Genealogy Trails

RUSH COUNTY, INDIANA
BIOGRAPHIES
CENTER TOWNSHIP



PERRY AKERS, who has resided in Center Township for the past fifty eight years, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, October 3, 1827, being the son of Burrel and Catharine (Hartsell) Akers, who were natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania respectively, the former of English and the latter of German descent. When he was two years old, his parents came to Rush County and settled upon a farm in Center Township, where both the mother and father spent the rest of their lives, the former dying October 10, 1869, and the latter dying December 28, 1869. The subject of this sketch grew up to manhood upon the farm where his parents settled, and upon it he has chiefly continued to reside ever since. His occupation throughout his entire life has been farming. He was married December 24, 1873,t0 Miss Loudoscia J. Cummings, who was born in Guilford County, N. C, October 11, 1844. Her parents were Enos F. and Emeline (Ballinger) Cummings. In November, 1884, Mr.  and Mrs. Akers removed to Carthage, this county, where Mrs. Akers died on the 7th day of the following February. Shortly after this, her surviving husband returned to his farm in Center Township, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church and a Republican in politics. He owns, in all, 120 acres of land, eighty of which are in Center Township and forty in Ripley Township. His home farm contains a good residence and is in other respect substantially improved.
 
SAMUEL J. BELL, of Center Township, was born where he now lives, October n, 1839. His parents, John and Margaret Bell, were natives of Kentucky and North Carolina, respectively, and are both deceased. His father was the son of Hugh Bell, and his mother was the daughter of John Kennedy. He was reared upon his birthplace where he continued until his marriage which occurred April 17, 1862. His wife was Mary C. Walker, and was born in Jackson Township, being the daughter of Aaron and Sarah Walker. From the time of their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bell resided upon a farm in Center Township, until 1877, when they moved to Indianapolis. There our subject was engaged in the lumber business two years, after which he was similarly engaged in Venice, 111., eighteen months, and three and one half years in St. Louis, and about fourteen months in Memphis, Tenn. He returned to Rush County in June, 1884, and has since been a farmer and tile and brick manufacturer of Center Township. He has had eight children: Sophia, Julius E., Corena J., Ida I., Maggie P., Walter J., Josephine and Leroy, of whom Sophia, Corena J., and Walter J., are deceased. Mr. Bell is a member of the Christian Church as is also his wife. In politics, Mr. Bell is a Prohibitionist. He owns 100 acres of land, four fifths of which is in cultivation.

JAMES BILLINGS, an old citizen of Center Township, was born in Kent County, Del., October 27, 1816, being the son of James and Nellie (Bostic) Billings, who were also natives of Delaware, the former of English descent and the latter of English American descent. His father was the son of Everett Billings, who was a native of England. His mother was the daughter of Shadrich Bostic. He was reared upon a farm in his native county, and at twenty years of age he came westward to Butler County, Ohio, where he resided for a period of eighteen years. While there, he was chiefly employed at chopping wood and making rails. In October, 1854, he came to Rush County, a resident of which he has been ever since. He was married in Union Township, this county, to Miss Mary Ann Lord December 2, 1856. She is also a native of Kent County, Del., born May 16, 1823, being the daughter of Andrew and Letitia (Reed) Lord, both of whom were also natives of Kent County, Del., the former of English and German descent, and the latter of Scotch descent. Her father was the son of Henry and Jennie Lord, and her mother was the daughter of Ebenezer and Sarah Reed. Mr. and Mrs. Billings entered upon their married life in Union Township. In October, 1872, they removed to Renter Township, and they have ever since occupied their present home. They have had two children: Martha E., born December 12,1857; married to Terrence McMannis January 4, 1877; she died May 5, 1880, leaving one child, Clara G., born December 31, 1877; their second child is Henry L. C, who was born October 24, i860, and is now at home with his parents. Mrs. Billings is a member of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Billings is an ardent Republican. He owns ninety acres of land, nearly all of which is in cultivation.

JOHN BITNER, one of Rush County's most prosperous and substantial farmers, was born in Fayette County, Ind., January 3, 1829. He is the son of Hiram and Lydia (Low) Bitner, both of whom were natives of East Tennessee, of German descent. His parents came to Rush County before he was quite a year old and settled in Center Township, where he was reared upon a farm. He was married October 30,1848, to Miss Judah Windsor, who was born in Grayson County, Va., August 6, 1827, being the daughter of .Amos and Mary M. (McDaniel) Windsor, both of whom were natives of Surry County, N. C. Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Bitner have resided upon a farm in Center Township, and with the exception of one year they have occupied their present home. They have had born to them thirteen children as follows: Amos J., born August 28, 1849, died December 17, 1849; Amanda, born April 27, 1851, died April 17,1863; Stephen, born September 14, 1853, died May 30, 1862; Hiram, born April 8, 1856, died April 20, 1863; Albert, born December 5, 1857, died April 11, 1863; Henry, born January 21, i860, died April 16, 1863; Genias, born November 2,1861, died April 8, 1863;. John J., born July 12, 1864; Laura I., born August 1, 1866; Adda and Ida (twins), born November 26,1868; Ira L., born July 8, 1871, died December 22, 1883; Lura J.., born January 19, 1874, died July 14, 1875. Mr. and Mrs. Bitner are members of the Christian Church. In politics Mr. Bitner is a Democrat. He owns 1864 acres of excellent land, about 120 of which is in cultivation. His farm contains a good residence and one of the largest and best barns in Rush County. Mr. Bitner ranks among the well-to-do and substantial farmers of his township, and he and his wife are among its worthy and honored citizens. Mr. Bitner's portrait will be found on another page.

JAMES BOWLES, a worthy and honored citizen of Center Township, was born in Harrison County, Ky., August 14, 1807. He was the son of Robert and Elizabeth Bowles, who were natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and was married there in September, 1827. The lady that became his wife was Sallie Ann Smith, who also was a native of Harrison County, Ky., born September 19, 1809, being the daughter of Paul and Christena, (Jaquish) Smith. In 1835, Mr. and Mrs. Bowles came to Rush County and located upon a farm in Anderson Township, just east of Milroy, and the farm now owned by John Jackman. In the fall of 1837, they removed to Union Township, and two years later they removed to Washington Township. In 1852, they removed to Center Township, in which our subject has resided ever since. He has given his whole attention to farming and trading. His efforts were attended with liberal returns, and at one time he was the owner of 1,080 acres of Rush County's best land. His wife died June 27, 1886. Mr. Bowles is the father of seven children: Paul, Christena, Joseph, Thomas J., Mary Ann, James H., and Amanda J., of whom Paul, Christena and Mary  are deceased. In politics, Mr. Bowles is an uncompromising Republican.

DANIEL T. CARTER, of Center Township, was born in Fleming County, Ky., February 20, 1814, being the son of Henry and Mary (Green) Carter, the former of whom was born in Culpepper County, Va., in about 1776, and the latter was born in Virginia in about 1791. He was married in his native country to Miss Ellen B. Fitch, on the 30th day of November, 1843. She was the daughter of Henry and Matilda Fitch, the former of whom was born in Kentucky, September 13, 1794, and died November 14, 1874; the latter was born in Kentucky, December 27, 1799, and died in August, 1864. In 1845, Mr. Carter moved his family to Rushville, traveling by stage from Cincinnati, having but $5.00 in his possession. His first work was in the harvest field at 62 cents per day, and he afterward assisted in the erection of many buildings in Rushville. Latter on, he rented a farm, and by hard work saved $4,000, with which he purchased a farm in Union Township. He is now the owner of a splendid farm in Center Township, all of which is due to his personal economy and industry. He and wife have had seven children as follows: Mary I., born September 2, 1845; Robert B., born January 2, 1847, died October 28, 1869; Henry F., born March 28, 1849; James M., born November 2, 1851; Martha E., born January 14, 1854; Alvin, born September 17, i860 and Charles M., born April 25, 1871. Mr. Carter's father was a soldier under General Anthony Wayne and died about i860. His mother died about 1856. In politics he is a Republican. He is a self-made man and a good citizen.

MARTHA A. CHANDLER, of Center Township, was born in Bourbon County, Ky., October 12, 1835, being the daughter of Aaron and Ann Barnes, both of whom were also natives of Bourbon County, Ky. Her father was the son of Brinsley and Mary Barnes, and her mother was the daughter of John and Martha Laughlin. Before she was two years old her parents came to Rush County, and settled in Noble Township, where she grew up to womanhood, and where, on the 19th day of February, i860, she was married to John G. Chandler. He was born in Harrison County, Ky., September 17, 1824, being the son of James and Elizabeth Chandler. He was married to Irene E. Welborn, in September, 1855. She bore to him two children: Ilola May and Walter, both of whom are deceased. Mrs. Irene Chandler died May 2, 1858. The subject of this sketch is the mother of three daughters, as follows: Carrie A., born February 2, 1861, married to Turner Hudelson, in May, 1885; Lizzie K., born June 12, 1862, married to Horace Atkins, in September, 1880; and Mary M., born November 22, 1864, married to Arthur Hinshaw, April 7, 1887. The husband of Mrs. Chandler died November 26,1871. She is a member of the Christian Church. She owns eighty acres of land, nearly all in cultivation.

MRS. CATHARINE CLARK, of Center Township, was born in Fayette County, Ind., October 1, 1825, being the daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Roysdon) Wandel, who were natives of Seneca County, N. Y., and Ashe County, N. C, respectively, the former being born July 30, 1797, and the latter being born January 11, 1802. He died December 16, 1854, and she died September 20, 1849. Her paternal grandparents were George and Sarah Wandel, and her maternal grandparents were Nathan and Nancy Roysdon, who were natives of North Carolina. When she was nine years old her parents removed to Rush County, and settled upon the farm where Mrs. Clark now resides, her father having entered the land from the government. She grew up to womanhood, at the home of her parents, and was married to Wiley Clark, July 21,1847. He was born in Wilkes County, N. C, December 25, 1820, being the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (McBride) Clark, who were natives of Maryland and North Carolina respectively. His father was the son of John T. and Barbara Clark. Mr. Wiley Clark was a farmer by occupation, which pursuit he followed in Center Township, until the time of his death, which occurred January 24, 1880. He was a Democrat in politics and was a member of the Christian Church. Mrs. Clark's parents came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1815, whence, after a five years' residence they entered land in Center Township, where both spent the rest of their lives. Her grandparents, George and Sarah Wandel, settled in Franklin County, Ind.; the former was born in May, 1770 and died February 11, 1817; the latter was born March 14, 1777, and died May 27, 1845. Mrs. Clark is the mother of seven children, only three of whom are living.    Their names and ages are Amanda F., born May 13, 1848, died May 30, 1883; Stephen A., born January 12, 1852; Albert N., born March 4, 1856, died April 27, 1857; John L., born July 20, i860; George B,, born June 25, 1864, and two sons that died in infancy, unnamed. Mrs. Clark is a member of the Christian Church. She has a farm of eighty three acres and a comfortable home, where she resides in a pleasant way. October 19, 1871, Amanda F. was married to Samuel Cohee, and became the mother of three children: Bertie N., Wiley E. and Marple P., of whom only the oldest is living. Stephen A. was married October 26, 1871, to Orpha Bowen, by whom he has one child, Pearl L, born April 29, 1878; John L. was married September 13, 1883, to Mary C. Bitner, by whom he has two children: Alta Doy, born March 8, 1885, and Bertha E., born March 4,1887. George B. was married September 16, 1886, to Ida J. Bitner, by whom he has one child: Emery L.

DR. J. C. DILLON, a prominent physician of Rush County, is a native of the township in which he resides, having been born in the house he now occupies, June 27, 1845, being the son of Dr. A. C. Dillon, who was one among the early practitioners of the county, and who practiced his profession in- this county for a period of thirty five years. He was reared upon the old homestead. He received in the common school a good knowledge of the ordinary branches of learning, and later on he was a student in De Pauw University for some time. Early in life he resolved to fit himself for the medical profession and studied for some time under his father. During the winter of 1866-67, he took a course of lectures in the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, and took his second course during the winter of 1869-70, graduating in March, 1869. He returned to his home in Center Township, and entered upon his professional labors in connection with his father. He soon won for himself an extensive practice, which he has ever since been able to hold. With the exception of one year, during which -he was located in Kokomo, his professional labors have been entirely performed in Rush County. His marriage to Mary J. Florea occurred in October, 1868. They are the parents of an only son, whose name is Otto P. He was born April 1, 1870. In addition to a common school education, he was a student at Notre Dame three years and at Butler University two years. He is now a student at medicine, having entered upon its study with his father in September, 1877. In order to keep well up with the latest advancements in the medical science, Dr. Dillon continues to devote himself to the study of his profession and scarcely a year passes but what some part of it is spent in some good medical college. He is, therefore, not only an alumnus of the Ohio Medical College, but also a physician whose learning has. been gathered in several of the best medical colleges in the country. While his practice extends to every branch of the profession, he makes a specialty of the diseases of the throat and nose. He is a skilled practitioner and has a rank among the leading physicians of Rush County.

ANDREW B. ENGLISH, one of Rush County's prominent citizens and well-to-do farmers, was born in Abbeville District, South Carolina, June 24, 1827. He was the son of Hugh P. and Mary A. (Armstrong) English, both of whom were also natives Abbeville District, S. C, and both were of Scotch Irish descent. His father was the son of Andrew and Martha (Porter) English, and was born October 30, 1803. His parents were also natives of Abbeville District, S. C. When he was five years old, or late in 1832, his parents emigrated to Preble County, Ohio, where they arrived in December, 1832. Three years later they continued westward to Indiana, and coming to Rush County, settled upon a tract of land in Center Township, where the father and mother spent the rest of their lives, the former dying January 10, 1850, and the latter April 9, 1852. The subject of this sketch spent his early life upon the old home place, assisting to clear and cultivate the ground in summer, and attending the district school in winter. While his education was confined to the common branches, it was such as to fit him for the practical affairs of domestic life. Through observation and reading he has somewhat mitigated the lack of early training, and he is now recognized as a well informed man. He was united in marriage to Miss Ellen M. Hudelson, November 29, 1851. She was born in Center Township, this county, November 10,1828, being the daughter of John M. and Matilda Hudelson, a more extensive mention of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. English have continued to occupy the old English homestead, where the former has dedicated his whole attention to agricultural pursuits. He now possesses a rank among the prosperous farmers of the county. Mr. and Mrs. English are devoted members of the United Presbyterian Church. In politics, Mr. English is a pronounced Republican. He takes a lively interest in the success of his party, and will use every reasonable effort to promote its welfare. He has been elected to the office of Assessor in his township three times, and is the present incumbent. He served as a member of the Board of County Commissioners from September, 1879, to September, 1882, and in that capacity he made an able and efficient officer. He owns 113 acres of land about ninety of which is in cultivation.

CYRUS FLOREA, who has resided in Center Township for the past fifty years, was born in Adams  County, Ohio, June 20, 1819, being the son of Joshua and Mary Florea, with whom he came to Rush County in 1837. The family settled in Center Township, where Cyrus continued with his parents until his marriage, which occurred January 13, 1842. The lady who became his wife was Almira Keever, who was born in Clarke County, Ohio, August 18, 1822, being the daughter of Henry and Rhoda Keever, both of whom were natives of Ohio. She came with her parents to Rush County in 1830, and this has ever since been her home. Shortly after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Florea settled upon the farm they now occupy, which has been their home ever since. The life occupation of Mr. Florea has been farming, and in this connection his efforts have been liberally rewarded. He at one time owned about 600 acres of land. This has been reduced by giving his children comfortable homes, but he is still the owner of a farm of 100 acres, which is in a good state of improvement and cultivation. He and wife are the parents of six children, two of whom are deceased. Those living are: Orange T., Mary J., Joshua E. and Florella A. Those deceased are: Sarah E. and Dale. Mrs. Florea is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics, Mr. Florea endorses the principles of the Union Labor Party. He has held the office of Justice of the Peace four years. He is one of the well-to-do and substantial men of his township.

JOSIAH FLOREA, farmer of Center Township, was born in Adams County, Ohio, October 30, 1823, being the son of Joshua and Mary (Spurgeon) Florea, and a twin brother of Joseph S. Florea, of Center Township, whose history appears below in this work. His father and mother were natives of Maryland and Kentucky, respectively; the former, who was the son of Albert Florea, was chiefly of German descent, and the latter, who was the daughter of John Spurgeon, was of English descent. When he was fourteen years old, or in October, 1837, his parents came to Rush County,, and settled upon a tract of land in the southwest part of Center Township, and the farm now occupied by Joseph S. Florea. There our subject spent his youth assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. He was married at the age of twenty three, or February 26, 1846, when Miss Martha Price became his wife. She was born in Center Township, this county, March 30, 1829, being the daughter of Jonah H. and Susannah (Burton) Price, the former of whom was born in Clarke County, Ohio, being the son of David and Sarah Price, and the latter, who was the daughter of Thomas and Mary Burton, was born in Virginia. Shortly after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Florea located upon the farm they now occupy, where Mr. Florea has ever since pursued the avocation of a farmer.    His home farm in this county contains 121 acres, about 100 of which are in a good state of cultivation. It contains a good residence and is in other respects well improved. Besides this he is the owner of 120 acres of first class land in Howard County, this state. He and wife are the parents of eleven children, as fol-lows: Sarah M., Louisa, Mary F., Lydia E., Martha S., Joseph A., Vilena, Isabell, John C, William O. and Bertha L., all of whom are living except William, who died in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Florea are members of the Baptist Church. In politics, Mr. Florea endorses the principles of the Union Labor party.

JOSEPH S. FLOREA, an old and honored citizen of Center Township, was born in Adams County, Ohio, October 30, 1823, being the son of Joshua and Mary (Spurgeon) Florea, and a twin brother of Josiah Florea, of Center Township. When he was fourteen years old, his parents came to Rush County, and settled upon the farm he now occupies in Center Township. There his youth was spent assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. He was married April 10, 1844, to Miss Dolly Keever, who was born in Clarke County, Ohio, September 6, 1824, being the daughter of Henry and Rhoda (Isham) Keever. The latter was the daughter of George J. Isham, who served as a Drum Major under Washington during the Revolutionary War. Mr. and Mrs. Florea spent the first year after their marriage with the parents of the former. They then removed to Washington Township. A year later they removed to Union Township, where Mr. Florea became a sub-stantial and prosperous farmer. In 1868 he and wife returned to the old homestead in Center Township, where they have since resided. They are the parents of nine children, two of whom are deceased. Those living are: Maria, Almira, Patrick H., Rosa E., Mary A., Olive D. and Sarah E. Those dead are: Joshua and Emily R. Mr. and Mrs. Florea are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The former is a member of the Masonic Lodge, having joined it more than twenty five years ago. While not a radical partisan, his political affiliations have generally been with the Democratic party. While a resident of Union Township he served as Trustee seven years. In i860 he was elected a member of the Board of County Commissioners, and served in a creditable manner for nearly four years. He has frequently been urged to accept other positions of honor and trust, but has preferred the quietude of domestic life.

BRICE D. FORT, farmer of Center Township, was born on a a farm three miles north of Knightstown, Henry County, April 10, 1844. He was the son of Benjamin and Eliza (Laten) Fort, who were natives of Virginia, and Maryland respectively. His boyhood and early youth were spent upon the old homestead where he was born. He received in  the district  school an  ordinary common school education. At eighteen years of age he began to learn the blacksmith's trade in Knightstown under the instruction of John D. Cameron.    He became the partner of Mr. Cameron at the end of eighteen months and they continued to operate a shop together for a period of nine.years.    Mr. Fort then purchased the interest of Mr. Cameron and continued alone for two years longer when  he sold out. In the meantime he was united in marriage August 4, 1870, to Miss  Alice  A.  Woods, daughter of Joseph and Elsie (Pearson)  Woods, the  former  of whom  was born in Wayne County, Ind. In about 1875 Mr. and Mrs. Fort removed from Knightstown to Center Township, this county, in which they have ever since resided.    They have occupied their present home since 1876. The whole attention of Mr. Fort since coming to this county has been given to farming, and he now has a rank among the prosperous and well-to-do farmers of Center Township. He  and wife are the parents of three children as follows: Charles V., Minnie I. and Harry B., all of whom are living.    Mr. and Mrs.  Fort and daughter Minnie, are members of the  Friends'  Church.  In the fall of 1864 Mr. Fort entered the service of the Union army in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty ninth Indiana Regiment, with which he served in the capacity of Second Sergeant for one hundred days when his term of service expired.    He is a member of the Masonic Fraternity, the G. A. R., and in politics he is a Republican.    He  owns a farm of 120 acres, about 100 of which are in a high state of cultivation.

JAMES H. FOXWORTHY, of Center Township, was born in Fleming County, Ky., April 4, 1817. He was the son of Samuel and Mary Ann (Calvert) Foxworthy, the former of whom was born in Virginia, being the son of William and Clarissa Foxworthy, and the latter was the daughter of Landon and Ann Wood Calvert. He was reared upon a farm in his native county, and continued with his parents until he became of age. For a number of years thereafter he was engaged as a farm hand m Fleming and Mason counties, Ky. In the fall of 1846, he came to Rush County, and during the following winter he taught public school in Center Township. In the fall of 1847, he returned to Kentucky and was engaged as a teacher in Lewis County during the winter which followed. In the fall of 1848, he went to St. Francis County, Ark., thence, in company with his uncle, Stephen Calvert, to New Orleans. In the spring of 1849, he returned northward to Fleming County, Ky., and a month or so later he again came to Rush County, in which he has chiefly resided ever since. He was married September 12, 1849, to  Miss  Cynthia A. Barrett, who was born in the State of Virginia, January 21, 1822, being the daughter of Rev. Samuel and Clarissa (McCommas) Barrett, both of whom were also natives of Virginia, the former being the son of Edward and Esther Barrett, and the latter being the daughter of William and Dicy McCommas. Mr. and Mrs. Foxworthy entered upon their married life in Knightstown, and during the winter of 1849 and 1850, Mr. Foxworthy taught school in Ripley Township. In the spring of 1852, they removed to their present home in Center Township, which they occupied ever since. The whole attention of our subject since then has been given to agricultural pursuits, and in this connection his labors have been attended with a reasonable degree of success. He and wife have had two children: Mary F., now the wife of Robert T. Overman, of Knightstown, and Anna D., now the wife of Hon. Thomas M. Green, of Rushville. Mr. and Mrs. Foxworthy are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In her earlier life, Mrs. Foxworthy taught public school four terms, two of which were in Knightstown, and two in Rip-ley Township, this county. In politics, Mr. Foxworthy is a Republican. He has a farm of sixty acres, which is fitted up with a good residence and is otherwise substantially improved. He is an industrious and successful fanner. The grandmother of Mr. Foxworthy, Mrs. Ann Wood Calvert, was a relative of Lord Baltimore.

WASHINGTON GILSON, a prominent citizen of Center Township, was born in Rushville Township, March 6, 1829. He is the son of Andrew and Mary Gilson, who were both natives of Virginia. His boyhood was spent in his native township upon a farm. His father died of cholera in 1832, after which he remained  with his widowed mother until he was fifteen, when he went to live with his uncle, Thomas Moffett, also of Rushville Township. He was with him two years, and then went to live with his brother in Center Township, where he continued until his marriage, which occurred December 10, 1850. The lady that became his wife was Miss Mary J. Curry, who was born in Harrison County, Ky., September 10, 1826, being the daughter of -James A. and Nancy Curry, who also were natives of Kentucky. Shortly after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Gilson located where they now reside in Center Township, where Mr. Gilson has ever since been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He owns a handsome farm of no acres, which is in a good state of improvement and cultivation. He and wife are the parents of two children, both living. They are Thomas L. and Mary B., both of whom are married. Mrs. Gilson is a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Gilson has never identified himself with any church, but is a firm believer in the principles of Christianity.  
In
politics he is a Democrat.    He has served his township as Justice of the Peace one term.

JAMES L. HAMILTON, of Center Township, was born in Washington Township, Rush County, June 27, 1823. He was the son of Robert and Rebecca Hamilton, the former of whom was born in Laurens County, S. C, October 9, 1797, and the latter was born in Wythe County, W. Va., April 1, 1807. They were married in this county, September 12, 1822. They entered upon their married life upon a farm in Washington Township, where their son James L. Hamilton, was born. On Christmas day, 1830, they removed to Center Township, and settled upon a farm, where James spent his boyhood and youth, and where his father and mother spent the rest of their lives. Robert Hamilton died January 16, 1879, and his wife survived him until October 5, 1886. They were the parents of six children: James L.., born June 27, 1823; William H., born November 18, 1824; Hugh, born November 11, 1826, disappeared December 3, 1868; Polly, born January 1, 1829; Andrew J., born January 1, 1831, died November 14, 18685 and Francis M., born April 14, 1834, died June 8, 1883. The subject of this sketch was married to Eliza J. Reeves, May 24, 1846. She was born May 6, 1830, and died August 23, 1864. In the latter part of May, 1865, Mr. Hamilton was married to Mrs. Anna Eliza Reeves, who was born February 4, 1839, and died July 6, 1865. The third marriage of Mr. Hamilton occurred February 25,    1866, when Miss Mattie J. Fink became his wife.    She was born in Adams County, Ohio,  November 14, 1842. She was the daughter of James C. and Mary A.  (Compton) Fink, who were natives of Huntingdon County, Pa., and Lexington, Va., respectively. Mr. Hamilton and his first wife had three children: Mary A. C, born September 2, 1847; Robert I., who was born July 26, 1850, and who is now the Superintendent of the City Schools  at Huntington, Ind.; James L., born April 6, 1854, died December 3, 1881. Mr. Hamilton and his present wife have two  children: Clement L. V., born May 8, 1867, and Benton Fink, born January 26, 1873-    In politics, Mr. Hamilton is a Democrat. He has resided during his life in  Grant County, Ind., Wichita, Kan., and in Hannibal, Mo.   He returned to Center Township, February 1,1885.

HON. JOHN M. HUDELSON, deceased, was one of those rugged pioneers of Rush County, who have left the impress of their character and energy upon their communities. He began life with this century having been born January 1, 1800. The place of his nativity was Millersburg, Bourbon County, Ky., and his parents were John M. and Catharine (Irvin) Hudelson, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. He passed his youth and early manhood  in Kentucky, and in the spring of  182S, located in the woods of Center Township, this county, where the remainder of his life was   spent  in  usefulness  and industry. He had visited  this locality in 1822,  and  entered the land that afterward became his home. Possessing a strong and splendid physique, he was enabled by unceasing toil and frugality to gain a competence that was more than enough to soften the aspirates of declining years, and smooth the pathway to the tomb. In 1824, Matilda Hinds, also a native of Kentucky, became his wife. She bore him these five children: Francis I., Sarah J., Margaret E., Mary A. and Robert A.  She departed this life in 1837, having been a devoted wife and mother and a consistent Christian. The second wife was Ann Hudelson, who became such in 1838. By her Mr. Hudeison was the father of two children, Lizzie and Henry.    He was  always foremost in his advocacy of whatever was for the good of society, and in him the public schools found an ardent supporter. In early life he was a Whig but with the downfall of that, he espoused the cause of the Republican party. He was Justice of the Peace, in Center Township, for two terms, having been the first to fill that position in the township.    In addition to this he served one term as Associate Judge of the county, under the old judiciary system, and was for three terms a member of the State Legislature. His death occurred October 18,1879, an event that caused much gloom throughout the community in which he had for more than fifty years been an honored and respected citizen. His portrait is presented with this volume as a fitting representative of those early settlers who contributed so largely to raise Rush County to its present prosperity.

ROBERT A. HUDELSON, whose portrait appears elsewhere, is a prominent farmer of Center Township and a native of the same township, born March 3, 1834. He was the son of John M. and Matilda  (Hinds) Hudelson, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, and the former of Millersburg, Bourbon Co., where he was born January 1, 1800.  he latter was born in 1805. A sketch of the parents appears above. The subject of this sketch was reared upon the old Hudelson homestead in Center Township.  He received in the district school a good common school education and one that enabled him to teach public school, which he did during four winters, or the winters included between the years 1861 and 1865." He was married December 29, 1864, to Nancy E. Barnes, who was born in Noble Township, this country March 9, 1839, being the daughter of Aaron and Ann   (Laughlin)  Barnes who were natives of Kentucky. Shortly after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Hudelson  settled upon the farm our subject now occupies, where they continued to enjoy life together, until their union was
broken by the death of Mrs. Hudelson, on the 16th day of March, 1886. Mr. Hudelson is the father of six children: Ruby M., born November 22, 1865, died December 24, 1871; Anna Bruce, born March 7, 1868; Ella Kate, born June 12, 1870; Lurena, born February 15,1873; Frank M., born January 22, 1878, and Bessie Barnes, born December 24, 1880. Mr. Hudelson is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, and a Republican in politics. He has served his township as Justice of the Peace one term and has also served as a member of the Board of County Commissioners one term. He owns 190 acres of first class land, about 140 of which are in cultivation. His farm is fitted up with good buildings and is desirably located. He also possesses an interest in the old home place which amounts to about thirty acres.

BENJAMIN F. HUDELSON, a well-to-do farmer and prominent citizen of Center Township, was born in Spiceland Township, Henry Co., January 28, 1848. He was the son of William and Lucinda Hudelson, the former a native of Nicholas County, Ky., and the latter a native of Henry County, this state. He was reared upon a farm in his native county, and received in the district school, a good common school education. At twenty years of age he took up the avocation of a teacher, which furnished his winter's employment for a period of six years. During the summer season, he worked upon a farm. He was married at the age of twenty four, or October 31, 1872, to Miss Mary E. Allen, who was born in Madison, Jefferson County, Ind., July 31, 1849, being the daughter of Eli and Eleanor Allen who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Hudelson entered upon their married life upon a farm in Center Township. Two years later, they removed to Henry County, where they resided upon a farm until in. March, 1885, when they returned to Center Township and settled where they now live. The attention of Mr. Hudelson is given to farming though he has in connection with this pursuit accommodated the public to a considerable extent in the capacity of an insurance agent. He and wife are the parents of four children as follows: Fred E., born September 17,1873; Clara E., born February 22, 1876; Floy B., born December 2, 1878, and Allen F., born January 3, 1884, died September 4, 1885. In politics, Mr. Hudelson is an ardent Republican. While not a political Prohibitionist, he is a strict temperance man and eschews the use of tobacco and intoxicants in every form. He owns a farm of 164 acres, about 140 of which are in cultivation. His convictions of right, though positive, are honest and he does not believe in concealing the truth of whatever character it may be. He was elected to the office of Justice of the Peace in April, 1886, which reflects
 very creditably upon his standing in the township, owing to the fact that it is strongly Democratic.

JONATHAN L. LORD, a prominent citizen of Center Township, was born in the State of Delaware, November 9, 1830, being the son of Andrew and Letitia (Reed) Lord, both of whom were also natives of Delaware, and both of English descent. His father died in Delaware. When he was about four years old, his mother removed to the State of Ohio, and settled in Belmont County, opposite Wheeling, W. Va. Some two or three years later she removed to Butler County, Ohio, and when he was about seven years old, his mother came to Rush County, and settled in Union Township. In 1842 the family emigrated to Clarke County, Mo., but not being pleased with the country, they returned almost immediately to Rush County, and again settled in Union Township. A year later they removed to Fayette County, but returned to Rush County in a few years and settled in Noble Township. Later on they returned to Union Township, where our subject continued with his widowed mother until his marriage, which occurred February 25, 1857. The lady that became his wife was Miss Clara A. Scruggs, who was born in Fayette County, Ind., March 8, 1840, being the daughter of William and Magdalene (Esterly) Scruggs. Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Lord located in Center Township, residents of which they have been ever since. The life occupation of Mr. Lord has been farming, and in this connection he has been fairly successful. He and wife are members of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Lord is a Republican. He owns a handsome farm of no acres, which is fitted up with a handsome residence, and which is a very desirable location.

CHARLES H. LYONS, an industrious young farmer of Center Township, was born in Noble Township, this county, August 11, 1853, being the son of Elijah and Amanda (Berkley) Lyons, both of whom were also natives of Noble Township, the former being the son of John W. and Amanda Lyons, and the latter being the daughter of John Berkley. His grandparents were all early settlers of Rush County. He was reared upon a farm in his native township, working with his father until his marriage. Florence A. Downey, daughter of Harrison and Ellen Downey, became his wife January 16, 1881. She is also a native of Noble Township, born October 14, 18^1. Her father and mother are natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Lyons entered upon their married life where they now live, where the former has ever since pursued the avocation of a farmer. He owns a first class farm  of   100   acres, about three fourths of which is in  a fine state of cultivation.    He and wife are the parents of two children: Elsie and Nellie, both of whom are living.

JOHN W. MARTIN, merchant and grocer of Mays, was born in Chester County, Pa., February 16,1837. He was the son of Major Benjamin  L.  and Sarah (Christman) Martin, who were also natives of Chester County, Pa. His father served as a Major during the late war. He was the son of John and Ruth Ann (Stevenson) Martin, who also were natives of Pennsylvania.    When  he was two years old his parents settled in Wayne County,  this  State, where our subject was reared and where his parents still reside. The father, B. L. Martin, served as  Auditor of Wayne County, from 1853 to 1861, and during the greater part of that time our subject was his deputy.    In the meantime he had provided himself with a collegiate education, having spent six years in Whitewater College of Centerville.  In 1861 he resigned the deputy auditor-ship to  accept the position as deputy Secretary of State under Judge William A. Peelle.    At the end of two years he entered the service of the Union Army and served in a creditable manner until the close of the war. On retiring from the service, he returned home and he was married in Aurora, this State, to Jennie J. Jones in the fall of 1866. She was born in Aurora, Ind., being the daughter of Jonathan and Sophia Jones.  Shortly after his marriage Mr. Martin went to Grenada, Miss., where he was engaged in merchandising two years. He then returned to Wayne County, Ind., and two years later he engaged in mercantile pursuits  in Chester and Bethel, both of Wayne County.  In about 1876 he entered the employ of the Maddux Bros, of Cincinnati as traveling salesman, in which capacity he continued three years. He then came to Rush County and engaged in merchandising in Raleigh, and also farming in the vicinity of that place. He continued in this way six years.    By this time his health was seriously impaired and he retired from business and spent one year recruiting it. February 1, 1887, he opened a general store in Mays, this county, to which his attention is now directed. He is the father of four children, Stella A., Inez S., Alice Blanche and Jessie, all living. Mrs.  Martin is a member of the Presbyterian Church.    Mr. Martin is a member of the Masonic fraternity and a Republican in politics. While a resident of Wayne County he served as Justice of the Peace one term. He is an intelligent man with good business qualifications and a first class citizen. His father is also an ardent Republican and has represented Wayne County, this State, two terms in the State Legislature.

ELDER AARON H. MORRIS, Superintendent of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home,  of   Knightstown, is a native of Butler County, Ohio, born March 13,1846, being the son of John and Sarah (Rose) Morris, who  were natives  of Butler  County,  Ohio, and Union County, Ind., respectively. He was less than five years old when the hand of Death had deprived, him of both  father and mother, and at ten years of age he entered the home of his grandparents, Joseph and Kezia Morris, who resided in Oxford, Ohio. As soon as he became old enough he entered upon  a course in the Oxford High School, and graduated from that institution at about sixteen years of age. In January, 1863, he entered upon a classical course in Miami University, and attended at that time one term. In June, 1863, he entered the service of the Union Army in Company K, Eighty Sixth Ohio Volunteers, with which he served until the 14th of February, 1864, when his term of service expired. On the 1st day of May, 1864, he entered Company I, 167th. Ohio Regiment, and  served   100  days,  when   he    received   an honorable discharge. He participated in a number of engagements, in all of which he discharged his duties in a manner becoming a loyal soldier. On retiring from the service, he  returned to Oxford, Ohio, and entered the Freshman Class of Miami University. There he pursued his classical studies for a period of four years, and graduated with honors in July, 1868. In the  fall of that year he took the position of High School Principal at  Connersville, this State. In the fall of 1869 he took charge of an academy in Montgomery County, Ind., a position he retained one year. He then took charge of an academic school at Ladoga, of that county, where he remained between two and three years, when he removed to Wave-land, Montgomery County, and there  became the pastor of the Christian Church.  "Three years later, or in January, 1875, ne took charge of the Christian denomination at Noblesville, where he remained live years. This was followed by a one year's pastorate at Tipton, after which he returned  to Noblesville, and   during the four years which   followed,  in connection with his ministerial work, he. performed the duties of   County Superintendent of Hamilton County, to which  office he was twice   elected In June,1885, he retired from that office, and in August following, the Board of Trustees elected him Superintendent of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, of Knightstown.  Notwithstanding the grave responsibility imposed by this position, Mr. Morris has discharged his duties in a manner which reflects credit both to himself and the State. The Home is a magnificent structure, and one of the truly great institutions of the State, and the history of its management for the past few years is an eulogy upon all concerned. Our subject was married September 9, 1869, to Miss Anna A. Harlan, who was born in Union County, Ind., November 25, 1847, being the daughter of George and Malinda (Stevens) Harlan. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of five children: John H., George G., Edith, Clifford and Harris P. S., all of whom are living.
Mr. Morris is a member of the I. O. O. F. and G. A. R. lodges, and has reached the Knight Templar's degree in Masonry. His political affiliations have always been with the Democratic party.


PHILIP D. PARKER, who for more than fifty years has been a resident of Center Township, and who is one of the substantial and prominent farmers of Rush County, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, April 21, 1818. He was the son of Benajah and Grace Parker, the former of whom was born in Northampton County, N. C, of English and Welsh descent, and the latter was born in Augusta County, Ga., of English and Irish descent. His father and mother came with their respective parents to Belmont County, Ohio, and there they became acquainted and were married in the year 1809. His paternal grandparents were Jacob and Rhoda Parker, who were natives of England and Wales, respectively. His grandfather, Jacob Parker, in his youth was apprenticed to a ship carpenter, but having no taste for that trade, he ran away, and putting his effects in a small wooden chest, he boarded a vessel and came to America, whither he arrived in time to participate in gun-boat building during the Revolutionary War, and thus loaned a helping hand to the striving colonists. He died in Belmont County, Ohio, in about the year 1828. That same old wooden chest is still an heirloom in the family, and is now in possession of the subject of this sketch. His wife, whose maiden name was Rhoda Draper, had preceded him, her death having occurred in about 1822. The maternal grandparents of our subject were William and Rachel Patton, who were respectively natives of Ireland and England. When the subject of this sketch was four years' old, his parents removed to Jefferson County, Ohio, where his boyhood was spent upon a farm. In 1836 he accompanied them to this State, and after a residence of a few months in the village of Raysville, Henry County, the family came to Rush County, and settled upon a farm in the northern part of Center Township, and two miles southeast of Knightstown. There our subject spent the rest of his youth and early manhood, assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. He has ever since continued to reside upon the same old homestead, his occupation being that of a farmer. He was married September 11, 1851, to Miss Joanna Morris, who was born in Washington County, this State, October 9, 1822. Her parents, Benoni and Rebecca Morris, were both natives of North Carolina. The former was the son of Mordicai and Abigail Morris, and the latter was the daughter of John and Jemima Trueblood.    Mr. and Mrs. Parker are the parents of five children, Ella M., Theodore F., Benoni M., Sophia A. and Virginia W., all of whom are living except Ella M., who died in the sixteenth year of her age. Mr. and Mrs. Parker are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, Mr. Parker formerly affiliated with the Whig party, casting his first vote for Gen. Harrison in 1840. Since 1856 he has supported the principles of the Republican party. His farm contains 260 acres of excellent land, about 200 of which are in cultivation. It contains a handsome residence and good barn, and is one of the most desirable farms in Rush County.

THEODORE F. PARKER, a prominent young farmer of Center Township, was born upon the Old Parker Homestead in that Township, November 21, 1856. He is the oldest son of Philip D. and Joanna Parker, a history of whom is given above. He was reared upon his father's farm, and at about twenty two years of age he took up the avocation of a farmer for himself, and to this pursuit his entire attention is now given. He was married September 6, 18S3, to Miss Role C. Pickering, who was born in the village of Cadiz, Henry County, January 24, i860. She was the daughter of Marcus A. and Eliza M. Pickering, both of whom were also natives of Cadiz, Henry County. The former was the son of Jonas and Mary Pickering, and the latter was the daughter of William and Nancy Cooper. Mr. and Mrs. Parker are the parents of one child: Morris, who was born December 25, 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Parker are members of the Friends' and Methodist Churches respectively.    In politics, the former is a Republican.

JOHN F. PECK, a prominent school teacher of Center Township, was born in Hancock County, this State, March 17, 1856. He was the son of James and Minerva (Smith) Peck, who were natives of Connecticut and North Carolina, respectively, both of English descent. His father was a direct descendant of Captain Wadsworth, who concealed the charter of Connecticut in the oak, and his mother could trace her ancestral lineage back to Captain John Smith. His father was the son of Erastus and Mary (Lewis) Peck, and his mother was the daughter of John and Prudence Smith. When he was two years old his parents came to Rush County, and settled in the village of Arlington, where the father worked at the trade of a carpenter, and also served as Justice of the Peace, and where our subject was raised. In i875> the family returned to Hancock County, and located in Carrollton, where our subject made his home with his parents until his marriage. At twenty years of age he took up the vocation of teacher, and this has furnished his winter's employment and the greater part of his summer's employment ever since.    He has now taught for eleven consecutive winters, five of which were in Hancock County, three in Shelby County, and three in Rush County. He taught in the graded schools of Carrollton four years, during three of which he was principal of the school. He was married December 24, 1881, to Miss Nannie B. Leonard, who is also a native of Hancock County, born February 27, 1865. She was the daughter of Rufus B. and Harriet (Eaton) Leonard, who were natives of North Carolina and Indiana, respectively. Her father was the son of John and Levina Leonard, and her mother was the daughter of William and Sarah Eaton. Our subject and wife are the parents of two children: Stella May, born November 16, 1882, and Ralph Waldo, born March 15, 1886. In politics, Mr. Peck is a Republican. In October, 1887, Mr. Peck began the publication of an educational monthly, entitled The Little Messenger, which is designed to be a children's paper and which now has a circulation of about 1,000. He is a faithful worker in the school-room and he possesses a rank among the best teachers of the county.

WILLIAM F. REEVES, a substantial farmer and prominent citizen of Center Township, was born in Brown County, Ohio, September 4, 1827. His parents, Jabez and Nancy Reeves were also natives of the State of Ohio. When William was yet a child but two months old, his parents came to Rush County and located upon the farm he now occupies in Center Township, the father having entered the land from the government. The parents continued upon the same place until the year 1861. In that year they removed to Knightstown, Henry Co., where they still continue to reside. The father is now in his eighty second year, and the mother in the eighty third year of her age. They were married on the 26th day of February, 1824, and have therefore lived as husband and wife more than sixty three years, and though aged as they are, both enjoy good health and bid fair to live for many years to come, to enjoy the fruits and blessings of a well spent life. The subject of this sketch was reared upon the old home place, which he now owns himself, assisting to clear and cultivate the farm in summer and attending district school in winter. At the age of nineteen, he took up the avocation of a teacher, which furnished his winter's employment for about five years. Since then his undivided attention has been given to farming. He was married May 16, 1850, to Hannah M. Gilson, who was born within the present limits of Jackson Township, November 13, 1831, being the daughter of Andrew and Mary Gilson, both of whom were natives of Virginia. They were married in their native state and came to Rush County in about 1820. Here they both spent the rest of their lives, the father  dying in  1832, and the  mother in  1841.
Mr. and Mrs. Reeves have had nine children: Marshal T., Newton J., Jefferson B., Chester D.} Ollie R, Milton 0., Isabell A., Girnie L. and Heber F., only four of whom are living. They are Marshal T., Ollie F., Milton O. and Girnie L. Mr. and Mrs. Reeves are members of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Reeves is a Democrat. He has served his township in the capacity of Trustee one term. He has also served as Justice of the Peace two full terms and was elected for a third term, but resigned before the term expired. He owns a fine farm of 185 acres where he lives, besides another farm of eighty acres in the same township. Their son, Jefferson B., was born September 24^ 1855. He studied law and was admitted to the bar, at Columbus, Ind., where he soon won a prominent place in his profession. He was elected a member of the State Legislature in the fall of 1884, but died before the expiration of his term, his death occurring September 1, 1886.

ABRAHAM RHODES, who has resided in Center Township for the past fifty two years, was born in Bedford County, Pa., March 20, 1810. He was the son of Jacob and Catharine Rhodes, who moved to Montgomery County, Ohio, when he was but seven weeks old. He was reared upon a farm in Montgomery County, and was married there early in 1835. The lady who became his wife was Mary Stroup, who was also born in Pennsylvania. Her parents were George and Catharine Stroup. In May following his marriage, Mr. Rhodes came to Rush County, and settled upon the farm he now occupies. His wife died there February 7? 1884. He is the father of twelve children, seven of whom are living. Those living are: Catharine, John, Henry S., Mary Ann, William F., Nancy J. and Sarah M. And those dead are: Eli, Levina, Elizabeth M., Eliza E. and a girl that died in infancy unnamed. Mr. Rhodes is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In politics, he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Andrew Jackson. Besides considerable property he has given to his children, he is the owner of a splendid farm of 220 acres, which contains a handsome residence, and which is in a good state of improvement and cultivation. He is one of the county's old pioneers, and one of its most highly respected citizens.

HENRY S. RHODES, a native-born citizen of Center Township, was born December 13, 1839, being the son of Abraham and Mary Rhodes, a history of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was reared upon the old Rhodes homestead in his native township, and continued with his parents until he became of age. On the 10th day of May, i860, he was married to Miss Mary A. Ruby, who is also a native of Center Township, born August 10, 1832, being the daughter of Jacob and Mary Ruby, who were natives of
Bedford County, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes entered upon their married life upon the farm they now occupy and there they have ever since continued to reside. The life occupation of Mr. Rhodes has been farming, and in this connection his efforts have been liberally rewarded. They have been the foster parents of three children: The first was William A. Schaffer, who remained with them from the age of thirteen to the age of twenty one, when - Mr. Rhodes gave him a horse, saddle and bridle, suit of clothes and $300 in money. The second child was Ettie Eagle who remained with Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes, from the time she was five years old until she became of age. The third child was Elmer Roberts, who is a nephew of Mr. Rhodes. He has now reached the age of fifteen and his home has been made with Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes ever since he was seven months old. Mr. Rhodes and wife are members of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Rhodes is a Democrat. He has a farm of eighty acres which is in a good state of improvement and cultivation.

ALBERT RHODES, of the village of Mays, Center Township, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, August 29, 1840, being the son of Lewis and Henrietta Rhodes, who were natives of Montgomery County, Ohio, and Rockingham County, Va., respectively. His father was the son of Philip Rhodes, and his mother was the daughter of Charles Yost. When he was eight years old, his parents came to Rush County, and settled in Center Township, where his early life was spent upon a farm. He was married at twenty one years of age, or February 27, 1862, to Mary Hollin-head, who was born in Hancock County, Ind., November 25,1844. She was the daughter of Thomas and Leah Hollinhead! Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes have resided in Center Township, and for the past four years they have resided in the village of Mays. The chief occupation of Mr. Rhodes has been farming though he has also given some attention to the buying and selling of live stock and to the preparation and sale of fresh meats. He and wife are the parents of eleven children: Flora B., born January 5, 1863; Sarah M., born June 30, 1S64; Emma F. born August 2, 1866, died September 1, 1870; Anna J., born March 31, 1867; James W., born December 24, 1869; Mollie M., born April 9, 1872; Owen W., born August 19, 1873; Mattie M. born July 17, 1875; Eva E., born May 2, 1877; William H., born June 30,1879, and Iva E., born February 23, 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes are the grandparents of two children: Rella F., born June 19, 1882, and Elva G., born August 10, 1885. The political affiliations of Mr. Rhodes are with the Democratic party.

WILLIAM F. RHODES, farmer of Center Township, is the son of Abraham and Mary Rhodes whose history is given elsewhere in this work. He was born upon the old home place where his father now lives, in Center Township, December 13, 1845. His early life was spent assisting to plant and cultivate the crops in summer, and attending school in winter. He was married to Miss Eliza Buscher, March 1, 1866. She was born in Ripley Township, January 13, 1848. Her parents, Edward W. and Susann Buscher, were natives of Germany and Ohio respectively, both of German descent. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes located upon the farm they now occupy, where Mr. Rhodes has given his undivided attention to farming. They have had four children: Edward A., Ara L., Amy D. and Effie I., all of whom are living except Amy D., who died in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes are members of the Christian Church. In politics Mr. Rhodes is a Democrat. His farm contains about 102 acres a good share of which is in a high state of cultivation. It contains a handsome residence and is in other respects well improved. Mr. Rhodes is an honorable man and a good farmer.

JOHN F. SOUTHER, farmer of Center Township, was born in Wilkes County, N. C, being the son of Joshua and Martha Souther, both natives of Wilkes County, N. C. He was reared in his native county, on a farm. In 1849, he came to Rush County, and has ever. since been one of the farmers of Center Township. He was married to Mary Ann Bowles, who bore to him eight children, Alvina, Josephine, Dora, Henry, Emma F., Addie, Viola, and a son that died unnamed. Of those named, Alvina,. Josephine and Dora are deceased. Mrs. Souther died July 15,. 1881. In politics, Mr. Souther is a Republican. He owns forty acres of land, is an industrious man and a good citizen.

DANIEL O. STOWHIG, farmer of Center Township, was born in Ireland, August 18, 1837. His parents both died when he was yet an infant child, there being but one day between their deaths. He has, therefore, but very little knowledge of his father and mother. While he was a small child they came to America and to Henry County, Ind., where they both died. The early life of our subject was spent upon a farm, in Center Township. In August, 1861, he entered Company I, Thirty seventh Indiana Regiment, with which he served three years. He came back to Rush County, and on the 29th day of August, 1870, he was married to Mrs. Nancy C. Wysong, who was the daughter of John ' and Nancy Temple. She was born in Rockbridge County, Va., September 29, 1838. They entered upon their married life in Knightstown, and in the spring of 1871 they settled upon a farm in Ripley Township, this county.    Two years later they removed to Center Township, and after a residence of one year upon the farm now occupied by Jonathan L. Lord, they settled upon the farm they now occupy. They are the parents of two children, Iva C, and Harry H., both living. By her first husband, George W. Wysong, Mrs. Stowhig- had three children, Washington, Frank M., and Perl O., the first two of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Stowhig and daughter Perl are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics, Mr. Stowhig is a Republican. He and wife have a good farm and a comfortable home where they reside.

ANDREW J. TODD, who has resided in Center Township since 1849, was born in Mercer County, Pa., March 6, 1820, being the son of John and Mary M. Todd, the former a native of Ireland, and the latter a native of Montgomery County, Pa. His father was of Irish and the latter of Dutch descent. He was reared on a farm in his native county. When he was nineteen years old he came to this State and spent a few months in Ripley and Franklin counties, working at farm work. He then came to Rush County, a resident of which he has been ever since. He was married August 10, 1842, to Elizabeth David, who was born in Bourbon County, Ky., October 25, 1818, being the daughter of Jacob and Catharine David, both natives of Pennsylvania. The life occupation of Mr. Todd has been farming. He and wife have had seven children as follows: Catharine, John, Rachel, Leah, Mary, Jacob D. and Joseph W., of whom Mary is deceased. In politics Mr. Todd is a Democrat. He owns 117  acres of good land, most of which is in cultivation.

JOHN HENRY W. WEAVINGER, a prosperous farmer of Center Township, was born in Owen County, Ind., March 6, 1850. He was the son of John and Susan Weavinger, the former of whom was born in Germany, and the latter was born in Pennsylvania, both of German descent. When he was about five years old his parents removed to Richmond, this State, and one year and a half later they settled upon a farm six miles southwest of that city, where the youth of our subject was spent upon a farm. He was married in Center Township, this county, on the 10th day of June, 1875, t0 M*ss Jennie Buscher, who was born in Ripley Township, this county, January 20, 1855, being the daughter of Edward W. and Susann Buscher, of Center Township. Mr. and Mrs. Weav¬inger entered upon their married life upon a farm in Wayne County, and about fifteen months later they, came to Rush County, and have ever since resided upon a farm in Center Township. They have occupied their present home since the 1st of August, 1881. They have had born to them two children, Anna B., born June 17,1876, and Willie L., born July 5, 1877, died February 22, 1878. In politics, Mr. Weavinger is a Democrat. He and wife have a comfortable home and fifty acres of good land, a good part of which is in cultivation.

ELDER HARVEY WRIGHT, of Center Township, is a native of Montgomery County, Ohio, born September 9, 1820, being the son of Dan and Catharine (Reeder) Wright, who were respectively natives of Vermont and Ohio, the former of English, and the latter of Welsh and German descent. His father was the son of Dan Wright; his mother was the daughter of George and Margaret (Van Cleve) Reeder, who are presumed to be natives of Pennsylvania. When he was yet a young child less than a year old his parents came to Rush County, and became among the first settlers of Richland Township. There his early life was spent assisting to clear and cultivate his father's farm. When he was in his twentieth year, or in 1840, he accompanied his parents to Orange Township, Fayette County, where they settled upon a farm. During his boyhood he attended the district school, but the advantages were poor, consequently his early education was quite limited. This lack of early training has been somewhat mitigated though by reading and home study. During the winters of 1842-3, and 1843-4, he taught public school in Fayette County. Before his second term of school closed he was married, on the 27th day of December, 1843, to Miss Delilah Stephen, who was born in Fayette County, Ind.., March 2, 1827, being the daughter of Thomas G. and Hannah (Sutton) Stephen, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Ohio, respectively. Her father was the son of Levi and Delila (Gatrell) Stephen, who were natives of Pennsylvania. Her mother was the daughter of David and Letitia (Gard) Sutton. Mr. and Mrs. Wright entered upon their married life upon a farm in Orange Township, Fayette County. They continued to reside in that township until the year 1865, when they removed to Center Township, this county, and they have ever since occupied their present home. Mr. Wright has a farm of 182 acres, about 130 of which is in cultivation. His farm is well improved and very desirably located. Mr. and Mrs. Wright have had eleven children, as follows: Drusilla, born November 27,1845; Thomas, born January 12, 1848; George, born April 28, 1850; Frances A., born November 26, 1852; Dan, born September 26, 1854; John, born April 8, 1856; Emma J., born April 2, 1858; Joseph A., born November 26, i860, died August 19, 1887; Rhoda C, born September 16, 1866; Eva E., born August 29, 1869, and Luella G., born February 23, 1872. In July, 1S50, Mr. and Mrs. Wright joined the Baptist Church, of which they have been. devoted members ever since. In 1854, Mr. Wright was ordained as a minister in that church, and he has continued to labor in that capacity ever since. His ministerial labors have chiefly been performed in Rush, and Fayette counties, though his transient labors as a minister extend to eleven different States of the Union. In politics, Mr. Wright is a Democrat. He is an intelligent, well read man, and in addition to general information, he possesses a masterly knowledge , of the Holy Scriptures, to the discussion and correct interpretation of which a good portion of his time is devoted. He is unequivocally opposed to secret societies, and believes that our affiliations should be confined strictly to that society which embraces the principles of the Christian religion.

THOMAS WRIGHT, the present Trustee of Center Township, was born in Fayette County, January 12, 1848. His father, Rev. Harvey Wright, was born in Ohio, and is now a time honored Baptist minister and prominent citizen of Center Township. His mother, whose maiden name was Delilah Stephen, is a native of this State, having been born in Fayette County. His boyhood was spent in his native county upon a farm. In February, 1865, he accompanied his parents to their present home, where he remained with them upon the farm until the time of his marriage, which occurred January 26, 1868. The lady that became his wife was Miss Mary E. Vandall, who was born in Shelby County, this State, April 22, 1849. Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Wright have resided in Center Township, except about eight months of the year 1881, during which they resided in Jackson Township. They have occupied their present home since October, 1881. They are the parents of two daughters: Effie H. and Cora F., the former of whom is at present a teacher in the public schools of Rush. County. Mr. and Mrs. Wright are both members of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Wright is a Democrat. He was elected Trustee of his township in the spring of 1884, and was re-elected in the spring of 1886, with an increased majority, which is evidence of his standing as a citizen and of the good management of his office. He is one of his township's most industrious farmers, and he and wife are among its best citizens.


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