Genealogy Trails


RUSH COUNTY, INDIANA
BIOGRAPHIES
POSEY TOWNSHIP




EDWARD P. ADAMS, an honored old citizen of Posey Township, was born in Scott County, Ky., August 21, 1822, being the son of Isaac and Nancy Ann Adams with whom he came to this State when he was between two and three years of age. The family settled upon a tract of land near Morristown in the Southern part of Hancock County. Some years later they removed to the northern part of Shelby County, and still later, or in about 1843, they came to Rush County and settled within the present limits of Posey Township. There our subject continued with his parents until the time of his marriage which occurred February 7, 1847. The lady he chose for his life companion was Miss Elizabeth Six who was born in Fleming County, Ky., October 22,1820, being the daughter of John and Mary Six, both natives of the State of Kentucky.. In 1826 her parents came to Rush County and settled in the woods of
Posey Township, and the childhood days of Mrs. Adams were spent within five miles of her present home. In the spring following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Adams settled upon a farm in Ripley Township, and after two or three other short moves in the same vicinity, they, in 1853, settled upon the farm they now occupy. It was then a tract of unimproved land containing but ten or twelve acres of ground ready for the plow. Though the outlook for Mr. Adams was then very bad and though he has had many difficulties to surmount, he has come bravely through it all and now in the decline of life he and wife are permitted to enjoy a comfortable home. They have had eleven children as follows: Amanda J., Nancy E., John W., Asenath M., James C, William E., Isaac L., Verneila J., Margaret E., Mary S. and Hettie D., of whom only four are living. They are John W., Asenath M., James C. and Hettie D.4 Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the former having joined it when he was nineteen and the latter when she was seventeen. In politics, Mr. Adams is an uncompromising Republican.

THOMAS G. ALEXANDER, a prosperous farmer of Posey Town-ship, was born in Walker Township, December 30, 1843. His parents, William and Lavina Alexander, were both natives of Fleming County, Ky. They came with their respective parents to Rush County in an early day, and here spent the rest of their lives. Our subject spent his early life doing farm work in summer and attending district school in winter. His father died when he was but sixteen years of age, after which he continued with his mother upon the farm until the time of his marriage, which occurred November 5, 1871. His wife, whose maiden name was Miss Ida J. Woods, was born in Posey Township, May 10, 1846, being the daughter of John and Lucy Woods, who were natives of Fleming Count}-, Ky.. For eighteen months after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Alexander resided in the village of Arlington. They then settled upon a farm three miles southeast of that place, which they have occupied as their home ever since. The life occupation of Mr. Alexander has been that of a farmer, and as such his efforts have been liberally rewarded. He owns a farm of eighty-two acres nearly all of which is in cultivation. It contains a handsome little residence and is, in other respects, well improved. He and wife are the parents of two children: Lucy M. and George W., both of whom are living. The political affiliations of Mr. Alexander have always been with the Democratic party. He, however, is not a strong partisan, and instead of engaging in political strife he has preferred the quietude of domestic life.

HENRY F. BAITY, farmer, of Posey Township, was born inthat township, December 29, 1839. He was the son of Ransom and Elizabeth Baity, natives of North Carolina and Ohio, respectively. He was reared upon a farm, and at the early age of eighteen he took up the pursuit of farming for himself. To this his attention has been given all his life, and his labors have been liberally rewarded. He owns a good farm of eighty acres, about two-thirds of which are in cultivation. His farm contains a handsome little residence, and other improvements equally as good. His marriage occurred January 31, 1867. His wife, whose maiden name was Miss Amanda E. M. Tarbet, was bora in Fleming County, Ky., April 7, 1850, being the daughter of Robert A. and Mary Tarbet, both natives of Fleming County, Ky.; the former, who was born March 14, 1815, at present makes his home with Mr. and Mrs. Baity. The latter was born March 4,1813, and died in this county, December 31, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Baity have had born to them four children, as follows: John F., Ransom R., Ida P., and a son that died in infancy, unnamed. The political affiliations of Mr. Baity are with the Republican party. He is one of the industrious farmers of his township, and he and wife are among its best citizens.

CYRUS W. BALL, one of Rush County's most excellent citizens,  was born in Mercer County, Pa., June 20,1832. He was the son of Jonathan and Asenath (Moore) Ball, both natives of Washington County, Pa., the former of German and the latter of English descent. When he was yet a small child his parents came westward to Rush County, and settled in Jackson Township (now Posey). Though Cyrus was then but a little past three years of age he has a distinct recollection of the old home in Mercer County in which he was born. His boyhood and youth were spent working upon a farm in summer and attending the district school in winter. As early as his fourteenth year he became a member of the Methodist Church, with which his ancestors had been identified for several generations back, and several years before he attained his majority his inclinations tended toward the ministry. He became a local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church at the age of twenty-five, but after four years of successful ministry he was compelled to abandon it owing to the impaired condition of his voice. He, however, carried on farming during this time having taken up agricultural pursuits for himself in about the year 1857. In April, 1864, he entered the service of the Union Army in Company K, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Indiana Regiment, with which he served one hundred days or the time for which he had enlisted. His military services were chiefly performed on guard duty in the States of Tennessee and Alabama. On returning from the war he resumed farming and stock-raising in Posey Township, in which pursuit he has ever since continued. He was married November 23, 1865, to Sarah E. Wilson, a native of Fayette County, born November 2, 1844. She was the daughter of Hugh and Maria (Copeland) Wilson, natives of Delaware and Ohio, respectively. To them four children have been born: Osmer W., Elma P., Eva M., and Blaine H., all of whom are living. Mr. Ball is a member of the G. A. R., and an ardent Republican in politics. He is, however, an avowed temperance man and eschews the use of intoxicants in every form. He has never tasted a drop of liquor in his life and has never been inside of a saloon, which can be said by few of his years.

HENRY W. BECKNER, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of Posey Township, was born in that township, September 3, 1837, being the son of Jacob and Polly M. (McDuffee) Beckner, who where among the early settlers of this county. He spent his boy-hood and youth upon his father's farm, and at the age of nineteen, or February 26, 1857, he was married to Sarah J. Mahan, who was born in Westmoreland County, Pa., September 25, 1837, just twenty-two days after the birth of our subject. She was the.daughter of James and Mary (Donald) Mahan, the former a-native of Ireland, who came to America with his parents when he was two years old. Soon afterward he was left an orphan child, his father and mother both having died the same night with an attack of yellow fever, in the city of Philadelphia. James was married to Mary Donaldin Westmoreland County, Pa., and in 1843, when Mrs. Beckner was but six years old they came to Rush County, and located upon the farm now owned and occupied by O. C. Hackleman, one mile west of Rushville, which place Mr. Mahan had entered from the government. In 1853, they removed to the city of Indianapolis. Two years later they located upon a farm four miles northeast of that city, where both spent the rest of their lives, their deaths occurring in the same year, namely 1871. Mrs. Beckner was nineteen years of age at the time of her marriage. She and her husband thus joined in the holy bonds of matrimony at about the same age; they settled upon the old Beckner homestead, in Posey Township. In 1859, they removed to the city of Indianapolis. A year later they located upon a farm northeast of that city, about four miles, but in February, 1862, they returned to this county, and located in the village of Arlington, where Mr. Beckner engaged in mercantile pursuits. In December, 1864, they settled upon the farm they now occupy, two miles west of that place. Since then the entire attention of Mr. Beckner has been given to farming and the raising of stock, in which pursuits he has been fairly successful. He and wife are the parents of four children, as follows: John H., Nannie M., Mary E. and Wilna F., all of whom are living except Mary E., who died in the sixteenth year of her age. Mr. and Mrs. Beckner and three children are members of the Christian Church. In politics, the former is a staunch Democrat. He owns a splendid farm of 140 acres, nearly all of which is in a high state of cultivation. Besides this Mrs. Beckner owns fifty acres of splendid land in Marion County.

JOHN B. BENTLEY, one of this county's worthy and honored citizens, was born in Hancock County, June 29, 1823, being the son of Reuben and Sarah Bentley, the former, who was the son of Levi and Sarah Bentley, was born in the State of Maryland, and the latter, who was the daughter of Thomas and Anna Hill, was born in North Carolina. When he was but three years old his parents removed to this county and settled on the present site of Carthage. A year or so later they settled on a farm in the south part of Ripley Township, where the father died September 5, 1839, and where the subject of this sketch spent his early life assisting to clear the ground, and to plant and cultivate the crops. After his father died he continued with his widowed mother until he reached the age of twenty-one, after which for a couple of years he worked at the blacksmith's trade. He also, about this time, taught one term of school. On quitting the blacksmithing he turned his attention to farming, having settled within the present limits of Posey Township. He has ever since given his undivided attention to this pursuit, and his labors have been attended with a fair degree of success. He removed to the farm he now occupies in February, 1882. It consists of ninety-two acres of good land, most of which is in cultivation. The first marriage of Mr. Bentley occurred January 10, 1850, when Miss Mary Henby became his wife. She was born in North Carolina, January 16, 1831, and was the daughter of John and Mary Henby, both natives of North Carolina. Mrs. Mary Bentley died June 13, 1857, and on the 22d of September, 1859, Mr. Bentley and Miss Mary E. Coble were united in marriage. She was born in Carthage, this county, December 29, 1841, being the daughter of David and Martha Coble, the former of whom was the son of Jacob and Mary Coble, and the latter was the daughter of John and Mary Henby, who were also the parents of Mr. Bentley's first wife. Our subject's first marriage resulted in the birth of four children: William P., Reuben, Sarah E. and Mary, of whom the last named is deceased. He and his present wife are the parents of seven children: Charles E., Addie J., Martha A., Olivi E., Susannah, Caroline and Naomi, all of whom are living except Caroline. Mr. Bentley and family are members of the Friends' Church.  Polit-
ically, Mr. Bentley in sentiment is a Prohibitionist, though his affiliations have chiefly been with the Republican party.

REV. JACOB B. BLOUNT, than whom probably no man in Rush County, is more prominently or favorably known, was born in Tipton County, Ind., November 7, 1842. He was the son of Dr. Silas and Barbara (Miller) Blount, the former a native of Ross County, Ohio, of English and German descent, and the latter a native of Pennsylvania, of German descent. His parents were married near Hillsborough, Highland County, Ohio, September 17, 1827. In the spring of 1841, they came to this State and located upon a farm six miles southeast of Tipton, Tipton County, where both still continue to reside. The former has now reached the advanced age of eighty-seven, having been born October 10, 1800. His wife was born September 9, 1809, and is therefore in the seventy-ninth year of her age. Though aged as they are and though more than sixty years of their married life have passed, both are enjoying good health and both are in full possession of their mental faculties and bid fair to live for many years to come. The boyhood and youth of our subject were spent in his native county working upon a farm in summer and attending the district school in winter. He received his first lesson in an old log school house, having to sit upon the smoothed side of a slab with his feet swinging probably six inches from the floor. While the surroundings and conditions were very unfavorable, he, like many another lad, made the best use of his time, and by the time he had reached his nineteenth year, he had a good knowledge of the common branches and algebra. In September, 1860, he entered the North Western Christian University, of Indianapolis, now Butler University, of Irvington, in which institution he completed a full classical course, graduating in June, 1866, as a Bachelor of Arts. Three years afterward he had conferred upon him by his alma mater the degree of A. M. In the fall of 1866, he took charge of the public schools of Tipton, of which he had control four years; after which, owing to the impaired state of his health he retired temporarily, from school-room work and entered the ministry of the Christian Church. His first sermon was preached in Tipton. After preaching for a time in his native county, he was engaged as an evangelist for four years in Western Indiana and Eastern Illinois. In the meantime he had taken the pastoral work of two churches in this county which he performed in connection with his work as an evangelist. In 1875, he moved his family to this county, and located in Arlington where for two years he had charge of the public schools. In April, 1876, he moved to his present home, one-half mile west of Arlington, where he has ever since resided. In- the spring of 1877, he was elected Superintendent of the schools of. Rush County, which, position he filled in an able and creditable manner for two terms. He has always been greatly interested in work of an educational nature and to the end of promoting the educational interests of Rush County, he has for the past eight years, conducted an educational column in The Jacksonian, which is the source of much interest and profit to all friends of education. Since retiring from the Superintendence, his attention has been given to his pastoral duties and to the management of his farm. He has also in connection with these, been engaged more or less as agent for insurance companies. His marriage occurred August 24, 1865, when Miss Josephine L. Martindale, became his wife. She was born in Wayne County, Ind., January 14, 1845, and was the daughter of Samuel P. and Armilda (Oldaker) Martindale, respectively natives of Henry and Wayne Counties, Ind., the former of Scotch-Irish descent, and the latter of Scotch-English descent. Mrs. Blount was a granddaughter of Elder Elijah Martindale, who was one of the pioneer preachers of Indiana. Their marriage resulted in the birth of eight children, as follows: Maud B., Elsie F., Zula M., Roland T., Ralph D., Raymond L., Wildene L. and Glen A., all of whom are living except Wildene L., who died in childhood. Elder Blount is a member of the Phi Delta Theta Greek Fraternity and of the Odd Fellow's Lodge. His political affiliations have always been with the Democratic party. On the 2d day of June, 1886, he was bereaved of a loving wife and his children of an affectionate mother.

NICHOLAS BROWN, an industrious and successful farmer of Posey Township, was born in Germany, December 6, 1840. He was the son of Fritzidona and Caroline (Smith) Brown, the former of whom died when our subject was but three years old. When he was eleven years old he accompanied his mother and stepfather, Joseph Bone, to whom his mother had previously been married, to America, the family locating in Cincinnati. During the summer of his twelfth year he worked upon a farm in Ripley County, this State. In March, 1853, he accompanied his mother and stepfather to this county, and settled with them in Posey Township. In the following September, his mother and her husband returned to Cincinnati, but Nicholas remained here, having found a home in the family of Jeremiah Beckner, where he continued about seven years, receiving his board and clothes, and a horse, saddle and bridle at the age of nineteen. At that age, or December 27,1859, he was married to Catharine Beckner, daughter of Henry and Phebe (Plank) Beckner. She was born in Posey Township, December 17, 1838.
During the entire married life of Mr. Brown, he has resided in Posey Township, his occupation being that of a farmer. His first wife died March 2, 1868, leaving four children: Jerry, Rosella, Henry and Catharine, all of whom are still living. On the 6th day of February, 1870, Mr. Brown was married to Sarah A. Allender, who was born in this county December 3, 1840. She is therefore just three days older than her husband. The parents of Mrs. Brown were George and Mary (Hulgan) Allender, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter a native of South Carolina. This latter marriage has resulted in the birth of seven children, as follows: Mary, Charley, Nora, James, John, and a son and daughter that died in infancy, unnamed. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are members of the Christian Church. Politically, our subject is a Demo¬crat. He owns a beautiful farm of 155 acres, nearly all of which is in a high state of cultivation. His farm is fitted up with a handsome residence.

WILLIAM COLLINS, an influential citizen of Posey Township, was born upon the farm where he now lives, June 16, 1832. He was the son of William and Elizabeth (Beckner) Collins, both natives of Fleming County, Ky., the former of Irish, and the latter of Dutch descent. His early life was spent upon the old homestead, where, when he was twenty-one years of age, he took up the avocation of a farmer for himself and where he has ever since continued in that pursuit. His first marriage occurred in December, 1857? when Martha A. Bentley became his wife. She was born in this county, and was the daughter of Eli and Mary (Hall) Bentley, formerly of this county. In February, 1864, Mrs. Martha A. Collins died, leaving three children: Omer P., Eli B. and Mary L, of whom Omer P. is deceased. In December, 1868, Mr. Collins was married to Mrs. Burzilla Bagley, a native of Fleming County, Ky., and daughter of Joseph and Caroline English. In politics, Mr. Collins is a staunch Democrat. He owns a good farm of 123 acres, all of which is in a good state of cultivation. His life occupation has been that of a farmer, having continuously given his entire attention to that pursuit ever since he was large enough to hold the plow handles. His father and mother are the parents of eight children, all of whom are still living. All have already reached a mature age, the oldest being sixty-eight and the youngest fifty-three. Mr. Collins is an industrious, hard-working man, and he and wife are among the worthy and esteemed citizens of Rush County.

ELI B. COLLINS, one of Rush County's progressive and successful teachers, was born in Posey Township, upon the farm where he now resides, April 29, 1861. He was the son of William and Martha A. (Bentley) Collins, both of whom, were natives of Rush County. He was but two years old when his mother died, and his boyhood and youth were spent at the home of his father who still resides in Posey Township. In winter he attended the public school receiving his first lessons in a country school house. Soon afterward, however, he became a student in the public schools of Arlington, in which he completed a course of study embracing the ordinary branches of learning1, and received a diploma at about the age of seventeen years. At about this time he took up the avocation of a teacher, discharging his first duties in this capacity in the schools at Arlington. This has furnished him winter employment ever since, and he is now recognized among the industrious and efficient teachers of the county. His vacations have been spent upon the farm and attending normal schools. He has attended, in all, five terms of school of this kind, three of which were in the Central Normal College of Danville, Ind. In the fall of 1886, he entered upon his duties as principal of the Arlington Schools, and he so discharged them that the Trustee has seen fit to reemploy him for another year. On the 20th day of December, 1882, he was married to Miss Nannie M. Beckner, daughter of Henry W. and Sarah J. Beckner, who are esteemed citizens of Posey Township. She was born in Arlington, May 12, 1863. Their union has been blessed by the birth of one child: Bula D., born Jan. 27, 1884. Our subject and wife are members of the Christian Church. In politics, the former is a Democrat.

SAMUEL CONAWAY, a farmer of Posey Township, was born in Fleming County, Ky., November 19, 1827, being the son of John and Phebe Conaway, both natives of Kentucky, the former of Lewis County, and the latter of Fleming County. His father died in 1833, and in 1836 he came with his mother and stepfather, Henry Beckner, to this State, and after a residence of four months in Randolph County they came to Rush County, and ever since then the place of residence of Mr. Conaway has been in Posey Township. He grew up to manhood upon a farm, and his attention ever since has chiefly been given to agricultural pursuits, though he has frequently dealt more or less in grain and live-stock. His marriage to Miss Phebe Allender, occurred April 1, 1848. She is a native of this county, born October 1, 1831. Her parents, George and Sarah (Adams) Allender, were natives of Kentucky and North Carolina, respectively. The families of both her father and her mother came to Rush County in an early day, and her parents were married here in about the year 1830. Mr. and Mrs. Conaway have had born to them fifteen children. Their names in the order of their ages are as follows: Mary J., John J., Harriet, Lusetta, Henry L. and George R. (twins), William A., Rebecca and Josephine (twins), Anna F., Sarah I., Nora F., Oma, Maud B., and Charley, all of whom are living except the oldest and the youngest. Mary J. died at the age of thirty-four, and Charley died in his fourth year. The family now consists of thirteen children, all of whom are grown and several of whom are married. Mr. and Mrs. Conaway and all their children are members of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Conaway is a Democrat. He owns a splendid farm of 231 acres, about 190 acres of which are in cultivation. In addition to this he is the owner of four residence properties in Arlington. He began life a poor boy, and the present state of his circumstances reflects very creditably upon his industry and good management. During the years of toil through which he has passed his wife has stood bravely by his side presiding over the duties of the household and administering to the wants of husband and children as only a devoted wife and Christian mother could.

JOHN M. CONAWAY, a prominent farmer and stock dealer of Posey Township, and the present Trustee of that township, was born in Fleming County, Ky., February 12, 1833. -He was the son of John and Phebe (Plank) Conaway, both natives of the State of Kentucky. His father, who was a cooper by occupation, died with an attack of the cholera, when the subject of this sketch was but five months old. When he was yet a small boy, probably eight years of age, he accompanied his mother and stepfather, Henry Beckner, to whom his mother had previously been married, to Randolph County, this State, where the family settled upon a farm. A year later they came to this county and located in Posey Township, where both his mother and stepfather spent the rest of their lives, the former dying in 1854,  and the latter in 1879,  where our subject spent his youth assisting to clear and cultivate the farm, and where he has ever since resided. In summer during his early life, he attended the district school in which he received sufficient education to teach public school, which pursuit he took up at twenty-one years of age, that furnished his winter's employment for five years, his vacations being spent.upon a farm. In the meantime his marriage occurred at the age of twenty-five, or October 5, 1858, when Miss Asenath Ball became his wife. She was born in Posey Township, in 1840, being the daughter of Henry and Harriet (Smith) Ball, both natives of Pennsylvania. Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Conaway settled upon a farm in Posey Township, and four years later they removed to another farm in the same vicinity, where the wife of Mr. Conaway died July 12, 1875. His second marriage occurred August 31, 1876, when Miss Annie Walker became his wife. She was born in Ripley Township, March 12, 1854, and was the daughter of John W. and Cynthia (Tullis) Walker, the former of' whom is a prominent citizen of Ripley Township. In March, 1885, Mr. Conaway and his present wife removed to their present home in Section 8, Posey Township. The chief occupation of Mr. Conaway has been that of a farmer, though he has given considerable attention to the raising, buying and selling of live stock. He has also in this connection, devoted considerable time to the training of fast horses, having at this time a number upon his farm that possess marked evidence of speed. The first marriage of Mr. Conaway resulted in the birth of eight children as follows: John J. C, Jessie, Margaret, Lavisa, Leona, Henry G., Theresie and Samuel, of whom John J. C, Margaret, Lavisa and Samuel are deceased. He and his present wife are the parents of three children as follows: Nellie C, Dallie and Gus, all of whom are living. Politically, Mr. Conaway is an uncompromising Republican. In 1880 he was elected Township Trustee as the candidate of his party, overcoming an opposing majority of thirty-nine. In 1886, he was again elected to that office and is the present incumbent. He owns a farm of 160 acres, nearly all of which is in a good state of cultivation.

JAMES H. DOWNEY, a farmer and influential citizen of Posey Township, was born in Jackson Township, July 20,1836.    He was the son of Jacob and Margaret (Hinton) Downey, both natives of Nicholas County, Ky., the former chiefly of Irish descent, and the latter chiefly of German descent.    His father was the son of Arch-ibald and Sarah (Cook) Downey, and his mother was the daughter of Ezekiel and Martha (Caldwell) Hinton. His parents were married in their native county on the 29th day of July, 1830, and immediately afterward they came to Rush County and settled upon the farm in Jackson Township, where our subject  was   born. James spent his early life assisting to clear and cultivate the farm in summer and attending the district school in winter. He received a good knowledge of the branches that were then taught in the public school, and £t about the age of twenty he took up the avo-cation of a teacher which furnished his winter's employment for about three years. During the summer season he worked upon a farm, and the pursuit of a farmer has furnished the chief avocation of his life.  He was married March 10, 1859, to Luanda Price, who was born in Jackson Township (now Posey), October 28, 1839, and was the daughter of John and Mary A.  (Courtney) Price, both natives of Fleming County, Ky., the former of Irish, and the latter of Dutch descent.  For one season after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Downey resided in Jackson Township. They then removed to Posey Township and in 1865 moved to Jasper County, His., but not being pleased with the country they, returned to this county and after a residence of one year in Center Township, they again settled where they had previously resided in Posey Township. Five years later they removed to their present home, where they have ever since resided. Mr. Downey has given his entire attention to agricultural pursuits and is considered one among the first-class farmers of the county. His farm consists of ioo acres of excellent land which is fitted up with good buildings and fences and nearly all of which is in a high state of cultivation. He and wife are the parents of two children, both of whom are sons. The older, Jacob Franklin, was born December 15, 1859; he was married September 27, 1882, to Mary I. Collins. He resides in Posey Township and is at present one of the prominent teachers of this county. The younger son is John Price, who was born December 9, 1861, and was married March 21, 1883, to Mary R. Stephens. He, also, resides in Posey Township and by occupation is a farmer. Our subject and wife are members of the Christian Church. The former became a member of that church in 1854, when he was but eighteen years old. Mrs. Downey joined the church in 1857, or when she also was eighteen years of age. Both have been devoted members ever since and both have endeavored to live consistent Christian lives. For a number of years Mr. Downey has served as Superintendent of the Sabbath School, and in this and many other-ways he has striven to promote the cause of Christianity. His political affiliations have always been with the Democratic party. He was elected Trustee of his township in 1876 and was re-elected in 1878.

JACOB F. DOWNEY, one of Rush County's most successful teachers, is a native of this county, having been born in Posey Township, December 15, 1859. He is the older of two sons born to James H. and Lucinda Downey, a history of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was reared upon the farm and in winter attended the district school in which he received a good knowledge of the common branches. Later on he attended a Normal School at Carthage, during two sessions, and at nineteen years of age he took up the avocation of a teacher, teaching his first term where he had previously attended school. This has furnished his winter's employment now for the first eight years and some idea of his success may be had from the fact that all of his teaching has been in but two districts, having taught three terms in one and five in the other. He was united in marriage September 27, 1882, to Miss Mary I. Collins, daughter of William and Martha A. (Bentley) Collins. She was born in Posey Township, January 12, 1864. They are the parents of one child: Clarence E., born August 19, 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Downey are members of the Christian Church. In politics the former is a Democrat. He owns an eighty-acre farm in Posey Township, most of which is in cultivation. He is an efficient and progressive teacher.

WILLIAM ENGLISH, a pioneer of Rush County, and an old and respected citizen of Arlington, was born in Harrison County, Ky., on the 25th day of December, 1816. He was the son of Robert and Patsy (Kenning) English, both natives of Harrison County, Ky., the former of Scotch, and the latter of Irish descent. In 1823, when William was but seven years old, his parents came to this county and settled upon a tract of woods land about two miles southeast of the present site of Rushville. There our subject spent his early life assisting to clear and cultivate the farm. He continued upon the old homestead until in the year 1870, when he removed to the village of Arlington. Since then his attention has been given to the management of his farm one mile and a half east of Arlington. He was married February 28, 1852, to Christiana J. Laughlin, who was born in Beaver County, Pa., November 19, 1821, and was the daughter of Wilson and Elizabeth (McCloud) Laughlin, the former a native of Beaver County, Pa., of Irish descent, and the latter a native of Virginia, of Scotch descent. She came with her father and mother to Rush County when she was but four years old, and she has even since been a resident of the county. She is a niece of Dr. William B. Laughlin, one of the earliest settlers of Rushville, and is a cousin to Harmony Laughlin, now an old and honored resident of Rushville. Mr. and Mrs. English are the parents of one daughter: Laura E., who was born February 14, i860, and who was married April 20, 1887, to Oscar M. Marshall, a native of this county, born July 9, 1859, the son of Benjamin Marshall. Our subject, his wife and daughter, are all members of the Presbyterian Church. In politics, Mr. English is a Democrat. Besides his comfortable residence property he now occupies, he owns a farm of eighty acres.

ROBERT HUTCHINSON, who occupies a prominent place among the successful farmers and stock-raisers of Rush County, was born in Franklin County, this State, May 30, 1844, being the son Sandford and Mary (Charlton) Hutchinson, the former a native of Kentucky, and the latter a native of Ohio. His father was the son of Carter Hutchinson, who was a Virginian by birth. His mother, who is still living and now resides in the State of Iowa, can trace her ancestry back to the crew of the Mayflower. When the subject of this sketch was ten years old, his parents removed to Butler County, Ohio, where his youth was spent upon a farm. At nineteen, or in December, 1863,  he entered the service of the Union
Army in Company M, Ninth Indiana Cavalry, with which he served during the remainder of the war. He participated in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, and several other less important engagements, in all of which he discharged his duties in a manner becoming a loyal soldier. On returning from  the war he located in Posey Township, this county, where he has ever since pursued the avocation of a farmer and stock-raiser. His first marriage occurred August 20, 1868, when Miss Margaret E. Moore became his wife. She was born in Posey Township, April 15,1851, being the daughter of Mordecai and Nancy (Gruwell) Moore.  She died November 29,   1880,  and  on  the 2nd  day of December, 1882, Mr. Hutchinson and Miss Ridenbaugh were united in marriage. She was born in Rushville, October 8, 1857, being the daughter of John and Rachel  (McMannis) Ridenbaugh, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter a native of this county. Mr. Hutchinson's first marriage resulted in the birth of three children, as follows:  Elbert, born April 14, 1870, died October 4, 1882; Leona, born July 21, 1872, died October 8, 1872, and Elmer, born .Au¬gust 30, 1873.   He and his present wife have one child, Essie, born July 26, 1885.  Mr.   and Mrs. Hutchinson are members of the Christian Church. The former is a member of the G. A. R. and I. O. O. F. lodges, and he is a firm supporter of the principles of the Democratic  party.  His  farm, which is admirably  situated, consists of 160 acres of excellent land, nearly all of which is in a good state of cultivation.  It is in other ways well improved and, with its splendid facilities, it is a most desirable location.  As a tiller of the soil Mr. Hutchinson has been very successful.  He began life a poor boy, but his industry and perseverance have placed him in comfortable circumstances and given him a rank among the well-to-do citizens. He is one of the influential and prosperous farmers of the township, and he and wife are among its best citizens. For the past two years, in addition to farming, Mr. Hutchinson has been engaged in the grain trade, which venture, like all others he has made, has been attended with success.

EDWARD A. JUNKEN, a prosperous farmer of Posey Township, was born in Barren County, Ky., September 27, 1840. He was the son of Harvey and Betsey (McHatteon) Junken, the former of whom was born in this county, being the son of William Junken, who was one among the first settlers of this county, and who was the first Clerk the county ever had. His mother was also born in this county, and was the daughter of David and Betsey (English) McHatteon, they, also, being among the early settlers of this county. The parents of our subject were married here in their native county about the year 1834, and very soon, afterward they removed to Barren County, Ky., where Edward was born and where his mother died when he was yet an infant but two weeks old, and where his father also died before he was seven years old. Between the ages of seven and twelve years, he attended Camden Seminary in his native county, which was taught by Jesse P. Murrell.  At twelve years of age, he, in company with his uncle, Alexander McHatteon, came to this, the native county of his parents, and for one year thereafter he made his home with his grand-parents, the parents of his mother, who resided a few miles east of Arlington. After this, his youth was  spent working upon a farm by the month in summer, and attending district school in winter. While his education was confined to the ordinary branches of learning, it was such as to fit him for the practical affairs of life. He had no more than attained his majority and entered fully upon his manhood  when  national difficulties arose  which  threatened the dissolution of the Union.  From the first his sympathies were with the North, and on the 19th day of August, 1862, he was mustered into the United States Army, in Company D, Sixty-eighth Indiana Regiment, with which he served until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Hoover's  Gap,  Dalton, Kenesaw Mountain, Nashville and many other smaller engagements.  As a soldier he discharged his duties in a manner befitting a man possessing true national pride and honor. While on furlough, he was married to Miss Sarah Beale, on the 25th day of December, 1862.   She was born in this county, December 10, 1836, being the daughter of William and Margaret (Love) Beale, natives of New York and Pennsylvania,  respectively.  On returning from the  war,  Mr. Junken joined his wife at her father's home in Jackson Township, and a few months later they removed to the farm they now occupy in Posey Township. Since then the entire attention of Mr. Junken has been confined to agricultural pursuits. He began with a tract of timbered land, which he has since improved with good buildings and fences, and most of which he has placed in an admirable state of cultivation. He and wife are the parents of four children, as follows:    Margaret W., Alvah T., Jerusha B., and Robert E., of whom the youngest died in infancy.  Our subject, his wife and two children, are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Junken is a member of the G. A. R. and I. O. O. F. lodges, and is a Republican in politics.

WILLIAM H. LEE, a worthy and esteemed citizen of Posey Township, was born in that township July 8, 1835. He was the son of Elzy C. and Sarah Ann (Murphy) Lee, the former a native of Fishkill Island, of English descent, and the latter a native of New Jersey, of Irish descent. He was reared upon a farm, and in winter he attended the district school. In 1856, he entered an academy at Hartsville, Bartholomew County, and attended one term of five months. He then took up the avocation of a teacher, and this furnished his winter's employment for four consecutive years. In the fall of 1862, he entered the Union service in the Twenty-second Indiana Light Artillery, with which he served until the end of the war. He participated in the siege of Nashville and the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., and Franklin, Tenn., and siege of Atlanta; from the war he was married August 3, 1865, to Catharine S. Nelson, who was born in this county January 15, 1837, being the daughter of Christian and Felitia Ann (Cooper) Nelson, a more extended mention of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Lee went to Kokomo, this State, where for a short time Mr. Lee worked at the carpenter's trade. In March, 1866, they removed to a farm in Tipton County, and in August, 1867, they returned to this county and settled upon the farm they now occupy in Posey Township. Since then Mr. Lee has given his whole attention to fanning and in this pursuit he has been liberally rewarded. He began with a farm of eighty acres, and since he has been enabled to add to this until now he owns 174 acres of excellent land, most of which is in a good state of cultivation. He and wife have had seven children as follows: Adenia, Arthur C, Fannie, Florence, Elzy F., William R., and Thomas R., all of whom are living except Elzy F., who died in childhood. Mrs. Lee is a member of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Lee is an ardent Republican. While not a political Prohibitionist, he is in favor of temperance and eschews the use of intoxicants in every form.

GEORGE W. LEISURE,.an aged and venerable pioneer of Rush County, and one of its most worthy and honored citizens, is a native of Garrard County, Ky., born June 9, 1809. His parents, Nathan and Sarah .(Irvin) Leisure, were respectively natives of Frederick County, Md., and Halifax County, Va., the former of English, and the latter of Irish descent. The parents of his father were Joseph and Rachel (Ryan) Leisure, the former of whom lived to be one hundred and five years old. His death was then premature, being caused by a cancerous affection. The maternal grandfather of Mr. Leisure was Joseph Irvin, who lived to be nearly eighty years of age. The early life of our subject was spent in his native county. In winter he attended the district school, and in summer he was chiefly employed in the culture of tobacco. He was married at the age of twenty on October 8, 1829. His wife, whose maiden name was Lucinda Myers, was born in Lincoln (now Boyle) County, Ky., July 27, 1810, and was the daughter of Michael and Christena (Pope)   Myers, both natives of Kentucky, of German descent.  Both the paternal and  maternal  grandparents of Mrs. Leisure were born in Germany. Almost immediately after the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Leisure they came to Rush County and first made a temporary settlement on Big Blue River in Ripley Township. A few months later, Mr. Leisure entered an eighty-acre tract of land within the present limits of Posey Township. " There he erected a cabin into which he moved his family and immediately set about clearing up a farm.This necessarily occasioned a great deal of hard work.  He chopped, burned brush, rolled logs, split rails, and not infrequently did his wife, too, enter the forest and assist in ways that she could to prepare the ground for' the plow. Mr.  Leisure toiled on as only a man of iron will and rugged constitution could, and Mrs. Leisure stood bravely by his side, sharing alike his adversity and prosperity and presiding over the duties of the household as only a faithful wife and Christian mother could. Their labors were liberally rewarded, and in the course of time Mr. Leisure was enabled to enter and purchase other lands until he finally became one of the most extensive freeholders in the county.  He was not only able to comfortably provide for all his children as they reached maturity, but he has a good farm and a comfortable home left where he and wife are spending the decline of life in a quiet, happy way.  They have resided where they now live since 1854. The fruits of their marriage were fourteen children: Sarah, Mary A., John, Joseph, Henry, Christena, Nathan, George M., Elizabeth, Lucinda, James P., William, Maria, and Rachel A., eleven of whom are living, grown, married and have comfortable homes. Those deceased are: Mary A., Christena, and George M.    Mr. and Mrs. Leisure, their six sons and their wives, and their five daughters and their husbands, are all members of the  Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Leisure is a staunch Democrat, and he prides himself that of his twenty-two children, both by birth and marriage, twenty-one of them are the same political faith. He has frequently been elected to the office of Trustee and Justice of the Peace, and in 1875 he was elected County Commissioner, overcoming an opposing majority of two hundred. He has a number of times been solicited to become a candidate for offices of importance and trust, but always declined, preferring the quietude of domestic life to the bustle of politics. He and wife have now lived together more than fifty-eight years, and though aged as they are, both enjoy the blessings of health, and both bid fair to live for many years to come. They are among the county's most worthy and honored citizens, and are among the few early settlers who yet stand as living monuments of the pleasures and hardships of pioneer life. They have sixty-seven grand-children and thirty-five great grand-children, of whom fifty-four of the former and thirty-three of the latter are living.

MRS. MARY MCDUFFIE, an aged and venerable lady of Posey Township, was born in Fleming County, Ky., October 15, 1818, being the daughter of William and Elizabeth (Berkner) Collins, both natives of Kentucky. When she was seven years old she came with her parents to Rush County, whither they arrived October 11, 1825. The family settled in Posey Township where the subject of this sketch grew up to womanhood. On the sixth day of June, 1850, she became the wife of Elder Gabriel C. McDuffie, who was a pastor in the Christian Church, and the son of Robert and Rachel McDuffie. He was born in Harrison County, Ky, May 12, 1791. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. McDuffie settled upon the farm the latter now occupies, where Mr. McDuffie died January 30, 1864. Since then Mrs. McDuffie has been a widow. Her marriage was blessed with the birth of one child. Mary A., who was born March 24, 1851, and died November 3, 1853. She is a member of the Christian Church, having joined it nearly fifty years ago. She resided in this county while it was but a wildwood and the incidents and associations of pioneer life are fresh in her mind.

WILLIAM J. MCMICHAEL, farmer, of Posey Township, is a native of that township, born May 6, 1834. He was the son of John and Mahala McMichael, the former, who was the son of Thomas and Nancy McMichael, and the latter, who was the daughter of Joseph Britton, were both natives of Guilford County, North Car¬olina. His paternal ancestors were of Scotch-Irish extraction. He was reared upon his father's farm, and received in the district school an ordinary school education. - At the age of twenty he "went to Hancock County, where he was employed in a saw mill two years. He then returned to this county and resumed farming, which has been the.chief occupation of his life. His marriage occurred May 31, i860, when Miss Sarah Worth became his wife. She was also born in Posey Township, the date being August 13, 1841, and was the daughter of Obed and Maria (Barnard) Worth, natives of North Carolina and Ohio, respectively. Mr. McMichael and wife have seven children, as follows: Phebe J., William W., Albert N., Ernest M., Eva M., Alice and Myrtle A., all of whom are living except the oldest. Our subject and wife are members of the Protestant Methodist Church. In politics, Mr. McMichael was formerly a Democrat, but he is now an uncompromising Prohibitionist. He believes in principle rather than name and does not hesitate to sacrifice the latter for the support of the former.  Mr. McMichael is six feet and six inches in height, and weighs 310 pounds.

ABRAM MILLER, an old and highly respected citizen of Arling-ton, was born in Shenandoah County, Va., January 1, 1810. He was the son of John and Flora (Hoffman) Miller, both of whom were natives of Shenandoah County, Va., of Dutch descent. He spent his boyhood and early youth in his native county upon a farm. His mother died when he was eighteen years old, and a few months afterward, owing to a dissolution of the household, he became an apprentice in a woolen factory, where he spent two and one-half years learning the carder's trade. He left the factory before his apprenticeship expired, to accompany his father, who had re-married, to Warren County, Ohio. There our subject worked at his trade about three months, but not finding this very remunerative he abandoned it and found employment upon a farm. At the end of two years, or on the 3rd day of October, 1832, he was united in marriage to Mary Sellers, who was born in Warren County, Ohio, January 31, 1833, and was the daughter of Jacob and Christena (Monger) Sellers, both natives of Rockingham County, Va., of Dutch descent. Immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller located upon a farm in Warren County, Ohio, where they resided until about 1813, when they came to this county, and settled in Walker Township. There they continued to-live happily together until their union was broken by the death of Mrs..Miller, April 30, 1878. On the 16th day of February, 1882, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Maria Sheets, who was born in Warren County, Ohio, February n, 1827, and was the daughter of John and Susan (Miller) Sheets, both natives of Virginia, of Dutch descent. Shortly after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Miller located in the village of Arlington, in the residence they now occupy. The first marriage of Mr. Miller resulted in the birth of ten children, as follows: Christena A., Sarah J., Andrew, Mary E., Flora, Wesley, Theodore, Julia A., Lucinda F. and Margaret E., all of whom all living except Andrew and Mary E. Mr. Miller is a member of the Methodist Church, the Odd Fellows' Lodge, and in politics he is an ardent Republican.

THOMAS B. NELSON, one of the prosperous and influential men of Rush County, was born upon a farm three and one-half miles southwest of Rushville, March 29, 1839. He was the son of Christian and Filitia Ann (Cooper) Nelson, the former of whom was born in Copenhagen, Denmark, February 2, 1797, and the latter was born in this county August 1, 1820. His parents were married in this county January 11, 1836. Immediately after their marriage they settled upon a farm three and one-half miles southwest of Rushville, and there raised a family of five children, as fol-lows:    Catharine S., born January 15, 1837; Thomas B., born March 29, 1839; William H., born March 3, 1841; Samuel D., born March 10, 1843, died in the service of the Union Army at Greenville, Miss., June 20, 1864, and James L., born March 30, 1845, died May 15, 1848. The wife of Christian Nelson died December 27, 1846, and on the 29th day of June, 1848, he married Mrs. Margaret Brown.    Some years later they settled in the village of Arlington, where Mr. Nelson died April 29, 1866.   His widow, Margaret Nelson, afterward married John Alsman.  She died October 6, 1881. The subject of this sketch spent his early life working upon a farm in summer and attending district school in winter. His education, though confined to the common branches, was such as to fit him for the ordinary transactions of life.    On the 18th day of April, 1861, he volunteered his services to the Union Army, and was duly mustered into Company F, Sixteenth Indiana Infantry, with which he served one year, or the full time of his enlistment.  He reached home on the 1st day of June, 1862, and four days later, or the 5th of the same month he was married to Miss Phebe Ball, who was born in Posey Township, March 11, 1843, being the daughter of Henry and Harriet (Smith) Ball, both natives of Mercer County, Pa. For a few months after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Nelson resided with the father of Mr. Nelson, in Posey Township.    In August, 1862, they settled upon another farm in the same vicinity. They have since made three other moves, but have resided all the time in the same township.. They settled where they now reside in February, 1882. The life occupation of Mr. Nelson has been that of a farmer, and as such he has had marked success.    He and wife are the parents of seven children, as follows: Charles W., William C, Catharine S.,Thomas C, James O., Harry H.,and John O., all of whom are living,    Mr. and Mrs. Nelson "are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, Mr. Nelson is an uncompromising Republican. He owns a splendid farm of 320 acres, which is fitted up with good buildings and fences, and about 270 acres of which is in a high state of cultivation.

MRS. MARY H. OFFUTT, an aged and venerable lady of Arlington, was born in Scott County, Ky., October 2, 1810. She was the daughter of William and Mary (Beachem) Morris, both of whom were natives of the State of Delaware, the former of Irish and Scotch, and the latter' of Welsh descent. Her father was a wealthy planter and slave holder of that part of Kentucky. Her early life was spent at the home of her parents in her native county, and on the 13th day of August, 1829, she was united in marriage to Sabret S. Offutt, a native of the State of Maryland, born December 4, 1807. He was the son  of Archibald and Jane   (Austin) Offutt, with whom he emigrated to Scott County, Ky., m an early day.     In July, 1830, Mrs. Offutt and her husband moved to Rush County, and located in a cabin on the bank of Little Blue River, where  Mr. Offutt  immediately  set   about clearing up a  farm. Month after month he toiled, and not infrequently did his wife, too, enter the clearing and assist in gathering the brush and rolling the logs to prepare the ground for the plow.  At the end of two years they removed to a farm of their own, in the same vicinity, the one they had previously occupied having belonged to the father of Mrs. Offutt. Six years later they returned to the farm upon which they had first settled, and there they continued to reside until in April, 1873, when they removed to the village of Arlington. The life occupation of Mr. Offutt, was that of a farmer, and as such he was very successful.  For a number of years before removing to Arlington, his health had been failing, and it gradually continued to decline until the 29th of March, 1882, when he died.  He was a , devoted member of  the Christian Church, and was universally known as a good man. Since the death of her husband  Mrs. Offutt has been a widow.  She, also, is a member of the Christian Church, having joined it more than fifty years ago. She is the mother of eight children, three of whom are still living.    Their names are as follows: James A. W., Mary J., John F., Lewis J., Samantha A., George W., Rebecca E., and a son that died in in¬fancy, unnamed. Mary J., Lewis J. and George W., are those who survive.    Besides other property, Mrs. Offutt has a comfortable home in Arlington, where she resides in a quiet, happy way. Though in the seventy-seventh year  of her age she is enjoying good health and bids fair to live for many years to come.    She is in full possession of her mental faculties, and has a vivid recollection of the scenes and incidents in the country's early history as witnessed by a pioneer.    Though a resident of Indiana more than half a century, with true Kentucky spirit, she recalls with pride her native State and the home of her childhood, and though aged as she is, she feels that were it possible she would like to pass her last days upon old Kentucky soil.

MRS. RHODA M. OFFUTT, whose maiden name was Rhoda M. Power, was born near Knightstown, this county, March 27, 1836. She was the daughter of Joseph and Nancy M. (Kirkwood) Power, both natives of the State of Kentucky, the former of Irish and. Dutch descent. . Her early .life was spent at the home of her parents in this county. She was married February 22, 1859, to James A. W. Offutt, who was born in Kentucky, September 16, 1830, and was the son of Sabert and Mary (Morris) Offutt.  Almost immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Offutt located in the village of Arlington, where they continued to reside happily together until their union was broken by the death of Mr. Offutt, October 5, 1867. They had born to them two children:  William C, born August 27,  i860, died September 17, 1860, and Joseph S., born July 29, 1862. On the 8th day of July, 1869, Mrs. Offutt became the wife of Joseph Little, from whom she was separated in 1885. Mrs. Offutt is a member of the Presbyterian Church.  Besides being the owner of several lots in the village of Arlington, she owns a good farm of nearly eighty acres adjoining that place. It is well improved, and most of it is in a good state of cultivation.

RICHARD H. PHILLIPS, one of Rush County's most prominent farmers and stock-raisers, was born in Guilford County, N. C, October 8, 1840, being the son of William and Esther (Vickry) Phillips, both natives of North Carolina, the former of Surry County, and the latter of Guilford County. His boyhood and early youth were spent in his native county.  As early as twelve years of age he began working out by the month upon a. farm, and in that capacity he continued until he reached the age of eighteen, his wages ranging from $3.00 to $6.50 per month. Owing to the poor school facilities in those times his early education was quite limited. But through observation and reading he has somewhat mitigated the lack of early training until now he has a good practical education.  He was reared not only in a slave-holding community but also in one in which even white people unless the)'" possessed wealth were denominated as poor white trash, and these associations not being congenial to him, he, as early as eighteen years of age, resolved to cut himself loose from an existence, the very nature of which proved distasteful to him, and find for himself a home in the west, where .equality and freedom dwelt together. Accordingly agreeable to a custom of that time, he, for the sum of $150, purchased his time from his father, and bidding his friends good bye he placed himself at the mercy of an unfriendly world. Having fallen in with a man who was moving with his family to Iowa, he came westward with him in a wagon and accompanied him as far as Arlington, this county, whither his father, Lewis R. Phillips, had come some years previous.  For some three or four years thereafter he worked upon a farm by the month, and during two winters he attended school.  He made his home with his brother, and in this manner he continued on up to August 7, 1862, when he volunteered his services to the Union Army, and entered Company C, Sixteenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until the end of the war.  Besides smaller engagements, he participated in the battles of Richmond, Kentucky, the first attack on Vicksburg, Arkansas Post, the siege of Vicksburg, Sabine,. Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill, in all of which he discharged his duties in a manner becoming a loyal soldier. At Richmond, Kentucky, he was taken prisoner, but in a few days he was released on parole. At the close of the war he returned to this county, and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Posey Township. His marriage to Miss Phebe A. Weesner, occurred December 16, 1866. She was born in Henry County, December 5, 1847, being the daughter of Nathan and Hannah (Pike) Weesner, the former a native of Persiath County, N. C, and the latter a native of Ohio. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of five children as follows: Clinton W., Adelia H., Edward N., Charlie M. and Ada L., all of whom are living. Mr. Phillips and wife are members of the Friends' Church. He is a member of the G. A. R. Lodge, and he and wife are both identified with the society known as Patrons of Husbandry. The political affiliations of Mr. Phillips have always been with the Republican party. He voted the day he was twenty-one, and has never missed an opportunity to deposit his ballot but twice since, and that was during the war when he was restrained from exercising this privilege by the legislature of his State. He owns 273 acres of excellent land, nearly all of which is in a high state of cultivation. In addition to his farming he gives a good deal of attention to the raising of fine cattle, and his herd of Short Horns ranks among the best in this part of the State. He is a prosperous farmer, and he and wife are among the county's most excellent citizens. Mr. Phillips began life a poor boy possessing nothing in the world but willing hands and a mental capacity to direct them with prudence.

ELIHU PRICE, a native-born citizen of Rush County and a farmer of Posey Township, was born October 5, 1843. His parents, John and Mary (Cotney) Price, were both natives of Fleming County, Ky., of English descent. During his boyhood and youth he worked upon a farm in summer and attended the district school in winter. He received a good knowledge of the common branches, and at the age of twenty-one he began teaching public school which furnished his winter's employment for eight consecutive years. His labors as a teacher were all performed in this county, except one term of school which he taught in Jasper County, Ills. In 1869 he attended the Normal School at Lebanon, Ohio, one term and also one term during the following year. His vacations were chiefly however, spent upon a farm. Since retiring from the school room his whole attention has been given to agricultural pursuits. He owns a splendid farm of 230 acres, about 200 of which are in cultivation. Fitted up as it is with a handsome residence and other substantial improvements it is a very desirable location. He was married August 17, 1871, to Miss Mary Reddick, daughter of John and Catharine (Ruby) Reddick. She was born in Ripley Township, this county, October 16, 1847. Her parents were natives of Ohio and came with their respective parents to Rush County, in an early day. Mr. Price and wife are the parents of six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom are living. Their names are John J., Mary C, Amanda E., Jesse F., Sarah J., and Noah E. Mrs. Price is a member of the Christian Church. Politically, Mr. Price is a Democrat. He has served as Justice of the Peace two terms, and as such he made a just and worthy officer.

JOHN F. PRICE, farmer of Posey Township, was born in the house he now occupies, December 13, 1846, being the son of John and Mary Price, both natives of Fleming County, Ky. The parents of his father were Thomas and Elizabeth Price, and his mother was the daughter of Elzy and Sarah Courtney. During his boyhood and youth, he attended the district school in winter, receiving a good knowledge of the ordinary branches of learning. He worked upon the farm in summer, and at twenty-one years of age engaged in agricultural pursuits for himself. He and Miss Sarah M. Scott were united in marriage August 18, 1867. Her parents, Aden D. and Emily Scott, were both natives of this State, the former of Henry County, and the latter of Hamilton County. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Price were Aden D. and Sarah M. Scott. Shortly after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Price settled upon a farm in Ripley Township. At the end of three years they removed to the old Price homestead in Posey Township, which they have occupied ever since. Mr. Price has followed the pursuit of a farmer all his life, and has been moderately successful. His farm consists of eighty acres of well-improved land, and it is very desirably located. Our subject and wife are members of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Price supports the principles of the Democratic party. He was elected Trustee of his township in 1882, and was re-elected in 1884, serving two terms in a very satisfactory manner. In the fall of 1886, he was the candidate of his party for the office of County Commissioner, and succeeded in reducing an opposing majority from more than 300 to 194, and carried his own township, which is about evenly divided politically, by forty-seven, which reflects very creditably upon nis standing.

GEORGE W. PRICE, who occupies a prominent place among the successful farmers of the county, was born in Posey Township, January 28, 1850, being the son of John and Sarah (Leisure) Price. The former who was born in Fleming County, Ky., was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth  (Gallaway) Price, and the latter is the daughter of George W. and Lucinda Leisure, a history of whom appears elsewhere in this work. The father of our subject died September 22, 1873. His mother, who has ever since been a widow, resides upon a farm in Ripley Township. His boyhood and youth were spent upon the old home farm, where he was born. In summer he worked upon the farm and in winter he attended the district school in which he received a good practical knowledge of the branches then taught in the public school. He continued upon, the farm with his father until after the latter's death, after which he took up agricultural pursuits for himself, and to this his undivided attention has been given ever since. His first marriage occurred December 15, 1874, when Miss Mary J. Conaway became his wife. She was the daughter of Samuel and Phebe Conaway, whose history is given elsewhere. She was born May 2, 1850, and died August 29, 1884. On the 1st day of October, 1885, Mr. Price was married to Miss Anna F. Conaway, who was a sister of his former wife. She was born in Posey Township, December 22, 1864. For four years after his first marriage, Mr. Price resided with his mother in Ripley Township. In the fall of 1878, he removed to Posey Township and located where he now resides. Mr. Price and wife are members of the Christian Church. The political affiliations of the former have always been with the Democratic party. His farm, which consists of 101 acres, is situated in an excellent farming locality and nearly all of it is in a high state of cultivation.

MARTIN RIGSBEE, farmer, is a native of Guilford County, N. C, born December 24, 1818. His parents, John and Lydia Rigsbee, were natives of Chatham and Surry counties, N. C, respectively, both of English descent. When he was eleven years of age his parents came westward to this State, and first settled in Union County. A little more than two years later they came to Rush County, and after a residence of two years north of Arlington, they removed to a tract of land four miles southwest of Arlington, where the father died, May 30, 1851, where the mother died, September 22, 1873, where the subject of this sketch spent the balance of his youth assisting to clear and cultivate the farm, and where he has ever since resided. The life-work of Mr. Rigsbee has been farming, and in this pursuit he has had marked success. He owns a splendid farm of 240 acres, 160 of which lie in Shelby County, and eighty in Rush. A good portion of his farm is in cultivation, and its natural facilities, handsome residence and other substantial improvements make it one among the best farms in that section. Mr. Rigsbee was married December 9, 1847. His wife, whose maiden name was Lucinda Barnard, was born in Guilford County, N. C, the date being, June 12, 1824.    Her parents, John and Elizabeth Barnard, were also natives of Guilford County, N. C. In 1830, they came to Wayne County, this State, and in the fall of 1836, they came to Rush County and settled in Walker Township, where they resided when their daughter Lucinda was married, and where her father died, February 19, 1863.  Her mother, who is now an aged and venerable lady of nearly four score years and ten, resides at present with a son in Shelby County.    Mr. and Mrs. Rigsbee have had four children:  Alveron, Florella E., John L. and Adrian, of whom the oldest is deceased. Mrs. Rigsbee is a member of the Friends' Church.  In politics, Mr. Rigsbee formerly was a Whig, casting his first presidential vote for General Harrison. Since 1856, he has supported the principles of the Republican party.

ZACARIAH T. SMALL, a prominent farmer of Posey Township, was born near his present place of residence August 30, 1850. He was the s,on of Josiah and Susannah (Maggard) Small, natives of North Carolina and Virginia, respectively.  The former, who was the son of Abraham and Delilah Small, was born February 13, 1812, and his wife was just one day his senior, being born February 12, 1812.  He was reared upon a farm, and in winter he attended the  district school,  but the  advantages were  poor, and consequently his early education was but ordinary. His marriage to Miss Mattie Holding occurred January 13, 1870. She was born in Shelby County, May- 31, 1853, being the daughter of John and Lydia A. (Cannon) Holding, natives of Pennsylvania and Indiana, respectively.  Immediately  after their marriage  Mr. and  Mrs. Small settled upon the farm they now occupy, where the former has ever since given his attention to agricultural pursuits. He owns a fine farm of 240 acres, nearly 200 of which are in an excellent state of cultivation.  His farm contains a handsome little residence, and improved as it is in other respects, it is one of the most desirable locations in the county.    Mr. Small and wife have had four children: Crilla, born November 22,  1870; Estella, born July 8 1873; Riley, born April 4, 1879, and Rufus K., born September 22, 1883, died August 22, 1884. Our subject and his wife are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, Mr. Small is a Republican.

JOHN SOHN, an honored citizen of Posey Township, is a native of Germany, born May 19, 1827, being the son of Adam and Catharine Sohn, both of whom were also natives of Germany. At six years of age he entered school, and according to the custom of that country, he continued to attend until he was fourteen. On quitting school he became employed in an eating and drinking establishment, and was thus engaged three years.   He then spent two years learning the tailor's trade; but this proved too confining, so he turned his attention to farming. He was married January 8, 1850. His wife, whose maiden name was Catharine Wieterholt, was also a native of Germany, born May 22, 1822, and was the daughter of Conrad and Martha Wieterholt. On the 3d day of June, 1852, Mr. and Mrs. Sohn embarked for .America, reaching New York on the 7th day of July following. They first settled in Ottawa County, Ohio, where for some three or four years Mr. Sohn was employed in quarries and dealt in cement and lime. They came to this State in 1856, and settled in Wayne County, where Mr. Sohn found employment upon a farm. In February, 1861, they removed to this count}- and they have ever since resided in Posey Township. The whole attention of Mr. Sohn since then has been given to farming, and in this pursuit he has had good success. He began with comparatively nothing, and he is now in comfortable circumstances, all of which is the result of hard work and good management. He had a farm in his native country that had been given him by his father, but when he got ready to start to America desiring to provide comfortably for his old father and mother, he deeded the farm back to them, and brought nothing with him but a little money in possession of his wife. He now owns eighty acres of excellent land situated in one of the best farming localities in Rush County, and with its convenient residence and other good improvements it is a very desirable location. Mr. and Mrs. Sohn have had five children: Lizzie, John, Conrad, Alonzo and Eva, of whom only Alonzo is living. He married for his wife Miss Susannah Rutherford, and he is the father of three children: John, Emma and Harry. Mr. and Mrs. Sohn are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as are Alonzo Sohn and wife. Our subject is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the I. O. O. F. Lodge.

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