BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP AND MARTINSVILLE
MORGAN COUNTY
(Transcribed from the book "Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Bown Indiana" 1884)

GEORGE A. ADAMS, attorney and Representative, is a native of Morgan County, Ind., and was born Jun. 4,1849. The county which gave him birth has made him a home. In his youth, after attending the common schools of the county, he went to the State University at Bloomington, Ind., for two years, and from which he graduated in the profession of law in 1872. He was Principal of the High Schools of Morgantown one year, after which, in April, 1873, he engaged in the practice of his profession, and has continued the same since that time. December 28, 1876, he married, at Brazil, Clay County, Miss Mattie Bennett, which union has given birth to two children an infant and Roy B. (deceased). Mr. Adams is a Republican, and was sent to the Legislature, as a Representative of Morgan County in November, 1882. He is a member of the venerable Masonic fraternity, and also of the Beta Theta Pi a college organization and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Adams is the possessor of a fine property in Martinsville, and is a much esteemed citizen.

WILLIAM R. ASHER is a native of Johnson County, Ind., and was born on the 30th of November, 1861. When he had reached the age of eight years, he was removed by his parents to this town, where he was reared, attended and graduated from the Martinsville High School, and afterward became a student of the State University in September, 1878, in a course of four years' study. In the month of March, 1883, he entered into the oratorical contest, with four contestants, for the privilege of representing the University in the State contest, and which privilege he won; consequently, he represented the University of Indiana in the State oratorical exhibition, which took place at Indianapolis April 17, 1883, in which effort he was successful, coming out number one from a list of six, each representing a college, and also winning the prize, $50. This success at the State capital bestowed upon him the right of contending in the inter-State contest of oratory, held at Minneapolis May 2, 1883, from which engagement he came forth third in honor.

J. G. BAIN, editor Martinsville Republican, and Postmaster, was born in Jefferson Township, Morgan County, on April 29, 1844, and is the son of John and Bridget (Gallagher) Bain, early settlers of Jefferson Township. Our subject passed his early life on a farm and attending a district school until he was seventeen years of age, when he enlisted in Company C, Thirty third Indiana Infantry, in August, 1861, for three years and participated in every march, battle and skirmish which the regiment was in. Near the close of the three years' term, the regiment "veteranized." During the Atlanta campaign, the regiment elected officers, and was under the fire of the enemy while balloting, and one man killed. Mr. Bain was elected Second Lieutenant, and remained with his command until the close of the war, having been mustered out August 20, 1865, after four years' service. Some of the battles and skirmishes in which the regiment was engaged are as follows: Wildcat, Cumberland Gap, Thompson's Station, Tenn. (where the entire brigade was captured and confined in Libby Prison two months), Besaca, Cassville, Burnt Hickory, Golgotha Church, Pumpkin Vine, Peach Tree Creek, the Atlanta campaign, Sherman's "march to the sea," and through the Carolinas, being in the battles of Averysboro and Bentonville; thence to Raleigh, on to Richmond, and in the " grand review" at Washington; thence to Louisville, Ely., where the regiment was mustered out. After his return home, our subject attended Mooresville Seminary six months, then Earlham College, Richmond, Ind., three years, and then the State University at Bloomington, graduating from that institution in the law course in the spring of 1870, after which he came to Martinsville and engaged in the practice of law. In August, 1870, he became connected with the Republican which sprang into existence that year, and was made its managing editor. In December, 1870, with H. A. Smock, he purchased the paper, and continued its publication for four years. Since September, 1874, Mr. Bain has been the sole proprietor. He has added to and improved the paper, now using a Campbell steam press, with a circulation of 1,700. In October, 1872, Mr. Bain was made Postmaster of Martinsville, and has held the office ever since. He has always been an active, influential politician in the Republican party, and is ranked among the energetic and progressive citizens, and as one of the representative men of Southern Indiana. In February, 1876, he was married to Sallie Johnson: a native of Morgan County, and daughter of Dr. J. J. Johnson. Four children have been born to them Mary E., Katie R., Jarvis J. and Dora I. Mr. Bain is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, and his wife of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, and of the G. A. R. Since Mr. Bain has been Postmaster, the office has increased its receipts threefold; and it is at present one of the best appointed and conducted post offices of any town of its size in the State.

JAMES P. BALDWIN, second son in a family of eight children, was born March 17, 1849, in Jennings County, Ind. His parents, James M. and Sarah (Thomas), natives of Indiana, were married in Jennings County, where they settled, remaining until 1861, the father following merchandising. Removing thence to Martinsville, he went into the milling business, and three years later, his mill being destroyed by fire, he retired from business, and is at present one of Martinsville's most influential citizens. The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in Martinsville. When sixteen years of age, he was employed as brake man on the F. F. & M. R. R., where he remained for six months, then for six months on the X. & Y. R. R. as fireman, and afterward on the main line of the Indianapolis & St. Louis Railroad as fireman between La Fayette, Ind., and Cincinnati, Ohio, for some time. He was then given an engine, working in this capacity until 1872, after which he worked for one year on the F. F. & M. R. R. again. In 1873, he entered the employ of Johnson & Long, druggists, of Martinsville, for a short time, afterward forming a partnership with J. H. Hart in the same business, and at present is so engaged doing a lucrative business. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is an active member in the Republican party. November 13, 1872, he was married to Maryetta K. Johnson, daughter of Dr. J J. Johnson, one of the leading citizens of Martinsville. They had four children, none of whom are living. Mr. Baldwin and wife are identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church.

QUINCY A. BLANKENSHIP, attorney at law. is a native of this county, born November 15, 1851. He was reared in the locality of his birth, attended the schools and high school of Martinsville, also the Northwestern at Indianapolis. He began farming in 1874; now owns 200 acres in Kay Township, and is a partner with his brother in farming and stock dealing; they handle about 100 head of cattle each year. In 1879, he went into the County Clerk's office as Deputy, at which he served four years. Afterward he began the study of law, was admitted to practice February, 1883, and April 17 of that year be married Miss Fannie Miller. The father of our subject, Perry M. Blankenship, was born in Jennings County, Ind., December 11, 1811. His parents died when he was quite young, and he was bound to Mr. John B. New, and learned the trade of cabinet making, at which he worked several years, and while vet a young man removed to this county.

JOHN BOTHWELL was born in County Moneghan, Ireland, March 17, 1803, and is a son of Charles and Mary Bothwell, also natives of County Moneghan, Ireland. The father of our subject, John Bothwell, Sr., was a native' of Ireland, where he married and died, having reared five children James, David. Mary, Margaret and Charles. Charles Bothwell, while in Ireland, married Mary Gordon; emigrated in 1809 to America, and settled in Pennsylvania, where he closed his life. He was the parent of the following: Samuel, William, Ann J. and John. Our subject, John Bothwell, married, January 14, 1832. Miss Nancy, daughter of John and Elizabeth Loraign. The following spring Mr. Bothwell moved to Montgomery County, Penn., and in 1838 to Morgan County, Ind., when he settled in this township, which has since been his home. Mrs. Bothwell died April, 1856, and some time after Mr. Bothwell wedded Mrs. Weathers, widow of Richard Weathers, who died February 1, 1883. Mr. Bothwell has been father to the following children: Samuel, Anna, Mary, David, John, Hugh, Sarah, James, Ann J., Isabel, Martha and Margaret.

DAVID BOTHWELL is a native of Morgan County, Ind., was born October 12, 1841, and is one of the twelve children composing the family of John and Nancy Bothwell. He obtained the rudiments of an education from the district schools; afterward fitted himself for the duties of a teacher, and has taught thirteen consecutive terms of school successfully in this county. February 28, 1883, he married Mary E., daughter of William M. and Mary C. Duckworth, of this county. Miss Duckworth was born in this county March 23, 1857. After marriage, Mr. Bothwell occupied and managed the farm on which he now lives. It comprises 215 acres, and is well cultivated and improved. Mr. and Mrs. Bothwell are highly respected among their neighbors.

FRANK O. BRAKE, native of Ohio, was born in Licking County October 10, 1853. His parents, Samuel and Sarah (Moore) Brake, were married in Ohio, their native place, in 1841, where they located, and the father was stationed as a United Brethren minister.    In 1863, they removed thence to Union County, and settled on a farm, where they remained for two years; then went into the mercantile business in Frankfort. In 1878, he sold his stock of goods, and was then in Shelby County for four years. Early in 1883, he embarked in the insurance business, and at present is so engaged. On December 23, 1877, his mother died. Subject is third son and child in a family of four children, and was reared and educated in his native county. When seventeen years of age, he began teaching school in Ohio. He continued teaching for five years, and in March, 1875, he entered the office of Dr. Levi Stuck, a dentist of Bryan, Ohio, remaining with him for one year. He then went with Dr. Myers, of Defiance, Ohio, remaining for five years, meanwhile attending the Ohio Dental College at Cincinnati, where he graduated in March, 1880. In 1881, he came to Martinsville, where he has a lucrative practice. Mr. Brake is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Martinsville Lodge, No. 74; of the American Legion of Honor, Fort Defiance, Lodge, No. 497. In politics, ho is a Republican. On September 26, 1877, he was married to Josephine Winfield, daughter of John Winfield of Ohio. By this union there is one child, Edith Harlan. Both himself and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

ELLIOTT F. BRANCH, Treasurer of Morgan County, Ind., is a native of Johnson County, and was born April 16, 1845. He was reared in the county in which he first saw the world's light, with fair facilities for education, and in 1866 commenced the grain trade at Martinsville, and now continues the same in partnership with his brother, under the firm title of Branch & Bro.; they own the Martinsville Flouring Mills, and are doing a large business, over $250,000 annually. Mr. Branch shipped the first carload out of the town on the new railroad. He is owner of 320 acres in Johnson County, the same number three miles east of this place, and his wife also has a like quantity near the town. From 1865 to 1878, he was engaged in merchandising and the stave business, in connection with milling and farming. v May 13, 1868, he married Miss Alice Parks, daughter of P. M. Parks, which union has been graced by four children Olive, Leafy, Emmett Forest and Frank Oak. Mr. Branch is a stanch Republican, and was elected County Treasurer in 1878. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the State committee for this Congressional district

ROBERT H. BRANCH was born in Johnson County, Ind., on April 7, 1852. A sketch of parents' life appears elsewhere in this work. He was fourth son and ninth child in a family of twelve children, and was reared in his native county. When eighteen years of age, he began working on his father's farm, which he continued to do for two years. He then came to Martinsville, and was employed by his brother, E. F. Branch, in the grain business, with whom he continued until January, 1874. At this time he became a partner in the firm, and continued so for three years, when his brother sold his interest to D. D. Cramer. Three years later, the firm was dissolved, R. H. Branch and D. D. Cramer selling their interests. Our subject then purchased a half interest in the flouring mills and elevator, which was destroyed by fire on June 22, 1883, the loss being about $26,000. An elevator, the capacity of which is 125,000 bushels, has since been built, in place of the one destroyed, and business was resumed on December 1, 1883, which most undoubtedly will prove as great a success as formerly. Mr. Branch is a member of the A. F. & A. M. He is also an active member and worker in the Christian Church. Politically he is a Republican, and quite influential in this party. He is liberal as a citizen, and highly respected by all who know him.

H. E. BRANCH is the oldest son and child in a family of two children, born January 12, 1855, in Franklin, Johnson County, Ind. His parents were John W. and Louisa (Alexander) Branch, natives of Kentucky and Indiana respectively. They were married in Grosport, Ind., October 5, 1853, and then settled in Franklin, remaining until 1858, when they moved to Grosport, where they remained until 1866. He was appointed Deputy Collector, and moved to Terre Haute, remaining until 1878, when they moved to Martinsville and engaged in the stave trade, and at present reside in Indianapolis. The subject was reared in Franklin, Grosport and Terre Haute, in the latter place of which he received a good education in the graded schools. In September, 1877, he came to Martinsville, and took the position of book-keeper for E. F. Branch & Bro., and is so engaged at present. On February 12, 1878, he married Sarah A. Comer, daughter of Mathew Comer, a pioneer of Mooresville. By this union there were two children. Mr. Branch is a member of the K. of P. He is an active member of the Republican party, and highly esteemed in the community in which he lives. He is a member of the Campbellite Church. During the years 1872, 1873, 1874, 1875, he was telegraph operator in Terre Haute.

MRS. MARTHA A. BROUGHTON (widow of John Broughton), is a native of Botetourt County, Va., and was born May 9, 1837, the daughter of Jacob and Nancy Ecbolds, both natives of Virginia, where they married. They afterward moved to Kentucky; thence from Madison County, Ind.; thence to Johnson, and thence to Morgan County. Their family consisted of Jeremiah, Martha A., Nancy J., William, Jennie, Eliza, Anna and Joseph. In Johnson County, Ind., our subject married James Childs, and they moved to Effingham County, 111., in which locality Mr. Childs died. In 1852, Mrs. Childs returned to Johnson County, Ind., and was there wedded to Thomas Stout, with whom, in 1858, she moved to this county, where he died in 1872; finally she wedded John Broughton, who left the world in 1879. Mrs. Broughton has been the mother of eight children, as follows: By Mr. Childs, two, Roan H. and an infant deceased; and by Mr. Stout, six .....Charlie T., Albert L., Nancy A., William W., Hattie F. and Joseph H. Mrs. Broughton is an exemplary and highly esteemed lady.

COL. JAMES E. BURTON was born in Monroe County, Ind., September, 23, 1824, is a son of John and Nancy (Wishard) Burton, the former a native of Virginia, born 1784; the latter, a native of Delaware, born 1782, who, after their marriage about 3819, emigrated to Monroe County, Ind., where Mr. Burton built a mill and also engaged in farming. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, and was the owner of more than 1,000 acres at his death in 1860; his wife survived him sixteen years. Their family was Susan L., Jesse M., Henry W., Elizabeth J., John W., Sytha A, Martha L., Josiah P. and James E. The grandfather of our subject, Josiah Burton, was a native of England, who first located near Philadelphia, Penn., then moved to Virginia, then to Kentucky, and about 1826 to Morgan County, Ind., where he closed his life. He had been twice married and the father of ten children. James E. Burton was married March 23, 1848, to Miss Cynthia A., daughter of James V. and Maria Buskirk, and born in Monroe County January 31, 1830. They have had three children David P., John M. (deceased) and James S.
Soon after marriage, Mr. Burton moved to and remained in Morgan County. In 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, of which he became Captain and served three years. He was wounded in the thigh June 22, 1864, and in September was promoted Colonel, which he held until mustered out, August, 1865. Mr. Burton has been Justice of the Peace, and is a member of the Masonic order and of the M. E. Church. He resides upon his own farm of 249 acres.

PATRICK CAIN is a native of Ireland; was born January, 7, 1829, and is one of the four children born to Thomas and Katie Cain, both of whom were natives of Ireland. In 1846, Patrick Cain emigrated from Ireland to Kentucky, and in the autumn of that year moved to Clark County, Ind., and subsequently to Morgan County, and settled in Washington Township, where he has since made a home, and is the owner of 480 acres of fine land, and also where he married Ellen Murkenroy, which union has resulted in the births of seven children Francis T., Edward L, William, Patrick EL, Joseph, Mary and Bosie. Mr. and Mrs. Cain are highly esteemed members of their community, and are communicants of the Catholic Church.

EDWIN W. CALLIS was born in Flemington, Hunterdon County, N. J., on January 17, 1827. His parents were natives of that State. He attended school until he was about thirteen years of age, when he was apprenticed to the printing business in the office of the Hunterdon (N. J.) Democrat. He had a natural inclination and taste for that business, and served an apprenticeship of five years. After that he worked in various cities and towns, in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, until the year 1847, when he purchased a half interest in the Mt. Holly (N. J.) Herald, a Democratic paper, and took the editorial control of that paper until 1851, when he came to the conclusion that he would like to master the " art preservative of all arts " in its various details. Then he sold his interest in the Herald, and removed to Philadelphia, Penn., where he worked in the leading book, job and newspaper offices, and edited and published a literary and pictorial paper called the Family Casket. He remained in that city until 1855, when he came West, to Martinsville, Ind., and bought the Morgan County Gazette, as the paper was then called. It was the first Republican paper published in Morgan County, and continued in that faith until 1870, when local differences arose, and the editor and paper filed into the Democratic party the party to which Mr. Callis originally belonged. It has been thoroughly Democratic ever since, under his editorial control, and has done efficient and faithful service for the Democratic cause. Mr. Callis is a natural and thorough newspaper man, from editor to pressman, and stands at the head of his profession wherever known. He has a wife and six children. The latter, four girls and two boys, range in age from fourteen to thirty years, and were all brought up at the " case."

WILLIAM P. CLARK is a native of Morgan County, Ind., born on August 23, 1835, and is the fourth of the seven children of John and Isabella (Major) Clark, both born in Indiana and in the same year, 1810. Soon after their marriage, they moved to Tippecanoe County, and thence to Morgan County, settling in this township, where Mr. Clark died in 1844. Mrs. Clark subsequently married William H. Craig, and died in 1881, by the latter marriage becoming the mother of three children. William P. Clark married, February 12, 1857, Miss Keziah, daughter of John and Sarah Rudicel. Mrs. Clark died May 17, 1863, and May 17, 1864 he married Alzina H., daughter of Lewis and Hannah Warren. Soon after this marriage, Mr. Clark moved to Martinsville, and in 1872 purchased the Martinsville Flouring Mills, in which business of milling he was engaged for five years. In June, 1883, he removed to the farm on which he now lives. Mr. Clark has been the father of five children, two by his first wife, Noah J. (deceased) and Minnie (deceased), and three by his second wife Lulu, Gettie and John W.

JOHN N. COBB is a native of Morgan County, Ind., born August 30, 1860, and is descended from Van B. and Harriet A. (Nutter) Cobb, natives respectively of Kentucky and Indiana They were married, September 20, 1859, in this county, where Mrs. Cobb died October 21, 1860, after which oar subject was taken by his grandfather, John Nutter, to rear, with whom he remained until 1881. July 30, 1882, he married Annettie, daughter of A. J. and Perlina (Dyer) Lafary, of Martinsville, and born in this county March 20, 1859. Mr. Cobb is a very much esteemed and promising young man and a member of the Knights of Pythias. He and wife are parents of one son William A.

WALTER COFFEY  Walter S. Coffey, senior partner of this firm, is the fifth child of Wiley and Harriet (McDonald) Coffey, natives of Indiana. He was born six miles southeast of Spencer, Owen County, Ind., May 16, 1858. His parents were married in Owen County, and located on a farm in Clay Township in that county, where the father died in 1879, leaving his widow with several small children, which she has reared. She is now living on the old farm, hale and hearty. Walter S. Coffey was reared on the home farm in Owen County, where he received an education in the district schools of the neighborhood. By persistent effort and close application, he attained a proficiency in music seldom excelled. When twenty one years of age, he was employed by F. G. White, the well known manager and actor, as leader of his orchestra, and for three years traveled with him. In July, 1883, he formed a partnership with W. N. Livingston in the grocery business in Martinsville, and they are at present doing a large, lucrative business. Mr. Coffey is a member of the Christian Church, in good standing, and an active and influential one in upholding its principles. In politics, he is liberal.

WILLIAM N. LIVINGSTON was born in Clay Township, Owen Co., Ind., August 21, 1860. His parents, Nathan F. and Elizabeth (Neill) Livingston, natives of Virginia and Indiana respectively, were married in" Greene County, Ind., in 1857, and located on a farm, where they remained for a number of years, and thence came to Owen County. They then settled in White Hall, Clay Township, where they sold dry goods for some time. At present they reside nine miles southeast of Spencer, on a farm in Clay Township. William N. Livingston is the second son and third child in family, and was reared and educated in his native township. When nineteen years of age, he was employed by F. G. White as a member of his band and orchestra. He traveled with him for three years. In July, 1883, Mr. Livingston went into the grocery business, in partnership with W. S. Coffey, in Martinsville, where at present they are doing a successful business.  In October, 1882, he was married to Ruth Coffey, daughter of Wiley and Harriet Coffey, natives of Indiana, and old pioneers of Owen County. Mr. Livingston is politically a Democrat.

MATTHIAS B. COLLINS, second child in a family of three, was born February 18, 1842, in Sutler County, Ohio. His parents, Jacob and May A.  (Arbuckle) Collins, natives of Pennsylvania and Virginia respectively, were married in Ohio, in 1837, and located near Cincinnati, where the father followed the cooper's trade and farmed up to the present time. His mother died November 6, 1877. Matthias was reared and educated in Clermont County, Ohio, and when nineteen years of age came to Indiana and entered the employ of carriage manufacturers, with whom he remained until July, 1862. He enlisted in Company I, Thirty third Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. Houser; served three years, and participated in the following engagements: Thompson's Station, Resaca, Cassville, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Burnt Hickory and Dallas Woods; he then marched with Sherman from Atlanta to the sea, and took part in the battles at Savannah, Bentonville and Averysboro; near Goldsboro, he was taken prisoner, and first imprisoned at Danville, then at Libby. Shortly after, he was paroled, and, going to Camp Chase, Ohio, was granted a furlough, and on June 10, 1865, was honorably discharged. Returning to Bartholomew County, Ind., he resumed work at carriage making. On March 25, 1866, he was married to Minerva L. Roininger, of Bartholomew County. One year later, they removed to St. Louis, Ind., where he engaged in wagon making, remaining until 1872; removing thence to Miamiville, Ohio, he engaged in photography (which he had learned while in the army), traveling with a portable gallery until in 1879, when he came to Martinsville and has since been successfully engaged there in the same business. Mr. Collins is Senior Warden of the A. F. & A. M., Martinsville Lodge, No. 74, and Officer of the Guard of Post No. 77, G. A. R. He is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. They have four children Ella F., Eugene 0., Willie A. and Mary E.

JOHN C. COMER was born December 8, 1842, in Wayne County, Ind. His parents, Joseph and Esther (Compton) Comer, were natives of South Carolina and Ohio respectively. The former came to Indiana in 3.808, when seven years of age; married in Ohio in 1826, and lived in Hendricks and Morgan Counties for ten years, when he again went to Wayne County, returning to Morgan County in 1862 and locating in Mooresville. He died in February, 1876. The mother died in January, 1868. John C. Comer is the eighth son and eleventh child, and was reared in Wayne and Randolph Counties until eight years of age, when he went with his parents to Iowa. In June, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Fourteenth Iowa Volunteers, under Capt. Warren C. Jones. He served for three and a half years, and took part in the battles of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Corinth, Jackson, Tenn.; Holly Springs, Vicksburg, Canton, Miss. He was in the Red River campaign, and at Pilot Knob. In December, 1864, he was mustered out, and came to Morgan County, Ind.; purchased a flouring mill at Mooresville, ran it for two years, and then purchased a saw mill, which he ran until 1870. He next farmed for two years, and then embarked in the lumber business, following it for eight years. He was elected Sheriff of the county in 1878, and two years later was re-elected. After faithfully fulfilling the duties of this office for four years, he bought a farm of 25S acres in Brown Township, and is at present farming. In April, 1869, he was married to Miss Annie Gilbert, of Morgan County. They have had  six children, four of whom are living Ella, Robert, Mattie and Dolly. Mr. Comer is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of H., the K. of P., and of the G. A. R. He is a Republican, and with his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JAMES F. COX, attorney at law, was born in Monroe County, Ind., May 15, 1852, and is a son of Rev. J. Bridgeman and Martha (Mosier) Cox. He was reared on a farm, attended the county schools, and when fifteen began his own support, and divided his time between labor and schooling. At nineteen, he became a teacher, and attended the State University for three years, after which he taught during winter and studied law during summer. He became aa earnest politician before he became a voter. He cast his first vote, in pride, for Horace Greeley, and came before the Democratic convention as a candidate for Prosecuting Attorney of the Fifteenth Circuit He was defeated meagerly after being nominated over three prominent competitors from this county, by a coalition of Greene and Owen Counties, the latter receiving the Judge and the former the Prosecutor. In 1878, he was made Deputy County Prosecuting Attorney, as which he served eighteen months before resigning to matriculate in the Law Department of the University of Michigan, from which he graduated March 24, 1880, and returned to this county and resumed practice. August 1, 1877, he married, in Brown County, Ind., Miss Mattie E. Armstrong, who died February 14, 1880, leaving one child Leon J.

WILLIAM COX, a native of Ohio, was born near Dayton October 5, 1820, and is the eldest son and second child of John and Nancy (Swishard) Cox, natives of Pennsylvania. They came to Morgan County in 1820, and built what is known as High Rock Mills in Jefferson Township, on White River, which they ran until in 1850. The father then went to California, where he died in March, 1850. The mother died in 1843. Subject was reared in Morgan County, where he was educated, and remained until 1843, and assisted his father in the milL He then went to Wisconsin, and worked in the lead mines for two years; thence returning to his home, he went on a flat-boat to New Orleans, and acted as pilot on a flat-boat for twenty years. In 1853, he purchased a farm in Jefferson Township, and farmed after his twenty years on the river until 1877. He then sold his farm, and removed to Martinsville, where in May he was appointed City Marshal, and is at present serving in that capacity. In 1856, he was elected Township Trustee, and served two years. In 1847, he was married to Jane Mills, daughter of Judge Mills, a pioneer of Morgan County. By this union there have been six children, four of whom are living Lida, Katie, George W. and Stephen J. Mr. Cox is a member of the A. F. & A M, Martinsville Lodge, No. 74. He is politically a Republican.    His wife is a member of the Christian Church.

GEORGE W. CRAMER was born in Morris County, N. J., October 27, 1829, and is a son of Archibald and Margaret Cramer, the former born July, 1803, the latter in 1802. Archibald Cramer was a son of Abram and Rachel (More) Cramer, who were natives of New Jersey, where they lived and died, the parents of eleven children. Archibald Cramer married Margaret Stephens, and after living in Sussex and Morris Counties, emigrated to Morgan County, Ind., in 1839, and died May 7, 1883, the father of six children Sarah, George W., Emeline, Dayton D., William S. and Nelson. George W. Cramer, December 22, 1853, in this county, married Sarah A., daughter of James and Delilah Crawford, and born in this county December 17,1834. This union brought forth nine children Mary E., Lenora A., Hannah M., James C, Julia, Charles L., Rosa L., Archie and Delilah M.   After marriage, Mr. Cramer located on his home farm of 267 acres of well improved and valued land. He is a much esteemed citizen, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church

WILLIAM S. CRAMER, a son of Archibald and Margaret Cramer, was born in this county March 19, 1841. August 2, 1862, lie enlisted in Company H, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He was wounded May 15, 1864, at the battle of Besaca, GaM in the left shoulder, by which he was disabled for a time, but has a good army record. In 1866, in partnership with his father and a brother, he purchased a saw mill and threshing machine, all engaging in said enterprise. This continued until 1871, when the sons bought their father's interest, and continued the business until 1876, when William purchased the interest of his brother, and has since managed the business alone; he is also interested in farming. January 4, 1870, at Indianapolis, he married Miss Patience M., a daughter of Thomas J. Breedlove, who died March 19, 1874, having borne three children Frederick S., Laura L. (deceased), and Lillie B. October 18, 1876, Mr. Cramer married a second wife, Elizabeth E., daughter of William and Mary A. Lockhart, with an issue of five children Arthur V. and a twin (still-born), John N., Thomas G. and Nellie. Mr. Cramer has served his township as Assessor. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

C. S. CRARY, born in Franklin County, Ind., March 21, 1845, is the youngest of seven sons and twelve children, and was reared in Indiana and Ohio. Of his father, the Martinsville Republican of August 16,1883, publishes the following: " On the 14th inst, Gen. Willis Crary suddenly died at his home, near Olney, 111. Gen. Crary was eighty one years old past. He was a native of Vermont, and moved to Cincinnati in 1813, where he resided for thirty years, when he removed to Franklin County, Ind. He was in his earlier days a prominent politician of Cincinnati. He was well acquainted with Gen. William Henry Harrison, and was a schoolmate and chum of his son, Scott Harrison, the father of Senator Ben Harrison. Shortly after he attained his majority, he was married in Cincinnati to Miss Almira Spencer, a native of New York State, who died in 1863. During the internal improvement furor in this State, he was a heavy contractor in the building of the White Water Canal, in which he lost over $20,000, which was a liberal fortune in those days. Of late years, he had resided in Illinois." In 1859, the subject of this sketch went with his parents to McLean County, 111. He received a good English education, and in August, 1861, he enlisted in the Fourteenth Indiana Cavalry, under Col. T. Lyle Dickey, serving for four years. He took part in the following engagements: Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh (at which he was Orderly to Gen. Hurlbut). From exposure, he was taken with the typhoid fever, and after lying in the hospital for some time he was discharged for disability. In the fall of 1862, he assisted in raising a company and returned to the front. On the 19th of March, 1863, he was commissioned Second Lieutenant, One Hundred and Thirtieth Illinois Infantry, and had the honor of being the youngest commissioned officer in Illinois, then being but seventeen years of age. In the battle of Port Gibson, his Captain was wounded, and the First Lieutenant in the hospital, so he assumed the command of his company through the battles of Raymond, the entire siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Miss., and some few others, after which he was promoted to First Lieutenant. His regiment spent the winter of 1863-64 on the coast of Texas, after which they returned to New Orleans, and on the organization of the Red River Campaign, he was appointed on the staff of Gen. W. H. Baldwin, of the Second Brigade, Fourth Division of the Thirteenth Army Corps, and served in that capacity during the entire campaign. In 1865, he received an honorable discharge and returned home. He entered the State University at Bloomington, Ind., remaining one year. In 1866, he began farming in Morgan County, and five years later moved to Mar-tinsville, renting his farm of 200 acres in Jefferson Township. He then went into the insurance business, and continued in it until 1881, when he went into the employ of the Gould Southwest Railroad System, with headquarters at Galveston, Tex., as traveling, freight and passenger agent, remaining nearly two years. In December, 1882, he resigned his position and returned to Martinsville, where he at present resides. He is a member of the G. A. R. and a Republican.

N. T. CUNNINGHAM, of the firm of Cunningham, Bollinger & Phelps, dealers in general merchandise, dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes, etc., is a representative business man of Morgan County, and was born in Martinsville October 1, 1832. He is the son of James and Huldah (Lizenby) Cunningham,- natives of Kentucky, who were married in that State August 15, 1826, and immediately came to this township. The father at first engaged in farming, but, being a business man was soon occupied in stock trading, hotel keeping, general merchandising, flat boating, etc. He died in Martinsville July 19, 1856, his widow following May 1,1861. N. T. Cunningham was reared a farmer until eighteen years of age, when he came to Martinsville with his parents and assisted his father in his hotel and other business, after which he returned to farming for two years. In 1858, he opened a general store in Martinsville under the firm name of Cunningham & Stevens; three years later, he purchased the interest of Mr. Stevens, and has continued business to the present time, associated, with various others, including W. R. Sheppard, S. McCracken, James Sheppard and T. Phelps, during the war carrying on two stores. The present firm was formed in 1880, the partners being James Bollinger and T. Phelps, and the firm is doing a thriving trade. Mr. Cunningham has also given much attention to stock raising and trading. He owns about 800 acres in Morgan County, mostly improved; he has laid out two additions to Martinsville, owns five rooms in Union Block, and has invested much money in building enterprises. He was married in 1862 to Miss Nettie C. Sheppard. native of Morgan County, and daughter of Isaac D. Sheppard, one of the early settlers. Two children have blessed this union C. Sherman and Julie M. Mr. Cunningham is a Republican and Mrs. Cunningham is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

MARION CUNNINGHAM, one of the most energetic and successful young farmers in Morgan County, was born in Jefferson Township August 3, 1850. His parents were William N. and Nancy (Lankford) Cunningham, natives of Kentucky and Virginia respectively, who were married in Morgan County in an early day, and were well known among the earliest and most prominent settlers. Our subject was the second son in a family of four children, and was reared in Morgan County, obtaining in the district schools the rudiments of a good education. On the 22d day of September. 1870, he was married to Miss Nancy Teverbaugh, daughter of William Teverbaugh, an influential and respected citizen of
Martin County, Ind. For about one year after his marriage, lie farmed in Morgan County, going thence to Daviess County, Ind., where he farmed for two years, ,at the end of which time he returned to Morgan County, and continued farming until early in 1881, when his father gave him the splendid, well improved farm of 297 acres, one mile south of Martinsville, where he at present resides. In connection with his farming interests, he is also extensively engaged in the stock business, and his energy and industry rank him among the successful farmers of the county.

CYRUS E. DAVIS, attorney at law, was born in Washington County, Ind., December 17, 1856, and is a son of James and Martha E. Davis. Cyrus was reared on a farm; attended school during the winter, and when seventeen years old the Salem High School some time, in 1876 the Southern Indiana Normal School, and in the autumn of that year was enrolled in the State University at Bloomington; was a student four years, and graduated therefrom in June, 1880. In July of that year, he came to Martinsville, engaged in reading law under Col. Jordan; became a partner with Hon. A. M. Cunning in 1881; graduated from the Law Department of the Michigan University in 1882; returned to Martinsville; continued the practice with Mr. Cunning and afterward became associated with E. C. Steele, under the firm name of Davis & Steele. Mr. Davis is a member of the "Sigma Chi" fraternity.

BENJAMIN DESSAUER is the fifth son and eighth child in a family of eleven born to Aaron and Fannie (Goldsmith) Dessauer, natives of Germany. His parents were married in Baltimore, Md., in 1836, where his father followed his vocation as merchant tailor; thence he removed to Missouri; remained until in 1842, and then went to Ohio; located in Cincinnati, and engaged in the clothing business. In 1852, he embarked in the general booking business, and was thus engaged for eight years, when he retired from business. He died November 16, 1866; his wife on October 29, 1866. Benjamin Dessauer was reared in Cincinnati, obtained a good education in the graded schools of that city, and when eighteen years of age took a complete course in Nelson's Commercial College. When twelve years of age, he began clerking in a general merchandise store in Thorntown, Ind.; then clerked at various points until 1875. He then came to Martinsville in September of that year, and formed a partnership with his brother David in the clothing, boot and shoe business, in which they have been so successfully engaged, their business rooms being two of the largest in the town. On June 10,1879, he was married to Rebecca Kronenberger, daughter of Max Kronenberger, a native of Germany. Mr. Dessauer is a member of the K. of P. Lodge, No. 89.

GEORGE W. EGBERT (deceased) was born in Warren County, Ohio, August 25, 1824. He removed with his parents to Dearborn County, where they remained for some time; thence they removed to Green Township while George W. was but a lad, in which community he grew up to manhood respected and held in high esteem by all who knew him. He was married to Miss Mary Williams, February 11, 1847. He survived his wife six years. He at one time served as Trustee of Green Township. In 1870, he was elected Treasurer of Morgan County. Such was the confidence reposed in him by the people that they committed to his care the guardianship and settlement, as administrator, of many estates, all of which was honestly and conscientiously performed. He was in the drug trade as a member of the firm of Tarleton & Egbert, which position he occupied until his failing health admonished him that he must withdraw from active business, after which he gradually sank, suffering intolerable pain. He died February 18, 1882, in the fifty eighth year of his age. He was a prominent citizen and highly esteemed. He was efficient as an officer, performing all duties devolving upon him with fidelity to the county and credit to himself.

DR. URIAH H. FARR was born in this county October 23, 1846, and is a son of Daniel C. and Susanna (Teague) Farr. Daniel C. Farr was born in Jefferson County, Ky., May 8, 1816, moved with his parents to this State in 1822, and was married in this county February 20, 1834. to Miss Susanna Teague. He afterward engaged at farming in Bay Township with success, and by industry was soon enabled to enter land until he owned 300 acres. He was father of three children, and died August 14, 1850. August 6, 1862, Dr. U. H. Farr enlisted in Company B, Seventieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served three years, and was in the following battles: Besaca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, the Atlanta campaign, the march to the sea, Savannah and Bentonville. He was discharged June, 1865, and March 16, 1866, married Miss Sarah Blankenship, with a result of four children Anna A., Kate E., Montana E. and Daniel B. Dr. Farr continued farming until 1874, when he began the study of medicine and attended lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Indianapois, from which he graduated in 1876. After practicing at Paragon until 1882, he removed to this town. Dr. Farr also took a course of lectures at the University of Pennsylvania., and received the ad eundem degree there from.

LEVI FERGUSON is a native of Pike County, Ind., and born May 29, 1841. He was also reared in Pike County, and commenced the study of law at the age of fifteen, which he continued four years. August 9, 1860, he married Miss Mary B. Montgomery, who died February 13, 1866, leaving one child Florence. July 1, 1861, Mr. Ferguson enlisted in Company A, First Indiana Cavalry, serving in this and in the infantry until 1863, at which time he was promoted to a Captaincy and assigned to Provost Marshal duty in the Second Division, Army of the Shenandoah, after the experience of battle in many sanguinary engagements and skirmishes. After the war, he engaged in the practice of law in Petersburg, Ind., where he continued until 1877, and served two terms as County Auditor. In the same year, he removed to Martinsville and transferred his law practice hither. In 1868, he married Miss Amelia Thomas, which union was honored by two children Ray and Minnie. In 1872, Mr. Ferguson was a delegate to the National Republican Convention, and in 1876 a Hayes elector for the Second Congressional District for this State.

JOHN J. FERTIG is the elder of two children born to John S. and Frances (Sarhmann) Fertig, natives of Germany, who were married in 1858, in Indiana, where they removed in 1854. His father was a carpet weaver, and since his marriage has resided in Madison, Jefferson County, Ind. His wife died January 29, 1873. John Fertig was born March 1, 1860, in Madison, where he was reared, and received a good English and German education. When fifteen years of age, he began learning the trade of saddletree making, which he followed for two years.      He also learned the barber's trade,  in Madison, where he followed it for three years. In the, summer of 1880, he came to Martinsville and worked at his trade until in 1882. In March, 1883, he purchased a barber-shop of T. M. Gillig, which he refitted, and is at present conducting. Mr. Fertig is a member of the Catholic Church, and active in its support. In politics, he is a Democrat, and a good citizen, always ready to assist in every benevolent undertaking in public enterprise.

JAMES FISHER was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, June 9,1840, and is a son of William and Nancy (Fitzsimons) Fisher, natives of New York and Maryland respectively. The former was killed in 1840, by the falling of a tree, and in 1845 his mother moved with her family to this county, afterward marrying Barney. Donohue, and residing in the county until her death in 1874. She was the mother of ten children nine by Mr. Fisher and one by Mr. Donohue. James Fisher is the youngest child of his father's family. He came with his mother and has since resided in this county. October 17, 1859, he married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel B. and Mary J. Black, and born October 17, 1838. After his marriage, Mr. Fisher located in this township, of which he is a worthy citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher have nine children "William, Mary A., Ellen, Francis, Lawson, Ida E., Alice B., Jennie and Minnie. Mr. Fisher was a soldier of the late war, having enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Forty eighth Indiana Volunteers, and served from February, 1864, until the end of the war.

WILLIAM L. FULKERSON is a native of Scott County, Va..; was born October 13, 1824, and is one of the family of Frederick and Lovina (Lawson) Fulkerson, both of whom were natives of Scott County, Va., where they were married, and whence, in 1832, they moved to Monroe County, Ind., and there closed their labors of life. Their family comprised seven in number Nancy, Sarah, Elizabeth, Catherine, William L., Mary and Abraham. William L., our subject, married in Monroe County, Ind., June 22, 1848, Miss Sarah, daughter of Eli and Mary Abernathy, and born in Lincoln County, N. C., May 7, 1825. In the spring of 1873, Mr. Fulkerson moved to Morgan County, and settled on the farm which he now occupies as a home, and where he manages a dairy and supplies the town of Martinsville with milk, butter and cheese. Mr. and Mrs. Fulkerson have no children.

WILLIAM G. GARRISON, a native of Gregg Township, Morgan County, Ind., was born December 25, 1840. His parents, William and Phebe (Norris) Garrison, natives of Kentucky, were married in 1840, in Morgan County, Ind., and located in Gregg Township, where they continued to live until 1848, when they removed to a farm in Jefferson Township. There, in 1852, the mother died. The father is at present living in Warren County, Iowa. He came to Indiana in 1825, and is one of the earliest and best citizens of Morgan County. William G. Garrison is the eldest of five children, and was reared in Gregg and Jefferson Townships until April, 1861. He enlisted in Company K, Seventh Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. Jeff K. Scott, in the three months' service his company immediately went into active service, and he took part in the battles of Philippi, Cheat Mountain, Garrick's Ford, etc. He was mustered out August 3, 1861, and in July, 1862, he re-enlisted in Company H, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. A. D. Cunning. He served until June 19, 1865, and took part in the battles of Russellville, Resaca, Cassville, New Hope Church, Lost Mountain, Kenesaw, Marietta, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Savannah, Averysboro and Bentonville. During Sherman's march to the sea, he was considered an expert forager, and some of his narrow escapes on various expeditions are interesting in the extreme. In March, 1862, he was married to Sarah Winter, daughter of George and Mary Winter, pioneers of Morgan County. After his return from the war in 1866, he followed his trade as stationary engineer, until July, 1873, when he was severely attacked with acute rheumatism in his right leg, which made him incapable of labor. In October, 1876, he was elected as Recorder of Morgan County, on the Republican ticket, and four years later was re-elected to the same office, in the discharge of which duties he is at present engaged. He is a member of the G. A. R His wife is an active and faithful member of the Christian Church. They have had eight children Orestes, Harriet E., Thomas 0. (deceased) May, Luther, Dot, Annie (deceased) and Perry.

JOHN GIBBS was born in Wayne County, Ky., April 2, 1823, and is a son of James and Mary Gibbs, both natives of Kentucky. The grandfather of our subject, John Gibbs, was a native of Ireland, who emigrated to America, where he married, lived and died, the parent of six children, James Gibbs was born in Wayne County, Ky., July 16, 1800, where he married Mary Helton, and in 1830 moved to Morgan County, Ind., where both closed their lives, the parents of thirteen children. John Gibbs moved with his parents to this State in 1830, and January 27, 1848, married Miss Sarah, daughter of Ralph and Rosina Cartwright and born in Washington County, Ind., April 27, 1825, a union which was followed by ten children James E., Joseph D., John F., Florence A., Alice C, Mary E., Martha J. (deceased), Kizzie B., Sarah A. and Andrew.    Mr. Gibbs is a highly respected citizen.

CHARLES M. GRAVIS is the eldest son and third child born to Sebastian and Minerva (Barker) Gravis, natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively, and married in Williamsburg, Ohio, in 1839. In 1863, they removed to Indianapolis, where the father at present resides. The mother died in July, 1849. Charles M. Gravis was reared and educated in Ohio. When seventeen years of age, he enlisted in Company B, Eighty ninth Ohio "Volunteers, under Capt. William A. Townsend. He served for three years, during which time he participated in the battles at Hoover's Gap and Chickamauga. At the latter, he was captured, and put in the prison on Belle Island, but was soon after transferred to " Libby," where he remained for about two years. From there he was sent to Danville, "Va., and incarcerated for five months, when he was transferred to Andersonville. He remained there for seven months when he was paroled, and soon after exchanged, immediately returning to his company. He participated in the battle at Bentonville and a number of skirmishes. At the close of the war, he returned to Clermont County, Ohio, soon after coming to Indiana, where he learned the brickmason trade with his father. He afterward studied medicine with Dr. D. Wiley, for three years. In March, 1871, he graduated at the Indiana Medical College, at Indianapolis. In September, 1870, he was married to Sarah C. Smock, a native of Indiana. They had six children Walter, Charles, William, Ursula, all of whom are dead; Gracie B.. and Frederick L. are living. In 1871, he began the practice of his profession in Southport, Ind., and from there, eighteen months later, removed to Indianapolis. He there entered into practice, and in the drug business, which he continued for three years,
returning thence to Southport, where he remained until September, 1880. He was hi partnership with Dr.. George Spees, in Glenn's Valley, where he remained eighteen months, when he came to Martinsville, where he is at present engaged in the practice of his profession. He has filled all the chairs in the L O. O. F., Southport Lodge, No. 394, and of the Grand Lodge. He is also a member of the G. A. R., and is a Republican. Himself and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

SAMUEL S. GRIFFITT, dealer in groceries and queensware, is carrying a stock of $3,000, with about $15,000 annual sales. The father of our subject, Reuben Griffitt, was born in Tennessee in 1797; there married, in 1824, to Miss Lovina Shell, and in 1834 removed to this county, and farmed near Morgantown, where he died November, 1871. Samuel S. Griffitt was born in this county February 13, 1836; reared on a farm; taught school some time; engaged in merchandising at Morgantown from 1856 to 1859; then served as Deputy County Clerk one term, and in the Auditor's office for several years. February, 1863, he married Miss Rebecca M. Drumheller, which union gave issue to two children, Mary and Neddie. After 1871, Mr. Griffith engaged in the hardware trade for five years, and served one year as Superintendent. In 1881, he engaged in his present business, in which he has been uncommonly successful. Mr. Griffitt is in politics a Republican.

HON. GEORGE W. GRUBBS, attorney, Martinsville, was born in Franklin, Johnson County, Ind., September 26,1842. He was the second son of Richard L. and Louisa (Armstrong) Grubbs. His ancestors came from Pennsylvania. His Grandfather Armstrong was a soldier in the war of 1812. The subject of this sketch graduated from Franklin County in 1861, and at once enlisted in Company I, Seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry. From this time until the spring of 1866, he was on active duty, and for meritorious conduct he rose successively from private to Lieutenant, Brevet Captain, and in the summer of 1864 was commissioned Major of the Forty second Regiment Colored Infantry, General of the First Brigade, Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps. He was in all the important engagements in which his regiment participated, and while commanding the Forty-second Regiment was engaged in the Nashville campaign. From the close of the war until he was mustered out of service, he was stationed as commander at Decatur, Ala. Immediately upon his return from the field, he entered the law office of Porter, Harrison & Fishback, at Indianapolis, and began the study of the profession. He was admitted to the bar in 1868, and removed to Martinsville the same year. In 1876, he was elected by the Republicans of his district to the Legislature, and served with ability, being honored with the chairmanship of Judiciary Committee. He was elected to the State Senate in 1878, and was appointed a member of the same committee. As an attorney, the reputation of Mr. Grubbs is high. He was a delegate to the National Convention, which nominated (Gen.. Grant for the Presidency in 1868, and the later one which nominated R. B. Hayes in 1876. He was also a member of the Electoral College in 1872, and assisted in the re-election of Gen. Grant. He has also been a constant attendant of the Republican State, district and county conventions.

SAMUEL M. GUTHRIDGE is the second child in a family of ten, and was born on August 30, 1854, in Green Township, Morgan Co., Ind. His parents, Lemuel and Elizabeth (Feeters) Guthridge, natives of Ohio and Indiana respectively, shortly after marriage located on a farm in Green Township, Morgan County, where they remained until 1865. They removed thence to Cope, Green Township, where the father engaged in the mercantile business, and continued there for three years, when he was elected County Treasurer on the Democratic ticket. He served for two years, and then formed a partnership with J. A. Lewis in the general merchandise business, which firm at present is doing a lucrative trade. Samuel M. Guthridge was reared and educated in his native township. In 1872, he entered the Martinsville High School, which he attended for two years; during the winters of 1872-73-74, he taught school in Green Township. In February, 1875, he entered the Northern Indiana Normal at Valparaiso, remaining until August, when he returned to his home and went to work on his father's farm. In 1878, he removed with his parents to Martinsville and took a position under his father as Deputy County Treasurer. January 1, 1879, he formed a partnership with W. H. Miller in the hardware and implement business, under the firm name of Miller & Guthridge. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Martinsville Lodge, No. 74, and of the I. O. O. F., Martinsville Lodge, No. 274. He is also a member of the K. of P., Anniversary Lodge, No. 89, and politically he is a Democrat. He was married on December 25, 1879, to Alice Egbert, daughter of G. W. Egbert, of Morgan County. They have had three children, Bernice, George E. (deceased) and Nellie.

WILEY S. HALTON, Sheriff of Morgan County, is a native of Owen County, Ind., and was born April 28, 1843; he was reared in the county of his birth, where, April 15,. 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Fourteenth Indiana (three months') Volunteers, after which service he re-enlisted, in October of the same year, in Company A, Fifty ninth Indiana Volunteers, and served in the following engagements: New Madrid, Corinth, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, siege of Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge and Sherman's campaign through Georgia and to Washington. After his discharge on July 25, 1865, he resumed farming in Owen County, at which he continued three years, when he removed to this county and farmed until 1882, except four years passed at Eminence and Louisville, in this county. December 7, 1867, he married Catherine Munday, with the result of five children Minnie, Alpha, Daisy, Ethel and Clarence (twins). In 1882, Mr. Halton was elected Sheriff by the Republicans. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and also of the G. A. R. He owns a half interest in a store and has other property in Louisville.

E. R. HAMILTON was born in Vermont, on September 15, 1843. He is the youngest of nine children. His parents, James and Sarah (Plumley) Hamilton, natives of Scotland and Vermont respectively, were married in Vermont, and located in Brattleboro, removing thence to Randolph, Vt., where they remained for some time. In 1849, they went to Lowel], Mass., where the father died in 1854. The mother at present resides in Martinsville, eighty two years of age. E. R. Hamilton was reared in Massachusetts and Vermont until nineteen years of age. In 1861, he went to Iowa, remaining for a short time, and then went to Tennessee, where he clerked for six months. He then went to Memphis, and kept books for the Elmwood Cemetery for one year. Returning to Vermont, he took a course at "Eastman Business College," and graduated in the fall of 1863. He then returned to Memphis, and took a clerkship under Gen. Ornee (Special Agent of the United States Treasury Department), and he remained until 1865, going thence to Vermont and then to Columbus, Ind., where he kept books for J. H. Philbrooks, a dry goods merchant. Two years later they formed a partnership, and in 1872 Mr. Hamilton purchased his partner's interest, and carried it on by himself for three years. He then came to Martinsville, and went into the "walnut lumber" business, in which he is now engaged. In June, 1864, he was married to Cora L. Plumley, of Albany, Vt They had one child which died when young. His wife dying, he next married, in 1876, Mary A. McEwen. They have two children, Mary A. and Samuel.    Mr. Hamilton is a stanch Republican.

JOHN T. HAMMANS was born in Morgan County, Ind., December 31, 1830, and is a son of Pryor and Matilda (Burk) Hammans, both of whom came to this county in the early days, married and passed the larger portion of their lives; Mr. Hammans died in 1866, but Mrs. Hammans is yet living in this county. Their children were by name Joshua, "William, Harvey, Andrew, Mahala, Mary, George, Martin, Elijah, Adeline, Hester, Elizabeth, Rhoda, Nancy, Martha and John T. Our subject married in this county, August 16, 1857, Delilah, daughter of Ivan and Irena Voyles, with an issue of eleven children, Catherine, James, Irena, Robert, Mary, John. Maria, Sarah, Clarissa, Burley and Margaret. In August, 1862, Mr. Hammans enlisted in Company H, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, and served until September, 1864, on July 23 of which year, at Atlanta, he was wounded by a gunshot passing through his cheek and cutting his tongue. Mr. Hammans is an honored citizen, and- he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

A. S. HART is the ninth child in the family of A. B. and Sarah A. (Chipps) Hart, both natives of Sussex County, N. J., where they married, and in 1840 moved to Morgan County, Ind., and made there a home. Their family was made up as follows: Mercy, Margaret, Amos S., Mary, Aaron R., Mahala, John W., Elizabeth and Emma. A. S. Hart, our subject, was born in Morgan County December 12, 1845. November 24, 1870, he married Miss Emeline, a daughter of Maxville and Sarah Shireman, and a native of this county, born July 10, 1848. This union was endeared by the following family: Harry M. (deceased), Ora A., Maggie M., Laura A. and Adie. Mr. Hart is a highly esteemed gentleman, a member of the order of Odd Fellows, and likewise of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

J. H. HART, eldest son and eighth child of Henry and Catharine (Bricker) Hart, natives of Pennsylvania, was born in Franklin County February 14, 1852. His father was a blacksmith, which trade he followed in Mercersburg, Franklin County, from the time of his marriage until the fall of 1852, when he removed to Salem, Owen County, Ind. Remaining two years, he went to Quincy, Owen County, where he died in December, 1880. J. H. Hart was reared in Quincy, Owen County, where he received his education. When thirteen years of age, he began working with the farmers in the neighborhood; continued for three years, and then came to Martinsville; he was employed in a drug store here until 1874, when he went to Indianapolis; returning in a short time, he formed a partnership in the drug business with James P. Baldwin. Continuing for two years in this, he sold out, and for several months acted as Deputy Clerk to Willis Record. In February, 1876, he was married to Arra Lindley, daughter of Robert and Cynthia Lindley, of Monrovia, He is the father of two children, Lillian E. and Beryl.    In the fall of 1876, Mr. Hart opened a drug store in Monrovia, removing his stock two years later for Martinsville, where he is at present doing a lucrative business.

CLARKSON C. HARVEY was born in Brown Township, Morgan County, Ind., October 12,1852. His parents, Robert and Sarah (Hadley) Harvey, were natives of Ohio and North Carolina respectively, and of Scotch-Irish extraction. They are Quakers, and in 1833 settled in Brown Township on a farm of 200 acres, where they have since resided. Clarkson C. Harvey is the seventh son and ninth child in a family of twelve children, and being raised on the farm, received a very ordinary education in the district schools of his native township, remaining at home until in his twenty first year, when he went into the employ of a grocery merchant in the town of Mooresville. About seven months later, he went to Illinois, and worked for some time at farming in Ford County. In September, 1874, he removed to Martinsville, where he opened a restaurant, and at present enjoys a lucrative business. Mr. Harvey is identified with the Republican party. He was married, January 14,1877, to Annis H. Gregory, a daughter of M. W. and O. D. Gregory, pioneers of Morgan County. He is a member of the Methodist Church in good standing. His wife has been attentive to her duties as a member of the Christian Church. They have two children, Harlon and Olivia.
CHARLES HASTINGS is a native of Franklin County, Ind., was born September 2, 1820, and is a son of Job and Keziah Hastings. Job Hastings was born near Pittsburgh, Penn., where he married; afterward removed to Franklin County, Ind., and thence, in 1835, to Morgan County, where he ended his life. His family was as follows: Matilda, Mary, Reese, Sarah, Charles, Kelly, Hannah C, Rebecca, Eliza J. and Martha A, The grandfather of our subject, Isaac Hastings, was a native of England who settled near Pittsburgh, Penn., but died in Franklin County, Ind., the father of nine children. Charles Hastings married, January 1, 1850, Susanna, daughter of John and Sarah Rudicel, and soon afterward located at his present home, which comprises a farm of 475 acres of fruitful and improved land. He is a genial gentleman and respected citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Hastings have been parents of four children Louisa L, Mary A. (deceased), Evangeline and William C.

AUSTIN HATLEY was born in Chatham County, N. O., September 15, 1822, and is the eldest of the family of William and Martha (Bowers) Hatley, natives respectively of North and South Carolina, who moved to this State and county in 1832, where they closed their lives  he in 1847, and she eight years later. They were parents of ten children Harriet, Jacob, William, James, Leroy, Minerva, Eliza, Polly, Elizabeth A. and Austin. Our subject has remained in this county since brought hither by his parents. December 19, 1850, he married Catherine, daughter of Harvey and Susan Williams. In 1869, Mr. Hatley located on his present farm, previous to which, in 1868, his wife died, and afterward he married Sarah Wilson, who died in 1872, whereupon, in 1873, he married Frankie E. Martin. Mr. Hatley has been the parent of fifteen children in all William H, Martha A. (deceased), Henry J., Elizabeth J., George W., Thomas M. (deceased), Lafayette and three unnamed, by his first; Sarah C. (deceased) aDd Harriet M. (deceased), by his second, and Mary A., Richard P. (deceased) and Nancy E., by his third wife.

LEROY S. HATLEY, fifth son and sixth child of William and Martha (Giles) Hatley, natives of North Carolina, and of Scotch and English extraction, was born April 7, 1837, in Washington Township, Morgan County, Ind. His parents came to Indiana from North Carolina, where they were married, and located in Morgan County, where the father died July 3, 1847. The mother died April 15, 1855. The father entered a farm of 220 acres, which he farmed during the last few years of his life. Leroy S. Hatley, when nineteen years of age, went into the employ of J. M. & S. M. Mitchell, worked on their farm for three years, and afterward worked for P. M. Parks until April, 1861. He then enlisted in the three months' service, in Company K, Seventh Indiana Infantry, under Capt. Jeff K. Scott. He participated in the battles at Philippi, Bealington, Laurel Hill and Carrick' s Ford, and at the expiration of this term of service he returned to his home. On July 7, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. A. D. Cunning, and participated in the following engagements: Bussellville, Besaca, Marietta and Atlanta. He marched with Sherman to the sea, and took an active part at Bentonville, and then on with Sherman to Washington. After the battle at Atlanta, he was promoted to Second Lieutenant, which position he filled until June 8, 1865, when he received an honorable discharge at Washington. After the war closed, he returned home, and for two years farmed, removing then to Illinois, where for two years he was again engaged in agricultural pursuits, after which he returned to Morgan County, locating in Martinsville shortly afterward. He owns 129 acres of excellent farm land in the county, the cultivation of which he superintends. He was for two years Assessor of Washington Township, also served the same length of time as Township Trustee. He was Deputy Sheriff for one year, and for some time City Marshal. March 20, 1872, he married Kate Watkins, daughter of John A. Watkins, a pioneer of Morgan County. Mr. Hatley is a member of the K. of P., Anniversary Lodge, No. 89, an active Republican, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. They have had three children Oscar (deceased), Bessie and Maudie.

EBENEZER HENDERSON (ex-Auditor of State) was born in this county June 2, 1833. His duties called him to Indianapolis quite often, and he resided there from January, 1875, until 1879. His parents, James C. and Mary (Piercy) Henderson, natives of Shelby County, Ky., were married in July, 1831. They came to Morgan County the following fall, and the father entered eighty acres of land five miles south of Martinsville. He built a cabin, and began to clear the wilderness. At his death, January 8, 1867, he owned 360 acres of land. The mother died in Martinsville, October 25, 1879. Ebenezer Henderson was educated in Morgan County in the three months' winter schools. At the age of twenty, he entered the State University at Bloomington, where he remained for two years. On returning home, he took charge of his father's farm and traded in stock, fast accumulating money. He was married, in 1856, to Ann C. Hunt, daughter of a neighboring farmer, soon after which he was appointed Deputy County Treasurer, in which office he served for four years. In 1860, he received the nomination, on the Democratic ticket, for County Treasurer. In 1868, he was nominated for State Senator for the counties of Morgan and Johnson, was elected, and served four years. On retiring from this office, he gave his attention to his extensive farm, and the erection of a large pork packing house in Martinsville, which was run under the firm name of Henderson, Parks & Co. until 1880, and now under the firm name of Harrison, Parks & Co. In 1874, he was elected Auditor of State, and was re-elected one year later, serving for three years. He was chosen by the Democratic party in their State Convention a member of the State Central Committee for the Indianapolis District, which position he occupied for two years. At present, he resides in Martinsville, in the full vigor and prime of his manhood. He is the father of six children Fannie, Ella, Maggie June, William, Howard and Court.

CORNELIUS HILL, a native of Indiana, was born August 23, 1836, in Richmond, Wayne County. His parents, Thomas and Elizabeth (White) Hill, native of Indiana and North Carolina respectively, were married in Indiana in 1833, and locating in Richmond, the father followed the carpenter's trade. In 1838, they removed to Grant County, to a farm, where in August, 1843, the father's death occurred. The mother died in April, 1865. Cornelius was the eldest son and second child, and was reared in Grant County until eight years of age; then with his mother he went to Washington County. Shortly after, they removed to Orange County, where he obtained a good education. When seventeen years of age, he began working on a farm, which he continued until the fall of 1856, when he came to Morgan County and farmed near Mooresville for some time. In 1859, he went into the confectionery business, and about one year later, he went to Kentucky, farmed for some time, returning thence to Indianapolis. In 1862, he enlisted in Company B, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, under Samuel Harriman, and served for nearly three years, acting as Corporal. He took part in the battles at Resaca, Atlanta, Peach Tree Creek, Averysboro, Cassville, Kenesaw Mountain and Bentonville. After the close of the war, he located in Martin County, Ind., as stationary engineer. In March, 1869, he was married to Letha A. Greeson, of Morgan County. They have one child Mabel Pearl. In 1874, he went into the confectionery business again. IQ November of 18t9, he sold a half interest and added a stock of groceries. In August of the next year, he went to Wabash and opened a bakery and confectionery, which he continued to run for one year, when he came back to Martinsville, where he is at present engaged in a lucrative business. Mr. Hill is a member of the A. F. & A. M. and of the G. A. R., and is politically a Republican. His wife is an active member of the Methodist Church.

JARVIS J. HILTON, a native of Indiana, was born September 21, 1855, in Morgantown, Morgan County. He was the second son and fourth child of Emsley C. and Sarah A. (Jones) Hilton, natives of Indiana and Kentucky respectively. His parents were married in Johnson County, Ind., where they remained for some time, removing thence to Morgan County, where his father followed cabinet making and carpentering until his death, which occurred October 5,1877. The mother at present resides in Morgantown. In April, »1869, Jarvis J. Hilton was employed as clerk in a general merchandise store, where he remained for three years. He then went into the employ of the National Publishing Company for a short time, after which he was in Franklin, Ind., for some time. Returning to Morgantown, he clerked for Samuel Rozengarten, a merchant in that place, until in the fall of 1877; afterward for another merchant in the town until December, 1878. Meanwhile he had been reading law, and in November, 1877, was admitted to the bar in Morgan County. He is at present extensively engaged in the practice of law and pension business in Martinsville. In 1881, he was appointed Deputy  Prosecuting Attorney and served creditably for about two years. In April, 1871, he was married to Ida M. Skinner, daughter of George W. Skinner, a pioneer of Morgan County. By this union there was one child Fred H., November 19, 1879. His wife dying, he was next married, May 6, 1880, to Flora B. Pervis, daughter of George C. Pervis, a citizen of Johnson County. Mr. Hilton is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is at present Prelate of the K. of P., Anniversary Lodge, No. 89.

D. L. HINE was born in Lincoln County, N. C, May 26, 1829, and is the youngest child of Philip and Mary M. (Shufford) Hine, the former born in Germany in 1774, the latter in Lincoln County, N. C, in 1784 Philip Hine emigrated to America in 1795, and located in Lincoln County, N. C, where he married in 1803. In 1836, they moved to Morgan County, Ind., where they ended their days, he in 1856, she in 1844. Their family comprised eleven children Elizabeth, George J., Barbara, Daniel S., Henry, Anna, Philip J., Clara, John W., Sarah and David L. Our subject married in this county, July 6, 1856, Miss Sarah, daughter of Cutter and Elizabeth Salmon, and born in Morris County, N. J., July 21, 1824; she died December 25, 1876, having borne one child Flora B. February 19, 1879, Mr. Hine married Miss Jennie, daughter of "William and Cynthia Clark, and born in Appanoose County, Iowa, November 11, 1856. The result of this union was two children Gentry S. and Edna M.

HIRAM J. HINSON was born in Mooresville, Morgan County, December 31, 1850. His parents, William H. and Mary (Butner) Hinson, natives of North Carolina, were married in Morgan County, and located in Mooresville, where the father has farmed, and they at present reside. Hiram J. Hinson is the fourth son and child of a family of nine children. He was reared and educated in his native town. When sixteen years of age, he began working on a farm in the neighborhood and continued to farm for five years. In 1861, he began learning the cabinet making with his uncle in Mooresville. Remaining with him for two and a half years, he came to Martinsville. Here he entered the employ of Lewis & Co., and in 1873 he opened a shop of his own in Monrovia, Morgan County, and after one year in this, he returned to Martinsville. He then entered the employ of J. A. Lewis, a furniture dealer, with whom he remained for four years. On December 23, 1878, he became a partner of W. W. Kennedy in the same business, having bought his stock of Mr. Lewis. Three years later he purchased the other half interest, and has since carried on the business by himself, at present being one of Martinsville's most successful and enterprising merchants. He has a stock of furniture worth $4,000, and is also doing a superior class of undertaking. Mr. Hinson is a member of the A. F. & A. M., Martinsville Lodge, No. 74. Politically he is a Republican.

GEORGE HUBBARD, born in Columbus, Bartholomew Co., Ind., June 31, 1843, is the fifth of six sons born to John C. and Hannah (Brice) Hubbard, natives of Connecticut and Pennsylvania. In August, 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Ninety third Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. Charles Hubbard. He served for three years, and took part at Jackson, Miss., Vicksburg and the Mobile campaign. After the war, he resided in Edinburg until 1869, and then went to Columbus, Ind., where he remained four years in the general merchandise business.     In 1873, he went into the lumber business and ran a saw mill in Bartholomew County for three years, when he again went into the general merchandise business in Columbus. In the fall of 1878, he removed to Seymour, Ind.; went into the saw mill business again, afterward going to Bartholomew County and engaging in the same business for a short time In 1880, he was appointed Deputy Sheriff in that county, serving for two years, when he came to Martinsville, where, becoming a partner in the saw and planning mills, he manufactures doors and sashes and builders' and general merchandise. September 11, 1882, he was married to Hannah B. Stevens, daughter of John and Mary Stevens, citizens of Ohio. Mr. Hubbard is a member of the K. of P., and in politics is a stanch Republican. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

D. R. KENNEDY, M. D., was born in Morgan County February 19, 1845, and is the son of Luke C. and Jane (Blockford) Kennedy, who were born and married in Kentucky, but were early settlers of Jefferson Township, this county, where the father still resides. The mother died in 1854, leaving seven children, of whom D. P. is the youngest. The early days of Dr. Kennedy were passed on the home farm and attending the district school. At the age of seventeen, he enlisted in Company H, Seventieth Indiana Infantry, in August, 1862, and served three years, taking part as private and non-commissioned officer in the fights at Buzzard Roost, Resaca, Golgotha Church and Peach Tree Creek; he was 104 days under lire in the Atlanta campaign, and went through with Sherman to the sea; he saw the surrender of Johnston and was in the grand review at Washington. At Golgotha, he was shot through the nose and mouth; his muster out took place in June, 1865. On his return, he farmed in Jefferson Township one year; then attended and taught school two years; then commenced the study of medicine at Paragon with Dr. John Kennedy, with whom he remained nearly three years. He graduated from the Cincinnati Eclectic Medical College in 1870, returned to Paragon, and for seven years was in practice in partnership with his brother. In March, 1877, he came to Martinsville, where he has ever since enjoyed an extensive and lucrative patronage. He is a member of the State Eclectic Medical Society, of the G. A. R, and K. of P., and in politics is a Republican. In 1871, he married Miss M. Olive Chambers, who has borne him two children Alexander R. and Park W. Mrs. Kennedy is a native of Hendricks County, Ind., and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

THOMAS A. KENNEDY is the sixth son and tenth child of John and Mary K. (Alexander) Kennedy, natives of Virginia, and of Scotch Irish descent. He was born, October 18, 1843, in Georgetown, Brown Co., Ind. His parents were married in or near Greenville, Tenn., about 1825, where they lived for seven years, removing thence to Indiana. They located in Johnson County, and in 1838, moved to Brown County. Locating in Georgetown, his father followed merchandising for several years, and afterward engaged in farming, which he followed until his death in 1864; his mother is still living in Brown County at the age of seventy eight. Thomas, when eighteen years of age, enlisted in Company C, Twenty second Indiana Volunteers, under Col. Jeff C. Davis. He served for four years, and took part in the fights at Pea Ridge, Stone River and Mission Ridge, and in almost every encounter from the last named battle to Peach Tree Creek, where he was made a prisoner of war, being placed in Andersonville Prison, and thence removed to Charleston, S. C; then to Florence, remaining a prisoner altogether about eight months, when he was discharged under a general order. He re-enlisted and took part in the Chattanooga campaign. He went to the relief of Burnside before Knoxville, and thence returned to Chattanooga. In June, 1865, he received an honorable discharge and returned to his home in Brown County, where, in January following, he was married to Sa-mantha Davis, of Virginia. They have seven children William D., Rosa, Clement R., Orrin and Odell (twins), Earl and Pearl (twins). After his marriage, he farmed in Brown County and then in Illinois for three, years, after which he removed to Johnson County and became agent for the Singer Sewing Machine Company. In February, 1878, he came to Martinsville, where he has since resided, representing the same company. Mr. Kennedy is a member of the K. of P., and with his wife is an active member of the Missionary Baptist Church. Politically he is a Democrat.

JAMES P. KENNEDY was born in Brown County, Ind., on May 3, 1846. His parents, John and Mary (Alexander) Kennedy, were natives of Virginia. James P. is the youngest of a family of seven children. He was reared and educated in Brown County. When he was nineteen years of age, he entered the employ of William Stafford, a farmer in Johnson County, where he remained for one year. He was then employed by George W. Ware, of Amity, to work in a saw mill and stave factory, with whom he remained for three years. He then began f arming in Johnson County and continued for eight years, after which, in 1879, he sold out and came to Martinsville. He was here employed by the Singer Sewing Machine Company. In February, 1882, he formed a partnership with A. P. Shields, and purchased the "Bed Cloud" saloon, where he is at present enjoying a lucrative trade. He was married on December 17, 1868, to Addie Mitchell, daughter of James A. Mitchell, a citizen of Johnson County. They have four children Willie E. Walter A., Maudie and Cecil C. Mr. and Mrs. Kennedy are identified with the Christian Church, and Mr. Kennedy is politically a Democrat.

DR. CHARLES A. KESSINGER was born February 8,1853, in Athens County, Ohio. He is the eldest child, and second son of Joseph L. and Mary (Jewett) Kessinger, natives of Ohio, who were married in their native place. The father was elected Sheriff of the county in 1852, and served for four years. In 1868, he was appointed Internal Revenue Collector, which office he filled for ten years. He served all through the war, and was commissioned Captain of the Fortieth Ohio for meritorious conduct. Charles A. Kessinger was reared in Athens County, where he received a good collegiate education in the Ohio University. In 1873, he began reading medicine with Dr. A. B. Frame, of Athens, and continued for three years, during which time he graduated at the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati in the spring of 1876. April 8,1876, he was appointed Superintendent of the Ohio Penitentiary Hospital, and served five years. In March, 1883, he came to Martinsville and entered the regular practice, and is at present so engaged. On September 19, 1883, he was married here to Julia D. Blackstone, daughter of Dr. D. B. Blackstone. Mr. Kessinger is a member of the A. F. & A. M, Parmacetia Lodge, Athens, Ohio. Politically he is a Republican. He is eminent as a practitioner and respected as a citizen.

LINDEN LAUGHLIN is a native of Owen County, Ind., was born May 9, 1832, and is directly descended from William and Nancy (Mackindley) Laughlin, natives respectively of Tennessee and Indiana, and of Irish extraction. They were parents of four children, namely: Mary J., John, Matilda and Linden. The subject of this sketch. Linden Laughlin, married, January 11, 1856, in this county, Miss Mary, daughter of William and Sarah Sraver, and a native of this county, born October 25, 1835. This union was endeared and cemented by the blessing of two children Francis M. and Margaret J., both of whom are deceased. Mr. Laughlin is a well known and much respected citizen.

FRANCIS C. LLOYD is the youngest son in a family of eight children, born to Owen and Sarah (Coleman) Lloyd, natives of Ireland and Ohio, respectively. He was born in Morgan County, Ind., September 10, 1852. His parents were married in Ohio and lived there until 1840, when they came to Indiana and located in Morgan County, on a farm of 320 acres, a part of which he entered, and where, in the full enjoyment of excellent health, they at present reside. Francis C. Lloyd was reared on the old home farm in Morgan County, where he obtained a good education in the district schools. In 1871, he went to Indianapolis and entered the wholesale and retail meat business, where he remained for two years. He then went to Morgan County and commenced farming there. In 1877, he went into the meat business in Morgan-town, Morgan County; removing thence to Martinsville, he opened a meat market and after two years in this was elected Deputy Sheriff. In April, 1883, he entered the grocery business and is at present carrying on quite a successful business, one door north of the post office. In October, 1871, he was married in Paris, 111., to Miss Margaret Norman, a daughter of Hiram and Annie Norman, old and respected citizens of Morgan County. By This union there were six children Ira, Bertha, Edna, Edgar (deceased) Efiie and Harry. Mr. Lloyd and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Martinsville Lodge, No. 274, and is a Republican.

CHARLES  LONG is a native of Morgan County, Ind., and was born July 24, 1829, his parents being Samuel and Nancy (Smith) Long, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, and who at a very early time emigrated to this county, where they lived until overtaken by death. Samuel Long was twice married, and was the father of twelve children James R., Charles, Alexander, Minerva, William, Elijah, Lizah, Erastus, Eraspus and three others. Charles, having remained in the county of his birth, married, November, 1849, Elizabeth Asher. They had a family of fourteen children Minerva, Nancy, Alice, George (deceased). Martha (deceased), Charles, William, Alexander, Cosey, Julia, Edwin, and three who died in infancy. Mr. Long is a pleasant gentleman and a greatly respected citizen.

HARVEY McDANIEL is a native of Pulaski County, Ky., was born August 29, 1825, and is the fifth of the family of Spencer and Martha McDaniel, natives of Virginia and Tennessee respectively. The grandfather of our subject was also a native of Virginia, where he married, and in the early time emigrated to Pulaski County, Ky., there continuing to reside until his decease. His family consisted of Polly, William, Elizabeth, John and Spencer. Spencer McDaniel was born in 1782, and in Kentucky married Martha Derosset, with whom" in 1834, he moved to Monroe, and the following year to Morgan County, Ind., where he "closed his life January 21, 1871. He had been a soldier in the war of 1812, and the parent of  eight children Mary, Hardin, Elizabeth, Channa, Samantha, Julia, Clarinda and Harvey. Harvey McDaniel, January 10, 1850, married Rebecca A. Darrell, who died May 25, 1853. He next married, March 24, 1880, Martha Owens, widow of Jacob Owens. Mr. McDaniel is the father of two children Elizabeth (deceased) and Martha E. (now Mrs. Beattie, residing in Wisconsin).

JAMES M. McGOWEN is a native of this county, was born January 3, 1840, and is one of the seven children of John and Malinda (Thomas) McGowen, natives respectively of Tennessee and Kentucky. They were married in Kentucky, whence at an early day they moved to this county, and lived the remainder of their days, having been parents of seven children Polly A., Andrew J., Thomas, Greenberry, Sarah, Elizabeth and James M. In August, 1862, our subject enlisted in Company H, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, in which he served until discharged, November, 1864. March 15, 1865, in Monroe County, Ind., he married Nancy A., daughter of John and Adaline Martin, from which union resulted seven children John, Rebecca J., Mary E., Nancy A., James M. (deceased), Nora A. and William J. After marriage, Mr. McGowen settled here, but four years later purchased a farm in Monroe County, to which he removed, and where he remained until 1873, at which period he purchased and occupied his present home and farm, embracing 490 acres of valuable land.    Mr. McGowen is much regarded by his neighbors.

WILLIAM MABEE, Township Trustee, is a native of Sussex County, N. J.; was born March 8, 1822; was reared in his native county, and there married November 2, 1849, to Miss Catherine Peters. In 1854, be emigrated to this State, located in this county, and engaged at carpentering in this town until 1865, when he purchased ninety acres three miles from town, and combined farming labor with his trade. In April, 1882, he was elected School Trustee, which office he now fills. Mr. Mabee is a Democrat. He enlisted as a volunteer for the Mexican war, took active part at Contreras and Churubusco, and in the latter battle was wounded. Mr. and Mrs. Mabee are the parents of five children, which are thus named: Jacob, Abraham, Elizabeth (Mrs. Thomas), Katie J. (Mrs. Bergman), and Sarah H. (Mrs. Dyer).

SYLVANUS MAJOR is a native of Morgan County, Ind., born April 26,1849, and is the second child of Noah J. and Mary E. Major. Noah J. Major is a son of William A. Major, born August 14, 1823. In 1844, he wedded Hannah Hastings, and after her decease married, in 1846, Mary E. Rudicel, to which union were born five children Isabel, Sylvanus, Amanda (deceased), Mary E. (deceased), and Laura. She also died, and he thereafter married in 1875 Mrs. Margaret A. Piercy. Mr. Major is a very prominent citizen, having been three times elected to the Legislature and for thirty years a member of the Christian Church. Sylvanus Major, our subject, married, March 20, 1872, Mary E., daughter of Thompson and Mary J. Hendricks, and native of this county, born January 6, 1856, which union has produced five children William H, Zora I., Amanda J. (deceased), Otis H. and Mary J. Soon after his marriage, Mr. Major settled on his farm and present home of 224 acres of valuable land. He is a much respected gentleman.

HON. JAMES J. MAXWELL was born in Morgan County, Ind., February 27, 1839, and is the eldest of the family of John and Catherine Maxwell, natives of Ireland. The grandfather of our subject was a native of England, who emigrated to Ireland, and thence, in 1805, to America, where  he settled at  Germantown,  Columbia  County,  N. T.
 About 1813, he moved to Lebanon. Ohio, thence to Dearborn County, Ind., and finally, in 1842, to Morgan County, where death laid claim to him. He was by trade a weaver, and that was his life long business. His family comprised seven children Robert, James, William, Henry, Nancy, Ellen and John. John Maxwell was born in County Down, Ireland, July 24, 1805, and was married in Cincinnati, Ohio, 1837, to Catherine Graham, born in 1812. After marriage, Mr. Maxwell located near Lawrenceburg, Ind., and in 1838 moved to Morgan County, purchased land and settled in Washington Township, where he died February, 1872. His family was as follows: Susan (deceased), Jane (deceased), Susanna, John (deceased), Robert F., Catherine and James J. James J. Maxwell was educated in the district schools in part, but which education he completed at Cincinnati. February 14, 1866, in this county, he married Cynthia A., daughter of John and Lucy Hodges, and born January 18, 1848, a union which gave being to eight children Josie, Minnie (deceased), Otto (deceased), Franklin R., Howard, Nora (deceased), Mittie M. and Don. Mr. Maxwell was elected to the Legislature in 1874, a position which he filled with honor. He is a highly respected citizen and a member of the Christian Church.

JAMES H. MAXWELL is a native of Morgan County, Ind.; was born February 6, 1855, and is the only son of James and Eleanor Maxwell, natives of Dearborn County, Ind. The grandfather of our subject was a native of Ireland, who at an early day emigrated to America, and reached Dearborn County, whence, in 1840, he moved to Morgan County, where he died in 1849, aged seventy four years. James Maxwell, his son, was born in Dearborn County September 26, 1810, and there married to Eleanor Paden, with issue of the following children: Mary J. (deceased), Martha, Eliza A., Nancy E. (deceased), Prudence M., Nancy J. and James H. In 1839, he moved to Morgan County, and died October 30, 1865. Mrs.. Maxwell is still living. James H. Maxwell, since the death of his father, has had charge of the homestead farm. which he is managing in addition to forty acres of his own. He is a very excellent and intelligent young gentleman, yet unmarried and a member of the Christian Church.

WILLIAM H MILLER, hardware merchant, is a native of Shelby County, Ind., and was born December 10, 1840. He was reared in his native county, and there remained until 1873; he attended the high school at Shelbyville, took a commercial course in Bryant & Stratton's College, and afterward engaged in teaching. April 21, 1861, he enlisted for three months and afterward served almost three years in Company D, Thirty third Indiana Regiment; was later transferred to Company E, One Hundred and Thirty second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and took part in the following actions: Philippi, Laurel Hill, Cheat River, Wild Cat, Thompson Station, Peach Tree Creek and the Atlanta campaign. He was discharged September 7, 1864; returned to Shelby County; was elected County Surveyor in 1866, and re-elected in 1868. December 21, 1864<f he married Miss Marthena Toner, with a result of five children  Laura B., Albert L., Alice, Edgar and Mary B. At this time, Mr. Miller engaged in merchandising and dealing in grain, which he continued until 1873, when he removed to this town and purchased a hardware store. He represents himself in the firm of Miller & Co.; they also deal in agricultural implements, have some $10,000 invested, and do from $40,000 to $50,000 per year. Mr. Miller is a Mason and an Odd Fellow; and has, besides a good town residence, 160 acres in Jasper County, Illinois.

 SAMUEL M. MITCHELL was born in Charlston, Clarke County, Ind., July 7, 1814. His parents, Giles and Mary (Moore) Mitchell, were natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively, and were married in 1807 in Kentucky. Three years later they came to Indiana, and settled in Charleston, where there was but a fort and one block-house. He followed his trade as brick-layer until 1820, when he came to Bartholomew County and remained until 1833, removing thence to Martinsville, where he built the first court house, thus continuing at his trade until his death, which occurred July 5, 1865. The mother died August 3, 1828. Samuel M. Mitchell is the third son and fourth child in a family of six children. He was reared in Clarke County until six years of age; then removed to Bartholomew County, where he remained for twelve years. He then came to Martinsville, and entered the employ of his brother, a dealer in general merchandise. He remained with him one year; then went to Salem, Ind., where he attended school for one year. Thence he went to Madison, Ind., and afterward was appointed second clerk of the " Livingston," a steamboat between Cincinnati and New Orleans. He returned in one year, and going to Martinsville became partner of his brother in the general merchandise store, and continued in. that until 1867. He then sold his interest and formed a partnership with his son "William in the same business, and is at present so engaged, enjoying a lucrative business. In June, 1867, he opened a private loan and deposit bank in Martinsville, which is still flourishing. In 1840, he was married to Jane M. Dietz, daughter of David Dietz, a citizen of Columbus, Ind. By this union there were two children William, and Marian J. (deceased). His wife died in January, 1846, and in December, 1849, he married Mrs. Annie Eslinger, a daughter of Jeremiah Sandy, a citizen of Gosport. By this union there were eight children, six of whom are living Catharine, Dr. Giles S. (now of Cincinnati), Mary E., Robert B. (at present the Cashier of Mitchell's Bank), India and Anna. Mr. Mitchell and wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is Republican.

JAMES V. MITCHELL, attorney at law, is a native of this county, born October 15, 1842, and was here reared. After attending the preliminary schools he became a student of and graduated from the State University at Bloomington in 1862, after which he began the study of law with Messrs. Barbour & Howland, and later formed a partnership with Alfred Ennis, but is now a member of the firm of Mitchell & Cox. In 1863, he married, in Monroe County, Ind., Miss Addie Draper,, daughter of Jesse Draper; she died November 7,1869, in San Jose, Cal., leaving two children May Pearl and Dick Draper. April 26, 1871, he wedded his second wife, Mrs. Sallie F. Lawson. Mr.. Mitchell was in early life a Douglas Democrat; during the war he voted with the Republicans, and after the great struggle he again joined the Democratic ranks. In 1868, he was elected to the Legislature from this county by the Republicans, and was the only member of that party who voted and fought against the fifteenth amendment. In 1871, he was elected by the Legislature Trustee of the Wabash & Erie Canal. Mr. Mitchell is a member of the Masonic fraternity.

JOHN S. NEWBY, attorney at law, of the firm of Adams & Newby, is a native of this county, of which he is also a citizen, and was born December 20, 1848. After attending the general schools of the county, the Mooresville High School and the State University at Bloomington, Ind., in which he took a four years' course and from which he graduated in the literary department as B. S. in 1873, and in the law department in 1874, in the autumn of which year he located in Martinsville for the practice of his profession, and in 1877 he made a partnership with Mr. Adams. January 21, 1880, he married in Martinsville Miss Mary Miller. Mr. Newby is a Republican, and takes deep interest in the success of that party. He is a member of the Masonic, also of the Phi Gramma Delta, college fraternity, and of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He has a farm of 120 acres in Section 28, Washington Township, one half mile north of Martinsville, and likewise a pleasant residence in the town.

WILLIAM NICHOLSON was born in Salem County, N. J., July 20, 1830. His parents, Isaac and Rebecca (Fogg) Nicholson, natives of Maryland and New Jersey respectively, were married in Philadelphia, and shortly afterward removed to Salem County, N. J., where the father carried on the manufacture of edged tools until a few years prior to his death in 1868. The mother died in 1873. William Nicholson is the third son and fourth child in family, and was reared in New Jersey, where he obtained a good education in the schools of his native town. When fifteen years of age, he came to Milton, Wayne County, Ind.., where he learned the blacksmith's trade with his brother John, with whom he remained for three years; returning thence to New Jersey, he followed his trade until 1866, when he began the study of dentistry with his brother George, and one year later purchased the business of his brother. The spring of 1869, he removed to Wilson County, Kansas., and practiced dentistry until in 1875. He then came to Indiana, and opened an office in Xenia, Miami County, where he remained only a short time. Removing to Plainfield, he engaged in his practice there, and in 1878, came to Morgan County and opened an office in Mooresville, where he lived until June, 1882, when he came to Martinsville and is at present here engaged very successfully. On March 4, 1852, he was married to Emily Sickler, of Salem, N. J. They had five children. William S., Albert A., Harriet E., Anna B. (deceased) and an infant. His wife died August 20, 1866, an active member of the Baptist Church. On May 15, 1868, he married to Sallie D. Price, daughter of Jacob and Mary Price, of Salem, N. J. They have had four children, Mary D. Harry, Fannie and Frank (deceased). Mr. Nicholson is a member of the K. of H., Mooresville Lodge, No. 997; in politics, he is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

JOHN NUTTER was born in Fayette County, Ky., August 29, 1817, and is a son of Hewitt and Susan Nutter, also natives of Fayette County, Ky. Hewitt Nutter, a son of Thomas Nutter, was born in 1785; married in Kentucky, Susan Talbott, removed to Warrick County, Ind., in 1823, and thence in 1828 to Morgan County. Mrs. Nutter died in 1837, after which Mr. Nutter married Catherine Wilson, and died February 26, 1846, the father of seventeen children thirteen by his first and four by his last wife. John Nutter came with his parents to this county, where he has since remained. August 26, 1841, he married Sarah Wilson, a native of Franklin County, and daughter of Joel Wilson, who emigrated to that county in 1811. This union was graced by three children Harriet A. (deceased), Albert H. and an infant unnamed. After his marriage, Mr. Nutter located on a farm at Indian Creek, and in 1842 purchased a boat and ferried over White River until 1849, when he purchased and occupied his present farm. He began life unaided, but now owns over 2,000 acres, being one of the most extensive farmers and stock dealers in the county.

CLEMENT H. NUTTER was born in Fayette County, Ky., December 7, 1820, and is descended from Hewitt and Susan (Talbott) Nutter, also natives of Fayette County, Ky., the former born in 1785, the latter in 1787. In 1823, they moved to Warrick County, Ind., and thence in 1828 to this county, where, in 1837, Mrs. Nutter died. Mr. Nutter died in 1846, having previously married Catherine Wilson. His family was as follows: Ellen, Rebecca, Sarah, John (deceased), Richard, Edwin, John, Cassandra, Clement H., Daniel G., David, William, Thomas, Mary A., Isaac W., Robert W., and an infant, deceased. Clement H. Nutter married in this county, November 13, 1846, Julia A., daughter of William H. and Julia Craig, and born in this county February 15, 1831; she died February 13, 1866, having borne a family of six, Sarah E., Mary A., Emma (deceased), Walter E., Hattie and William (deceased). Mr. Nutter is a greatly esteemed gentleman, and a consistent member of the Christian Church.

ALBERT H. NUTTER first saw the light of this world in Morgan County, Ind., on the 2d day of May and of the year 1854. He is a son of John and Sarah Nutter, and a young man of uncommon excellence and much promise. September 2, 1875, he married Miss Charlotte T., daughter of Thompson and Mary J. Hendricks, and a native of this county, having been born August 29, 1858. To this happy union have been born two children William C. and Edith E. Mr. Nutter is highly respected in his community, and resides on one of the farms belonging to his father, in Section 21.

HENRY H. OLDS, proprietor of the "Eureka House," was born in this county June 6, 1840, where he was reared and has made a home. George W. Olds, father of our subject, was born in Connecticut January 11, 1810. He came early to this county, where he married, June 6, 1834, Miss Eliza A. Wall, who died August 18, 1842, leaving two children William (deceased) and Henry H. He next married, August 10, 1843, Miss Louisa Rudicel, which union gave being to five children Harriet E., Francis A. (deceased), Charles W., Lina E. and Eliza Ann (deceased). Mr. Olds was a carpenter, and worked many years thereat. He built the first steam saw and grist mills in the town the former in 1848, the latter in 1858. In July, 1861, Henry H. Olds enlisted in Company K, Twenty first Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which regiment was assigned to the Fifteenth Army Corps, marching to Newport News, and thence to New Orleans. He was in many skirmishes, and was wounded in the battle of Baton Rouge, which wound was severe, shattering a bone and making him a cripple. He served three years, was promoted to a First Lieutenancy, and resigned on the death of his father. February 20, 1863, he married Sarah Koons, who died October 8, 1872, the mother of three children, Butler (deceased) William A. and Perry. He next married Mrs. Alice Raniez November 23, 1873, and that year he sold his farm interest, moved to Martinsville, worked at carpentering, and in 1880 became landlord of the "Eureka House." Mr. Olds is a Freemason, a member of the G. A. R. and a Republican, by which party he was elected, November, 1882, County Recorder.

WILLARD E. PARKS was born in Martinsville, November 7, 1855. He was the youngest of nine children born to Perminter M. Parks, a native of North Carolina.    He came to Indiana when  seven years of age, and in twenty two years was married and living in Martinsville with a family growing up around him.    He was quite a prominent man in Indiana; his death occurred on July 24, 1867, in his sixtieth year. The subject of this sketch was reared in Martinsville, and educated in the public schools. In 1873, he entered Wabash College at Crawfordsville, which he attended for one year. In 1875, he entered Washington and Lee University at Lexington, Ky., where- he stayed for one year. In 1874, he had attended the Christian University at Indianapolis one year. Shortly after he was through college, he began speculating, and is so engaged at present. On December 4, 1879, he was married to Miss Fannie Henderson, daughter of Ebenezer Henderson, oE Martinsville. They have two children Myra and Robin. Mr. Parks is a member of the K. of P. Anniversary Lodge, and also of the I. O. O. F., Martinsville Lodge, No. 274.    In politics he is Democratic.   

EATON W. PAXSON was born in Warren County, Ohio, January 13, 1854. His parents, William and Margaret (Shrack) Paxson, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania respectively, and of Scotch, Irish and German extraction, were married in Warren County, Ohio, in 1853. Thence three years later, they removed to Greene Township, Morgan Co., Ind., and located on a farm of 160 acres, to which the father added 122 acres before his death, which occurred June 26,1883. The mother is now living on the home farm, seventy two years of age. Eaton W. Paxson is the elder of two sons, and was reared in Green Township, Morgan County, where he received a good education. When twenty years of age, he began teaching school. His first two years he taught in Green Township. He then entered Yalparaiso Normal College, and three years later graduated. He is also a graduate of the commercial course there. After this time until June, 1881, he farmed and taught school. He was then elected County Superintendent on the Democratic ticket, and in 1883, having faithfully served his term of office, he was re-elected and at present is in discharge of the duties devolving upon him. Mr. Paxson is a member of the A. F. & A. M., of the I. O. O. F. and also of the Encampment. In September, 1875, he was united in marriage to Mary E. Koons, a native of Morgan County, and a daughter of James and Rebecca Koons, respected pioneers of Morgan County.

VAN B. PEARCY was born in Johnson County, Ind., September 15, 1843, and is one of the thirteen children of Henry and Lovina Pearcy, natives of Kentucky and Indiana respectively. The grandfather of our subject, Robert Pearcy, was a native of Kentucky, where he married. Subsequently he removed to Jennings County, Ind., where he died about 1852. He was twice married and reared a large family. Henry Pearcy was the eldest of his father's family. He was born July 24, 1815, and after coming, to Jennings County married Miss Lovina Whitsitt, then moved to Johnson County, and in the spring of 1847 to Morgan County, where he closed his life. His children were by names, Jacob, Robert, John, George, Van B., Mary, Martha, Charity, Harriet, William, Joseph, Nancy and Hiram T. Van B. Pearcy, our subject, married November 9, 1865, Miss Caroline, daughter of Charles and Louisa Hess, and a native of this county, born August 22, 1844. Shortly after marriage, Mr. Pearcy moved to Crawford County, 111., and remained until 1867, when he removed to this county, and located on a good farm of 139 acres, all well improved Mr. and Mrs. Pearcy have had seven children, George R. (deceased), Charles EL, John W., Wilford B., Annettie, Robert and an infant daughter (deceased).

FRANCIS P. A. PHELPS, attorney at law, was born in Jackson County, Ind., December 4, 1822.  His parents, George A. and Rebecca Phelps, removed to this county in 1824, shortly after its organization, and settled on what was subsequently the site of Brooklyn. In 1826, Mr. Phelps was elected Sheriff, the second person who held that office, and removed to Martinsville. In 1828, he was elected Clerk of the county, the second incumbent of that office, which position he held at his death, February 25, 1833, aged thirty six. He served as Drum Major of a Baltimore regiment in the war of 1812; his wife survived him until February 25, 1863, and, strangely true! died on the same day and month thirty years afterward. They were the parents of five children, two of whom are living and reside in Martinsville. Francis P. A. had but meager facilities for education in boyhood, yet later attended two sessions at the county seminary. At the age of twenty one, he served as Deputy Sheriff, with full management of the office. In 1846, he was elected Sheriff, re-elected in 1848, and on October 21 of that year married Miss Eleanor E. Tull; they have seven children, Zerilda, Tull, Allen H., Francis P. A., William C, Eleanor E. and Thursa R. After this time, Mr. Phelps engaged in the drug business at Martinsville for five years, during which he studied law, engaged in its practice in 1857, and in February, 1883, was appointed Prosecuting Attorney for this district. He was a Whig, is a Republican, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. He has a good residence in town, and 220 acres adjacent.

TULL PHELPS, eldest son and second child of F. P. A. Phelps, was born January 26, 1851, in Martinsville, where he was reared and educated. When nineteen years of age, he went into the employ of N. T. Cunningham, a general merchandise merchant of Martinsville, and remained with him for about one year. He then attended Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College at Indianapolis, where he took a course in book keeping. Returning to Martinsville, he began the study of law with his father, which he continued for some time, afterward being again employed by the same firm, in which he had formerly been as book keeper. In 1875, he took an interest in this business, and it was continued under the firm name of N. T. Cunningham & Co. for five years, when a third interest was purchased. The business has since then been conducted under the firm name of Cunningham, Bollinger & Phelps, and is in a flourishing condition. Mr. Phelps was married December 20, 1876, to Lina E. Olds, daughter of George Olds, a pioneer of Morgan County, the Rev. W. T. Furgeson performing the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. Phelps are identified with the Presbyterian Church, and Mr. Phelps is a prominent member of the Republican party.

JAMES PRATHER, SR., was born in Fleming County, Ky., August 4, 1806. and is the eldest of the family of Basil and Mary (George) Prather, natives respectively of Virginia and North Carolina, the former born in 1785, the latter in 1784. They were married in Kentucky, and remained there until 1817, when they moved to Jackson County, Ind., where Mrs. Prather died in 1839. Subsequently, Mr. Prather married a Mrs. Dobsou, and died in 1874, the father of six children, Susan, Margaret, Thomas, Elizabeth, Jane and James. February 6, 1824, in Jackson County, Ind., James Prather married Josephine Hagard, born January 1, 1808. In 1834, he moved to Morgan County, where Mrs. Prather died August 16, 1846, and March 5, 1847, he married Mrs. Almira Taylor, widow  of  Simeon  Taylor,  a native of  Plymouth County, Mass. Mr. Prather has been the parent of twelve children John, Martha, Mary, Judith, Basil, Thomas, James, William, Edward, Elizabeth and two that died in infancy.

JOHN PRATHER is a native of Morgan County, Ind., was born October 10, 1849, and is a son of James H. and Susan (Townsend) Prather, both natives of Indiana, the former born in 1817, the latter in 1815. They were married in Morgan County, where Mr. Prather died in 1879, and where Mrs. Prather now resides on the homestead. Their family consisted of William E., Hannah, Robert, Julia A. (deceased), John, George, Jennie, Amanda and Joseph. Our subject, John Prather, married, February 27, 1876, in this county, Mary E., daughter of Henry and JaDe Remer, and born February 10, 1856. The issue of this union was two children Emma J. and James M. Mr. Prather resides at Mahalasville, where he is proprietor of fifty acres of superior land. He is now engaged in the lumber business, and is a reputable citizen.

WILLIAM Y. PRATT was born in Henry County, Va., June 3, 1834 His parents, James A. and Leanna (Lake) Pratt, natives of Virginia, and of Irish and German descent respectively, were married in Henry County in 1832, where the father followed his trade as blacksmith until 1836, when he came to Indiana, and located in Morgan County. He worked at his trade a number of years and then began farming, which he continued until January, 1879, when he died. The mother died in March, 1850. William Pratt is the eldest child in a family of six children, and was reared in Jackson Township, Morgan County, where he obtained the rudiments of a good education. When twenty two years of age, he began learning the carpenter's trade with E. Hilton, and worked with him for four years. He then moved to Martinsville and formed a partnership with Alfred Carver, and carried on the carpentering business with him for three years. In 1876, he was elected Justice of the Peace of Washington Township for four years, at the expiration of which time he was re-elected, and at present is in the discharge of the duties of that office. In April, 1857, he was married in Johnson County, Ind., to Lydia C. Winchester, daughter of Jordon Winchester, a citizen of Johnson County. By this union there were four children Melinda J., George N., James (deceased), and Joe. Mr. Pratt is a member of the IL of P. Lodge, No. 89, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Church. In politics, he is a Republican.

JOHN F. RAY, Justice of the Peace, is a native of Wayne County, Ky., was born January 26; 1830, and is a son of James and Polly Ray, who in that year removed to Bloomington, Ind., and in 1831 to Washington Township. James Ray was a carpenter, and for many years labored as such, and died in March, 1875; Mrs. Polly Ray is still living. John F. Ray learned the trade of a carpenter under his father, and followed the same for a long time. He served as Deputy Clerk of this county from 1852 to 1856, in which year he went to Kentucky, and on May 29 married Miss Angeline Bogle. He remained there until 1863, when he came again to Martinsville. Mr. and Mrs. Ray are parents of five children, namely, James D., Delia V., Jennie, John B. and Eddie. In 1872, Mr. Ray was appointed Deputy Auditor, as which he served about two years. He is politically a Democrat, and was elected in 1880 a Justice of the Peace for a four years' term.

FELIX A. REINHART,  Justice of the Peace, is a native of Lincoln County, N. C.; was born August 17, 1815, and is a son of John C. and Elizabeth L. Reinhart. Felix was reared in that county, with the ordinary advantages for education, and there married, October 1,1835, Miss Mary Havner, after which he engaged in farming, and in 1838 emigrated to Morgan County, Ind., where he also engaged in farming, and continued the same since, except 1854-55, during which years he acted as hotel keeper. He is a member of the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows of Indiana. He is politically a Republican; was appointed to fill a vacancy as Justice of the Peace and was afterward elected to the position; he has also served as Deputy Sheriff of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Reinhart have had born to them a family of seven children, of which number four are yet living  Lewis A., John C, George W. and Felix A. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.

CAPT. FLETCHER D. RUNDELL, born January 5,1839, in Richland County, Ohio, is the fifth son and seventh child of Hiram R. and Mercy (Wyatt) Rundell, natives of New York, and of English and French descent. His parents were married in New York, whence they moved to a farm in Richland County, Ohio, and lived until 1842, when they came to Indiana. They entered eighty acres of land in Green Township, Morgan County, which they continued to improve for several years. In 1850, they removed to a farm near Morgantown, where, in November of the same year, the father's death occurred. The mother still lives in Morgan County. Capt. Rundell was reared at home until after his father's death, and he was then employed to help on a farm in the immediate neighborhood. He kept this situation until in 1860, when he began learning the carpenter's trade in Morgantown, continuing until 1861. He enlisted in April, 1861, in Company K, Seventh Indiana "Volunteers, under Capt. J. K. Scott, and on September 12 1861, he enlisted in the three years' service in Company G, Twenty seventh Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. J. R. Fessler. He served nearly four years, and took part in the following engagements: Philippi, Laurel Hill, Carrick's Ford, Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Atlanta, and a large number of smaller engagements. After the battle of Antietam, he was promoted to Second Lieutenant. April 5, 1863, he was promoted to First Lieutenant for meritorious conduct, and soon after to the rank of Captain. He received an honorable discharge November 4,1864, and returning to Morgantown was soon afterward married to America A. Holman, daughter of William P. Holman, of Morgan County. By this union there was one child, Chester Q. His wife died August 12,,1867. On June 17,1870, he married Mary A. Moran, daughter of John Moran, an old citizen of Martinsville. They have one child, Eunice May. In 1867, the Captain came to Martinsville, and has since resided there, engaged in carpentering. He is a Past Chancellor of the Knights of Pythias, and is politically a Republican; and he and wife are members of the Methodist Church.

ALFRED W. SCOTT is a native of Fayette County, Ind., having been born on the 8th of November, 1856. He was reared on a farm near Connersville, in this State, and attended the common schools of his county, an academy at Spiceland, and later the State University at Bloomington, from which he graduated, after a four years' course, in 1881. Previous to his collegiate course, he had studied law at Indianapolis. In 1881, he came to Martinsville and engaged in the practice of the legal profession. Recently, he formed a partnership with Mr. Phelps, and is now Deputy Prosecuting Attorney for this judicial district. In politics, he is an earnest and active Republican; he is also a member of the L O. O. F.

ISAAC D. SHEPPARD was born October 30, 1811, in Cumberland County, N. J. His parents, Harvey and Amelia (Davis) Sheppard, natives of New Jersey, came to Indiana in 1818, and located near Madison, removing thence, in 1834, to Martinsville, Morgan County, Ind., where, in 1852, the father died. The mother died in 1880, in Franklin, Ind. Isaac D. Sheppard is the eldest in a family of five children, and was reared on a farm near Madison, Ind. He received his education in the district schools in the neighborhood, and when fifteen years of age began to learn harness making in Madison. After five and a half years of service, he worked in various places until 1834, when he came to Martinsville. He here opened a harness shop, and at the present time is doing a successful business. Mr. Sheppard is a member of the Republican party. He was married, in September, 1836, to Thurza Toll, of Martinsville, and he and wife are identified with the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are active workers in its cause. By their union they have three children, William, James and Letitia.

JAMES S. SHEPPARD is the second son and child of Isaac D. and Thurza (Hess) Sheppard, natives of New Jersey and Kentucky respectively. He was born November 11, 1839, in Martinsville, Morgan County, Ind. James Sheppard was reared in Martinsville, where he obtained a good English education. When thirteen years of age, he entered his father's harness shop and began learning the trade, at which he worked until June 16, 1862, when he enlisted in Company C, Sixteenth Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. Paul J. Beachbard. He served more than three years, participating in the battles at Richmond, Kj., Arkansas Post, siege of Vicksburg (Red River campaign), Black River, Sabine Cross Roads, and some few others. After the close of the war, he returned to his home, where he resumed his trade, which, in 1875, he gave up, becoming a partner of N. T. Cunningham, of Martinsville, in the general merchandise business. He continued in the business for five years, when, his health failing, he sold his interest and retired from business for one year. In January, 1881, he became agent for pianos and organs in Martinsville, and at present is so engaged very successfully. On September 19, 1867, he was married to Lydia S. Meginnis, a daughter of the Rev. William Meginnis, one of the oldest Methodist ministers in the Indiana conference. By this union there are two children Harry A. and Lulie A. Mr. Sheppard is a member of the L O. O. F. Lodge, No. 274, and also of the G. A. R. Politically, he is a Republican.

JOHN SHEERER is a native of Morgan County, Ind., was born November 15, 1838, and is the son of Joseph and Phebe Sheerer, both natives of Ireland, who were brought to America when very young. They were married in Washington County, Md., April 30, 1837, and the same year moved to Morgan County, Ind., and settled near Martinsville, where Mr, Sheerer was killed by the limb of a tree falling upon him March 29, 1842. Mrs. Sheerer subsequently married a Mr. Thomas McClure, with whom she moved to Martinsville for a time, and then returned to her present abode; Mr. McClure died January 11, 1867. Mrs. McClure is the mother of eight children, two by her former husband, John, and Robert (deceased), and six by her latter husband, Nancy A. (deceased), Lida, Isabel W., Francis, Martha A. and Thomas. John Sheerer, our subject, was married in this county, May 17, 1872, to Maria J. Morbley, and afterward settled on the old homestead, which is still his home. This wife died October 15, 1872, and March 16, 1879. Mr. Sheerer wedded Sarah Stewart. Mr. and Mrs. Sheerer have no family, but have a good home of 180 acres of excellent land.

ABEL P. SHIELDS was born in Bartholomew County, Ind., October 8, 1842. His parents, Samuel and Elizabeth (Roberts) Shields, natives of North Corolina and Indiana respectively, were married in Indiana in 1838, and located on a farm near Columbus, Ind., where they lived until their deaths the mother's occurring in 1850, the father's in 1875. Abel P. is the second son and child in a family of five children, and was reared in Bartholomew County until twenty years of age, when he enlisted in Company D, Sixty seventh Indiana Volunteers, under Capt. Abbott. He served for two years, and took part at Munfordville (where he was captured, and soon after paroled, then discharged), Yazoo Swamps (near Vicksburg), Arkansas Post, "Vicksburg, the battle between Alexandria and Brashear City (where he with his regiment was captured; after remaining in prison for thirteen days he escaped, and finally reached his own line), Cross Roads, Plainfield and the entire Red River campaign. In July, 1864, he received an honorable discharge at Baton Rouge, La., and returned to his home, where he commenced work on his father's farm, remaining about two years. On February 25, 1865, he was married to Margaret Davis, daughter of Enoch Davis, a citizen of Brown County. They have one child Elizabeth Luella. After his marriage, he farmed for eight years, and then went to Edinburg, Ind., where he acted for two years as agent for the Singer Sewing Machine Company. He soon afterward came to Martinsville and acted in the same capacity until February, 1882, when he purchased the Red Cloud Saloon, which he is now running. He is a Democrat.

MAXVILLE SHIREMAN is a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Shufford) Shireman, and was born in Lincoln County, N. C, November 2, 1821. In 1835, his parents removed to Morgan County, Ind., where Maxville grew to manhood. March 6,1846, he married Miss Sarah, daughter of Archibald and Margaret Cramer. After his marriage, he settled on the farm which is now his home, and which he has improved to be a good property, embracing a territory of 317 acres of superior land. Mr. Shireman is an honorable and esteemed citizen, and the parent of thirteen children Emeline, Henry, Archibald, Mahala, Lewis, Andrew, James, Margaret, Robert, Edward, Dayton, Harry and one unnamed.

HENRY SHIREMAN, SR., is a native of Lincoln County, N. C, was born December 18, 1823, and is a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Shufford) Shireman, both natives of North Carolina the former born in 1783, the latter in 1789. They were married in Lincoln County, and in 1835 emigrated to Morgan County, Ind., where they made a local habitation. Mrs. Shireman died March 31, 1846, after which Mr. Shireman married Catherine Clodfelter, and died in Washington Township, the father of the following family: Polly, Anna, Barbara, Daniel, Elizabeth, Rhoda, Maxville, Catherine, Michael, Susan, John S. and Henry. Our subject, Henry Shireman, on the 13th of April, 1854, married Miss Maria, a daughter of Isaac and Lydia Deturk. After his marriage, Mr. Shireman purchased and located on the farm he yet holds. He is now owner of more than 500 acres of land, and is comfortably and independently situated. Mr. and Mrs. Shireman have been the parents of ten children  Mary E., Louisa A., "William A., Ellen A., Isaac (deceased), Charles E., Harriet C, Maxville, Flora B. and Eugene C.

HENRY SHIREMAN, JR., is a native of Morgan County, Ind.; was born November 13, 1849, and is one of the thirteen children born to Maxville and Sarah Shireman, of this county. October 28, 1874, he married Margaret, daughter of John and Martha Rothwell, and a native of this county, born December 3, 1856. In 1876, Mr. Shireman moved to the farm he now occupies. He is a very promising young man, greatly esteemed and liberally educated, having taught successfully six successive terms of school. Mr. and Mrs. Shireman are the parents of four children Frederick, Martha, Sarah and an infant son, which died before receiving a name. Mr. Shireman is a member of the order of Odd Fellows.

ABRAHAM SIMMS is a native of Surrey County, N. C, was born April 29, 1820, and was the third of the family of John and Frances Simms, both natives of North Carolina, the former born August 8, 1793, the latter May 18, 1784. They were married in Surrey County October 27, 1814; in 1832, moved to Shelby County, Ky., and, in 1833, to Hendricks County, Ind., and one year later to Morgan County, locating on the identical farm now occupied by the subject of this sketch, where they both closed their lives, he August 22, 1837, and she September 3, 1854. They reared a family of five Cyrus, Elizabeth, Matthew, Nimrod and Abraham. Abraham Simms came with his parents to this county in 1834, where he grew to manhood and married, March 29, 1843, Miss Ellen, daughter of Daniel and Sophia Graver, who died April 15, 1877, having been the mother of five children Sarah J, (deceased), Catherine, Sophia, Susanna and George W. Mr. Simms is sole owner of the homestead created by his father; he is a member of the Baptist Church, an excellent man and a respected citizen.

HENRY A. SMOCK, attorney at law, is a native of Marion County, Ind., was born October 11, 1847, and is a son of Abraham V. and Rebecca J. (Brenton) Smock, the former a native of Kentucky. Henry was reared in Iowa, whither his parents had removed, and where they afterward died. After working on a farm he learned the trade of a printer, at which he was employed in several large cities before coming, in 1870, to Martinsville, where he worked in the Republican office, then purchased a half interest therein, continued until 1874, when he sold said interest to considerable advantage after he had raised the paper to be a first class one. November 11, 1873, he married Miss Dora T. Barnard, and they have had born to them three children, Thomas B., Mary I. (deceased) and Antoinette. In 1875, Mr. Smock began the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1880, forming a partnership with Mr. Ferguson; they are doing a good practice. Mr. Smock also manages the real estate of the Northwestern Life Insurance Company. He is an active Republican, and has served as Secretary of the Central Committee of this county since 1880. Mr. Smock is a Knight of Pythias, and owner of a good farm five miles north of town.

THOMAS M. SOMERVILLE, a native of Indiana, was born in Ripley County March 30, 1841. His parents, Thomas W. and Sarah McCreery) Somerville, natives of Pennsylvania and Ireland respectively, were married in Versailles, Ripley County, and shortly afterward settled in Penasylvaniaburg, where the father farmed, and has since resided. He is sixty seven years of age. His wife is sixty four years old. Thomas M. is the eldest son and second child in a family of five. He was reared and educated in his native county.    When twenty years of
 age, he enlisted in Company D, Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, under Capt. J. C. McQuistine. "After his return from the war, he entered the employ of the L C. & L. R. B. Company as brakeman for three months, and was then promoted to conductor. He remained in this capacity until 1872, when he was put in charge of the yards of the same company at Indianapolis. After two years in this, he again took charge of a train as conductor. On February 14, 1881, he was appointed General Manager of the F. F. & M. R. R., which position he has since filled. He was married in Versailles, Ripley County, to Maggie Mathes, daughter of Andrew Mathes, a citizen of Dearborn County. By this union there are three children, Flora E , Melville D., Elmer W. Mr. Somerville is a member of the A., F. & A. M., Lawrenceburg Lodge, No. 21; of the I. O- R. M., Red Cloud Tribe, No. 18, at Indianapolis. Is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

JESSE R. STARKET, second son and third child in a family of nine children, was born August 12, 1849, in Madison County, 111. His parents, Joel W. and Jane C. (Hagerman) Starkey, natives of Illinois and Indiana respectively, were married in Illinois in 1844, and located on a farm in Madison County, where they lived until 1869. Removing thence to a farm in Logan County, they have since resided there. Jesse Starkey was reared and educated in his native county. When he was twenty years of age, he entered Lincoln University at Lincoln, 111., from which he graduated in 1874 after four years of hard study. During the winter following (1874-75), he was Principal of the schools at Broadwell, 111., and during the two succeeding winters taught select school in Boyle County, Ky. In the fall of 1876, he took the Principalship of the Martinsville Schools, where he at present resides. On December 21, 1876, he was married to Phibbie H. Caldwell, daughter of R. H. Caldwell, a resident of Boyle County, Ky. By this union there have been four children Lucy C. (deceased), Ella, Horace L. and Russell I. Mr. Starkey is a member of the I. O. O. F., Martinsville Lodge, No. 274, and in politics is a Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Starkey are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

E. F. STIMSON was born in Iredell County, N. C, December 13, 1829, and is the fifth of the eighteen children of Henry E. and Annie L. (Brandon) Stimson, natives of Halifax County; Va.., where they married and afterward moved to Iredell County, N. C. In 1845, they moved to Monroe County, Ind., and there remained till death. Their children were Robert T., Sarah J., Elizabeth, George, Erasmus F., Mary A., John W., Henry A., Lafayette, William, Louisa, Joseph, Wilbur, Edward, and others who died in infancy. E. F. Stimson moved with his parents to Monroe County, and in 1856 removed to Morgan County, where, June 10, 1860, he married Mercy A., daughter of Jacob and Mahala Vansickel, and a native of Morris County, N. J. To this union were born nine children Jacob, Harry, Louisa (deceased), Dayton C, Anson R., Mahala, Mary, Anson M (deceased), and Evalina. In 1861, Mr. Stimson enlisted in Company G, Twenty seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served until September, 1864. After his discharge, he moved to his present place and engaged in farming. Mr. and Mrs. Stimson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

AUSTIN SWEET is a native of Fleming County, Ky., was born August 16, 1831, and is the youngest of the three children of Benjamin and Harriet (Mills)  Sweet, natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia. Benjamin Sweet was born in 1798, his father, "William Sweet, having been one of the earliest pioneers of Fleming County, Ky., and the parent of eight sons and two daughters. Benjamin moved to Morgan County, Ind., in 1834. where he and wife closed their lives. Our subject, Austin Sweet, married in this county, November 22, 1855,  Hannah K. daughter of John and Isabel Clark, and born March 11, 1838. This union gave being to six children Benjamin F., Halleck (deceased), Edward M., Harriet A., Ann (deceased) and Otis A. Mr. Sweet is a worthy and genial gentleman, as well as a respected citizen.

ROBERT H. TARLETON, M. D., druggist, was born in Mason County, Ky., March 24, 1822, and reared in Brookville, in that State. During his boyhood, he attended the schools of the day, and when seventeen one of a higher grade. At the age of twenty one, he removed to Missouri, but soon returned to Kentucky, and engaged in teaching and in the study of medicine. In 1846, he located as a practitioner near Edinburg, Ind.; in 1847, came to this county, and in 1849 attended lectures at and in 1850 graduated from the Ohio Medical College, during which year he removed to Kentucky and there married Miss Maria Prather April 18, 1850. He then located at Patriot, Ind., where he lost his wife in 1851, and afterward came to this town, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession, together with the drug business, which he established in 1852, in which he has now a partner in his nephew, W. B. Tarleton, and does a business of from $15,000 to $18,000 annually. March 2, 1852, he married Miss Elizabeth S. Wampler, with an issue of eight children Carrie, Emma J. B., Harriet S., James W., Harry H., Edgar, June and Maurice. In 1867, he laid out the beautiful Hillsdale Cemetery. In addition to his store building, Dr. Tarleton owns a fine residence and other property. He is a member of the Masons and a Democrat. In 1879, he was appointed Trustee of the Indiana Hospital for the Insane, and re-nominated in 1881

WILLIAM B. TAYLOR was born in Lawrence County, Ind., September 15, 1819. His parents, Joshua and Mary (Armstrong) Taylor, natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively, came to Indiana in 1809, and settled on a farm in Washington County, where they remained for eight years, removing thence to Lawrence County. In February, 1821, they came to Morgan County, locating on a farm one mile from Martinsville.  In 1834, the mother died, and ten years later the father, with his children, moved   to Green Township,  where he died in June,  1855. William B. Taylor is the fourth son and seventh child in a family of eleven children reared in Morgan County, and when fifteen years of age he began learning the blacksmith trade.    After one year at this, he worked for the neighboring farmers until 1839. He then worked on a flat-boat between New Orleans and Martinsville for Mitchell Bros, until 1842.  For some time he worked in lead mines in Wisconsin, and in August, 1845, he was married to Jane Estlinger, a native of Washington County, Ind. They have two children Mary A. and Sarah A.  His wife died in November, 1854, and one year later he was married to Caroline Hough. By this union there is one child,  Lillie. After his first marriage, he farmed near Martinsville, in Washington Township, for nine years, and then sold his farm and purchased another one in Green Township. Here he farmed for thirteen years.  In 1869, he began trading in stock, and at present resides in Martinsville, engaged in the same way. Mr. Taylor is an active member of the Republican party. He was County Commissioner for two years, re-elected, and served six years longer. He was Township Trustee for two years. He filled the unexpired term of office for Mr. Perham (deceased) in 1861, and was again elected in 1862 and 1863, and again in 1866. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the Cumberland Church.

JOHN THOMAS is a native of Tennessee, was born January 2, 1817, and is the eldest of the ten children of Peter and Sarah Thomas, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. John Thomas, the subject of this sketch, came with his parents to this State in 1823> who settled in this county, and here John has remained. April 1, 1841, he married Miss Nancy, a daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Maxwell, and born in this county November 11, 1823. After his marriage Mr. Thomas located in this township, where he has since made his home. Mrs. Thomas died October 17, 1859, and March 31, 1861, Mr. Thomas 'married Mrs. Lucy . J., widow of Joshua King, and a daughter of Henry and Mary Harper. Mr. Thomas is the parent of three children, Sarah, Harrison and an infant daughter, which died unnamed. Mr. Thomas is a generally respected citizen.

ELI THOMAS was born in Morgan County, Ind,, on the farm on which he still resides October 15, 1830, and is a son of Peter and Sarah Thomas, both natives of Orange County, N. C, the former born December 15, 1791, the latter May 3, 1795. The grandfather of our subject, Abram Thomas, was a native of Wales, who emigrated to America during the last century and settled in North Carolina, where he married, reared a family of nine children and passed away. Peter Thomas married, in 1816, Miss Sarah Graves, soon after settled near Knoxville, Tenn.; in 1818, moved to Clarke County, Ind., and thence in 1822 to Morgan County, where he died December 2, 1868, and his wife December 25,1878. They were parents of ten children, John, Henry, Daniel, Solomon, Lucinda, Louisa, Eli, George W., Elizabeth and Nancy A. Eli Thomas married, December 2, 1855, Miss Ruth, daughter of Abraham and Nancy A. Huff, and a native of Monroe County, Ind., born May 14, 1831. After marriage, Mr. Thomas settled on a small farm previously purchased, and in 1869, having purchased the homestead, moved thereon. In 1864, he enlisted in Company C, Thirty third Indiana Volunteers, and served until the struggle ended. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have had six children, Albert W., Nancy E. (deceased), Sarah E., Mary E., Francis M. (deceased), and an infant (still-born).

ELI THOMAS, JR., is a native of Morgan County, Ind., was born September 11, 1852, and is a son of Daniel Thomas, also a native of said county. Daniel Thomas was twice married, and the parent of nine children, viz.: By the first wife five Eliza, Elizabeth, Allen, John and Eli, all of whom are deceased except the subject of this writing; by the second wife four children, Sarah, David D., Susanna and Charles W., all of whom are living. Eli Thomas married in this county December 31, 1874, Miss Anna L., daughter of William and Katie Maybee, and born February 2, 1857, a union which was conspicuous in the birth of four children Bertha M. (deceased), Charles 0., Daisy (deceased), and Gertie. Mr. Thomas is an energetic and genial gentleman, and much esteemed among his fellow citizens.

HARRISON THOMAS is a native of Morgan County, Ind., was born April 25, 1852, and is one of the family of three children born to John and Nancy Thomas. October 28, 1875, our subject married Miss Martha A., daughter of John and Martha Bothwell, and a native of this country born July 4, 1854. This union has been endeared by the birth of two children John and Harry. Mr. Thomas is a most promising and greatly regarded gentleman, as well as practical and enterprising farmer. His farm comprises 215 acres of rich and cultivated land.

AMOS THORNBURG, of the firm of Thornburg & Small, dealers in grain and proprietors of the Union Mill and Elevator, was born in this county February 27, 1827, and likewise reared here. His father, Benjamin Thornburg, was born near Harrodsburg, Ky., September 25, 1797; reared in Washington County, Ind., and in 1822 removed to this county; settled near Brooklyn, and entered in all 160 acres, 100 of which are now in cultivation. He was rigidly temperate, and thus set a fair example to the pioneers; a life-long member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, also an exhorter and class leader; he was an old time Whig, and later a Republican. In 1817, he married a Miss Susan Monical, who died in 1876, having borne fourteen children, seven of whom survive Rachel (Mrs. MOOD), Hannah (Mrs. Davis), Amanda (Mrs. Hornor), Ada (Mrs. Dryden), John EL, Peter F. and Amos. Our subject engaged in farming for his father several years, and in 1856 purchased sixty acres in Brown Township, to which he added forty afterward. He continued farming until 1877, when he moved to this town and engaged successfully in the milling line, having one of the best mills in the country, with buhr and roller combined. Their elevator is also very superior, having capacity of 40,000 bushels; they can, too, load and weigh a car of wheat in eight minutes. Mr. Thornburg has been twice married, first, April 10, 1854, to Miss Caroline E. Doughty, of Vermont, who died January, 1876, leaving three living children James D., Benjamin E. and Albert M.; second, October 3, 1877, to Mrs. Amanda B. Wilson. Mr. Thornburg is an Odd Fellow, a Republican and strictly temperate and prudent.

SALEM A. TILFORD, M. D., was born in Jefferson County, Ind., February 2, 1827, with good opportunities for education in the Madison High School In 1845, he took up the study of medicine udder Dr. J. H. D. Rogers, of Madison; afterward attended lectures at the "University of Louisville and the Indiana Medical College, at Indianapolis; graduated from the latter, and took the ad eundem degree in 1879. In 1848, he located here and has continued his practice successfully. November 28, 1849, he married Miss Emeline Major, who died in May, 1853, leaving one child, Ella R., now a well known teacher in this county. April 1, 1857, he married Miss Ann Wolfe, which union was favored with eleven children, Isabel. Benjamin W., Lulie, Jennie, Ann, Alex S., Mary, Joseph W., Amanda, Harry and Roy E. Dr. Tilford was a Whig, but afterward became a Republican; was zealous during the war, but later affiliated with the Democrats, by which party he was elected, in 1870, Auditor of Morgan County, having served about eighteen months previously as said officer. Dr. Tilford is a Chapter Mason. When he came first to this town there were only 350 souls therein.

BENJAMIN W. TILLFORD, physician and druggist was born in this town November 8, 1859, where he was reared and attended the high school. In 1878, he began the study of medicine under his father's instruction; also attended lectures at the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis in 1879 and 1880; graduated in March, 1881; came home to Martinsville, and in the autumn engaged in the drug trade. He has a $2,000 stock, and has done a satisfactory business.

J. E. TONER, a native of Shelby County, Ind., was born on January 21, 1841, and is the son of John  and Nancy (Parker) Toner,  natives of Pennsylvania and Kentucky respectively.   The father still resides in Shelby County, the mother having died in 1856, leaving four children, of whom our subject is one. 
The father subsequently remarried, and has four children by his last wife.    One subject was engaged in early life on the farm and attending school; later entered the Northwestern (now Butler) University,  at Indianapolis. From this university he enlisted in April, 1861, in Company D, Seventh Indiana Infantry (three months' service), went to Virginia and was a participant in the battles of Philippi, Laurel Hill and Carrick's Ford.    Returning home after his time expired, lie re-enlisted for three years in Company B Thirty third Indiana Infantry, proceeded with his regiment to Kentucky, and participated in the battle of Wild Cat, siege of Mill Spring and Cumberland Gap. At the latter place he was taken prisoner by Morgan, held for seven weeks, when he was paroled and sent to Columbus, Ohio, Parole Camp, where he remained four weeks, and then decamped and came home. On January 8 following, he was exchanged, and returned to his regiment at Nashville, Tenn.    He with his command took part in the battle of Thompson's Station, where a large portion of his regiment was captured by the enemy. Our subject, with about eighty others, escaped.  Returning to Franklin, he was discharged for disability, and again returned home.  In January following he again re-enlisted in Company D, Sixteenth Indiana (mounted) Infantry, served sixteen months, and was engaged in the siege of Vicksburg, in the Red River campaign,   and at the battle of Sabine Cross Roads.  After his regiment's term of service expired, he was transferred to Company C, Thirteenth Indiana Cavalry, and served with it until December, 1865, when he was mustered out at Vicksburg, Miss. He was wounded at Thibodeaux, La., in the left leg, the enemy's bullet severing the main artery near the groin.  Upon his return home, he assisted his father on the farm until he was twenty seven years old.  On September 24, 1867, he was married to Sophia Salla, a native of Rush County, Ind. Then for seven years he farmed for himself in Shelby County. In 1875, he came to Martinsville and embarked in the grocery trade, continuing nine years, when he purchased the Mason House, and has since been conducting it. This is the only first class hostelry in town. Mr. Toner is a Republican, and served as Chairman of the City Council seventeen months. He is a member of the A. O. U. W., the K of P., and of the G. A. R. He and wife are both members of the Methodist  Episcopal Church.    Mr. and Mrs. Toner have five children living Ottway V,  Edward, John, Grace and Alice; an infant deceased. He is one of the liberal and enterprising citizens of Martinsville.
(note his first name is James)

ERVIN TOWNSEND, a son of Silas and Hannah Townsend, was born in Washington County, Ind., November 20, 1820. The grandfather of our subject, William Townsend, was a native of South Carolina; moved to Washington County, Ind., in 1810, and to Morgan County in 1821, where he died. He was a soldier for seven years in the Revolutionary war. Silas Townsend married in Washington County, Ind., Hannah Nogles, about 1813, who died in 1821. In 1822, Mr. Townsend moved to Morgan County, where he married Susan Thacker, after which he removed to Louisville, Ky., and ended his days. He was father to five children, Robinson, Susan, Huston and Ervin by first wife, and Martha by second wife.    He was a soldier in the war of 1812. Ervin Townsend came to Morgan County with his grandparents, with whom he remained until December 31, 1840, when he married Mary A., daughter of Richard and Rebecca Deakins, and a native of Washington County, Tenn., born May 25, 1825. After marriage, Mr. Townsend settled in this township, where he has an improved farm of 240 acres. Mrs. Townsend died June 5, 1883, having borne twelve children, Sarah J., Thomas J., Martha, William, Franklin P., James (deceased), Rebecca, Emma F., John, Hattie, Maggie and Nora E. Mr. Townsend is an esteemed citizen.

THOMAS J. TOWNSEND, son of William and Mary Townsend, natives of North Carolina, was born May 16, 1840, in this township. His parents were married in South Carolina, and immigrated to Indiana, locating in Washington County, whence they shortly afterward removed to Morgan County, and settled on a farm in Washington Township, where the father farmed until 1847. He then removed to Missouri and remained until the spring of 1857, when he returned with his family to Morgan County. In the fall of 1857, the father died. The mother in November, 1865. Thomas Townsend was reared in his native county, and educated in Missouri. When seventeen years of age, he returned to Morgan County with his parents, finally locating on a farm of 130 acres in Washington Township, which he inherited upon his father's death. He remained there for twenty three yea/s, when he removed to Martinsville, where he at present resides. In 1863-64, he served as Township Assessor. He also served several times as Supervisor of Roads in the township. On December 13, 1860, he was united in marriage to Melinda J. Cox, daughter of John L. Cox, an old and respected citizen of Morgan County. By this union, there have been eight children, Mary E. (deceased), William L., Thomas A., Ruth A. (deceased), Yiola (deceased), Maggie, Nettie and Lillie.    Mr. Townsend is a Republican.

SAMUEL TUCKER was born in Henry County, Ky., May 26, 1819, and is a son of James and Mary (Kitcher) Tucker, natives respectively of Ireland and Virginia. James Tucker emigrated from Ireland to America and settled in Fayette County, Ky., when twenty one years old, where he married. In 1836, he moved to Marion County, Ind., located near Indianapolis, and shortly after died, his wife surviving him about twelve years. Their family consisted of Robert, William, James, Harvey, Margaret, James R., Stephen, Sarah and Samuel. When Samuel was eighteen years of age, he became an apprentice to the cabinet making trade, after completing which, in 1839, he moved to Martinsville, worked for a time, and then commenced business for himself, where he continued a number of years. April 23, 1843, he married Sarah C, daughter of Jeremiah and Nancy Vincent, and born in Franklin County, Ind., February 2. 1823. To this union were bequeathed' a family of eight Nancy A. (deceased), Ledgard R., Clarinda, Rees H, Isaac W., Ida A, Palmanora and Lily P. In 1865, Mr. Tucker moved to Indianapolis and engaged in hotel keeping one year, then returned to Martinsville and purchased the Mason House, which he managed eighteen months, and finally moved to his present home and farm. Mr. and Mrs. Tucker are members of the Christian Church.

REV. AARON TURNER was born in Greene County, Ohio, June 4, 1835. His parents, Joseph and Mary (Burnsides) Turner, natives of Ohio, were married in Ohio in 1830, removing thence, in 1849, to Rush County, Ind.    His father, a Methodist minister, resides in Pike County, Ind., at the advanced age of seventy three years. The mother died in 1849. The subject was the third son and fourth child in a family of fourteen children, and was reared in his native county until fourteen years of age, removing thence to Bush County, Ind., where he taught school for two years. In 1857, he entered the ministry at the Annual Conference, held at New Albany, over which Bishop Morris presided. His first appointment was on the Poseyville Circuit, where he remained for one year, then receiving an appointment to Owensville Circuit. At the end of his first year at Owensville he was ordained "Deacon" at Bloomington, Ind., by Bishop Scott. His third appointment was Sullivan Station, where he remained for two years. After his first year at Sullivan, he was ordained " Elder " by Bishop Simpson at Rockport. He was at Greencastle, during which time he was appointed agent for the Asbury University, which position he filled for two years; for the past five months has been located in Martinsville. In 1870, the Wesleyan University conferred upon him the degree of "A. M.," and in June, 1883, the Asbury University conferred upon him the degree of "D. D." In October, 1858, he was married to Mary E. Yan Sickle, daughter of Jacob Tan Sickle, a pioneer of Morgan County. There was one child by this union, Luella (deceased). His wife died in 1861. August 21, 1866, he married Lucy Bowles, daughter of Henry Bowles, of Evansville, Ind. By this union there are two children, Helen and Jessie. Rev. Aaron Turner is a member of the A. F. & A. M., also of the K. of P., and is a Republican.

JOHN A. WAGNER is a native of Germany, was born July 6, 1821, and is a son of Adam F. and Wilhelmina Wagner. In 1848, he emigrated with his mother to America, his father having died in his native country in 1840. January 2, 1849, in Onondaga County, N. T., our subject married Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Adam and Hannah Ditze, and born May 6, 1824. Shortly after his marriage, Mr. Wagner moved to the State of Ohio, thence to Indianapolis, Ind. and finally, in 1865, to Morgan County, where he has since resided. Mr. Wagner is the owner of 103 acres of very excellent land, which is well improved and cultivated. Mr. and Mrs. Wagner are the parents of five children Catherine, Charlie, Frank, John and Louisa.    Both are highly respected in their community.

GEORGE M. WALKER is a native of Monroe County, Va., was born October 5, 1830, and is a son of Goodlow and Rebecca (Henderson) Walker, both natives of Yirginia; the former born 1800, the latter 1804. Goodlow Walker was a son of George Walker, also a native of Virginia, who married a Miss Adams, then moved to Tennessee, and finally to Madison County, Ind., where he died. He was twice married and the father of ten children. Goodlow Walker moved to Hendricks County, Ind., in 1835, and there died in 1864, the father of five children, James D., Harriet S., Clarinda J., John E. and George M. Our subject married, October 6, 1853, Mary T., daughter of John M. and Martha E. (Branch) Satterwhite, and born March 27, 1836. In 1851, Mr. Walker moved to Montgomery County, Ind., and September, 1862, enlisted in Company F, Fifty fourth Indiana Volunteer Regiment, in which he served until December, 1863, during which time his family moved to Martinsville, where our subject made a home after his discharge from the service. He is now serving most satisfactorily as Superintendent of the Poor. Mr. and Mrs. Walker have a family of seven children,  James H, Susan M.? Ida T., Louisa E., George, Nettie B. and William A. 
A. B. WALKER, eldest son of Michael and Mary (Andrews) "Walker, natives of Maryland and Ohio, respectively, was born in Johnson County, Ind., October 20, 1855. His parents located in Milford, Ohio, after marriage, where the father followed his trade of cooper for a short time, removing thence to Indianapolis, where he began the manufacture of barrels. His property there being destroyed by fire, he went to Franklin, Ind., his present residence. A. B. Walker was reared in Johnson County, Ind. He received a good education in the graded schools at Franklin, and at the age of seventeen, was employed by the F. F. & M. R. R. in the office of John M. Johnson, at Franklin. Two years later, he was appointed agent at Martinsville for the same road, and is at present acting in that capacity. In 1878, he began buying timber and for two years past he has also been dealing in coal. In August, 1883, he built a factory for the manufacture of hubs, spokes and staves, and has thus far been very successful. In February, 1882, he was married to Louisa A. Clapper, daughter of W. G. and Martha Clapper, Martinsville. Mr. Walker is a charter member of the K. of P., Anniversary Lodge, No. 89, is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church.

F. M. WARNER is second of four children born to Andrew J. and Judith (Lockhart) Warner, natives of Kentucky. He was born in this township August 3, 1842. His parents located on a farm in Morgan County after marriage, where they lived for some time, removing thence to a farm one mile south of Martinsville. Four years later, they moved to Martinsville, where the mother at present resides. F. M. Warner remained with his parents until nineteen years of age. He received his education in the graded schools at Martinsville. He was refused enlist- ment in the army in 1861, being under age; he afterward entered his father's employ in a livery stable, which he purchased three years later, and is now profitably conducting. Mr. Warner is a Republican, and acted as Councilman of the Fourth Ward for two years. In October, 1878, he was married to Laura F. Bogle, of Putman County, Ind. She was a good Christian, and at the time of her death, which occurred August 15, 1879, she was a member of the Methodist Church.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS was born near Paoli, Ind.? May 1, 1816, a son of Jonathan and Celia (Silcox) Williams, natives respectively of Tennessee and North Carolina. Jonathan Williams was a son of John R. Williams, of East Tennessee, who married Margaret Reed, and in the early time moved to Morgan County, Ind., where he died about ^1830, the parent of ten children, seven boys William, Lewis, John R., Isaac Keyton, Robert and Jonathan. He was born in Tennessee February 17, 1795, came to this territory when young, and in 1820 to Morgan County, where he and wife died, the former September 15, 1845, the latter July 26, 1868. He was one of the first County Commissioners who located the city of Martinsville. He was elected Sheriff in 1834, again in 1836, and in 1838 was elected to the Legislature. He was with Gen. Jackson in his first battle, was a prominent and respected citizen, and the father of the following family: William Pleasant, John, Jona than, David, Jackson, James, Polly and Nancy. 'William has resided here since he came with his parents in 1820. December 31, 1846, he married Emma, daughter of John King, to which union three children followed: Celia A., Howard (deceased) and an infant (deceased). After Mrs. Williams' death, February 25, 1849, he wedded Martha J., daughter of William A. Major, with an issue of seven children Angeline (deceased), Franklin,  Perry (deceased), Robert H., Dora E., Jennie (deceased), and California.    Mr. Williams has served as Sheriff and is now Township Assessor.    .

EDWARD WOODS was born in Morgan County, Ind., July 12, 1848, and is one of the five children composing the family of Patrick and Mary (Dougherty) Woods, natives of Ireland and Ohio respectively. Patrick Woods was born in 1811, emigrated to America, and in 1843 to the State o£ Ohio, where he married the same year, and afterward moved to Morgan County, Ind.., and settled on the identical land where our subject now resides, which was his home until his death in 1865. Mrs. Woods subsequently wedded Thomas Dougherty, and is yet living, her family comprising live in number James, Thomas, Edward, Patrick and Catherine. Edward Woods married in this county, October 8, 1873, Miss Mary E., daughter of William and Ruth Kemp, and a native of Morgan County, born February 13, 1857. Mrs. Woods died April 15, 1881, having been the mother of six children Rosie A., Mattie, Alice, Thomas, William (deceased) and Mary E. (deceased). Mr. Wood is much respected by his fellow citizens.

OWEN WOODS is a native of Ireland, and was born June 24, 1814, and is the youngest of the family of James and Mary (Welch) Woods, both natives of Ireland, where they were married and died. They were the parents of four children, Thomas, Patrick, Catherine and Owen. Our subject was married while in Ireland, in 1835, to Ellen McCarugh. After emigrating to the United States, he settled in Morgan County, Ind., in the year 1848, on the farm on which he now lives, and where he is Comfortable and independently situated. Mr. and Mrs. Woods are members of the Catholic Church, and have been the parents of eight children  Mary (deceased), Catherine (deceased), Bridge (deceased), Mary, Ellen (deceased), Katie (deceased), Ann and James. Mr. and Mrs. Woods are greatly respected in the community.

A. R. VANSICKEL was born at Martinsville, this county. February 27, 1842, and is one of the eight children of Jacob and Mahala (Salmon) Yansickel, natives of Sussex County, N. J. Jacob Vansickel was born in 1814. his wife in 1812, and in 1838 they moved to Henry County Ind., and thence to Morgan County, where Mr. Vansickel died in 1860, and Mrs. Vansiekel twelve years later. Their family was Mercy A., Mary E., Sarah S., John D., Andrew R., Alonzo, George W. and Susan R. Our subject, August, 1861, enlisted in Company G, Twenty Seventh Indiana Volunteers, and served until September,. 1864, with much experience in many severe battles. After his discharge and return to this county, he married, November 24, 1864, Mary L., daughter of Henry and Phebe Miller, and a native of New Jersey, born February 20, 1840, which union was favored with six children Otis H. (deceased), Sarah E, William F., Maggie A., Joseph A. and Mary E. Mr. Vansickel is a member of the Masonic order, of the G. A. R., and of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ALBERT VOYLES was born in Morgan County, Ind., August 20, 1842, and is a son of Ivan and Irena (Elgin) Voyles, natives of Indiana; the former born in 1813. Mi's. Voyles died in 1855, after which Mr. Voyles married Catherine Shireman; he died in 1880. The grandfather of our subject, Moses Voyles, was one of the earliest settlers of Washington County, Ind., whence he moved to Morgan County, and there lived out his days; he was a soldier of the war of 1812. Albert Voyles is the youngest of the four children of his parents. August 11, 1862, he became a soldier of Company H, Seventieth Indiana Volunteers, in which he served until June, 1865. In October, 1868, he married Susan, daughter of Joshua and Rhoda Gilpin, and born in this county February 20, 1849, which union was cemented by two children Mamie D. and James K.  Mr. Voyles is a practical man and a respected citizen.


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