Genealogy Trails

OHIO COUNTY, INDIANA

BIOGRAPHIES

GREER, WILLIAM N.—Fruit-grower, section 25, P. O. East Des Moines. Was born in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, April 9, 1824, and at the age of seventeen years moved with his parents to Dearborn county, Indiana, living there until 1853, when he moved to Scott county, this State. He had previously entered his farm in 1850, and resided there until 1869, when he came to this county and has since resided here. Owns ten acres of land all in fruit and in good condition. During the war he raised company C, Second Iowa cavalry, in Scott county, and went into camp as captain of his company August 9, 1863. During the winter of 1861-2 he resigned, on account of disability. Mr. Greer was married February 15, 1854, to Miss Margaret H. Espey, who was born in Ohio county, Indiana, June 23, 1829. They have one son living, John L. Lost one, William H. They have also an adopted daughter, Clara K.
Source: The History of Polk County, Iowa By Union Historical Company

REV. LUCIEN ALDEN, a Presbyterian clergyman, and a gentle-man of high scholastic accomplishments, removed from Boston to Aurora," and opened the seminary established through the efforts of Judge Holman, in 1826. In 1828 Mr. Alden removed to Rising Sun, and took charge of the seminary at that place, which had just been completed. He conducted the institution with marked success for two years, when, in the fall of 1830, he returned to Boston, from which city he had been sent to this part of the country as a missionary, and wore back a full suit of blue jeans, woven by Mrs. Judge Holman, on the old hand-loom. During his sojourn in this section of the country, Mr. Alden preached at Aurora, Rising Sun, Hartford, Dillsborough, and other points, as opportunity was afforded him. After returning to Boston, he was pastor of a church there many years.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

MASON W. ANDERSON, of Rising Sun, one of the proprietors of the Anderson & McHenry Omnibus Line, was born in Boone County, Ky., September 28, 1827. His parents were Henry and Mildred (Cornelius) Anderson, the latter born in Kentucky. Mr. Anderson, left an orphan in childhood, was reared chiefly by an uncle in Boone County, where he resided till about twenty years of age. At eighteen he began the butcher's trade in Covington, in which place he continued the same about fifteen years. He was married, in September, 1849, to Emma Newman, of this county, a native of Philadelphia, and daughter of Timothy Newman, who came into this locality about 1837. After his marriage he began the butchering business in Rising Sun, continuing till 1861. He then clerked for four years for.H. S. Espey, and subsequently took up the cleaver again for a short time. He still does some "ham trimming" for shippers of pork, of Rising Sun, being quite an adept at that business. In 1867 Mr. Anderson started, on a limited scale, the Aurora & Rising Sun Omnibus Line, which has developed in efficiency till almost an equal to steam railway as a means of passenger transportation. This line, started with much opposition, Mr. Anderson has continued from the beginning, never having missed but one trip from the first to the present. In 1875 the Aurora & Rising Sun Turnpike was constructed by a company composed of W. B. Sinks, Dr. H. T. Williams, and Mr. Anderson, at a cost of about $10,000, this being one of the most important improvements of the county.   Mr. Anderson has been a member of the L O. 0. F. for thirty-five years, and, with Mrs. Anderson, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.   He is a man of jovial disposition, and relates many amusing incidents of his bus line experience, which "our limited space forbids us to repeat."
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

NOAH L. BABBS, of Rising Sun, and one of the oldest residents of the place, was born in Hampshire County, Va., November 13, 1794. His parents were John and Rebecca (Lane) Babbs, natives of Virginia and Maryland respectively, and of English and Irish descent. In 1803 his parents removed from Virginia to Cincinnati. Here the family resided until 1819, when they removed to the vicinity of Rising Sun and purchased forty acres of land, where the parents passed the remainder of their lives, the father dying at the remarkable age of one hundred and three years. Our subject grew to manhood on the farm of his parents, remaining until nineteen years of age. During the war of 1812 he was in New Orleans, and saw Jackson after he had won that battle which has almost immortalized him. Returning North, Mr. Babbs went to Ohio, and during the building of the Miami Canal, he worked on it as one of the bosses. Next he purchased a tract of land several miles back of the Ohio River, north of Cincinnati, and followed gardening for thirty odd years. In 1871 he again purchased property in Rising Sun, where he has since resided, living a retired life, though by proxy dealing some in real estate. Mr. Babbs first married Nancy Smith, who died one year later. He then married Kittie Ann Phares, who died in 1832, there having been born to the union, live children, viz.: Charles P., William, Emeline, John and Susan. His third wife was Amey (Tucker) Rawlson; one child was born to them—Virginia. His fourth marriage occurred in 1868, to Mrs. Catharine Hyner.   Mr. Babbs is a member of the Christian Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

ANDREW J. BARRICKLOW, of Randolph Township, was born in Ohio County in 1825. His parents, John and Mary A. (Emmerson) Barricklow, were natives of Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, respectively. His father was a son of Daniel and Judith Barricklow who was born, reared and married in Pennsylvania, and immigrated to this county about 1808 or 1809, coming via the Ohio River in a little float-boat. He purchased land here, some of which is still in possession of the family. He reared a family of eight children, only one of whom is now living, viz.: Merribah Hanna, wife of- David Hanna, of Union Township. The deceased are Edward, Coonrod, John, Henry, Farrington, Joseph and Sallie. Our subject's father was but eight or nine years of age when he came to this county and here grew to maturity and married, rearing four children: Andrew J., Daniel, Hiram and John, all still living in the county. He was a farmer by occupation, and was quite prosperous, leaving a creditable competence at his death, which occurred about 1873. His widow is still living in her seventy-ninth year, though in a helpless condition from paralysis, cared for by her son, Andrew, at his home. Andrew J. Barricklow grew up on the farm in this township. Being of a studious turn of mind ,he acquired a good education in the common schools and by self-help at the fireside, and in 1847 began the profession of teaching, which be continued to follow up to 1876, teaching twenty-eight winter terms. He obtained a portion of his father's estate, the father and sons working together till the latter were all married, when the property was divided. Since that time Mr. Barricklow has given his chief attention to farming. He now owns 223 acres. Mr. Barricklow was married, in 1849, to Nancy Oglevee. of this county, daughter of John and Margaret (Marnock) Oglevee, her father, a native of Ireland, and her mother, born in Pennsylvania. They were early settlers of this county, and later moved to Ripley County, Ind., where they died. Mr. and Mrs. Barricklow have but one child living, namely—Hiram. Mary A., a daughter of rare musical attainments as well as other accomplishments, died at the age of about twenty-two years. Hiram was married, in 1876, to Elizabeth Corson, daughter of Albert Corson, and they have two children: Jackson A. and Mary A. Mr. Barricklow is an enthusiastic Democrat and takes some interest in local politics. He has served two terms as township trustee since 1875.   During the war Mr. Barricklow was commissioned lieutenant of the "Rough and Ready Rifles," and was subsequently made captain of the same. The company was regularly drilled and met Morgan at old Vernon, capturing twenty-nine men and several horses. Mr. Barricklow has always been a lover of out-door sports, and has quite a local reputation as a modern Nimrod; is said to have killed the last wild deer in this locality. In early years, with his father and brothers, he caught forty wild turkeys at a single trap. He has been connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church about thirty-five years, and during that time has officiated for many years as class-collector, steward and superintendent of the Sunday-school.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JOHN W. BARRICKLOW, brother to the above, was born in Ohio County in 1831. He grew up on the homestead, which was divided among the children of tho family, as stated above.   He was married, in 1857, to Lucy Ann Richardson, daughter of Joseph P. Richardson, an early settler of this county. This marriage was fruitful in the birth of six children, three still living: Zoah E., wife of William Hastings; John and James. March 5, 1872, Mrs. Barricklow departed this life, death ensuing from "spotted fever." In 1873 Mr. Barricklow was united in marriage with Jane Nelson, a daughter of Thomas Nelson, native of County Armagh, Ireland. Mr. Barricklow is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and one of the thrifty farmers of this township, having always given his attention to agricultural pursuits.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

HIRAM BARRICKLOW. Rising Sun, one of the representative men of Ohio County, was born in the same in 1829. He is a son of John Barricklow, who was born in 1800, and who came to this county with his father Daniel Barricklow, from Pennsylvania in 1815. Our subject grew up on his father's farm in Union Township, and obtained the rudiments of ah education in the common schools. He began business operations for himself about 1857, inheriting a small portion from his father's estate. He first purchased a farm valued at about $2,000, and by his able management of business affairs he has increased his realty in this county to 265 acres, besides owning some valuable town property in Rising Sun, and some Western land. For twenty years Mr. Barricklow has done quite an extensive business in dealing in stock, and also in real estate and securities, being generally successful in his^business enterprises. He served for some time as trustee of Union Township, and was three years commissioner of the county. Mr. Barricklow was first married to Sarah A. Pate, daughter of William T. Pate, and they had five children: Rebecca, wife of Stephen Hastings; Mary J., wife of David Hanna; William T., who married Agnes Fisher; George who married Laura Turner; and Anna M., wife of Lawrence Turner. Mrs. Barricklow departed this life in 18—, and Mr. Barricklow has since been united in marriage to Lizzie Pate, a native of the county and a most excellent lady. Mr. Barricklow ranks among the most thrifty business men of Ohio County.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JAMES S. BARNS, retired minister, Rising Sun, was born in Marion County, W. Va.. May 6, 1812. His parents were William and Jane (Graham) Barns, natives of Maryland and West Virginia, respectively, and of English. Welsh and Irish extraction. They were married in Marion County, W. Va., where they remained until about 1817, at which time they moved to Madison County, Ohio, and from thence, in the following year, to Wayne County, Ohio, and in 1830 to Brown County, Ohio, where he died in 1833, at the age of fifty-five years. His wife moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1840, and there died in 1843, at the age of fifty-five years. He was a physician by profession, and a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church.    Their family consisted of Thomas F., John W., Rebecca A., Phebe 8., Frances S., William A., Rachel S., Thornton S., Reason ML, and James S., our subject, the third member of the family. He was educated in the district schools of the vicinity where he was raised, and in them acquired quite a thorough education. But after reaching the years of maturity, he turned his attention to milling, farming and trading. He was united in marriage, in Clermont County, Ohio, September 11, 1838, to Miss Lydia A., daughter of Elijah, and Nancy (Champion) Applegate. She was born in Clermont County, Ohio, August 3, 1819. After Mr. Barns' marriage, he settled in Brown County, Ohio, where he engaged in milling, and in 1841 moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, and engaged in the grocery trade. In 1845 he removed to Switzerland County, Ind., and purchased a farm and engaged in farming, and shortly afterward was licensed to preach, as a local minister, in that county, and in 1849 was admitted in the Indiana Conference as a traveling minister, a calling pursued till 1862, in this State, and was then sent to southern Illinois, and in 1875 was transferred back to the Southeastern Indiana Conference, and then settled at Moore's Hill Ind., where he resided until the spring of 1885, at which time he removed to Rising Sun, where he at present resides. Mr. and Mrs. Barns have had born to them five children, viz.: Carroll O, Maria B., Olive E., Florence A., and Emma M.; of whom the latter two only are living.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.


ABIJAH BENNETT, of Rising Sun, a native of Fairfield County, Conn., died in the place of his adoption February 7, 1846, aged seventy-eight years. Mr. Bennett settled in Rising Sun in 1817, by the citizens of which place he was at several different times entrusted with important civil stations, which he performed to their satisfaction. He was universally esteemed by all who knew him.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.


THOMAS A. BENNETT, of Rising Sun, and sheriff of Ohio County and a native of Ohio, was born in 1856. He is a son of John W. and Mary E. (Stanley) Bennett, who were natives of Virginia. His parents were married in the latter State, moved to Ohio and later to Ohio county, where his father died in 1864 and where his mother is still living. There are four children in the family; James W., Thomas A., Laura and William E. The subject of this sketch, Thomas A., grew to maturity in Ohio county, and was educated in the public schools of Rising Sun. After abandoning his educational pursuits, and for a time before, he was employed by Martin & Sullivan in the Rising Sun Tanyard, in all about three years. He next engaged with R. H. Gould, proprietor of the Gould Livery and Feed Stable, Rising Sun, in whose employ he remained about six years. In November, 1884, he was elected to the office of sheriff of Ohio County, and since that time to the present his official duties have claimed his entire attention, and in their discharge he has played a very creditable part. In May, 1885, Mr. Bennett forsook the barren paths of celibacy, and on the 3d of that month was joined in marriage to Miss Cora Goodner, of Rising Sun.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.


SIMON BEYMER, president of the National Bank of Rising Sun, Ind., is a native of Guernsey County, Ohio, where he was born in 1834. His parents, Henry and Sarah (Clark) Beymer, were natives of Pennsylvania. They moved to New Albany, Ind., from Wheeling. Va., about 1850, and from there S. Beymer, the subject of this sketch, came to Vevay in 1853, having spent two years previous as clerk of a steam-boat plying on the Wabash River. He began clerking in a store at Vevay when about twenty years of age, and soon after established himself in business by buying out his employer, having as a partner in the transaction Mr. L. Bledsoe, with whom he continued in business in general merchandising at Florence, Ind., for twenty-eight years. During the late war the firm did considerable business in flat-boating produce, and of late Mr. Beymer has given some attention to the hay and grain trade. In 1872 he took stock in the National Bank of Rising Sun, which he still has invested, and since January, 1885, has officiated as president of that institution. Mr. Beymer was married, March 4, 1857, to Caroline Harris, daughter of Jacob R. Harris, an old and esteemed resident of Switzerland County. They have one child, Lettie R., wife of A. P. Twineham, of Princeton, Gibson Co., Ind, an attorney at law and member of the State Legislature from that county. Mr. Beymer is a member of the Masonic fraternity and a man of excellent character as a citizen. In 1884 he was a prominent candidate for representative to the State Legislature, but was defeated by a small.majority.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.


JAMES BILLINGSLEY, of Ohio County, died August 30, 1873. He was born at what was designated as Old Redstone Fort (now Brownsville), Penn., in the spring of 1776, while the parents were on their journey from Virginia to the Northwest Territory. After a voyage of two weeks the family landed at Cincinnati, Ohio, and located on the site of the present town of Reading, where they cleared up a farm and tilled it, operating for a period of seven years, in connection with farming, a saw-mill. In 1803, the family removed to what was then Dearborn County, and our subject since that period, until death, resided in the counties of Dearborn and Ohio.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.


OTHA BILLINGSLEY, farmer, Center Township, resides on Section 29, and possesses 300 acres of land, was born in Dearborn County. Ind., in February, 1829, where he received a common school education. He has been a farmer all his life. He was married, September 10, 1858. to Miss Priscilla J. Mefford, a native of Kentucky, who was born in Newport, December 10, 1837. Eleven children have been born to their marriage, namely: Elizabeth, George, Rebecca A., Mary J., Eliza B., William, James. Emily, Otha, Inez, Joseph. Mrs. Billingsley's father. James P. Mefford, was born in 1808, and was killed in California, in 1850. while blasting a mine. Mr. Billingsley's father, John, was born in Red Stone, Va., in February, 1790, and as was very common in his day. received no education. The mother, Elizabeth Stitt, died June 6, 1866. They raised seven children: James, Thomas, Otha, Mary, Nancy, Elizabeth, Emily P. Four have passed beyond the river: Thomas, Mary. Nancy and Elizabeth. Father Billingsley flat-boated in early life, and walked from New Orleans to this county. The balance of his life has been devoted to farming, at which he has been successful.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

JOHN BLACK, superintendent Iron and Nail Company, Aurora City, was born in Allegheny  County, Penn., February 2, 1840. His father Thomas, was born in Allegheny County, Penn., and mother, Susan Fred It, was born in Germany.    The  father was a farmer. John not being favorably impressed with the idea of tilling the soil, left the farm in 1846 and began working in the nut and bolt works at which he continued for nine years.    In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Twelfth Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, and served three months as corporal.    September 15, 1861, he re-enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Infantry, and was appointed sergeant, serving in that capacity three years.   He received a flesh wound at Malvern Hill.   After returning home be learned the machinist trade, and worked at it for eight and a half years.   In 1873 be went to Covington, Ky., as foreman in nut and bolt works, thence to Aurora, Ind., in 1875, and officiated as foreman in O.P. Cobb & Co's. mill.   In 1878 he was promoted to the office of superintendent of the nail works, which position he has since held.   Mr. Black was married in 1867, to Miss Catharine Holland, a native of Canada.   Unto them have been born six children:   Anna, John, Charles, Roy, Jessie and Glenn.   Our subject is a member of Aurora Lodge No. 51, Aurora Chapter No. 13, and Aurora Commandery No. 17, and the A. O. U. W. of Pittsburgh, Penn.   His wife is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Black invented the cylinder nail picker in 1880, which is now in use at Cobb's nail-mill    He is  now perfecting a system to remove the carbon from steel rails, which will enable them to make nails from the same by rendering the steel soft and pliable to the rolls, Mr. Black is truly a inventive genius.   He has also completed an emery wheel.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

ROBERT R BLAIR, of the firm Blair Bros., inventors of and manufacturers of revolving cylinder engines, headquarters, Eagle Hotel, Aurora, Ind., with factory in Cincinnati, Ohio, was born in Ripley County, Ind., January 1, 1854. His early training was upon the farm, but his education was completed in college, after which he taught school for two winters. In 1876, he engaged in selling threshers and engines in Kentucky, at which he succeeded admirably. He then read medicine under Dr. William Anderson, of Versailles, Ind., and attended lectures at Miami Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio; not liking the profession he abandoned the practice. In the fall of 1878, he began traveling for Aultman, Taylor & Co.. of Mansfield, Ohio, remaining with that arm until in 1881 when he began traveling for C. & G. Cooper & Co., Mount Vernon, Ohio, with whom he remained until November, 1883, at which time he located in Aurora to develop the invention of the present firm. His father, Robert C. Blair, was born in Clermont County, Ohio, January 18, 1814. His mother, Elizabeth (Fisher) Blair, was born in Rising Sun, Ind., in 1820. They were married in 1837; the father came to Indiana in 1818. He followed the river for years and has farmed all through life. He raised six children. The parents are members of the Christian Church, and are an exemplary couple. Our subject is a member of Friendship Lodge No. 68, F. A A. ML, Milan Chapter, No. 32, at Moore's Hill, and Aurora Commandery No. 17, Aurora, Ind. He attended the conclave at San Francisco in 1833, with Raper Commandery, which was a great treat Mr. Blair is a shrewd and thorough young business man, with genial and affable manners that endear him to his many friends and acquaintances and make him a popular gentleman.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

SHERWOOD F. BLASDEL, farmer. Miller Township, and assessor of the same, was born in Dearborn County, December 8, 1848. He is a son of John F. and Mary J. (Hampson) Blasdel, the former born in this county in 1821, son of Enoch Blasdel, the latter, a native of West Virginia, but who came to this county in an early day with her people-John F. was educated in the Cambridge Academy, and after his marriage, taught school a few years, though his chief occupation from his youth up was fanning. He reared eight children: John C. (now of Chicago). Mary S., Sherwood F., William H. Ambrose, Jennie, Paraelia and Albert, nearly all of whom are school teachers. After abandoning the school work, Mr. B. purchased land in Kelso Township, where he resided till 1862, when he entered the service of the government as a member of the Eighty third Indiana Regiment He served about seven months and died in the spring of 1868, of typhoid fever, contracted while acting as hospital steward. His remains were brought home and interred in the Pella Cemetery on the same portion of land on which he was born and reared. Mrs. Blasdel, died in February, 1884, in her sixty-first year. Sherwood Blasdel, with the rest of the family, was brought up on the farm and was educated in the common schools. He was married in 1878 to Elizabeth Kirkwood, a daughter of John and Eliza (McGahan) Kirkwood, her mother and herself both natives of this county. Since his marriage, Mr. Blasdel has been farming and trading, owning a farm of forty acres. He served his first term as township assessor in the spring of 1885, which is sufficient evidence of his good judgment in matters of business as well as his character and popularity as a citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Blasdel have two children, Nora and Arthur.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

CHARLES B. BLASDEL, of Lawrenceburgh Township, a member of one of the oldest families of this county was born in Miller Township, April 19, 1846. He is a son of Franklin T. Blasdel, of the old Blasdel family, which was prominent in the early settlement of the county, and is elsewhere referred to in this work. Our subject was reared on the farm and educated in the township and district schools, with the advantage of two years in the public schools of Lawrenceburgh. In the fall of 1862 he entered the war, enlisting in Company H, Eighty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and serving almost three years. He took part in some of the most important battles of the war among which were the siege of Vicksburg, and the engagements of Sherman on his famous march to the sea- On his retirement from the service Mr. B. taught school five terms, and in 1875 purchased fifty acres of land, which he has since been engaged in cultivating. He was married, October 4,1870, to Mary E. Leming, daughter of Lorenze D. Leming, of Miller Township, an old resident of the county. They have six children: Flora E., Mabel A., Emma G., Quiney E_, Franklin T. and Charles D. Mr. Blasdel is a member of the G. A. R., and Baptist Church, and is an industrious, reliable citizen in every particular.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

DANIEL BOHL, farmer, Kelso Township, Dearborn County, was born in the county and township July 31, 1839. His parents, Mathias and Margaret (Hare) Bohl, were both natives of Germany, and from thence, in 1830, immigrated to Cincinnati, Ohio, where they resided until 1835, in which year they moved to Dearborn County, Ind. Our subject is the only member of six children born to them. He was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Gilmann in 1861, and afterward settled on the farm where he at present lives. She was born in Germany August 8, 1834 They have had born to them seven children: Annie M., Mary D. (deceased), Mary, Elizabeth (deceased), Catherine and Peter, and one that died in infancy. Mr. Bohl and family are members of the Lutheran Church.
Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana : Chicago: F.E. Weakley & Co., 1885.

Lucius Taylor Barbour

Lucius Taylor Barbour, c. 1862.
This dignified 20-year old man, Lucius Taylor Barbour, enlisted in the Civil War with the 12th Indiana Volunteer Infantry out of Fort Wayne, Indiana. After the Battle of Missionary Ridge, Lucius was taken prisoner and sent to Andersonville Prison. He survived the ordeal though he nearly died. He met his wife, Elizabeth Loring, through his sisters who attended the seminary in Oxford. Ohio, with Elizabeth.
They were married in Rising Sun in 1866. They lived in Rising Sun for a short time and then moved to Warsaw. Indiana, where Lucius was a druggist. Following the birth of their third child, they separated and Elizabeth returned to Rising Sun
with the children.
Barbour Family
Barbour Family, C. 1895. Elizabeth Loring Barbour and her children are, from the left, as follows: Myron, Frank, and Jeannette. The family traveled to Aurora to have their portrait taken by Mr. Walton. A portrait of Jeannette Inslee Loring born in New York, 1818, and died in Rising Sun, 1896, hangs in the museum. She was the mother of Elizabeth Barbour. Jeannette was named after her grandmother. Both Myron and Frank served during World War I, Myron in the Aviation Corps and Frank with the Transportation Corps.
Source: Ohio County, Indiana 
By William J. Dichtl
Edgar Pendry, c. 1930s. Edgar Pendry served two terms as Ohio County Auditor beginning in 1950 and was re-elected again in 1934. In the 1940s Mr. Pendry served as Clerk of the Ohio County Draft Board. After World War II began, he resigned and was replaced by Jessie Hannah, the woman in the photograph. Prior to his resignation from the Draft Board, he purchased the Ideal Restaurant from Estal Draut.

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