. F., of which  he is P. G.

JAMES WALLACE, farmer and stock dealer, was born in Adams Township, Morgan County, Ind., October 21, 1837, and is the third child in a family of eleven children born to Elijah and Melvina (Manley) Wallace, natives of East Tennessee, and of Irish and English descent respectively. Elijah Wallace received only a limited education at the subscription schools
taught in the rude log schoolhouses of the East Tennessee frontier.  Here he was also married, and soon after, in 1834, came to what was then Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., but is not included in Hendricks County. Here he bought and entered some 200 acres of land, which he partially improved, and afterward sold and bought other lands in the same township, where he has since improved a farm to which he added until he was the owner of some 2,000 acres in Putnam, Morgan and Hendricks Counties, Ind., a part of which he has since deeded to his children.  He now lives in Hendricks County, and is in his seventy fourth year.  His father, David Wallace, was a veteran of the war of 1812.  James Wallace, the subject, received a fair common school education, and was employed on the home farm until he was twenty one years old, afterward farming on shares for some four years.  He then bought a farm of 190 acres in Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind.  upon which he still resides.   The farm is well improved and Mr. Wallace has given especial attention to breeding fine stock, especially Norman horses, Poland China hogs and Cotswold sheep.  He is now serving his second term as Trustee of Adams Township.   He was first married March 21, 1861, to Rebecca Allee, a native of Putnam County, Ind. To this union were born seven children, three sons and four daughters, all of whom are yet living.  Mrs. Rebecca Wallace died March 5, 1879.  She was a member of the Church of God.  Mr. Wallace was next married June 15, 1882, to Mrs. Mary A. (Pike) McFadden, a native of Hendricks County,
Ind.  One daughter has blessed their union Hattie M.  In politics, Mr.  Wallace is a Democrat.

ROBERT S. WALTERS, farmer and teacher, was born in Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., March 5, 1850, and is the youngest of seven children born to Richard and Frances (Asher) Walters, natives of Clay County, Ky., and of Welsh descent.  Richard Walters received his early education in his native State.  At the age of eighteen years, in 1823, he  emigrated with his parents to Owen County, Ind., where he was first married to Miss Susan Brasier, who bore him two children;  after her death he  was married, in the same county, to the mother of our subject.  In about 1835, he came to Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where he entered 240 acres of wild land, and improved a farm, upon which he resided until his death, which occurred April 13, 1871, in his sixty fifth year;  both were members of the Baptist Church.  His wife died September 11, 1873, aged sixty six.  Robert S. Walters, the subject, received a good common school education, and has taught during the winter season in his native township and county for the past fourteen years.  He has always resided on the old homestead, a part of which he now owns and cultivates.  He was married, April 12, 1874, to Miss Mary C. Patrick, a native of Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind.  Three children have been born to them, only one of  whom, an infant, not named, is now living.  Mr. Walters is a member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M.  In politics, he is a Democrat.

ALFRED A. WATSON, blacksmith, was born in what is now Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., October 22, 1848, he being the seventh in a family of eleven children born to Simon and Samirah (Bowman) Watson, a sketch of whom will be found elsewhere in this volume. Alfred A. Watson, our subject, received a good common school education in his native county. At the age of twenty two, he began learning the trade of blacksmithing, serving an apprenticeship of three years. He then opened a shop of his own in Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind., where he is still conducting the business. He was married, December 24, 1869, to Mrs. Jane (Nicholas) McMorries. Six children were born to them, of whom three daughters are still living. Mrs. Watson dying February 23, 1881, Mr. Watson next united himself with Mrs. Mary J. (Summers) Sligar November 16, 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Watson belong to the Baptist and the Methodist Episcopal Churches respectively. Mr. Watson is a member of the Eminence Lodge, No. 317, I. O. O. F. In politics, he is a Democrat. He is one of the principal business men of Eminence, Morgan Co., Ind.

ANDREW J. WATSON, merchant, was born in Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., February 23, 1845, and is the sixth child in a family of eleven children born to Simon and Samirah (Bowman) Watson, the former of whom was a native of North Carolina, and the latter of Kentucky. When but an infant one year old, in 1813, Simon Watson's parents emigrated from North Carolina to Washington County, Ind., where they remained only a few months. They then removed to Jackson County, Ind., where young Simon passed his childhood and youth, receiving only a very limited education at the rude log schoolhouses of that frontier settlement. In about 1830, the family came to Adams Township, Morgan Co., Ind., where his father entered land, and improved a farm. Simon was married November 27,1836, and soon afterward entered 160 acres of land in Ashland Township, Morgan Co., Ind., to which he has since added, now owning a well improved farm of 200 acres. For more than forty five years, he and wife have been members of the Missionary Baptist Church; he is also a member of the Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M.; and in politics is a Democrat. The father of Mrs. Samirah Watson, viz., John Bowman, was one of the companions of Daniel Boone in the early settling of Kentucky. Andrew J. Watson, the subject of our sketch, received a good common school education in youth, and was employed on the old homestead, in Ashland Township, until he had attained his twenty third year. He then taught in this and Owen County during the fall and winter seasons for some sixteen years, being employed at the painter's trade during the summer months. In March, 1883, he engaged in merchandising at Eminence, Ind., in company with Mr. Joseph C. Rhea, continuing in the trade one year. He is not at present engaged in any active business. Mr. Watson was married, June 21, 1874, to Miss Lucretia A. Cummings, a native of Morgan County, Ind. Two daughters have blessed their union. Both Mr. Watson and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is also member of Eminence Lodge, No. 440, A., F. & A. M., of which lodge he is a Past Master, and has represented the same in the Grand Lodge of the State. In politics, he is a Democrat, and is one of the prominent citizens of Morgan County.


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