Genealogy Trails

RUSH COUNTY, INDIANA
BIOGRAPHIES
ORANGE TOWNSHIP



AMOS ALLISON, a citizen of Orange Township, Rush County;, was born in Russell County, Ky., February 24, 1822, and is the son of Matthew and Mary (Richardson) Allison.  Matthew was born in Washington County, Va., in 1792, and was the son of John Allison who was of Scotch-Irish origin. Matthew was married in Virginia, and later became an early settler of East Tennessee, settling in Knox County, in which county he operated a merchant mill on the French Broad River. In 1821, he came to Indiana and entered land, and the following year started with his family for Hoosierdom. In the early spring he arrived in Russell County, Ky., and here he left his family with relations, and he proceeded to Indiana and to his entered land in Rush County, on which land he built a cabin and raised a corn crop, then returned and brought thither his family in the fall of 1822. He lived to be an aged and well respected man. The subject of this sketch was born while the family was remaining in Kentucky, but was reared in Rush County. He has always followed farming since reaching manhood, and is a representative farmer and citizen. He is the youngest of six children, viz.: John, Eliza, James, Susan, Mary, and Amos. The father of the children died in 1871, and the mother's death had preceded that of the father, and occurred in 1823, soon after the settlement of the family in Indiana. The subject of the sketch is a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and is a progressive and representative citizen.

CHARLES ALTER, a farmer and citizen of Orange Township, Rush County, was born in Butler County, Ohio, June 8, 1829, and is the son of Christian and Susan T. (Tolbert) Alter. The father was born in Maryland in 1783, his death oocurred in Rush County, Ind., in 1868. The mother was born in Virginia in 1785, and died in Rush County, Ind., in 1873. Their children's names are: Frederick, Francis, Mary, David, Sarah, Benjamin M., Susan, Elizabeth, George W., and Charles. The parents removed from Maryland to Cincinnati, and later settled in Butler County, Ohio, and still later in Rush County, Ind. Charles was the youngest of their children, and was reared on a farm, and has followed the occupation since early in life. He commenced life a poor boy, and is now a prosperous man, all due to his untiring energy and industry..

He is a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics, a Republican. In 1855 (February), he was united in marriage with Viola Johnson, daughter of R. H. and Nancy G. f Drummond) Johnson. Nancy was born in Orange Township, Rush County, Ind., May 7, 1837. Her marriage has been blessed by the following offspring: William, born April 30, 1856; Mary L., born January 16, 1858; Harriet A., bora April 13, i860; Olive, horn May 6, 1862; Elma, born January 2, 1864; Cora F., born September 2, 1865; David O., born May 30, 1868; Charles, born January 29, 1871; John H., born April 27, 1875; and Viola S., bom August 31, 1877.

JOHN BOWLING, a farmer and citizen of Orange Township, Rush County, Ind., was born in said township January 28, 1835, and is the son of Richard and Sarah (Brown) Bowling.    The father was a native of Kentucky, and was born February 4, 1800.  In 1828, he was married to Sarah Brown, also a native of Kentucky, born December 28, 1800. Two sons  and four daughters were born unto the marriage, viz.: Lucy, Maria, Susan, John, Maria and Hiram. In 1832, the father removed to Rush County, Ind., and settled in Orange Township, where he lived till his death, which occurred January 27,1885. He followed farming for an avocation, was a well respected citizen, noted for his sobriety and industry. He was a lineal descendant of John Randolph, of the Old Dominion. He was an early settler of Rush County, and his life was identified with that of the early pioneers of the county. A strange event occurred in the course of his life. We have observed that he was a farmer by avocation, and a good old farmer he was. On one occasion, while he and his happy family were at midnight rest, an  unknown   (and still unknown)   character, entered his house armed with an axe, and the farmer being aroused, sprang from his couch to the floor, but was commanded by the intruder to stand still; his command was obeyed, but for a short time only, and while the burglar was plundering a bureau drawer, the axe he had released and placed at his side, was seized by the farmer and one stroke laid the intruder to the floor in death. A coroner's jury acquitted the farmer, and we add that our farmer was certainly a hero.  He was always firm in life, and he lived a life deserving much credit and praise. Our subject was reared to farming, and has followed it as his chosen occupation.  He is both a representative farmer and citizen.  In 1861, March 3rd, he married Nancy A. Lee, daughter of Jonathan and Mary (Copeland) Lee. One child, a son, named John Hiram, has blessed the marriage.

OSCAR L. CARR, who is a representative farmer and citizen of Orange Township^ Rush County, was born in Walker Township,
Rush County, January 8, 1851, and is the son of Jacob and Mary Ann (Jones) Carr. Jacob was a native of Rush County, and was born in 1823; his occupation was that of farming. His father was Isaac Carr, and was an early settler of Rush County, and emi¬grated from Kentucky to Indiana, and was a farmer by occupation. The subject of this sketch was reared on a farm and educated in the country schools, receiving a fair education. He is a prosperous and self-made man; and has followed farming for an avocation. In 1875, ne married Lucinda F. Tumes. The marriage has been blessed by Mary, Bessie, Shirley and Lavon. Mr. Carr is a mem¬ber of the Christian Church, and in politics he is a staunch Re¬publican.

ELI GREEN.The paternal grandparent of the subject of this sketch was General Nathaniel Green of Revolutionary fame, and the father of the subject was John Green, a carpenter by trade, and a farmer by occupation.   John was an early settler of Kentucky, where the greater part of his life was spent. He married for his first wife Rachel Williams, unto whom was born the following offspring: Thomas, Sallie, Charles and Newel. For a second wife he married Rebecca Snider; the second marriage  was blessed by the following children: Eli, born January 27, 1811; Polly, born November 28; 1813;Jonathan, born December 31,1815; William, born January 8, 1818, and Absalom, born January 23, 1820. The mother of these children was the daughter of Henry and Mary Snider who were of German lineage, and she was born June 30, 1782, and was united in marriage with John Green, November 19, 1807; her death occurred February 14, 1831. John, her husband, died in Ohio, March 5, 1823; he had removed with his family from Kentucky to Ohio, about 1813, and shortly after his death, his widow with her family, removed to Indiana, and in 1824, settled in Shelby County, settling on Blue River, and here the widow lived till  occurred  her death. Her eldest son  Eli, who is our subject, was born in Madison County, Ky.; when but an infant his father made the removal to Ohio, and when he was thirteen his widowed mother made the removal to Indiana.  He was reared on the farm, and received a limited education in old subscription schools of the various vicinities in which he lived in early life. He has devoted his life to farming, and has experienced much hard toil, and a hard battle with life, for he was born a poor boy, but nevertheless born with an ambitious and industrious spirit, which has gained for him property and many ardent friends.  In November of 1834, he was united in marriage with Mary B. Marshall.    She was born in  Harrison   County, Ky., and was the daughter of James and Susannah Marshall.  Unto this marriage were born: Eliza, April 16, 1839; Adalino, November 15, 1841; William Dallas, July 11, 1844, and Arthur, November 15, 1851. For one year after the marriage of our subject he lived in Shelby County, and then re¬moved to Rush County, where he has since resided, and followed agricultural pursuits. He has always been a main factor in whatever communities he has resided,and has always been an industrious, energetic and progressive man. He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for many years, and has always advocated and aided-churches, schools and public improvements. He has always been reserved, however in life, and has never aspired to public life, but has preferred the life of an independent farmer. In politics he has never taken an active part, but is an ardent Republican, having never voted with any other party since the organization of the Republican party. He is now in his seventy-seventh year, and while far along in the decline of life he is surrounded by property and many faithful friends.

SAMUEL GRIFFITH, the subject of the following biography, is the grandson of John Griffith, who was the son of an early emi¬grant from Wales to America. John was born in Pennsylvania, Bedford County, and was a farmer by occupation. He married Catherine Helm. The marriage was blessed by two sons, John and Samuel, both of whom are dead. John, the father of our subject, was born in Bedford County, Pa., March 10, 1806. He was reared on a farm in Bedford County, Pa., and received a limited education in the country schools of his native county. He was married in Bedford County to Margaret "Feaster. In August, 1837, he located in Moscow, Orange Township, Rush County, Ind. The rest of his life was spent in Rush County. He followed farming as an occupation. He was successful in his undertakings and was energetic and enterprising. A self-made man, he was universally respected by all who knew him. He lived a useful life, ;and was benevolent and charitable in character, and was a faithful friend and a representative citizen. The mother of our subject was born in Bedford County, Pa., May 14, 1819, and was the mother of two sons and two daughters, viz.: Sarah, Samuel, Martin D., and Caroline. Our subject is the only one now living. He was born in Rush County, Ind., August 10, 1838, and was reared on a farm and educated in the country schools, and has followed agri-cultural pursuits as an avocation, making success. In 1865, Octo¬ber 29, he was united in marriage with Susan Apple, daughter of Elias and Magdaline (Slifer) Apple. Susan was born in Mont-gomery County, Ohio, October 5, 1846. Three children have blessed her marriage, viz.: Elmor Ellsworth, Van Elias (deceased), and Caroline.     Our  subject and his wife are members of the
Methodist Episcopal Church.    He is a progressive man and is a Republican.

J. F. HENDERSON, the subject of the following sketch, is a citizen of Orange Township, Rush County, Ind., and was born in that township, February 2, 1841, and is the son of George and Eliza (Spurgeon) Henderson. The father was born in Ohio, in 1811, and was the son of Joseph Henderson, who was of Irish and Dutch lineage. Joseph was a farmer by occupation and removed from Ohio to Indiana and became an early settler of Rush County, in which county he lived for many years. His life was identified with the pioneer settlers of this county. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was a well respected citizen. George, the father of our subject, was a farmer by occupation. He was reared on a farm, and he followed his occupation with zeal, and was an industrious and well respected citizen. He was married early in life, and when he began the battle of life, had no capital other than willing hands, but by his honesty and industry, together with frugality, he made an average success in life, and was surrounded at death with many friends, and with prosperity. His death occurred in the fall of 1875. He was a member of the Protestant Methodist Church, and was universally respected by all who knew him. The mother of our subject was born in Kentucky, in 1807, and now re¬sides in Rush County. She is the mother of three sons and four daughters, who are now living: Joseph S., John, Nancy, Jefferson Franklin, Matilda, Melvina and Mary. Our subject was reared on a farm, and educated in the country schools, and has followed farming as an occupation, and had no capital to begin the occupation, and many have been the obstacles that have appeared before him, but by industry and hard toil he has made a success of life. He is a self-made man, and a representative citizen. He has established an unquestioned character and in the spring of 1886, he was elected as the Democratic candidate, for Township Trustee, for Orange Township. He has always been an advocate of free education, and has manifested an interest in schools, to churches he has been an aid, and is a member of the Christian Union Church, and is a progressive citizen. In 1864, November 11, he married Sarah A. McDuffee, daughter of Robert McDuffee, of Shelby County, Ind.

ELIAS TRUITT HILLIGOSS  George Hilligoss, the paternal grand-parent of our subject, was a native of Germany, and before he emigrated to America, he had married Lizzie Clavel, and together these two emigrated to America a very short time before the American Revolution, and settled in Pennsylvania. He was a tailor by trade, and in late life followed farming as an occupation
About 1781 he removed from Pennsylvania to Kentucky, and settled in Fleming County, in which county he and his wife both lived till the close of their long and useful lives. They reared a family of five sons and two daughters, viz.: Jacob, John, Conrad, Solomon and William, who were the sons, and we are not able to give the names of the daughters. John Hilligoss was the father of our subject, and was born in Pennsylvania in 1775, and was but a small boy when his parents removed to Kentucky. He was reared on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits throughout life. Soon after he reached his majority he was united in marriage with Nancy Shockley, a native of Maryland, who was born about 1783. She was of-English descent, and was the daughter of William Shockley, who was a citizen of Maryland in early life, during which time he was a sailor at sea for fifteen years, and in later life emigrated to Kentucky and became a pioneer settler of that State. The above marriage was blessed by eight sons and two daughters, viz.:  William S., George B., Eli, Mary, John W., James S., Elias T., Sanford H., Hulda Ann and Johnathan S. The father of these children and his family emigrated to Brown County, Ohio, from Kentucky, in 1825, and in 1834 removed to Indiana, and settled in Rush County. Elias T. Hilligoss was born in Fleming County, Ky., March 2, 1819, and was reared on a farm and received a common school education in the schools of Ohio. He has followed farming as an occupation, and when he began life had no capital other than eighty acres of "Congress Land."  He has been an energetic and industrious man, and has been a success in his calling, and is now surrounded by prosperity.  He was united in marriage with Nancy Thomas, September 27, 1838.    Nancy was born in Lewis County, Ky., November 3,1817, and is a daughter of  David and Mary (McQueen) Thomas. The children born unto this marriage are: Missouri, Jane, Nancy L, Daniel W., Winfield Scott, Mary A. and Henry Clay. Our subject became a member of the Christian Church in the spring of 1839, and has been a friend to churches, schools and public improvements, and has been an Elder in the church for the last thirty-eight years, and has been a very zealous member. T. H. C. Hilligoss, a young and enterprising farmer and stock-raiser of Orange Township, Rush County, k was born in said township, May, 14, 1855, and is the son of Elias T. and Nancy (Thomas) Hilligoss. The sketch of the parents is observed above.  The subject of this sketch was reared and educated in Rush County, and has devoted time and attention to the pursuit of farming and raising fine stock. In June of 1876 he was united in marriage with Margaret M. Machlan. Two children have been born unto the union, viz.: Benjamin T. (deceased), and Raymond.The subject is a zealous member of the Christian Church in which he has been Deacon for several years. In politics he is an ardent Republican, and is a representative citizen.

BENJAMIN AND WILLIAM MACHLAN. Over a century ago, in 1763, and in Scotland, there was born John Machlan, the paternal grandparent of William and Benjamin. This grandparent came across the Atlantic to America, when a youth, and afterward settled and married in Lycoming County, Pa. He was married to Hester Updegraft, who was American born, and of French lineage. This marriage was blessed by the following children: Rebecca, John, William, George and two others who died in early life. The mother of these children died in Pennsylvania, and adversity after adversity beset the father, and the family was reduced to poverty. The father determined on a removal to Ohio, and in the fall of 1816, removed to Butler County, of that State, where he settled and lived for seven years. The stay in Ohio was accompanied by a financial success, for the father was a farmer, and by his industry, together with the co-operation of his children, he was successful in that pursuit in Ohio, and he determined to remove to Indiana. Accordingly in the spring of 1823, the removal was made, and a settlement was made in Rush County, where lands were purchased. The father continued his agricultural pursuits, and his following life was identified with the pioneer settlement of Rush County. In his calling his success was evident, and at last he became a prosperous man. Though his early life was beset by many difficulties, his last days were more of sunshine. He was a descendant of a Quaker family, and was faithful to the Quaker faith. He lived a long and useful life, and in the fall of 1839, was called away. We have observed the death of his wife, who died in. Pennsylvania. She was a devoted mother and wife, an ardent Friend in truth and in sect. She was of the Quaker faith, in which she was reared, and lived and died in that faith. After her death, and after the removal to Ohio, Mr. Machlan married for a second wife, Sarah Woods, who lived nine years after Mr. Machlan's death, and then was called away. John Machlan, Jr., the father of our subject, was born in Lycoming County, Pa., in May of 1795. He was reared on a farm, and never attended school a day in his life, but in later days he learned to read, and being a man of strong intellectual power, he became conversant on general subjects. He was an industrious and frugal man, reserved in character, and a very considerate citizen, possessing conservativeness, honesty, sobriety and sincerity. Born a poor boy, he died a prosperous man; his success in life was due to his untiring energy, firmness and perseverance. His life pursuit was that of farming, in which he was practical and successful. He came to Indiana in 1823, the date of his father's settlement in the State, and purchased a small tract of land in Rush County, and when he died he owned a broad tract of more than 400 acres. His early life was beset by many difficulties. In the spring of 1818, he chose a companion for life, and was united in marriage with Sally Day, in Butler County, Ohio.  Sally was born in York State, in the year 1800, and was of English and Dutch lineage.  She was a strong and sturdy woman, and proved a faithful companion to her husband, whose struggle in early life was difficult.  At his marriage he began a hard battle, for he was very poor, and hard toil was his lot. He often said in after life, that hard toil seasoned his bread, and that he thanked God that he was blessed with Sally, to whom he attributed much of his success in life. Sally was not only a faithful wife, but a kind and faithful friend and mother, and a devout Christian. She lived a useful life of forty-seven years, and in the spring of 1846,. was called away, leaving a family of seven children to mourn her loss.  The number of children that were born unto her marriage was eleven, but four died in early life. The names of the others are: Benjamin, William, Sarah, Joseph, Mary, Martha and Phibia. The father of those children married for a second wife,  Alvira Garner nee Alvira Shaw.  He was reared in the Quaker faith, but at the age of twenty-eight, he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was a zealous member throughout the remainder of his life.    His death occurred in the fall of 1857.  Benjamin is the older of our subjects, and was born in Butler County, Ohio, November 12, 1822, but was reared in Rush County, Ind., receiving a fair education in the country schools. He has followed farming for an occupation.  In July, 1840, he married Louisa Hume, who was born in Boone County, Ky., in 1820; her death occurred in July of 1875. Seven children were born unto her as follows: Sarah, Mary, Wilbert, Margaret, George and two others who died early in life. In 1876, Benjamin married for a second wife, Susan Bows, nee Susan Hume.  William, the younger of our subjects, was born in Rush County, Ind., February 2, 1825, and was reared on a farm in his native county, receiving a common school education in the country schools.  He has followed farming as an occupation, and is one of the most extensive farmers of Orange Township. In the spring of 1845, he was united in marriage with Sarah Carpenter, who was born in Butler County, Ohio, May 3,1825.  Unto them have been born John, Catherine and Meirit.

BENJAMIN L. MCFARLAN, whose portrait appears in this volume, is a farmer and stock-raiser of Orange Township, Rush Co., Ind., and was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, October 14, 1844, and is the son of James and Jane (Kelly) McFarlan. The father was born in Mercer County, Pa., and was the son of a native of Scotland. He was a steamboat man by calling, but died in early life, and when our subject was only a small boy. Our subject was reared by his maternal grandparents, who resided in Mercer County, Pa., but who removed to Indiana in 1853, and settled in Decatur County. Benjamin received a common school education in country schools. He was born a poor boy, and in early life had many obstacles to contend with. He was but a youth of seventeen years when the Civil War broke out, and in August, of 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh Indiana Infantry, and was the youngest of his company, in which company he served till 64, when he re-inlisted as a veteran volunteer of the same; and at the expiration of the three years, of the Seventh Infantry, the veterans of the Seventh, Fourteenth, Nineteenth, and Twentieth were consolidated and known as the Twentieth Infantry, and in which Regiment our subject served till he was mustered out of the service on the 14th of July, 1865, as Orderly Sergeant of his company. At the close of the war he returned to Rush County, and has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits, commencing with a very limited means, but by hard toil and energy he has been successful in the pursuit. He now owns a fine and well improved farm of eighty acres, and is one of the representative farmers of the County of Rush. He is a progressive and representative citizen. In politics he is an ardent Republican, and has served as County Commissioner of Rush County for one term. In 1866, he was united in marriage with Susan Wood, daughter of Benjamin Wood. One child, a daughter, Alice by name, has blessed the marriage.

LOYD W. MCGINNIS, a citizen of Orange Township, Rush County, Ind., was born in Anderson Township, Rush County, November 1, 1837, and is the son of Samuel and Sarah (Earlywine) McGinnis. The father was born in Nicholas County, Ky., April 1, 1795, and was the son of William McGinnis. William was a native of Ireland, and after he emigrated to America, settled in Kentucky; later he removed with his family to Indiana, and settled in Rush County; still later he removed to Hancock County, and remained in that county until his death. He was a teacher by profession, and was an able district school teacher, and was an intelligent and respected man. Samuel, his son, was reared to farming, and followed it for an avocation. When his father removed to Indiana, he was left behind. He was married in Kentucky to the mother of our subject, and afterward came to Indiana and settled in Rush County, and here he lived and followed farming up to  the  time  of his death which occurred June 14, 1869. The mother of our subject was born in Nicholas County, Ky, April 13, 1798, and died in Rush County, Ind., April 20, 1869. She was married to Samuel October 10, 1816. The following children blessed her marriage: William, Mary, Dulcina, Orville S., James, Franklin, John M., Sanford, Elizabeth, Samuel and Loyd W. Loyd W. was reared on a farm and educated in the country schools. He was born a poor boy, and has had many obstacles to contend with through life, but has been energetic and firm, and has generally accomplished success in whatever he has undertaken. He has followed farming as an avocation, and is a progressive and self-made man. In politics, he is a Republican, and is a member of the Homer Lodge No. 471, of the I. O. O. F. January 16, 1856, he married Sarah Earlywine, daughter of Daniel and Sarah (Gohegan) Earlywine. She was born in Nicholas County, Ky., May 6, 1833. Three children have blessed their marriage, viz.: Josephine, William and Arthur M.

JOSEPH OWEN. The paternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of Georgia, and was of Scotch lineage. His father was a native of Scotland, and emigrated to America about the time of the French and Indian War, and during the American Revolution he was living in Georgia and was killed by a band of Tories. The grand-father, Owen, was a farmer and miller. He was an early settler of Rush County, Ind. About 1821, he came from Ohio, Montgomery County, to where he removed from North Carolina to Indiana, and settled on Flat Rock Creek, Orange Township, Rush County, where he built about the first mill that was operated in Orange Township. The father of our subject, Benjamin Owen, was born in North Carolina, November 15, 1808. He removed with his father to this State and was reared on a farm, and followed farming for an occupation. He lived to be seventy-one years old, and after coming to the State he continuously lived m Orange Township, till his death. Thus his life is identified with the history of Orange Township. In 1829, he was united in marriage with Millie Haymond. Ten children were born unto this marriage, of whom one son and two daughters are still living. He was married a second and third times, his second wife was Sarah Berry, and the third Jane Sliger. Our subject was born in Rush County, November 18, 1833, was reared on a farm and received a limited education in the country schools. He has followed farming for an occupation. He had a limited capital to begin the battle of life, but he is now a prosperous citizen, enterprising and industrious. In 1857, he married Sarah Farlow. Three sons and one daughter have blessed the marriage, viz.: Benjamin, John, Elmer and Mary. Our subject has never aspired to public life, but has preferred the life of an independent and prosperous farmer. In politics he is a Republican. He is a friend to all laudable public improvement, and is a progressive citizen.

H. F. PRILL is the son of Thomas and Francis (Evans) Prill. The father was born in Rockingham County, Va., February 21, 1800.  He was the son of  Thomas Prill, a native of Pennsylvania, and is a lineal descendant of Lord Bargasser of Hessedarm-stat, Germany. He was a single man when he went to Virginia, where he was married. The father of our subject was a mechanic by trade, and in  1821 located  in Ohio, and was married in that State May 21, 1833, in Preble County. The fruits of his marriage were one son and two daughters, the son, who is our subject is the only one now living to represent this family of children.   His father removed to Rush County, in 1835, where he settled and lived until his death occurred, which was December 15, 1873.    He was a practical and successful man in his calling.    He was an early settler of Rush County, and followed farming. He was a representative-citizen, universally respected by all who knew him. He was a member of the German Reform Church, and was a quiet and unoffensive man, noted for his reserved and honest, as well as faithful character. The mother of our subject was born in Bedford County, Va., August 7, 1805. She was of Welsh and English lineage. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and when a child joined this church under the influence of Rev. Rensor Dow. She died November 14, 1886, leaving our subject as the only representative of her family.  Her daughters, Mary (who died November 21,1855,) and Elizabeth (who died November 28, 1884), had never married; and our subject has never entered the relationship of marriage, and  thus .it will be seen he is the only representative of one of the oldest families of Orange Township. He was born in Rush County, Ind., December 31, 1846, and was reared on a farm and received a common school education at the country schools.  He has followed farming as an occupation, and together with farming has been in the nursery business.  He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and is a progressive man, and an advocate of schools, churches, and public improvement.

PHILIP REDENBAUGH, a farmer and citizen of Orange Township, Rush County, Ind., was born in Jefferson County, Ind., May 13, 1826, and is the son of Philip and Frances (Arbuckell) Redenbaugh. The father was a native of Pennsylvania, and was of German lineage. He was a farmer by avocation. He was married in Pennsylvania, and afterward removed to Ohio, and thence to Indiana, and settled in Jefferson County, of this State. He was married twice, his second wife was the mother of our subject, and was a native of Kentucky, and was of Irish descent. She was the mother of six sons and two daughters four sons and one daughter are living at present. Our subject was reared on a farm and educated in the country schools. His school days were of an early date, and then the schools were supported by subscription, and were taught in queer log houses. He has followed farming as an occupation, and when he began the battle of life, he began under many difficulties. His parents died when he was young, and he was reared by James Arbuckell, an uncle. He was a poor youth, and when he reached his majority had no capital other than willing hands to begin the battle of life. He has, however, been an energetic and industrious man, and has succeeded in surmounting the many obstacles encountered in his course of life. He is truly a self-made man, a prosperous farmer and a representative citizen. In 1851, February 6, he was united in marriage with Cinderella Wagoner, and unto the union was born a daughter, who died at the age of four years. This wife died January 29, 1852, thu living but a short time to contribute her influence toward the happiness of our subject. He was married to Mary Ann McDuffee, November 3, 1853, and unto the second marriage have been born ten children, five of whom are dead. The names of the living are: Alpheus Theodore, Robert McDuffee, Ulysses Grant, Elbert Morton, Stella May. Our subject has held several positions of honor and trust among which are the positions of Road Superintendent and Township Trustee. The former position he held for one term, during which time he advanced the idea of graveling the public roads, which idea has been successfully placed into practice. The office of Township Trustee of Orange Township, he held for one term, in which capacity he served with ability and satisfaction. He is a progressive man, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics he is a Republican. He has ever been an ardent advocate of churches, schools and public improvements. He has served his church twenty-two years as class leader.

JAMES H. SELBY is one of the oldest citizens of Orange Township, Rush County, and was born in Harrison County, Ky., December 21, 1813, and is the son of John and Annie (McCallie) Selby, The father was born on the east shore of Maryland, in 1783, and was of English lineage. He was a young man when he emigrated to Kentucky, in which State he married the mother of our subject, unto whom were born the following children: John A., Elizabeth, Sarah, Mary, Jamima and James H., who reached man and womanhood. In 1827, the father removed from Kentucky to Orange Township, Rush County, where he settled and lived for a number of years. He was a farmer, and a practical and successful one
He was a zealous member of the Christian Church, and was universally respected by his acquaintances. He died in his eighty-ninth year, ending a long and useful life. Our subject was reared on a farm and received a common school education in the schools of Kentucky.  He has followed farming as an occupation, in which he has been a decided success. In 1835, he was united in marriage with Drusilla Whiteman, unto whom has been born seven children: William, Charles, Mary Ann, Indiana, Sarah, John, and one that died in infancy Only two of these children are now living, viz.: Charles and Sarah. Our subject is a progressive and a self-made man. When he began the battle of life, he had no capital other than willing hands, and by his untiring energy and enterprise, together with integrity and frugality, he has been successful in accumulating wealth, and has established for himself a good character, and is universally respected as a representative citizen by all who know him. He has been an endorser of religion and liberal education, and is a progressive man, and has encouraged such enterprises that have been for the benefit of the public.

C. M. SELBY, a farmer, stock-raiser and dealer, is one of the representative citizens of Orange Township, Rush County, and was born in said township, and is the son of James H. and Drusilla (Whiteman) Selby. He was reared on a farm, and received a common school education in the country schools. He has followed farming as an occupation, raising stock and trading in live stock, has been connected with his farming. When he began the battle of life, he had no capital to begin with, but he has been successful in his calling, by means of energy and enterprise. He is a progressive man and a representative citizen. In September 15, 1864, he was united in marriage with Samantha Carter, daughter of Finley S. and Eliza Carter. Three children have been born unto the marriage, viz.: Minnie Florence, Mary and Amanda. Our subject has never aspired to public life, but has preferred the life of a prosperous farmer. In politics, he is Democrat, and while he is not a member of any church, he is an advocate of true morality, and is a friend to education and encourages all commendable public improvement.

WILLIAM SPRINGER.The paternal grandfather of William was Gabriel Springer, a native of Kentucky, and was of Swedish lineage. He was a farmer by occupation, and emigrated to Indiana and settled in Rush County in 1822. William's father was John Springer, and was born in Kentucky, March 13, 1801, and came to Indiana with his father; his life pursuit was that of farming. The mother of William was Susan (Fisher) Springer. She was born in Clermont County, Ohio, August 1,1809.   The marriage of John and
and Susan was blessed by only one child, "and this child is the subject of this sketch. He was born in Rush County, Ind., August 16, 1827, and was reared a rural lad, and educated in the old sub¬scription schools. His life avocation has been farmingj and in this he has been a decided success. He commenced it with no capital, and is now a prosperous and representative farmer of Orange Township, Rush County, owning two farms aggregating over 300 acres. In 1851, he was united in marriage with Zipporah Mull, daughter of Frederick and Jane (McDonald) Mull. She was born in Warren County, Ohio, in April, 1826. Four children are the re¬sults of this marriage, viz.: Hinda Ann, Armilda, Francis Marion, and Amanda.

A. D.TEVIS, a native and citizen of Rush County, Ind., was born January 31, 1844, and is the son of Thomas and Mirza (Day) Tevis. The father was born in Bracken County, Ky., in 1810, and was a farmer. In 1836, he came to Rush County, Ind., in which county he settled and lived for several years thereafter; he is now a citizen of St. Paul, Ind. He was married in Rush County, to Mirza Day, who was born in Bourbon County, Ky., in 1813, and who died in Rush County, in 1875. The above marriage was blessed by the following children: James L., John (deceased, Solomon who died in the army), Agostine D., Eva and Emma (twins), Elizabeth (deceased) and Milton. Agostine D. was reared and educated in Rush County. When but a youth he began teaching in the public schools of Rush County, in i860, and with the exception of three years, he has taught from three to" eight months each year since he took up the calling. He is a self-made man, for he educated himself, and from a poor country boy he has grown to be a prosperous and representative citizen. Beside fol¬lowing the profession of teaching, he has devoted much time to agricultural pursuits, in which he has been very successful. He resides in Orange Township, where he owns and cultivates a well improved farm of 170 acres. He has never aspired to public life, however he is a progressive citizen. In politics he is a staunch Democrat.

WILLIAM A. WAGGONER, the subject of the following sketch, is the son of John and Nancy (McDuffee) Waggoner. John was born in Harrison County, Ky., September 15, 1803. He married, in Kentucky, Nancy McDuffee, who was also born in Harrison County, January 17, 1805. The marriage was consummated September 20, 1825, and was blessed by the following children: William, born August 2, 1826; John, born February 24, 1828; Sarah, bora February 23,1830; Ellen, born April 9, 1832, and Aris, born December 23, 1836.    Their father's death occurred August 24, 1881, and their mother's April 10, 1877. Our subject's father came from Kentucky to Indiana in the fall of 1826, and settled near the present site of Milroy, in Rush County. His life pursuit was that of farming, and he was practical and successful in the calling-He lived a long and useful life, and was universally respected by all who knew him. Our subject was reared on a farm in Rush County, and received a fair education in the country schools. He has followed farming as an occupation, and had no capital when he began the pursuit, but he is now a prosperous and representative farmer and citizen. In politics he is a staunch Democrat, and in 1880, was elected Township Trustee for Orange Township, and was re-elected in 1882. On March 25, 1852, he was united in marriage with Sallie Jones, who was born August 18, 1832. This union has been blessed by the following children: Franklin P., born February 7, 1853; N. Harden, born June 27, 1855; Mary E.,'born January 17, 1858, and William B., born March 3, 1863.

ARIS WAGGONER, who was born in Rush County, Ind., December 23, 1836, is a representative farmer and citizen of Orange Township, of said county, and is the son of John and Nancy' (McDuffee) Waggoner. (See the sketch of William A. Waggoner.) Aris was reared on a farm and has devoted his life to farm-ing. He received a fair education in the country schools. He had no capital to begin farming, but by energy and hard toil he has become a prosperous and thrifty farmer. October 8, 1857, he mar¬ried Margaret E. Louden, who was born in Rush County, Ind., November 11, 1841. Three children have blessed the marriage as follows: John A. D., born January 13, 1861; Armilda J., born January 21, 1871, and Aris D., born May 28, 1876. Our subject is a member of the Christian Church, and in politics a staunch Democrat.

E. A. WILLEY, the subject of the following sketch is a far-farmer and citizen of Orange Township, Rush Co., Ind., and was born in Butler County, Ohio, May 13, 1822, and is the son of Noah and Mary (Buffington) Willey. The father was a native of New York, and born in 1776, and Noah Willey, was a farmer by occupation, but his early life was spent in school teaching, and was a very early emigrant to Ohio, his parents bringing him to Cincinnati when that city was but a fort and village; his father later removed to Butler County, and was living on the Miami River when his death occurred. The father of our subject was but a boy when the family emigrated to Ohio, and his youth and early manhood were spent in Ohio, and in the spring of 1839, removed from that State to Indiana, and settled in Rush County, where he afterward lived until his death occurred.  He married in Ohio, the mother of our subject, unto whom were born the following children: The first who died in early life and a second an infant. Then came Jeremiah, Hannah, Eathan, Elizabeth, Seth, Margaret, Orren, George and Charles. Our subject was reared on a farm, and educated in the country school, and has followed farming as an occupation, and when he commenced the battle of life he had no capital, but by hard toil and energy he has been successful in life, yet he has never attained great wealth, but he is surrounded by the comforts of life and is a well respected man. In 1844, October 20, he was married to Martha Ann Callahan, daughter of John and Mary (Hilligoss) Callahan. Our subject is a member of the Christian Church, and is a progressive man. He has been, and is, a zealous member of his church, in which he is a Deacon, and his action in regard to education has been friendly, and as to public improvement he has not fallen behind his fellow citizens.

JONATHAN G. WRIGHT, a farmer and citizen of Orange Township, Rush County, was born February $, 1846, and is the son of Ephraim and Polly (Buckley) Wright. The father was born in Pennsylvania, February 26,1818, and was the son of Justice Wright, who was an early settler of Fayette County, Ind. The father of our subject was a farmer by occupation and a minister by profession. He was a zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and lived to be forty-five years old. He was a progressive man and was universally respected by all who knew him. The mother of our subject was born in York State, May 20, 1808, and was the daughter of Nathan Buckley. She was a widow of John Hardy, when she was married to the father of our subject. Her second marriage was blessed with five children, three sons and two daughters, viz.: Alfred (deceased), Jonathan, Henry, Amanda, and Olive. Our subject was reared on a farm, and received a common school education. He has followed farming as his occupation. He had a limited capital to begin life, but by untiring energy and frugality, he has been successful as a farmer, and is a progressive and representative citizen. In 1869, January 24, he was united in marriage with Sarah Selby, daughter of Harrison Selby. She was born in Rush County, Ind., April 3, 1849. Four children, one son and three daughters, have been born unto the marriage, viz.: Drurie, Almy, Estella, and James. Our subject served two years in the Civil War in Company M, One Hundred and Twenty-first Regiment of the Ninth Indiana Cavalry. He is in sympathy with churches and schools, and has aided all laudable public enterprises.

LEWIS YOUNG, one of the oldest citizens of Orange Township, was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, January 20, 1808. His paternal grand-father was Reuben Young, a native of Virginia, and of English lineage. The father of our subject was John Long Young, a native of Virginia. He was a farmer by occupation. At the age of twenty years, he entered the United States Army, and served three years, in the struggle with the Creek Indians, and afterward located in Bracken County, Ky., where he was united in marriage with Sarah Preble. Four sons and four daughters were born unto the marriage. Two sisters and our subject are the only children now living. The father, with his wife and three children, removed to Pickaway County, Ohio, about 1806, and shortly afterward our subject was born on the Pickaway plains of that county. Still later, in 1816, the family removed to Clermont County, Ohio, and in the fall of 1826, the family removed to Franklin County, Ind., and later lived in Fountain, then Franklin, then Rush County; the father was living with a son-in-law in Decatur County when he died. The mother of subject died in Rush County. Both were members of the Christian Church. Our subject was reared on a farm, and received a common school education in the county of Clermont, Ohio. December 21, 1837, he was united in marriage with Cassander Haymond. A son and a daughter were born unto the marriage. The daughter is deceased, and the son is a farmer of Orange Township. Mr. Young had no capital to begin life with, and had many obstacles to contend with, but by energy and frugality, he has been successful in his undertakings, and is a prosperous and well respected citizen.

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