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BELLE UNION SUFFERS BIG FIRE SUNDAY
TWO GENERAL STORES, BARBER SHOP, K. OF P. HALL AND SEVERAL OUT BUILDINGS TOTALLY DESTROYED IN CONFLAGRATION WHICH STARTED ABOUT MIDNIGHT SATURDAY NIGHT--THE CAUSE IS NOT KNOWN--LITTLE PROPERTY IS SAVED.
THE LOSS NEAR $7,500
Fire which started early Sunday morning destroyed several business buildings in Belle Union, causing a loss of approximately $7,500, which is only partially covered by insurance.

The buildings which were consumed were the John Cohn general store building, a barber shop owned by Fred Terry, which occupied a part of the building and the K of P hall which occupied the hall above the store and the barbers hop; the Albert Allee general store, a barn belonging to Dr. W. A. Moser, and a ware room, huckster wagon shed, oil sheds, poultry houses and garage, all owned by Mr. Cohn, which buildings were in the rear of his store building.

The loss will amount to approximately $7,500. This is partially covered by insurance.

The fire had gained great headway before it was discovered. The flames started in either the Cohn store, the barber shop or the K of P hall, as that building was the first to be discovered as burning. The flames spread from this building to the Allee building, just across the alley east. This building, too, was totally destroyed.

The flames then caught the buildings south of the stores and they were consumed. The fire had gained such headway before it was discovered that the bucket brigade were unable to check it. Little property was saved from any of the buildings which burned. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Sewer Remains Stopped Up.
The sewer leading from the college buildings into the Sellers cave remains stopped up, although several shots were fired in the holes that have been sunk by the Hills and Shoptaugh well drilling outfit, in an effort to open the drain.

Eight holes have been sunk in the street near the corner of Indiana and Larabee streets. The drill passed through only one cavity in the rock which showed signs of being the outlet through which the wast material from the college has been passing. A heavy shot was fired in this hole, but whether it will benefit the situation or not is not known at the present time. It will take some time for the waste material to pass out if the sewer was opened by the shot. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

The blasts that were fired in the holes which which were drilled on Indiana street near the intersection of Larrabee street Monday afternoon failed to open the drain from the college buildings which has been stopped up for several weeks. Nine holes were sunk in the street in an effort to locate the Sellers cave through which the waste material from the university buildings passed. A small crevice was found in which indications of the waste material was found. Several blasts in this cavity failed to open the drain. The well drilling outfit left this morning. Just what action will be taken by the authorities of the university in an effort to relieve the situation as soon as possible, is not known. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

The well drilling outfit which is endeavoring to find an opening into the Sellers cave on south Indiana street, to make an effective drainage system from the university buildings, has been unable to locate the cavern supposed to run under the street in that vicinity. Several holes have been sunk in the street, to a depth of 25 or 30 feet but as yet an opening to the cave has not been found. The drill cut through a crevice in the rock this morning and sediment, which emptied from the old drain which is stopped up, was found. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Many of the local public school teachers attended the annual convention of the Indiana Teachers' Association which is being held in Indianapolis this week. The Severin Hotel is headquarters for the out-of-town visitors who are attending the convention at Indianapolis. Among those who are attending the convention from this city are: W. P. Sackett, Oscar Thomas, B. L. Knight, Miss Jean Selby, Miss Etta Adams, Miss Ida Adams, Miss Amy Adams, Miss Florence Byrd, Mrs. Amy Smith, Miss Delilah Miller and Prof. Streightoff and Prof. Smythe of the university. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Andrew Hanna has on display in one of his store windows a collection of articles which are causing much comment. The collection consists a toy revolver, a belt, which would encircle the waist of a very small boy, a large tin star, on which is printed "Traffic Officer, No. 1" and a small tin sword. A placard stated that these are the implements which will be used by William Kreigh, who after January 1, will be Greencastle's traffic officer. Ever since the election, when a Democratic administration was elected, Mr. Kreigh's friends have been joking him about seeking an appointment as traffic officer. They have chosen the southeast corner of the square as the best location for him to work. To take the joke a little further Mr. Hanna hass ecured everything to supply Mr. Kreigh with all the necessary articles for his work. It is safe to say that the display will not remain in the window long after Mr. Kreigh discovers it. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

NUMBER OF ARRESTS THIS YEAR IS LESS THAN USUAL
Mayor John R. Miller has made out a report of the total number of arrests, affiadavits filed and fines assessed from the law breakers of this city. The report this year is much better than usual only 36 arrests being made during the entire year of 1913. Thirty of the total number of arrests were made for intoxication, two for violation of the speed law, one for assault and battery, one for assault, one for trespass, and one for the violation of the liquor law. Mr. Miller will present the report to the State Board of Statistics at the end of his term of office, which is next Monday at 12 o'clock. (Greencastle Daily Herald., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, January 1, 1914; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Mrs. George Conklin will have ripe tomatoes right off of her own vines for her Christmas dinner. Just before frost this fall Mrs. Conklin transplanted a tomato plant, taking it from her garden and placing it in a large flower pot. The plant was then taken into the house and placed with her potted flowers, where it has thrived. Mrs. Conklin had ripe tomatoes for her Thanksgiving dinner and will have some for her Christmas dinner. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Claude Bishop, formerly of this town, but now residing in Indianapolis, who with his wife, is visiting William McNary, who lives east of Greencastle, met with a painful accident Friday evening when he stepped on a pitch fork in the barn on the McNary farm. One prong of the fork entered his foot causing a painful wound. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

The condition of Mrs. A. M. Stowe, who was operated on at the Methodist Hospital at Indianapolis several weeks ago for appendicitis, is reported to be much improved. It is hoped that Mrs. Stowe can be brought home in a week or ten days. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Thomas, the son of A. H. Manuel, who resides on east Anderson street, fell this afternoon while playing at the high school building and broke his right arm just above the wrist. The lad was running from a playmate and stumbled over the stone steps that lead to the basement of the high school building and fell on his right arm fracturing it badly. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

CLOVERDALE. S. Paul Poynter is a former Cloverdale boy, and a graduate of DePauw. He is now owner of the Sullivan, (Ind.) Times, and the St. Petersburg, (Fla.) Times. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

FILMORE, R. R. NO. 2. The son of J. B. Morrison, while returning home from Cloverdale, narrowly escaped being badly hurt when the horse he was driving became frightened at a loose shalve and ran away. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MALTA. The sale at Harley Smith's Monday was well attended. Mr. and Mrs. Smith will go Bainbridge in a few days to make their future home. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MALTA. Last Sunday being Mary Shuck's birthday anniversary about twenty of her friends made her a surprise. Candies and fruits were served. All departed at a late hour wishing her many more happy birthdays. She received several beautiful presents. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

WALNUT VALLEY. The school at No. 10 is having a week's vacation. The teacher, Edward Scott, and wife are spending the week with homefolks near Mt. Meridian. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

WALNUT VALLEY. William Wells bought a nice heifer from Alice Frank one day last week. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

REELSVILLE. James Rodgers, who lives near Reelsville, missed a duck about four weeks ago and believed that it had either been stolen or killed by a fox. Imagine his surprise a few days ago to see the old duck come waddleing home with 14 ducklings tagging along behind. Tim Bond, another Reelsville man, is claiming a record for a turkey hen he owns. Recently he found the nest of the hen with 8 eggs. It is rare for either a duck or turkey to nest so late in the season. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

John Keightley has returned from a business trip to Elwood and has accepted a position at the Palace Barber Shop. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Harry Wells, who has assisted Treasurer Reat during his term of office, has accepted a position with the Central National Bank of this city and will assume his duties there Friday. He will also assist Treasurer Henry Runyan for a few weeks. (Greencastle Daily Herald., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, January 1, 1914; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

A horse belonging to Herbert Elmo, who resides southeast of the city, died Friday of hydrophobia. The horse was bitten by a mad dog several days ago and developed a well defined case of rabies. The animal was valued at $135. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

The following officers were elected by the comrades of the Greencastle Post, No. 11, department of the Indiana G. A. R., for the ensuing year at the regular meeting held Dec. 2: John Kellar, commander; C. M. Short, S. V.; W. B. Vestal, adjutant; L. P. Chapin, chaplain; Simpson O'Hair, O. of D.; H. C. Reeves, O. G.; T. C. Grooms, S. M.; A. H. Lockridge, Q. M. S. Simpson O'Hair and Col. Dorsett will be representatives to the state encampment. H. C. Reeves and Robert Allen are the alternates. The officers will be installed at the meeting held January 3. The Memorial Day exercises will be held at the court house instead of at the cemetery as has always been the rule. The committee that decorates the graves will leave immediately after the exercises for the cemetery. (Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Masons Elect Officers.
New officers were elected and installed at the meeting of Temple Lodge, No. 47, Free and Accepted Masons, Wednesday evening.
The following are the new lodge officials:
Lawrence H. Athey...W. M.
George M. Wilson...S. W.
Raleigh C. Siddons...J. W.
James McD. Hays...Treasurer
Edward E. Caldwell...Secretary
Herman B. Pierson...S. W.
Oscar G. Williams...J. D.
Elmer Crawley...Tyler
Fay Hamilton...Steward
Jerome M. King...Trustee
(Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Morton Lodge Elects.
The Morton Lodge, No. 469, F. & A. M., has elected the following officers:
R. A. Talbott...W. M.
Lee Whitted...S. W.
Amos Brown...J. W.
S. B. Thomas...Secretary
Albert Gardner...Treasurer
L. S. Moler...S. D.
Alva Stultz...J. D.
D. P. Alexander. T.
Lee Wood...Trustee
(Herald-Democrat., Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, December 26, 1913, Vol. 7, No., 47; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

BAINBRIDGE. John A. Givin has broke up housekeeping, and is going to Missouri. He had a public sale of his household goods Saturday afternoon. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

BAINBRIDGE. Quite an exciting scene occurred on the street Wednesday evening. Two daughters of John Shuey were driving along the street, when their horse became frightened and ran away, throwing the girls from the buggy, and bruising one of them considerably, the buggy being torn to pieces. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

BELLE UNION. C. C. Hall and Miss Jane Hurst were married at the residence of the bride's grandparents Tuesday. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

BELLE UNION. W. B. Brown has at last concluded to roof his barn. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

BRICK CHAPEL. Chas. Johnston is suffering considerably with a cut on the instep of his right foot, which he received several days since while trying to cut off a turkey's head. That turkey is not minus its head yet. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

FILLMORE. S. P. James has moved into the property he bought of the Leachmans. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

FILLMORE. Andrew Jackson, Jr., has moved on a farm, and John Clark in the house he vacated. James Nesmith occupies the Morris house. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

FILLMORE. B. M. Nicholson is moving to Greencastle. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

FLOYD TOWNSHIP. Isaac Keith a former citizen of this township, died suddenly at Danville, Ill., last week, while being treated for cancer on the lower lip. He had been a sufferer from the disease for somtime. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

HAMRICK. A number of our neighbors and friends surprised Miss Alice Houck the first day of April, it being her birthday. They presented her with a nice chair, and several other appropriate presents. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MANHATTAN. Volney Smith shipped three hundred dozen eggs last week. He goes east this week to purchase his spring stock of goods. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MAPLE GROVE. Harry Elliott has moved from Greencastle to the farm of S. H. Hillis. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MAPLE GROVE. J. N. Dicks made one hundred gallons of molasses this season. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MAPLE GROVE. John McFarlane has hired to Lex Hillis; Erastus Hinkle, to W. A. Reeves; Sandy Scobee to Ben Singleton. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MAPLE GROVE. Milton Hillis has moved to Greencastle. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

PUTNAMVILLE. John B. Cooper has placed a very nice pavement around the street in front of his residence. It would be well if some of the rest of our citizens would do the same thing. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

PUTNAMVILLE. Miss Ella King started to Greenville, Ohio, last Saturday. She intends making her future home there. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

PUTNAMVILLE. William Berigan moved to Greencastle Junction Tuesday. He is going to work on the Vandalia. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

PUTNAMVILLE. Persons desiring the Sunday edition of the Indianapolis Journal can get them of Edgar Bishop every Sunday evening (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

RUSSELLVILLE. Quite a squabble is up between Messrs Long and Hoover as to who shall have the postoffice, but Mr. Darter thinks that he will hold it for a while yet; at least while there is trouble in their camp. Meanwhile Dr. Baird, the only Democratic applicant, is gaining friends every day. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

RUSSELLVILLE. Harvey Jones has moved his harness shop back to his old stand. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

RUSSELLVILLE. Taylor Swope will move out on a farm in Parke county. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Ind., Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

UNCLAIMED LETTERS.

The following letters remain in this office uncalled for:
Fox, Edward.
Irwin, L. R.
McElhaney, C. W.
Morgan, Glenn.
O'Neal, John.
Rhubart, Miss Grace.
Wengle, B. F.
In calling for the same please say "advertised." A. O. Lockridge, P. M.

(Herald-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 17, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 9, 1913; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Interment at Forest Hill cemetery in April, 1913:

Merle Abrams, Crawfordsville, Ind., age 28 years, apoplexy.
Anna E. Fry, Putnam county, Ind., age 56 years, --.
N. Hazel Thompson, city, age 21 years, diabetis.
Catherine O'Brien, Putnam county, Ind., age 80 years, heart disease.
J. N. "Bob" Robinson, city, age 36, paralysis.
William Callahan, city, age 76 years, pneumonia.
Joe Daggy, Supt.

(Herald-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 17, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 9, 1913; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Capt. Blankinship, the builder of the colored school house, is in nowise responsible for its inferior and "outcast" appearance. He did the best he could for the money received, and says that the material is good. The error was in attempting to erect a public building with a sum inadequate for such a purpose, inspired by improper motives, and regardless of the welfare of the city. If the children now going there should be distributed in the ward schools, what could this building be converted into? It looks like the city had an elephant on its hands. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Henry Meltzer has been appointed [illegible]-de-Camp to Department Commander Foster, G. A. R., with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. The BANNER salutes Colonel Meltzer. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

A stranger coming up town from the Vandalia depot the other night, was surprised to see so many "lightning bugs" on the streets, and was especially struck with their being apparently stationary. As he came nearer they seemed to have long black tails reaching to the ground. It was very strange, and he began to experience a sensation akin to fear, for he had never seen such monsters before. Certainly, they could'nt be fairies, for that would beat the Black Crook, nor did he believe that fairies would wink at him as these did. Cautiously and with much trepidation he approached the first, and when he had arrived within four or five feet, it emitted enough light to enable him to discover that it was a street lamp! (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Harry Savage had a remarkable adventure Sunday evening. Shortly after night had fallen upon the city he went out for a quiet walk on Seminary street, with a fair lady upon his arm, to whom he talked sweetly, as is his wont, of art as exemplified in fitting the human form divine with elegant clothing, made in the latest styles, thus rendering himself and her oblivious of all surrounding objects. There was an occasional "lightning bug" beside their path, but the rays of light emitted were not so overwhelming as to attract their attention, or to give warning of the danger ahead. He had arrived at the climax of his description of "the latest think out," when suddenly they found themselves "the latest thing in" a mud hole up to their necks. In the darkness they had stepped into an excavation made for a sewer from Mrs. Sheek's residence, at the crossing of Locust street. They climbed out of the mud and water as best they could, minus hat and bonnet, and the lady was hastily taken home, and then Mr. Savage sought his hotel, the wettest and the maddest man ever seen in Greencastle. A damage suit agatnst the city may result. Where, oh where, were our street lamps then? (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

The Crawfordsville Review says: George Durham, of Russellville, has received from Washington City two dozen German Carp with which he has stocked a pond near his house. George is very enthusiastic on the fish question. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

The Indiana Farmer Says: Mr. R A. Mayhall, New Maysville, Putnam Co., Ind., has recently purchased of Churchman & Jackson, Beech Grove Farm, the imported prize winning cow Dahlia, 439, together with four other of their fine cows, also a fine young bull calf of Le Brocque prize. Mr. M. is laying the foundation for a herd of thoroughbred Jerseys. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

The State Horticultural Society met at Muncie, Ind., this week, and was attended by citizens of this County, as follows: Mr and Mrs. J. C. Ratliff, J. W. Ragan, and Joe H. Priest. The attendance was good and the proceedings interesting. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

The Christian Church Sunday School has chosen the following officers for the ensuing year: Supt., Mrs. D. Stanley; Asst. Supt., John A. Crose; Sec., Miss Katie Riggs; Asst. Sec, Chas Jennings; Treasurer, John Ireland; Cor. Sec., John A. Crose; Organist, Miss Susie Christie; Supt. Musical Dept., Miss Carrie Weik; Librarians, James Woodrum, Albert Ricketts, Frank Hays, Ira Owen. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

The following officers for the Women's Reading Club, for the ensuing year, were elected Saturday: President, Mrs. J. E. Earp; First Vice, Mrs. James Beck; Second Vice, Mrs. E. Marquis; Third Vice, Mrs. J. B.DeMotte; Recording Secretary, Mrs.Jonathan Birch; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Jerome Allen; Treasurer, Mrs. Emma Hoyt; Critics, Mrs. J. R. Miller and Miss Minnetta Taylor. (Greencastle Banner., Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, April 9, 1885; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Greencastle Commandery, No. 11, K. T., has elected the following officers for the ensuing year: W. G. Burnett, E. C.; Adam Hanna, G ; G. W. Bence, C. G.; Elder A. J. Laughlin, P.; Hiram Teter, S. W.; C. Phayler, J. W.; G. H. Brown, Treas.; J. A. Crose, Rec. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

The following officers, in addition to those mentioned elsewhere have been chosen by Greencastle Cammandery, No. 11, K. T.; Saml. Alben, St. B.; Ed. E. Black, Sw. B. Chas. W. Arnold, W.; Sol. Henry, Sent. Trustees will be elected at next stated meeting. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

Greencastle Council, No. 17 R. & S. M., has chosen the following officers for the ensuing year: Wm. H. Smythe, Ill. M.; H. C. Darnall, Deputy; C. W. Arnold, P. C. W.; G. C. Smythe, Treas.; John A. Crose, Rec., W. A. Y. Bishop, C. of G.; James Stone, S. and S. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

Greencastle Chapter, No. 22, R. A. M., has elected the following officers for the ensuing year: H. C. Darnall, H. P.; Chris. Phaylor, K., G. H. Brown, S. W. A. Y. Bishop, C. H., C. W. Arnold P. S.; M. T. Conover, R. A. C.; G. C. Smythe, Treas.; John A. Crose, Sec.; D. E. Williamson, 3d V., F. B. Catherwood, 2d V.; Samuel Alben, 1st V.; A. R. Brattin, G.; H. C. Darnall, Trustee 3 years. (The Greencastle Star., Greencastle, Indiana, December 24, 1881, vol. 9, no. 36; Transcribed by SallyH)

Fred O'Hair is of the opinion that the equipment of automobiles is not complete. Three things are shy, according to his ideas. The three tools which he believes should be added to the kit are a grubbing hoe, a spade and a good old coal oil lantern. For the first time since he began to drive his father's new Cadillac car Fred had occasion to use some tools, last night. He had driven his father to the farm north of town, and while Mr. O'Hair was at the farm house, Fred was to turn the auto around and head it toward Greencastle. In his maneuvers Fred got the rear wheels of the machine in a ditch. When he attempted to get out the rear wheels would spin around but would not take the car out of the ditch. Going to the farm house he borrowed a spade, grubbing hoe and lantern and went to work. Finally he dug trenches from the wheels and got safely started on his way home. He intends, however, to add some new equipments to his tool kit: namely, a hoe, spade and lantern. (Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 6, no. 10, Thursday, April 11, 1912; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

SLIGHTLY INJURED WHEN STRUCK BY COW'S HORN
Isaac Harris, who lives on North Indiana street, and who is employed at the Bennett dairy, just north of town, was slightly injured about eight o'clock Thursday morning when a cow struck him in the face with its horn. Harris was working near the cow's head, when the animal suddenly raised its head and swung it to one side. The end of one of her horns struck Harris in the right eye, causing an injury to the eye and a slight injury above it. Mr. Bennett brought Harris to town immediately and Dr. Tucker dressed the injury. Luckily, the horn did not injure the eyeball and Dr. Tucker says that the injury to the eye will not be permanent. Harris, however, will be unable to work or several days. (Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 6, no. 10, Thursday, April 11, 1912; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

Mr. Ira Masten met with a serious accident while in town last Friday He was riding a horse in front of Campbell's Hardware store and the animal became frightened at a passing train. While triying to turn the horse's head in an opposite direction, it began backing and reared and fell over backwards. Mr. Masten was thrown violently to the ground, striking his head and knocking him insensible. It is belived that the horse also fell onto his leg, as that was severely injured. He was unconscious for quite a while, and remained in a serious condition for several hours. We are glad to say, however, that he is now better and it is believed he will get along all right, although he had a very narrow escape from serious injury. --Coatesville Herald. (Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 6, no. 10, Thursday, April 11, 1912; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

Charles Kelley and Arthur Hamrick had all kinds of trouble this morning when they started to Mr. Kelley's farm, east of town in the Kelley automobile. They got out to the farm all right but when Mr. Kelley attempted to turn his machine around he got in the ditch at the side of the road. The car wheels sank in the mud up to the hubs and after an hour or so of futile effort to get out a farmer's team was utilized as motive power and the machine was gotten out of the ditch. Then, soon after they had started for town, bang a tire blew out. Another half hour to repair the tire before they were on their way again. When the men reached town they were covered with mud and their usual good nature was just a little bit awry. (Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 6, no. 10, Thursday, April 11, 1912; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

Wm. Hartwood, the old reliable barber, has moved his shop to corner of Jackson and Franklin streets, where he will be happy to see all his old patrons and as many more as wish to call. (Greencastle Banner, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 35, no. 13, Thursday, March 31, 1887; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

William M. and Joseph Torr have been running the stone-quarry and lime-kiln at Oakalla the past Summer. (Greencastle Banner, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 29, no. 43, Thursday, October 27, 1881; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

The tooth of a mastodon was found in Walnut creek, west of town, the other day by R. D. Goddard. It is now on exhibition in Brattin's show window. (Greencastle Banner, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 29, no. 43, Thursday, October 27, 1881; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

"Stebor," the Indianapolis correspondent of the Terre Haute Express, writes as follows regarding a gentleman who is soon to become a resident of this city: "Col. Henry Jordan has purchased a fine farm adjoining Greencastle, of Col. John R. Mahan, the consideration being $20,000. Col. Jordan is a child of political fortune, and there is not one of his acquaintances who is not glad of it. He was a gallant soldier, and after the war struggled along here in the practice of law until appointed Register in Bankruptcy to succeed Col. Ray, when he accumulated money rapidly on account of the closing up of all bankruptcy business. The office is now abolished by limitation, and it is safe to say a more deserving and competent person could not have been given the appointment. Col. Jordan has a great liking for the ways of countsy life, and will be happier when he moves with his family to the farm." (Greencastle Banner, Greencastle, Indiana, vol. 29, no. 43, Thursday, October 27, 1881; Transcribed and Contributed by SallyH)

TAKES TURPENTINE WITH SUICIDAL INTENT
It was made public Tuesday that a Mrs. Gorham, who lives in the old Sinclaire homestead in the south part of town, attempted suicide by drinking turpentine, several nights ago. The reason for the attempt to take her life is not known. The woman recovered from the effect of the turpentine. It is said that she took only a small amount. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

TAKES OVERDOSE OF LAUDNUM
MRS. VERNE TWIGG NEAR DEATH FOR SOME TIME FROM DRUG, SAID TO HAVE BEEN TAKEN AS RELIEF FOR TOOTHACHE.
SUICIDE RUMORS AFLOAT
Mrs. Verne Twigg had a narrow escape from death, about 8:30 o'clock Monday evening, when she took an over-dose of laudnum, supposedly for the toothache.. The affair has an air of mystery, as the Twigg women refused to tell what she had taken until Tuesday morning. There were many reports afloat about town Tuesday morning that she had tried to commit suicide. This however is said not to be true. Mrs. Twigg had gone from her house, on the corner of Chestnut and Locust street, into the yard. She had walked only a few feet, when she fell. Mrs. Jessup, who lives in the same house with Mrs. Twigg, ran to her. A crowd of neighbors were soon on the scene, and they picked up her up and carried her into the house. Before she was taken into the house the woman was heard to say: "I took something. I guess I'm done for; I guess I'm going." Dr. A. E. Ayler was called and after working for some time, succeeded in emptying the woman stomach. The physician questioned the woman as to what she had taken, so that he might know what course to take, but she refused to tell. At first she said she had taken nothing. Later the woman admitted that she had taken something, but refused to tell what. The woman soon recovered and there is little doubt but that she will recover. Tuesday morning the woman told Dr Ayler that she had taken a dose of laudnum in an effort to get relief from an aching tooth. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

WILLIAM SMITH TO LEAD HIGH SCHOOL IN MINNESOTA
William Smith son of Rev and Mrs. L. S. Smith who live on the corner of Bloomington and Anderson street, has accepted a position as principle of the high school, at Crookton Minn. Mr. Smith will go to Crookton next fall to take up his work. The position carries a good salary. Mr. Smith will graduate from DePauw this spring. During this year and last he has been attending DePauw and teaching English at the high school. His father Rev. L. S. Smith is a secretary of the Endowment Fund Association of DePauw. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

THREE INJURED IN A RUNAWAY
MISS BESSIE GROGAN RECEIVES BROKEN COLLAR BONE AND MRS. CHARLES LUETEKE AND MISS MARY RUARK HURT WHEN THROWN FROM BUGGY
OCCURED NEAR LIMEDALE
Miss Bessie Grogan, Mrs. Charles Lueteke and Miss Mary Ruark were all injured about 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon, when a horse which they were driving ran away upsetting the buggy, and throwing them out. Miss Grogan has a broken collar bone, Miss Ruark a badly wrenched back and Mrs. Leuteke a sprained ankle. All three also have painful bruises about the body. The accident occurred just south of Limedale.

The three women had gone driving in a rig belonging to Miss Ruark's father, Harry Ruark. When a short distance south of Limedale, one of the shafts broke, letting part of it down so that it struck the horse's legs. The animal took fright and ran. The three occupants of the buggy made every effort to stop the horse, but were unable to do so. After running a short distance the horse made a sudden turn and upset the buggy.

When the buggy upset the women were thrown out and all struck the ground with great force. Mr. Sigman, living on the G. W. Bence farm, had passed the women only a few minutes before the accident. He and another man saw the horse start to run and heard the women scream, when thrown from the buggy. He procured a two-seated surry and brought the three to Greencastle. All were taken to the home of Miss Ruark. Dr. Sudranski was called and treated their injuries. Later Miss Grogan and Mrs. Leuteke were taken to their homes.

The horse ran for more than a mile after upsetting the buggy. A farmer caught the animal and brought it back to town. The horse is not injured but the buggy is demolished. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

"Uncle Jim" Hurst, who has developed into quite an automobile salesman in the past year, decided a short time ago that to be a real salesman one must be able to drive a car. And so Jim had several of the buggies in the large buggy room moved so that there was room to run an auto up and down the room. For several days he practiced and learned to run a car. He then ventured out on the streets and ran around the square several times without mishap. Gaining courage he asked a friend to accompany him and started out the East Washington pike. Every thing went all right until he got ready to turn back and then a problem confronted him. He could not turn around. But Jim was resourceful and at the first gate which opened into a field he stopped and opening the gate drove in. With several ares of room to work in Jim managed to get the machine headed west and arrived home in safety. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

CLAUDE FARMER BADLY INJURED
SON OF MR. AND MRS. T. B. FARMER, WHO LIVE JUST EAST OF TOWN, IN HOSPITAL AT LAFAYETTE SUFFERING FROM BROKEN THIGH.
ACCIDENT ON WEDNESDAY
While helping unload a car of coal, at Lafayette, Wednesday afternoon, Claude Farmer, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Farmer, who live just east o ftown, fell from the car. His right thigh was broken in the fall. Half conscious the young man was carried into a power house and later taken to St. Elizabeth Hospital.

The car on which the young man was working was on a dock several feet above the ground. With one foot on the car and one on the dock, Farmer lost his hold and fell to the ground, a distance of more than 20 feet. The injury will cause the young man to be confined to bed more than six weeks. As the thigh is broken, when he recovers, the right leg will be several inches shorter than the left.

Mr. Farmer formerly worked on the Monon. He has been in Lafayette for about a year. The car on which he was working when injured belongs to the Fort Wayne & Northern Indiana Traction Company. He had been working for that company only a short time. Dr. W. W. Hutcheson, of this city, was called to Lafayette Thursday, on account of the injury of Mr. Farmer. Mr. Farmer is a brother of Mrs. Hutcheson. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Between 2 and 3 o'clock Thursday morning, Officer Stone and H. G. Pearson, baker for the Zeis Grocery store, heard an explosion and what sounded like the crash of glass. The men could not find what or where the disturbance was and at this time it is not known whether safe crackesr were at work or some person shooting a gun. There were many rumors that a safe had been blown in one of the business houses of this town, but so far, no trace of it has been found. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

"Rastus," Greencastle's former colored piano player, who three years ago enlisted in the Regular Army, has served out his time and is expected home within the next few days. With "Rastus", whose real name is Harold Townsend, will come Martin Payne, who also has served his three years in the army. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

BORN IN 1803; TOO YOUNG TO WED
CORNELIUS BARTLETT, OF NEW MAYSVILLE, INSISTS THAT BIRTH OCCURRED OVER CENTURY AGO, BUT IS DENIED LICENSE TO WED.
WILL HAVE TO WAIT
Although Cornelius Bartlett, of New Maysville, insisted that he was born in 1803, when he applied for a marriage license, Tuesday afternoon to marry Miss Eva May Myers of New Winchester, County Clerk Adams held that he was too young to enter into wedlock legally,, and one rip was given the filled-out application for license before it found its way into a yawning basket.

A woman's hesitancy about signing a public document was all that kept two youthful hearts from beating as one. The irony of the matter is that she would have been perfectly safe in affixing her signature to an affidavit as to the girl being of legal age, and her caution gave Clerk Adams a chance to discover an error of his own which was about to result in the prospective groom getting his clearance papers on the sea of matrimony. When Mrs. Denny, of North Jefferson street, aunt of Miss Myers, hesitated about signing the affidavit, Mr. Adams told the would-be groom that as he was over 21 he could sign the affidavit and make things all right. The young man informed him that he was not 21. Mr. Adams glanced at the application he had just filled out and saw the date "May 29, 1887." He informed the young man that he was almost 22.

"No I'm not. I'm not 18 yet," insisted Bartlett.

"In what year were you born?" inquired Mr. Adams.

"In 1803," was the reply.

"Then you are too young to get a marriage license," said the clerk, who realized that the young man was becoming so excited that there was excuse for him missing his age a century.

Bartlett fished out a written permit from his father, authorizing the clerk to issue him a license, but a stern law says a boy under 18 cannot marry, notwithstanding parental permission. Clerk Adams told them to come back after the 29th of May and he would see that they got a license.

Mr. Adams had understood the young man to say he was born in 1887, and the license would have been issued without question, as Bartlett appeared to be fully 22 years old, had not Mrs. Denny hesitated about signing the affidavit that the girl was over 18, which she was. It was evident from the downcast appearance of the young people as they left the clerk's office that they considered the 29th of May centuries removed.

Young Bartlett is a son of John A. Bartlett, a merchant of New Maysville. The young lady's father lives in Kansas and she is making her home with her grandmother, Mrs. Blanton, near New Winchester--Danville Weekly Gazette. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Thomas Nixon, of Cloverdale, formerly proprietor of a barber shop in Greencastle, is in a critical condition as the result of blood poisoning. Mr. Nixon, who is conducting a barber shop and undertaking business in Cloverdale pierc of his hand with a needle Friday night while embalming a body and blood poisoning developed. Mr. Nixon's arm probably will have to be amputated and it is feared that he can not survive the operation. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Dr. Brummett, who has been practicing medicine at Reelsville for the past seven or eight months, has moved to Illinois. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

The progress on the improvement of East Washington street is rapid, and it will be only a short time before the constructing of the new sidewalks, curbs and gutterings will be commenced. Almost all of the old walks have been torn up, and the grading is completed with the exception of about two blocks on the west end. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Contractor Bergen said Monday morning that the work would be started on the building of the sidewalks and curbs on East Washington street, the latter part of this week, providing the weather made it possible. The work of grading is almost completed and a few days of clear weather will make it possible to finish it. (Star-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 18, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 26, 1911; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Will Hammond, youngest son of Nat Hammond, is slowly recovering, and it is hoped that he will be able to be out in a short time. (Greencastle Banner, Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, December 4, 1879; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

John Hammond Allee, son of Mrs. J. P. Allee, of this city, who is in Washington, where he is employed in the Marine Corps work, has been promoted to the rank of a sergeant. The pay for this rank is $200 a month. This is the second promotion for Mr. Alle in the past eight months. He is in the clerical department of the corps. (Greencastle Herald, February 23, 1918, Page 3; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MALTA. Olyn Campbell who was badly burned about three weeks ago is able to be up most of the time. (Greencastle Herald, vol. 14, Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, January 19, 1922; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

MALTA. Mrs. Kate Campbell and son Walter spent last Sunday with Morris Campbell and family. (Greencastle Herald, vol. 14, Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, January 19, 1922; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

James Terry, who makes his home with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Hammond of Marion township is visiting for a few days with his father, Earl Terry, of Greencastle. (Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, Monday, June 19, 1922; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

JOHN ALLEE HONORED BY APPOINTMENT TO U. S. NAVAL ACADEMY
John [Percy] Allee, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Allee, received word this morning from Washington, D. C., that he had been awarded the first appointment from the Fifth Congressional district to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis. The appointment was secured through the efforts of Congressman Sanders. Allee, who is a senior in the local high school, is the editor-in-chief of the Annual issued by the fourth year class. His scolarship is of a high rank, and his many friends in the city predict success for him in his examination for admittance to the naval academy, which he will take in April. (Greencastle Herald, January 28, 1918, front page; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Three children named Querry were brought here from Cataract, Monday, and sent on the cars to relatives living in Harrisonville, Mo. A card containing the destination of each child was fastened to its clothing, and each was furnished with a through ticket. The oldest was a ten-year-old boy, and the other two being girls of six and eight years. (Greencastle Banner, Greencastle, Indiana, Thursday, March 6, 1879; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Mrs. William Guy, wife of a Big Four electrician, who live on north Madison street, who recently was declared to be insane, was taken to the state hospital for the insane in Indianapolis on Monday. Mrs. Guy is suffering emotional insanity. She is the woman, who last fall went to Miss Florer's room in the public schools and created a scene by threatening the teacher. Two of the children will be taken to the Greencastle Orphans' Home while the third will be sent to the state school for feeble minded. (Herald-Democrat, vol. 7, no. 17, Greencastle, Indiana, Friday, May 9, 1913; Contributed and Typed by SallyH)

Miss Cletis Williamson Seriously Injured Sunday
Miss Cletis Williamson, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Williamson on south Crown street of this city, was the victim of a serious accident early Sunday morning, when she fell against a stove, inflicting servere burns on her face and neck. The Williamson family had arisen early Sunday morning on account of the illness of Miss Lota. Miss Cletis came down stairs and was standing near the stove in the living room, when she fainted, falling headlong against the stove. The left side of her face, neck and left hand were badly burned. Miss Williamson was reported to be getting along nicely today. (Herald-Democrat, Greencastle, Indiana, January 30, 1914; Submitted by Teresa Haines Rigney)

Frank Cole, a drayman of Cloverdale, was severely hurt this morning, when he was kicked by a horse. Cole suffered a badly lacerated leg and severe bruised but the injuries are not of the serious nature. He had gone behind the horse to place feed in a manger when the animal kicked him. (The Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, August 23, 1915; Submitted by Teresa Haines Rigney)

Miss Irene Koesler was here Sunday to spend the day with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L.N. Koesler, on south College avenue. Miss Koesler, who has been spending the summer at the home of Mr. and Mrs. F.H. Krase in Indianapolis, has accepted a positition as trimer in the millinery department of the Wm. Block store in that city. (The Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, August 23, 1915; Submitted by Teresa Haines Rigney)

PAINFULLY HURT WHEN BUGGY OVERTURNS
Mrs. Columbus Alspaugh was painfully injured shortly after noon Sunday, when a buggy in which she and her sister, Mrs. George Ensign, were riding, turned over near the Vanfossen blacksmith shop in Limedale. The horse they were driving frightened at a passing automobile and turned suddenly turning the buggy over. Mrs. Alspaugh suffered a badly bruised hip, and Mrs. Endign escaped injury. When the buggy turned over the horse was thrown to the ground and people nearby held the animal down until Mrs. Alspaugh and Mrs. Ensign were able to get out of the buggy. Mrs. Alspaugh will be confined to her bed for several days as a result of the accident. She was attended by Dr. W.W. Tucker. (The Greencastle Herald, Greencastle, Indiana, August 23, 1915; Submitted by Teresa Haines Rigney)

SUICIDE ATTEMPT NOT SUCCESSFUL
Fred Moore a printer, attempted to commit suicide by taking carbolic acid at this home at the corner of Jackson street and Seminary street about 4:30 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Despondency because of domestic troubles are said to have been the cause for the attempted suicide. Moore went to the Cook Drug store at about four o'clock and purchased a two-ounce bottle of carbokic acid and ten cents worth of turpentine. He then went on to his home where he found Millard King, brother of his wife, and his wife. Entering the room where the two were talking he handed his wife the note and then raised the bottle to his lips and started to drink the acid. Mrs. Moore, realizing that her husband was about to commit suicide sprang toward him and knocked the bottle from his hand. In doing so she spilled some of the acid upon her hand, which was slightly burned. Moore's face too was slightly burned as was his lips and tongue. Dr. McGarghey was called and attended the would be suicide. He had drank but little acid, however, and was little the worse for his experience. Moore came to Greencastle shortly before the holidays. He worked in local print shops for several weeks and since then has worked in shops in nearby towns. His wife who is a former Greencastle woman came to Greencastle at about the same time he did and they have live in one of the Chapin houses since. (Star-Democrat, Greencastle, Indiana, February 28, 1913; Submitted by Teresa Haines Rigney)

Greencastle, IN.
Feb. 26, 1898.
The Republican precinct committeemen of Putman county met this morning and unanimously selected Maj. John G. Dunbar chairman of the county central committee. The name of Hon. Silas A. Hays, of this city, will be presented by the Putnam Republicans as a candidate for Congress at the congressional convention.

GREENCASTLE, Ind., June 10--Senator S. F. Lockridge's sale of short horn cattle, held today at his farm near this city, drew a large crowd. The prices were fair. Forty-two head were sold, ranging in price from $200 down, with an average of $70. (Source: Indiana State Journal, June 17, 1898)

GREENCASTLE. Ind., June 10--August Horn, aged twelve, son of W. E. Horn, postmaster at Cloverdale, was accidentally shot yesterday while watching a ball game. A man sauntered into the crowd, carrying a loaded gun. Some boys were fooling with it when it was discharged and Horn was killed. Though but twelve years old, the boy was deputy postmaster, and was one of the best-known lads In the county. (Source: Indiana State Journal, June 17, 1898)

GREENCASTLE, Ind., July 11--A thirteen-year-old son of James Brown, a quarryman of this county, was fatally injured to-day. He loaded a gas pipe heavily with giant powder, touched the fuse, the pipe burst and Brown was terribly mangled by the explosion. His recovery is very doubtful. (News Of the Week Current Events (News Article) Date: 1897-07-14; Paper: Indiana State Journal)

Thrown from a Buggy
Greencastle, Ind., April 27--Herbert Gifford, son of the man who attempted suicide twice last week, was thrown from a runaway buggy this afternoon and received injuries that may yet prove fatal. His father still lives and may recover. (Date: 1880-04-28; Paper: Cincinnati Daily Gazette)

LIST OF LETTERS,
Remaining in the Post Office at Greencastle, Indiana, on the 1st of October 1830
which if not taken out within three months will be sent to the General Post Office as dead letters

(Indiana Democrat, Nov 13, 1830; Contributed by James D.VanDerMark)


Austin, Daniel 2
Allen, Solloman
Athey, William Esq.
Ash, Majr. George
Anderson, Col. John
Brown, Robert C 2
Baird, John
Bell, Daniel
Buchanan, Samuel J.
Barnard, Thomas
Bliss, C. W.
Barnes, David Esq.
Barnett, Joshua
Becroft, William 2
Blake, James
Bridgewaters, Elias
Cunningham, J. W
Chaney, John
Celler, John
Cooper,William
Case, Joseph 2
Cardwell, Thomas
Clark, Harriman
Collins, Miss Harriet
Crawford, John
Catlen, John
Collins, Abraham L. Esq.
Conley, John
Durham, Jacob
Denney, James
Evans, Joseph
Evans, Martha
Evans, Margaret
Elliot, John
Earp, Joel
Farley, Joseph F.
Forgeson, Henry
Frank, Andrew
Forkner, Lewis
Fortney, Jonas
Gunter, Thomas
Grogan, John
Goodrich, Justice
Gilstrap, Peter Esq.
Grave, Windle
Goodwin, Capt. Abner
Griffth, Samuel
Gleason, John
Garten, May
Gibson, Campbell
Hoffman, Jacob
Haines, Dainel
Hogan, Washington
Higgins, David
Harrison,Basil
Hedges, Benjamin
Hawkins, John
Hunter, M.
Jelf, Joel 2 Keller, Henry Live, Robert
Lefollett, Usual
Lister, Nathan
Logan, William
Logan, Joseph
Lyon, Peter
McQuery, Daniel 2
Mc Carty, William
Matkins, Isaac 2
Myers, West
Miller, James
Mclntire, Jacob
Norvel, Grief
Nelsonm, John
Owens, Rev Obadiah
Orr, Gen. Joseph
Percy, Mrs. Eliza
Pickeson, Rebecca
Pearson, Mr.
Pierce, Isaac
Patton, John
Pearcy, Col. George
Peck, Majr. Issac
Presser, Jona
Pratt, Thomas R.
Robertson, Thomas
Runjan, William
Raburn, John
Rolling, Willis
Rabum, Julias
Russel, Nancy
Rolen, James
Relph, Rohn
Smith, John 2
Shuck, Jacob
Sandram, David
Stevenson, A. C
Swift, John 2
Starbuck, Benjamin
Sanders, Jesse
Sallust, James
Sigler, Col. Daniel
Shull, Joseph
Tuberville, Jesse
Trusner, Philip
Tilson, Joseph
Townsend, Luke
Tresner, Philip
Weller, Henry 2
Wilson, Edward
Watkus, Samuel
Woodard, John
Wright, Reuben
Winkfield, John
Worley, George
Wain, Henry
Wright, Benjamin
York, Joshua.
Lewis H. Sands, P.M. 10-3




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