Ripley Township
Biographies




Benjamin Foust

Benjamin Foust, who is one of the substantial farmers of Rush County, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in November 1830, being the son of George and Catherine (Vance) Foust, who were natives of Virginia and Ohio respectively. His father was the son of Lewis and Barbara (Bowman) Foust, who were natives of Virginia. His mother was the daughter of John and Barbara (Smith) Vance. Both his parents and maternal great grandparents were natives of Germany. When he was a young child less than two years old his parents came to Rush County, Indiana and became early settlers of Ripley Township, in which his early life was spent assisting to clear and cultivate the farm on which his mother died January 4, 1839, and on which his father still continues to reside. When he reached maturity, he engaged at farming for himself, and he has ever since pursued that avocation in Ripley Township. In this connection he has had good success. He owns a farm of seventy-three acres, nearly all of which is in cultivation. It contains a splendid barn and an elegant brick residence, which with its natural facilities makes a very desirable location. When Mr. Foust began life for himself he had nothing; his only capital was willing hands and a mental capacity to direct them with prudence. With these he went to work and the present state of his circumstances reflects very creditably upon his industry and good management. He was married March 1, 1855, to Miss Cornelia E. Reid, who was born in Marion County, Indiana, November 3, 1835, being the daughter of John B.E. and Elizabeth (Wolfe) Reid, who were natives of South Carolina, and Scott County, Kentucky, respectively. Her father was the son of Archibald and Martha (Alexander) Reid, and her mother was the daughter of Jacob, and Euphemia (Cannon) Wolfe, who were natives of Maryland and Delaware, respectively. Her parents settled in Marion County in 1830. Her father died there, August 25th, 1838, and her mother afterward married John Addison, who died November 14th, 1859. She still survives and lives in Knightstown. Mr. and Mrs. Foust had five children as follows: The first was a son, that was born April 12, 1858, and died unnamed; the second is Laura A., born July 30, 1858, and Ida C, born March 20, 1860, died October 2, 1865, Emma G, born September 9, 1869, and Earl R, born August 24, 1871, died September 19, 1871. Mrs. Foust is a member of the Christian Church. In politics, Mr. Foust is an Uncompromising Democrat.
( History of Rush County Indiana 1888 Brant & Fuller, Chicago Contributed by Darlene Anderson)

MICAJAH BINFORD was born in Northampton County, N. C, March 14, 1783. He was the son of James and Hannah (Crew) Binford. In North Carolina he married Sarah Patterson in 1804. He attended the very common schools in North Carolina. The children of this union were: William, Micajah C, Rebecca, married Thomas Jessop; Anna, married Henry Winslow. His wife having died, he, in 1820, married a Miss Morris. The children of this marriage were: Sarah, married Joseph Young; Marion, married Joseph Butler; Martha, married Oliver Andrews; Margaret, married Joseph Butler; Mirian, married Jesse M. Pitts. In 1826, in the spring, he left North Carolina with his family, married three months in Belmont County, Ohio, and the same year he arrived in Ripley Township, and moved onto the land he had just entered from the government. His family lived in a tent until he had his cabin ready for occupancy. He had a section of land to open and develop. He assisted in building the first meeting house at Walnut Ridge, and the first school house. He was a farmer and a respected citizen. March 25, 1865, he died after a very brief illness. He was a member of the Friends' Church, and a Republican. Micajah C. Binford, son of Micajah and Sarah (Patterson) Binford, was born- July 14, 1812, in Northampton County, N. C. At the age of fourteen he came with his father's family to Indiana, attended school at Walnut Ridge in Ripley Township, and passed his boyhood in assisting his father in opening up the farm. On the 22nd day of September, 183.6, Micajah married Susannah Bundy, daughter of Josiah and Mary (Morris) Bundy. Her parents came from North Carolina and settled in Wayne County, Ind. Susannah was born there and removed with her parents to Ripley Township where her parents resided until they died.    The place is now owned by Sarah Jane Bundy and her children. Micajah and Susannah began housekeeping on the farm where both now reside, and have continuously for fifty-one years. The old cabin in which they first lived is still in existence. They are the parents of: Ruth, William P., Josiah, Levi and Micajah M. Mr. Binford is a farmer and has made a success of it. He has settled up numerous estates to the satisfaction of all concerned; was Clerk of the Friends' monthly meeting at Walnut Ridge for twenty-one years; is a member of the Society of Friends, and in politics is a third party Prohibitionist. Micajah M. Binford, son of Micajah and Susannah (Bundy) Binford, was born December 18, 1851, in Ripley Township, Rush Co., Ind. In his youth he attended school at Walnut Ridge, and in 1867 he went to Earlham College, where he stayed one year. When twenty-two years of age he went to Mexico under the auspices of the Friends' Foreign Mission Association of Indiana. In March, 1873, he married Susannah Binford, daughter of Oliver and Mary (Foulke) Binford. In December of that year Micajah went to Mexico accompanied by his wife. After remaining in Matamoras nearly two years, he returned to Indiana on ac¬count of his wife's health. The result of the marriage is one son: Edward Binford, born March 24, 1877. After returning to Indiana, Mr. Binford remained four years, and subsequently traveled in the Southwest in the interest of the American Bible Society. In 1882 he removed with his family to Lynn, Mass., where he was pastor of a charge for five years. In May, 1887, he returned to Indiana, where he now resides. He is now a State Evangelist and belongs to the Society of Friends at Walnut Ridge.

JOSEPH BINFORD, one of the honored citizens of Ripley Township, is a native of Northampton County, N. C, born June 29, 1817, being the son of James L. and Mary (Ladd) Binford, who were natives of North Carolina and Virginia, respectively, both of English descent. His father was the son of James and Hannah (Crew) Binford, and his mother was the daughter of Robert Ladd. When he was nine years old, his parents came westward to this State, and became among the first settlers of Hancock County. There his youth was spent assisting to clear and cultivate a farm. He continued with his parents until his first marriage, which oc¬curred December 25, 1844. The lady that became his wife was Miss Elizabeth C. Hill. She was born in Wayne County, this State, November 9, 1824, being the daughter of William and Charity (Hawkins) Hill, the former of whom was born in Randolph County, N. C., of English descent, and the latter was born near Bush Hill Church, S. C, of Welsh descent. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Binford settled upon a farm in
 Hancock County, where Mrs. Binford died, October 20, i860.   On the 23rd day of April,   1863, Mr. Binford was married to Mrs. Mary E. White.    She was born in Prince  George County, Va., June 19, 1825, being the daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Hunnicutt, both of whom were natives of Virginia, the form-er of Prince George County, and the latter of Dinwiddie County, both of Eng¬lish descent.    Her father was the son of John and Mary (Butler) Hunnicutt.    Her mother was the daughter of John and Sarah (Butler) Andrews, all of whom were natives of Virginia.    When she was seven years old,  her   parents  came westward to Hancock County, this State, where her father died six months later.    Her mother afterward married Nathan Overman, who died in 1853, and she survived him until 1856.     In 1857, Mrs. Binford went to Jasper County, Iowa, where, on the 18th of July, 1857, she was married to William C. White, who was born in Guilford County, N. C, being the son of Isaac and Mahala (Hunt) White, who also were natives of North Carolina.    After their marriage, they con¬tinued to reside in Jasper County, Iowa, until the fall of 1850, when they returned on a visit to Hancock County, where Mr. White died on the 29th day of November, 1859.    After his death, his wife remained a widow until her marriage with the subject of this sketch.    The first marriage of Mr. Binford resulted in the birth of six children, as follows: Charity H., Anna J., Oliver L., Mary A., Louisa and Elizabeth C, all of whom are living and married.  The first marriage of Mrs. Binford resulted in the birth of two children, as follows: Nathan C. and William C, of whom the former is de¬ceased and the latter is married and resides in  Hancock County, Ind.    Mr. Binford and his present wife have had two children: Caroline and Joseph O., the former of whom is married, and the latter is at present a student at Earlham College.    Our subject and wife are members of the Friends' Church,    In politics, both are Pro-hibitionists.    Besides a good residence property where he resides in Carthage, Mr. Binford is the owner of a farm of 300 acres in Hancock County, which is well improved and two-thirds of which is in cultivation.    Besides this, he has  also provided comfortably for all his children, having given to each a farm of eighty acres. In October, 1880, Mr. and Mrs. Binford removed from Hancock County to Carthage, and they have occupied their present home ever since.

JOSIAH C. BINFORD, of Ripley Township, was born in Prince George County, Va.,Juhe 17, 1826, being the son of Benjamin and Mary (Cook) Binford, both of whom were natives of Virginia, of English descent. His father was the son of Aquilla Binford, and was born February 20, 1797, and his mother was the daughter of Josiah and Mary Cook.    When our subject was about six years old, his father died, after which he continued with his widowed mother until the time of her death, which occurred when he was fifteen years of age.    For a while before and one year following that event he made his home with his uncle Joel Cook, in Isle of Wight County,  Va.   He then came  westward  to  Jefferson County, Ohio, where for about one year he attended school at Mt. Pleasant.    After this he was employed as a farm hand in that vicinity for four years.    He then returned to Virginia, to visit his relatives, and at the expiration of a few weeks he returned to Jefferson County, Ohio, where he was employed upon a farm for another period of four years.   The winter of 1852-3, he spent in Wa-bash County, this State.    In the spring of 1853, he came to Rush County, and he has resided in Ripley Township ever since.    For about two years he was engaged as a farm hand.    February 21, 1855, he was married to Miss Mary Ann Hill, who is a native of Ripley Township, born February 6, 1836, being the daughter of John and Dinah (Cox) Hill, both of whom were natives of North Carolina.    Her father was the son of Benjamin and Mary (Jessup) Hill, arid her mother was the daughter of Joseph and Dinah (Rich) Cox.    Ever since their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Binford have resided in Ripley Township, and they have occupied their present home since the fall of 1856.    The life occupation of Mr. Binford has been farming and in this connection his efforts have been liberally rewarded.    He owns in all 295 acres of land, of which 247 acres lie in Ripley Township, and 48 in Hancock County.    A good part of his land is in cultivation, and his home farm is fitted up with a good residence and other substantial improvements that make it a desirable location.  Mr. and Mrs. Binford are the parents of nine children, as follows: Joseph J., Adaline, Morris, Emma J., Marcia, Charles F., Irvin H., Walter and David M., all of whom are living.    The son, Irvin H., is now a student in Earlham Col-lege, which institution, Morris, Emma and. Marcia have also at¬tended.    Mr. and Mrs. Binford, and all their children are members of the Friends' Church.    In politics, Br. Binford is a Republican.

JARED P. BIINFORD, farmer, is a native of Ripley Township, born  December  9,   1834, being'the son of William  and Mary (Jessup) Binford, who were natives of Northampton County, N. C, and Wayne County, Ind., respectively, both of English descent. His father was the son of Micajah and Sarah (Patterson) Binford, and his mother was the daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Hill) Jessup, all of whom were natives of North Carolina.    When he was about sixteen years old, his mother died, and in about 1855, his father was married to Mary Henley, who was born in Randolph County, N. C, being the daughter of Joseph and Peninah (Morgan) Henley.    His father died in August, 1885, but his stepmother still survives, and makes her home with the subject of this sketch.   The latter was reared upon a farm in his native township, and at twenty-one years of age he took up the avocation of a farmer for himself, and he has continued to follow that pursuit in Ripley Township ever since.    He was married September 26, 1S67, to Miss Emily Lamb, who is a native of Hamilton County, this State, born June 3, 1843, being the daughter  of Phineas  and  Huldah  (Bundy) Lamb, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, the former being the son of John and Sarah Lamb, and the latter being the daughter of Josiah and Huldah Bundy, all of whom were natives of North Carolina.    Mr. Binford owns a farm of eighty acres, nearly all of which is in cultivation.    It contains a handsome residence, and with its other substantial improvements and natural facilities, makes a very desirable home.    Our subject and wife are members of the Friends' Church.    In politics, the former is an ardent Re¬publican.    He cast his first vote for Oliver P. Morton, for Governor of Indiana, and he has supported Republican principles ever since.    He is a prosperous, well-to-do farmer, and he and his wife are among the best citizens of their township.    They have in their family a foster child, who by name is Ella Binford, who was born March 15, 1868, being the daughter of Calvin and Peninah (Hill) Binford.    Her home has been with Mr. and Mrs. Binford ever since she was two years old.

JONATHAN BINFORD, farmer, and a native-born citizen of Rip-ley Township, was born April 20, 1842, being the son of William and Mary (Jessup) Binford, who were natives of Northampton County, N. C., and Wayne County, Ind., respectively. His father was the son of Micajah and Sarah (Patterson) Binford, and his mother was the daughter of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Hill) Jessup, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. He was reared upon the home farm in Ripley Township, and continued with his father until his marriage, which occurred December 25, 1867. The lady that became his wife was Miss Anna Wilson, who was born in Grant County, this State, July 29, 1847, being the daughter of Nathan D. and Mary (Hill) Wilson, the former of whom was a native of North Carolina. After his marriage Mr. Binford settled upon a farm in Ripley Township, where his first wife died May 18, 1868. After this he made his home with his father until the 9th day of December, 1869, when he was married to Miss Nancy J. Henley, daughter of Jesse and Abigail (Newby) Henley, both of whom were natives of Randolph County, N. C. Her father was the son of Joseph and Peninah (Morgan) Henley, and her mother was the daughter of Henry and Sarah (Thornburg) Newby, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. Immediately after their mar-riage Mr. and Mrs. Binford settled upon the farm they now occupy, where they have chiefly resided ever since. Mr. Binford gives his attention to farming. He owns about ioo acres of land, about seventy of which are in cultivation. He and wife are the parents of four children, as follows: Henry N., born January 15, 1871; Calvin, born January 6, 1873; Jesse H., born June 21, 1877? and Anna C, born October 27, 1879, whom are living. Mr. Bin¬ford and wife are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, the former is a Republican. Mrs. Nancy J. Binford was born in Rip-ley Township, January 18, 1844.

LEVI BINFORD,  druggist   and   prominent   business   man   of Carthage, is a native of Ripley Township, born August 18, 1843. He was the son of Micajah C. and Susannah (Bundy) Binford, who are old citizens of Ripley Township.     He was reared upon the old Binford homestead, working upon the farm in summer and attending school in winter.    Later on he attended Earlham College, of Richmond, a few terms, which, in addition to a good common school education, gave him a knowledge of several of the higher branches of learning.    In his early manhood he taught one term of public school.    At about twenty-one years of age, he engaged in agricultural pursuits and continued to give his attention to farming until 1872.    In that year he became a resident of Carthage, where he has since conducted a large drug store, and has also been con¬nected with extensive saw milling interests.   In addition to the above he has also acted in the capacity of agent for a number of reliable insurance companies and the public associations, which all of these have occasioned, have won for him an enviable reputation as  thoroughly reliable and trustworthy business man.    He was married January 6, 1870, to Miss Abbie S. Marshall, who is the daughter of David and Zelinda (Binford)  Marshall, who  were natives of Green County, Tenn., and Prince George County, Va., respectively.    Mrs. Binford died on the 26th day of March, 18S7, leaving to the care of our subject an only child, Marshall D., who was born October 19,  1880.    Mr. Binford is a member of the Friends' Church, and a Prohibitionist in politics.    He is a man who possesses good business qualifications and who has the confidence of all.

JOSEPH J. BINFORD, son of Josiah C. and Mary Ann (Hill) Bin-ford, was born February 15, 1856, in Ripley Township, Rush County, Ind. He grew to manhood on his father's farm attending school, in season, at Walnut Ridge. On November 20, 1883, Joseph married Rebecca Williams, daughter of James and Elizabeth (Winslow) Williams. The result of this union is one child, named Ethel, born May 13, 1885. Joseph J., is a farmer, and resides on his farm one mile south of Walnut Ridge. He is a member of the Friends' Society, at Walnut Ridge, and votes the Repub¬lican ticket.

WILLIAM BUNDY, a prominent business man of Carthage, is a native of Ripley Township, born July 24, 1837, being the son of Elias and Sarah (Nicholson) Bundy, both of whom were natives of Pasquotank County, N. C, and both of   English descent.    His parents were reared and married in their native county, and in 1831, they emigrated westward to this State, and after a short stop in Wayne County, they came to Rush County and settled in Ripley Township, where both spent the rest of their lives, their respective deaths occurring in 1873 and 1885.   The subject of this sketch was reared upon a farm in his native township, and received in the dis¬trict school an ordinary common school education.    At twenty-one years of age he began to learn the trade of a blacksmith, in Car¬thage, which was finished in due time, and which furnished his chief avocation for a period of twenty-three years.    His services in that capacity were chiefly performed in Carthage, though for about four years he was engaged at his trade in Henry County.    Since I88I> he has been connected with a pump factory and repair shop in Car¬thage, and now possesses a rank among her influential and prosperous citizens.    He was married July 25, 1861, to Miss Mary A-Steuart, who was born in Henry County, Ind., April 7, 1840, being the daughter of John and Martha (Stratton) Steuart, who were natives of North Carolina and Ohio, respective.    Mr. and Mrs. Bundy have had born to them eight children, as follows:    Addie E., Albert L., Alice, John, Edgar J., Leona Belle, Arthur W., and Mary A., of whom Alice, John, Arthur W., and Mary A., are de¬ceased.    Mr.  and Mrs. Bundy and family are members of  the Friends' Church.    In politics, our subject is a Republican.  He has been honored with a position on the School Board of Carthage for nearly twelve. years, resigning the  position on retiring.    He has always had the educational interests of his town and township at heart, and it is largely through his influence while a member of the School Board, that Carthage can boast of one of the best graded schools in the State.    He has also ever been ready to lend a help¬ing hand to public improvements, and to the advancement of the interests of his town, and many of the most substantial improvements of that place are due to his enterprise.    He possesses a good practical education, and evidence of his genius is found in the fact that he has invented and received patents on two devices, one a garden hoe, patented in June, 1878, and a fence loom upon which he received a patent September 6, 1887. He is President of the Natural Gas Company of Carthage, also President of the Ripley Township Temperance organization, and for a long time he has been Superintendent of a large Sabbath School at Carthage. He possesses a rank among the influential and public spirited men of the county, and he and wife are among its worthy and honored citizens.

DR. JOHN M. CLARK, deceased, whose portrait appears else-where, was a native of Guilford County, N. C.,born August 16,1815, and was the son of Jonathan and Ruth (Morman) Clark.    He was raised upon a farm in his native county, and while yet a mere boy he exhibited a strong inclination to books.    His taste for reading was so great that not unfrequendy his books would accompany him to the field, where, while resting his physical body he would store his mind with useful information that would be of practical value to him in future years.    In his early manhood he began to prepare himself for the medical profession, and in 1840, he graduated in the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, Pa.    For one year following his graduation he occupied a situation in the Philadel¬phia Dispensary.    He then returned to his native county and en¬tered upon his professional labors and soon won- for himself an ex-tensive  practice.    In June, 1849,  ^r-  Clark removed with his family to Rush County, and located in Carthage, where the prac-tice of his profession occupied the greater part of his time until the date of his death.    He soon became one of the leading physicians of the county, and for a period of twenty years his practice was very extensive.    In his later years the impaired state of his hear¬ing somewhat interfered with his professional duties, although he did not entirely abandon them until his earthly career was ended. He was recognized as a careful and conscientious practitioner and was kind and indulgent, alike, to both the rich and the poor.    Dur¬ing all of those years of his medical practice he continued to pursue his literary studies, and in addition to a knowledge of Greek and Latin* he became familiar with the German language,and was a ready reader of French, Spanish, Italian, Hebrew and Arabic languages. He was also  a  great student of the Scriptures, and read them in both Hebrew and Greek.    From his early years he was in opinion and sentiment in sympathy with the Friends' Church, in which he had a birthright.    Though liberal toward others he was himself a conservative Friend, using that term in its true and better sense. He possessed a natural faculty for writing poetry, and many of his productions of this kind have been greatly admired; yet his diffi¬dence and humility or absence of self-esteem were such that, shrink¬ing from notoriety, he preserved only a small portion of his writings
He died September 6, 1887. He married, August 9, 1842, Miss Eunice A. Hill, a native of Randolph County, N. C, born Decem-ber 9, 1823, being the daughter of Samuel and Mary (Branson) Hill, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, of English descent. She grew to womanhood in her native county. She is a member of the Friends' Church, and is the mother of an only child, a sketch of whom is given below. Mary M. Clark, only child of Dr. John M. and Eunice A. Clark, was born in Guilford County, N. C. August 14, 1844. She accompanied her parents to Carthage, this county, in 1849, where her maidenhood was spent with them. In the fall of 1858, she entered a Friends' boarding school at Union Springs, Cayuga County, N. Y., where she remained one year. She then entered Earlham College, where she finished the Junior year. Afterward she became a student in the Indiana State N or-mal School at Terre Haute, where one year was spent in diligent study. She was married February 1, 1881, to Thomas Dryden, who is a native of Jefferson County, this State, ^and who is now a merchant and who resides in Hamilton County, Ohio. Her mar¬riage has resulted in the birth of one child: Mary E., who was born March 14, 1882. Mrs. Dryden is also a member of the Friends' Church.
CYRUS B. COX is a native of Ripley Township, born April 22, 1827, being the son of Benjamin and Mary (Price)  Cox, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, of English descent.    He was reared upon a farm and received in the district school a knowl¬edge of the ordinary branches of learning.  At the age of twenty-two he turned his attention to the carpenter's trade to which it was directed at that time about three years, or until his first marriage, which occurred September 15, 1852.    The lady that became his wife was Miss Sarah Haskitt, who was born in Hancock County, October 29, 1833, being the daughter of Silas and Milla Haskitt. After their marriage they settled in  Hancock County, where for one year Mr. Cox was engaged at saw milling and farming.   In the fall of 1853, he moved to a farm near Richmond, where for a per¬iod of eighteen months he farmed and worked at his trade.  In 1855, he returned to Hancock County, but in the  spring of 1856, he moved his family to Ripley Township, in which he resided three years, giving his attention chiefly to his trade.    His first wife died December 7, 1857, and on the 24th of May, 1859, he was married to Miss Mary Binford, a native of Ripley Township, born in 1837, and daughter of William and Mary (Jessup) Binford.    For eight years after this marriage Mr. Cox resided in Shelby County, this State, where his attention was given to farming.    In the fall of 1867, he returned to Ripley Township, in which he has ever since
 
566    RUSH   COUNTY.
resided. His second wife died September 18, 1873. On the 23rd of December, 1874, he was married to Miss Phebe Lamb, who is a native of Hancock County, born November 3, 1841. Her par¬ents, Phineas and Huldah (Bundy) Lamb, were natives of North Carolina, of English descent. In all, Mr. Cox is the father of eight.children, as follows: Benjamin F., James P., Albert T., Charles S., Annetta, Sarah, Michael and Mary P., of whom the first three were by his first marriage, the next four by his second, and the last one by his third marriage. The children are all living except Albert T., who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Cox are mem¬bers of the Friends' Church. He owns 100 acres of land, about four-fifths of which is in cultivation. Politically, Mr. Cox formerly affiliated with the Whig party. In 1854, he helped to organize the Republican party of Wayne County. In 1856, he voted for the first Republican candidate for President, and he has ardently sup¬ported Republican principles ever since.
F. J. DRAKE, M. D., of Carthage, is a native of Switzerland County, Ind., born December 10, 1847, being the son of Dillard R. and Almena  (Sisson)  Drake, who were respectively natives of Ohio and Switzerland counties, Ind., both of English descent.   His mother died when he was but three years old, and two years later his father married Mrs. Hevila Palmer, who was to him a mother during the rest of his minority.    He continued to make his home with his parents until he was twenty-one years of age.    At the age of twenty he became a student in Moore's Hill College, and for a period of five, years he attended that institution and taught school alternately.    His marriage occurred April 3, 1873, to Miss Emma J. Isgrigg, who was the daughter of Dr. Nathan Isgrigg, of Moore's Hill, Ind.    She was born in that place July 4,1852.    For two years after his marriage, Dr. Drake was employed as salesman in a gen¬eral store in Vevay, this State.    He then moved to Indianapolis, and entered upon the study of medicine, receiving his instruction from the faculty of the Indiana Medical College.    He took his first course of lectures in that institution during the winter of 1876-7. In the spring of 1877, he entered upon his professional labors in Hendricks County, this State.    During the winter of 1880-81, he took a second course of lectures in the Medical College of Indiana, graduating in March of the latter year.    In May, 1881, he came to Rush County, and he has since been actively and successfully en¬gaged in his professional labors in Carthage and vicinity.    He is the father of two children:  Dellceine  and Edwin, both of whom are living.    Our subject and wife are members of the Friends' Church.    In politics, the Doctor is a Republican.    He possesses a good knowledge of his profession, is a very successful practitioner.
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.
 
567
 
and though young, he already has a rank among the successful, physicians of the county.
JOHN B. EARNEST, who has been a resident of Ripley Town-ship for fifty-four years, was born in Green County, Tenn., De-cember 25,  1817.     He was the son of Henry F. and Hannah. (Bitner) Earnest, who were also natives of Green County, Tenn.. both of German descent.    His father was the son 6f Felix Earnest., and his mother was the daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hatler). Bitner, who were natives of Pennsylvania.    When he was four - years old his parents removed to Levere County, Tenn., where the father died October 17,1827.'  In  1833, he accompanied his widowed mother to Rush County, and the family settled upon the farm where our subject now resides in Ripley Township.    The mother died April 18, 1877.    Our subject was married October 27, 1842, to Miss Marzella Draper, who was born in Southampton County, Va., April 16, 1823.    She was the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Turner) Draper.    Her father was the son of Ephraim and Elizabeth Draper, and her mother wras the daughter of Joseph Turner.    Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Earnest have continued to reside upon the old Earnest homestead, where the for¬mer has always pursued the avocation of a farmer.    He owns a handsome farm of 290 acres, over 200 of which are in cultivation. He and wife have had seven children, as follows:    Ira D., born January 27, 1844; John W., born December 5, 1846; Henry M., born August 10,1850; Joseph E., born March 17,1852; Albert N., born October 9, 1854; Roland H., born November 23, 1856, and Francis M., born January ^, 1859.    As wall be seen, all their chil¬dren are sons.    They are all living and married.    Our subject and his wife and most of their children are .members of the Christian Church.    In politics, Mr. Earnest is a Democrat.
JAMES M. FORBIS, farmer, is a native of Guilford County, N. C.? born October 1, 1848. He was the son of Madison and Elizabeth (Gilbreth) Forbis, both of whom were also natives of Guilford County, N. C, of English descent. His father was the son of John and Mary J. Forbis, and his mother was the daughter of James and Mary Gilbreth, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. In 1859, he accompanied his parents to Adams County, Ills., and four years later they returned eastward to this State, and located in Hamilton County, where he was employed for two years in his fathers saw mill. In about 1865, they removed to Henry County, and a year later they located in Knightstown. They remained in Henry County altogether eleven years, during which time he worked in his father's saw mill. In about 1872, they went to Cumberland County, Ills., and eight months later they removed to
 
568    RUSH   COUNTY.
Indianapolis. A year later our subject came to Rush County, and on the ioth day of May, 1874, he was married to Miss Sarah A. Haskitt, who was born in Ripley Township, November 24, 1853, being the daughter of Henry and Maria (Coffin) Haskitt, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, the former of Perquimons County, and the latter of Guilford County. Her father was the son of John and Mila (Holloway) Haskitt, and her mother was the daughter of Zachariah and Phebe (Starbuck) Coffin, who were natives of the Islands of Newfoundland and Nantucket, respectively. Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Forbis have occupied their present home, where the former has pursued the avocation of a farmer. He and wife have a farm of 340 acres, about 250 of which are in cultivation. They are the parents of three children: Leona, born July 6, 1875; Ada M., born November 25, 1877; Eve J., born April 25, 1881, all of whom are living. Our subject and wife are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, the former is a Republican.
MRS. RACHEL M. FOUST, of Ripley Township, is a native of Ripley County, Ind., born December 31, 1825. She was the daughter of Enoch and Cynthia Ann Isgrigg. Her father was the son of Daniel and Rachel Isgrigg, who were natives of Kentucky. Her mother was the daughter of Nathan and Elizabeth Lynn, who were also natives of the State of Kentucky. When she was but five years old, her father died and her mother afterward married John Bussell. When she was twelve years old, she accompanied her mother and stepfather to this county, and for a few years, or until her marriage, she resided with them in Ripley Township. She was married August 6,1840^0 Henry C. Foust, who was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, August 4, 1820, being the son of Philip and Elizabeth (Cash) Foust, who were natives of the State of Vir¬ginia. Immediately after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Foust lo¬cated where the latter now resides in Ripley Township, where Mr. Foust pursued the avocation of a farmer until the date of his death, which occurred August 1, 1866. Since then Mrs. Foust has been a widow. In all, she is the mother of nine children: Nathan J., Mary E., Francis M., Emily J., Owen C, Ann M., Margaret L., Charles H. and Lucy O., all of whom are living except Ann M., who was born November 7, 1851, and who died August 29, 1887. Mrs. Foust is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She has a farm of ninety-five acres, most of which is in cultivation.
BENJAMIN FOUST, who is one of the substantial farmers of Rush County, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, in Novem-ber, 1830, being the son of George and Catharine (Vance) Foust, who were natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively.    His father
 
RIPL.EY   TOWNSHIP.
was the son of Lewis and Barbara (Bowman) Foust, who were natives of Virginia.    His mother was the daughter of John and-Barbara (Smith) Vance.     Both his paternal and maternal great grandparents were natives of Germany.    When he was a young' child less than two years old his parents came to Rush County and became early settlers of Ripley Township, in which his early life was spent assisting to clear and cultivate the farm, on which his mother died, January 4, 1839, anc^ on which his father still contin¬ues to reside.    When he reached maturity, he engaged at farming for himself, and he has ever since pursued that avocation in Ripley Township.    In this connection he has had good success.    He owns a farm of seventy-three acres, nearly all of which is in cultivation. It contains a splendid barn and an elegant brick residence, which, with its natural facilities, makes a very desirable location.    When Mr. Foust began life for himself he had nothing; his only capital was willing hands and a mental capacity to direct them with pru¬dence.    With these he went to work, and the present state of his circumstances reflects very creditably upon his industry and good management.    He was married March 1, 1855, to Miss Cornelia E. Reid, who was born in Marion County, this State, November 3, 1835, being the daughter of John B. E. and Elizabeth (Wolfe) Reid, who were natives of South Carolina and Scott County, Ky., respectivel}'.    Her father was the son of Archibald and Martha (Alexander) Reid, and her mother was the daughter of Jacob and Euphemia (Cannon) Wolfe, who were natives of Maiyland and Delaware, respectively.    Her parents settled in Marion County in 1830.    Her father died there, August 25, 1838, and her mother af¬terward   married John Addison,  who  died November 14, 1859. She still survives and lives in Knightstown.    Mr. and Mrs. Foust have had five children, as follows:    The first was a son, that was born April 12, 1857, and died unnamed; the second is  Laura A., born July 30, 1858; and Ida C, born March 20, i860, died Octo¬ber 2, 1865; Emma G., born September 9, 1869, and Earl R., born August 24, 1871, died September 19, 1871.    Mrs. Foust is a mem¬ber of the Christian Church.     In politics, Mr. Foust is an uncom¬promising Democrat.
SAMUEL GATES, who is an esteemed pioneer of Ripley Town¬ship, is a native of Ross County, Ohio, born March 3, 1823, being the son of John and Mary (Weaver) Gates, who were natives of Pennsylvania and Virginia, respectively; and who were both of German descent. His father was the son of John Gates, and his mother was the daughter of Leonard and Mary (Schaffer) Weaver. When he was but four years old his parents removed from Ross County, Ohio, to Rush County, Ind., and became early settlers of
 
57°    RUSH   COUNTY.
Ripley Township. That was in the fall of 1826. The father and mother spent the rest of their lives in Ripley, the latter dying March 21, 1858, and the former dying January 24, 1868. The subject of this sketch spent his early life assisting to clear and cul-tivate his father's farm in summer, and attending the district school in winter. The school advantages in those days were, however, quite limited, consequently his education was quite limited. By observation and reading he has somewhat mitigated the lack of early training, and he is now possessed of a good practical educa¬tion, and one that fits him for the affairs of domestic life. He was married at the age of twenty-four, on December 23, 1847, to Miss 'Sarah Phelps, who is a native of Randolph County, N. C, born October 11, 1823, and who was the daughter of Jonathan and Su¬sannah (Henley) Phelps, both of whomwere also natives of Ran¬dolph County, N. C, and both were of English descent. Her father was the son of Jonathan and Mary (Prevo) Phelps, and her mother was the daughter of Joseph and Peainnah (Morgan) Henley. Her parents emigrated to Rush County in 1828 and settled in Ripley Township, where both spent the rest of their lives, the .mother dying August 1, 1847, and the father dying January 17, 1877- Mr. and Mrs. Gates entered upon their married life upon a farm in Ripley Township, and their home has been in that town¬ship ever since. They have occupied their present home since the fall of 1869. The life occupation of Mr. Gates has been farming, and in this connection he has earned a rank among the substantial and well-to-do farmers of the county. In all he owns nearly 300 acres of excellent land, about 180 of which are in cultivation. His home farm is fitted up with a splendid barn and an elegant brick residence, which, united with other improvements and natural facil¬ities, makes it one of the most attractive places in Rush County. Mr. and Mrs. Gates have had three children, as follows: Amos F., born August 28, 1848; Charles F., born May 22, 1850, and Susan¬nah, who was born August 25, 1852, and died October 26, 1861. Our subject and his wife'are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics, Mr. Gates is a Republican. He has been an industrious man, and there is probably no one who is entitled to more credit for the present excellent condition of the county than he. ISAAC T. GATES, a native-born citizen of Ripley Township, was torn near where he now resides, February 20, 1828, being the son of John and Mary (Weaver) Gates, both of whom were born in Pennsylvania. He was reared upon his father's farm, and at twenty-one 3'ears of age he was married to Miss Jemima Cofield, who was born in Wayne County, Ind., June 20, 1832, being the daugh¬ter of John Cofield.    After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Gates
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    571
settled upon a farm in Ripley Township, on which they resided at that time three years.    They then removed to Hancock County. About two years later they removed to Madison County, Iowa. ' A few months later they returned to Ripley Township, and settled where he now resides.     x\ year or so later they again settled in Hancock County, but returned again to the old homestead in Rip¬ley Township, about two years  later, and he has continued to oc¬cupy it ever since.    His chief occupation has been farming, though he has, in connection with this, given considerable attention to the manufacture of brick.    His first wife died in May, 1872.    On fhe 2nd day of Febnmy, 1876, Mr. Gates was married to Mrs. Katie J. Macy, who is a native of Randolph County, N. C, born Decem¬ber 20, 1830.    She was the daughter of Eliab and Mary Jackson, who also were natives of Randolph County, N. C.    Her father was the son of Jacob and Martha  (Thornburg)^ Jackson.    Her mother was the daughter of William and Sarah Gauset.    On the 6th of March, 1851, she was married to Henry A. Macy, who was born in North Carolina, being the  son of   Henry   and   Rachel (Armfield) Macy.    Mr. Macy became a Union soldier, and was lost in 1863, while in the service.    By his first wife, Mr. Gates had seven   children:  Ithamar  S.,  Alonzo, John H.,  Margaret  Ann, Charlotte E., Edith M. and Mary L., all of whom are living.   Our subject and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics, the former is an uncompromising Republican.  He owns 100 acres of land, about seventy of which are in cultivation.
CLARKSON GAUSE, of Ripley Township, is a native of Wayne County, Ind., born December 20, 1849, being the son of Nathan and Ann (Cox) Gause, who were natives of Ohio and Wayne counties, Ind., respectively. When he was thirteen years old, his parents- removed to Marion County, but a year later, they removed to Henry County, where his youth was spent upon a farm. At twenty-four years of age, he became a teacher in the public school, and altogether he has taught five winters.- His labors in that capacity were entirely performed in Henry and Hancock counties. He was married in Henry County, July 1, 1S75, to Miss Mary R. Millikan, who was born in Henry County, April 8, 1854, being the daughter of Nathan andPriscilla (Christy) Millikan, both of whom were natives of Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Gause began their married life in Henry County, but at the end of two years they removed to Rush County, and settled in Ripley Township, in which place they have resided ever since. They first settled upon a farm in the northwest part of the township. Three years later they removed to Wayne County, and after a residence of a year there upon a
 
572
 
RUSH   COUNTY.
 
farm, they returned to Ripley Township, and settled in Carthage, where for two years Mr. Gause conducted a livery business. For two years following this his attention was given to trading. In the fall of 1886, he moved his family to their present home one mile and a half west of Carthage where Mr. Gause is the owner of a farm. In addition to the management of his farm, he has during the past year devoted considerable time to the study of works of a veterinary character, and it is his present intention to devote his un-divided attention to this branch of surgery, for which his knowl¬edge of the horse peculiarly adapts him. He has always had a particular fondness for the handling of horses, and this natural in¬clination, united with a careful study of their treatment, is sufficient to warrant his success in the practice of veterinary surgery. He and wife are the parents of two children: Estella and Helen, both of whom are living. Our subject is a member of the Friends' Church. In politics, he is an ardent Republican; He is a man of intelligence, and will fill with credit any station to which his atten-tion may be directed.
GEORGE JAMES THOMAS O'BRIEN GWYNNE, late of Carthage, this county, was born near Strabane, County Tyrone, North Ireland, February 20, 1820, and was the son of John and Catharine Gwynne, of whom the latter died when he was very young.    His boyhood was chiefly spent at the home of his brother, William Gwynne, whose partner he afterward became in the extensive manufacture of linen goods, and in the banking business.    Their manufacturing interests were of such magnitude as to give employment to  500 operatives.    In 1847, Mr. Gwynne came to America, and during the two years which followed, he resided at Shelbyville, Ind.    In 1849, he came to Rush County, in which he resided until the date of his death, September 4, 1884, and in which he became familiarly known as O'Brien, Gwynne.    Locating at Carthage, he turned his atten¬tion to mercantile pursuits, and for probably more than a quarter of a century he was a member of the firm of Gwynne, Johnson & Co., who conducted a large general store.    He was very successful in business, and when he died he left an estate valued at $100,000. He was very kind to the poor, and his charitable deeds were many. He took great interest in the improvement of his town, and there is probably no one to whom Carthage is more deeply indebted for its present neat and cleanly appearance than to Mrl Gwynne.   Full of wit and good humor his genial nature won for him many friends. In politics, he was formerly a Democrat and continued to be such until the outbreak of the late war.    From that time to the date of his death, he was an ardent supporter of the Republican party.
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    573
He served as Trustee of Ripley Township for fourteen years and also served for a time as Treasurer of the Carthage Schopl Board. He died a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
FESTUS HALL, son of Samuel A. and Allida (Hoes) Hall, was born in Jackson County, Ohio, February, 1808. He married Maria A. Abernathy, June 17, 1845. Maria is the daughter o£ John and Lavinia (Logan) Abernathy, natives of Virginia. Mr. Hall's father was a native of Connecticut, near New Haven. He came to Ohio in 1790; here he remained thirty-three years, and afterward moved to Hancock County, where he died in 1835. Festus, at the age of twenty-two, entered eighty acres of land in Hancock County, and purchased eighty acres of land in Rush County. He bought and sold several times, and in 1855 ^e bought the farm on which he resided during the rest of his life, having built a most comfortable and commodious brick residence in 1870. When a lad, the subject of this sketch had but few advantages for securing an education, the pioneer school house and the teacher of those days were not always sufficient to inspire the young people with much zeal for prosecuting their studies. In 1829, Mr. Hall attended a short term of school in Rushville, and while there wit¬nessed the execution of Swanson. In 1S58, he was the Republican candidate for Representative from Rush County and was elected by a decided majority. He was in the Legislature wTith Dr. Stanley Cooper, of Noble Township, this county. His children are: Euse-bius (deceased), John Chalmers, William A., Frank L. and Hattie Lavinia (deceased). Mrs. Hall's father and mother came to Rush County, Center Township, in 1839, anc^ owned the farm just south of the Soldiers' Orphans' Home, known as the Abernathy farm, which now belongs to the estate of Festus Hall. In 1838, he was , tax collector for Rush County, and traveled about from house to house collecting the taxes. On January 3, 1880, our subject laid down the battle of life, having been in delicate health for several months. He had served his time and his people well, was univer¬sally respected, a kind neighbor and a good friend. His widow, and son William still live on the old farm, made hallowed by so many cherished memories.
JOHN B. HERKLESS, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of Rush County, was born within the present limits of Posey Town-ship, August 16, 1837, being the son of Linsey S. and Rebecca J. (Brosius) Herkless, who were born, reared and married in Rock-bridge County, Va., and who emigrated to Rush County in 1834. The father died in Ripley Township, in 1872, and the mother still survives and is now a resident of that township. Our subject was reared upon the old Herkless homestead, and received in the dis-
 
574
 
RUSH   COUNTY.
 
trict school a good common school education and one that enabled him to teach public school.    At twenty-one years of age, he took up the avocation of a teacher, which furnished his winter's employ¬ment for a period of ten years. e In that time he taught thirteen terms, and his labors' in that capacity were all performed in Rush County.    As an instructor he attained considerable proficiency, and he ranked among the successful teachers of the county.    In the meantime he was married, August 21, 1862, to Miss  Nancy L. Stanley, who was born in Posey Township, this county, April 13, 1844, being the daughter of Preston and Elizabeth (Oldham) Stan¬ley, who are old and esteemed citizens of Posey Township.    In March following their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Herkless settled upon the farm they now occupy, where the former has ever since pur¬sued  the avocation of  a farmer and stock-raiser.     In this con¬nection his efforts have been liberally rewarded, and he now has a rank among the substantial and successful farmers of Rush County. He owns a magnificent farm of 240 acres, about 190 of which are in cultivation.    His farm is fitted up with two fine slate-roofed barns, and a handsome brick residence, which, with other substantial im¬provements, makes it one of the most attractive and desirable places in the county.    Mr. and Mrs.  Herkless have had ten children, as follows:  Preston S., born December 18,  1863, killed by being thrown from a horse, November 3, 1883; Alma R., born Decem¬ber 13, 1865; Arvel R., born December 1, 1867; Edith E., born December 13, 1869, died October 20, 1884; Linsey R., born Au¬gust 22, 1871, died August 12, 1873; Ora W., born July 11, 1874; Earl, born March 5, 1877; Mary, born July 15, 1879; Samuel B., born June 18, 1882, and Carrie L., born September 6, 1885.    The second child, Alma R., is now a student in Purdue University. The third child, Arvel R., has been a student in that institution for two years.    Our subject and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.    In polities, the former is an ardent Republican.    In con¬nection with farming Mr. Herkless has also given considerable at¬tention to the breeding of tine stock.    He possesses excellent speci¬mens of Short Horn cattle, Poland China hogs, and his flocks of Cotswool and Shropshire sheep, are not excelled by any, as prem¬iums he has received at several of the leading State Fairs of the country plainly testify.    Mr. Herkless is a progressive farmer and he uses every available instrumentality to attain the highest possi¬ble degree of success in every branch of domestic life.
WILLIAM B. HENBY is the youngest child of John and Mary (Bagley) Henby. The parents were natives of North Carolina, and in that State were born all of their twelve children, who were named: Thomas, Willis, Eli and Elias (twins), Sarah, John, Eph-
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    575
raim B., Martha, Jonathan, Jesse, Mary and William B. The last named of these was born May 18, 1833, in Perquimans County, N. C. His father, who had died in December before that, had ac¬quired a considerable tract of land in that State, and had prospered with his constantly increasing family. At the time of his death he was fifty-one years of age. In 1835, William B. came to Indiana with his mother and a large portion of her family. After stopping in the vicinity of Richmond for about one }*ear they located in Rush County. Mr. Henby has been a resident of this county from that time to this, excepting a few years in Hancock County. He worked for a short time at blacksmithing, but soon abandoned that for saw milling, which he continued as his chief occupation until the outbreak of the Civil War. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Nineteenth Regiment, in which he served for three years. He was in many of the hard fought battles of the wa'r, and shared to the fullest extent the vicissitudes of his company, which was in what was familiarly known as the " Iron Brigade." He was honorably discharged August 28, 1864. On September 20, follow¬ing, his marriage was celebrated with Catharine, daughter of Rob¬ert and Ellen (Templeton) Brooks. By her he was the father of six children, named: Annie, Mar}' E., Charles R., Jennie, Alice (deceased), and Nora. Mrs. Henby died January 24,1879, having been a consistent member of the Friends' Church. Mr. Henby's second marriage occurred October 21, 1880, when Mary E. Hill became his wife. To this marriage have been born two sons: Eddie H. and George C. Upon returning from the war, he took up the business of farming in Hancock County. He remained there until 1876, when he removed to his present home in Ripley Town¬ship. His farm consists of 182 acres, and is highly improved. He and his wife belong to the Friends' Church. Politically, he is a Republican, and fraternally, is a Mason and an active member of the G. A. R.
JOSEPH HENLEY, was born in eastern North Carolina, June 16, 1768, raised in Randolph County. He was a descendant of Welsh parentage. The subject of this sketch, in 1798, married Peninnah Morgan. When a young man, about the spring of 1821, he made a prospecting tour to -Rush County, Ind., and selected a tract of land which afterward became known as the Henley homestead. This land was advertised and offered at public sale at auction. This was the plan of the early disposition of public lands. Afterward it was subject to entry. On this trip, as the land sale was to be at Brookville, 1821, he left sufficient money with Robert Hill (then liv¬ing in Wayne County, and also a brother-in-law), to purchase for him about three-quarter sections of land.   The land was accordingly
 
576
 
RUSH   COUNTY.
 
purchased by Robert Hill. He returned to North Carolina, with Samuel Hill, who had accompanied him on this trip. In 182S, he made another trip to his new possessions in Rush -County, and pur¬chased from his son Henry, a quarter section of land, which is now known as the Herkless farm. He again returned to North Caro¬lina, and in the fall of 1835, he, in company with his wife and young¬est son, Robert, made a trip to this county, for the purpose of deciding, whether or not they should make their home permanently in this new country. The matter was soon decided, and as his family was large, the discernment and sound judgment of this pio¬neer was that Rush County offered inducements which were want¬ing in their native State. The trip from North Carolina, with his wife, was made in a two-horse vehicle, starting from their home in August, and returning in November.- In the spring of 1837, he started with his family, leaving their old home on April 12th, and arriving on the present site of Carthage, just one month later. The eleven children were born in North Carolina, and named Sarah, Su¬sanna, Thomas, Henry, Lucretia, Mary, Nancy A., Charles, Mica-jah, Jesse and Robert. The subject of this sketch was a practical farmer, and a member of the Carthage Society of Friends. He do¬nated the land on which the Friends erected their school house, just south of Carthage. He lived to see his forest farm cleared up and develop into one of the finest farms on Blue River. Here he lived an honored citizen until December 16, i860, when he died at the ripe old age of ninety-two years and six months.
HENRY HENLEY, son of Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Hen-ley, was born November 19, 1805, in Randolph County, N. C. On October 1, 1828, he arrived in Richmond, a very small town in the new country just then opening up to settlement. The same month, in company with his father, he came to Ripley Township, Rush Caunty, to look at the country. In 1830, he entered a farm in Ripley Township, and the same year, March 31, 1830, was mar-ried to Ruth Morrow, daughter of John and Mary (Stout) Morrow. Their children were born as follows: Mary W., June 12, 1831; Peninnah, February 2, 1833; Eunice S., January 9, 1835; Jane and Sarah died in infancy; Joseph J., July 28, 1843, died April 29,. 1881; William Penn and Robert Barclay, twins, born August 11,. 1846. In the winter of 1830-31, Henry Henley taught school in the log school house which stood where Joseph Binford's house now stands, a term of three months. He taught in a school east of Richmond in 1828-29. He had taught two three-months' terms in Randolph County, N. C. He lived on his farm from 1830 to 1831, in the fall of which he bought a half interest in the mill which was built by Robert Hill in 1827-28, with a grist mill attached.   About
 
RIPLEY TOWNSHIP.    577
two years later he traded his interest in the mill for 200 acres of land. He built a saw mill a few years after on the farm which now belongs to his son William P., just north of Carthage. He served ae Postmaster at Carthage during Jackson's administration. He kept the office one time in the comfortable room in which he now spends his declining years. Mr. Henley was Township Trustee for several years, was one of the projectors in the laying out of the town of Carthage in 1834. December 13,186S, his wife Ruth, died, and in 1873, ^e married Margaret Moore, daughter of Samuel and Rebecca (White) Moore. Mrs. Henley's parents were both born in Guilford County, N. C. No children have been born of this union. Henry Henley has long been a member of the Society of Friends, and in politics is a third party Prohibitionist.
CHARLES HENLEY was born in Randolph County, N. C, July 17, 1814. He is the son of Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Hen¬ley, and removed with his parents to Ripley Township, Rush Co., Ind., in the spring of 1837. He was then a young man about twenty-three years of age. He immediately entered his brother Henry's store as a clerk, and in the following spring he became a partner. The spring of that year he made his first trip to Cincin¬nati on horseback to buy goods. The goods were all wagoned through, which usually required as much as twelve days to make the round trip. Mr. Henley was married on June 25, 1846, to Ta-mar Hill, daughter of Jesse and Mabel (Overman) Hill, and started immediately for Cincinnati, in - a buggy, to buy a new stock of goods, taking his young wife with him. On his return he settled down in Carthage, where he has ever since resided. Their chil¬dren were born as follows: Charles, deceased; William C, deceased; Sarah and Caroline. The subject of this sketch remained in the mercantile business twenty-two years, after which he turned his attention to the milling business and farming, he having become possessed of two farms north of Carthage. The flour mill and woolen mill he managed for twenty-three years. The grist mill burned down June 22, 1879. ^e so^ t^ie m^ s^te to ^s nephews, Robert and William P. Henley, who rebuilt the mill. In the spring of 1876 he engaged in the banking business and organized the first bank in Carthage, and was made president of the bank, which po¬sition he has held continuously up to the present time. With his interest in the .bank and his farms, Charles Henley has little time for idleness, although he claims to be living a retired life. -He re¬sides in Carthage, has a pleasant home, is a well-preserved man, a member of the Friends' .Church, and votes the Republican ticket.
THOMAS  W. HENLEY, who has been a resident of   Ripley Township for the past fifty-seven years, is a native of Randolph
 
573
 
RUSH   COUNTY.
 
County, N. C, born December 21, 1S18. He was the son of Elias and Jane (Hubbard) Henley, both of whom were natives of Guil-ford County, N. C, of English descent. . His father was the son of John Henley, and his mother was the daughter of John Hubbard. He was but six years old when his mother died, and when he was twelve years old he accompanied his father and stepmother to Ripley Township, this county, in which his youth was spent assisting to clear and cultivate a farm, and in which he has ever since resided. He continued with his father upon the farm until he became of age, after which he was chiefly employed upon a farm by the month until 1848, in which year his father died.. After this event he re¬turned home and took charge of the old home place, of which he became sole owner about 1853, and which he still continues to own. He was married December 20, 1854, to Miss Hannah C. "Williams, who is a native of Belmont County,, Ohio, bora June 23, 1832, be¬ing the daughter of Jason and Abigail (Holloway) Williams, the former of whom was a native of Pennsylvania, of Welsh and English descent, and the latter was a native of Belmont County, Ohio, of English descent. Her father was the son of Joseph and Mary (Cooper) Williams, natives of Pennsylvania. Her mother was the daughter of Joseph and Eleanor (Pickering) Holloway, who were natives of Virginia. Ever since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Henley have resided in Ripley Township. They have occu¬pied their present home since the fall of 1865. The life occupation of Mr. Henley has been farming, and in this connection he has been very successful. He owns in all, 433 acres of land, of which 393 lie in Rush County, and forty in Shelby County, this State. His home farm contains a handsome brick residence, and it lies but a half mile southwest of Carthage. Mr. and Mrs. Henley are the parents of seven children, as follows: Rollin Edgar, x\bbie J., Mary E., William J., John B., Annie W. and Thomas B.,.all of4 whom are living, except John, who died in childhood. Mr. and' Mrs. Henley and all their children are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, Mr. Henley is a Republican. He is one of the substantial and well-to-do farmers of the county, and he and Mrs. Henley are deservedly esteemed by all who know them.
ROBERT HENLEY, deceased, but formerly an old resident of Rip¬ley Township, was born in Randolph Co., N.C, March 17, 1822, being the son of Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Henley, with whom he camato Rush County when he was fifteen years old, or in 1837. The family settled upon a tract of woods land just south of the town of Carthage, where the father and mother —Joseph and Peninnah Henley spent the rest of their lives — the latter dying April 30, i860, and the former dying December 17, i860.    The subject of this
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    579,
sketch spent the rest of his youth and early manhood assisting to clear and cultivate his father's farm.    In addition to a common school education, he was a student for  one year in the Friends' Boarding School of Richmond — now Earlham College.    He was married April 24, 1856, to Miss Mary Newby, who was also a na-tive of Randolph Co., N. C, born August 13,  1826, and was the daughter of Henry and Sarah (Thornburg) Newby, with whom she came to Rush County .when she was but four years old, or in 1830. After their marriage, Robert Henley and wife continued to reside upon the old Henley homestead, of which the former became the owner in i860, or at his father's death.    He and wife became the parents of four children:    Hiram H., bom xMarch 28,1857; Albert, born April 1, 1859; Peninnah, born June 25, 1863, and Jesse, born March 16, 1866, all of whom are living.    Sketches of the two oldest children appear  elsewhere in this work.    The third child, Miss Peninnah Henley, graduated in the Carthage High School in April, 1882, and afterward spent three years in Earlham College, com¬pleting the junior year.    The fourth and youngest, Jesse  Henley, is also a graduate of the Carthage High School, and has been a student in Earlham College two years.    Robert Henley worked some at the carpenter's trade, but his chief occupation was farming. His death, which occurred July 1, 1879, was the result of injuries received when in the act of reaping, on the 28th of June preceding. His wife survived him until May 20,   1881.    Both were devoted members of the Friends' Church, and as citizens none  were more dearly beloved.
OWEN S. HENLEY, a prosperous farmer and substantial citizen of Ripley Township, was born upon the farm he now occupies, October 20, 1846. He was the son of Thomas and Abigail. (Starbuck) Henley, who were respectively natives of Randolph and Guilford counties, N. C, the former of English, and the latter of Irish and English descent. His paternal grandparents were Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Henley, and his maternal grand-parents were Thomas and Eunice (Leonard) Starbuck, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. His fathe-r was born August 18, .1803. His mother was bora August 2, 1804. His parents were reared in their native State, and were married in Guil¬ford County, March 5, 1829. Immediately after their marriage they emigrated westward to Rush County, and settled in Ripley Township, whither the father had entered 'land in 1827. They were among the -early settlers of that township, and their residence there dates from a time when Rushville was but a hamlet arid when Knightstown and Carthage did hot exist. The father and mother continued to spend the rest of their lives in Ripley Township, the
 
5-8o
 
RUSH   COUNTY.
 
latter dying December i, 1878, and the former dying December n, 1885, his death resulting from a fall on ice three days previously. The subject of this sketch was reared upon the old homestead, and continued with his parents until their deaths. He received a good common school education, and later on he was a student in Earlham College two terms. He then returned home and resumed work upon the farm, which pursuit has occupied his entire attention ever since with the exception of two winters, during which time he taught school in this county. He was married October 17, 1878, to Miss Mary B. Wright, who was born near Marion, Grant County, this State, January 10, 1849, being the daughter of Joab and Ma-linda (Elliott) Wright, the former of whom was born near Greens¬boro, Tennessee, and the latter was born in Wayne County, this State, both of English descent. Her mother died May 2, 1877, and her father still survives, and resides in Marion, Ind. Her maternal grandparents were Jacob and Ann Elliott, who were natives of North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Henley are the parents of two children: Earle B., born September 12, 1879, and Clyde C, born March 11,1881. Our subject and wife are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, Mr. Henley f ormerly affiliated with the Re-publican party, casting his first vote for Gen. Grant. He sup-ported that party until 1884, since which time he has been an ardent Prohibitionist. He has served his township in the capacity of Trustee one term, having been elected in 1880. He owns a splendid farm of 246 acres, about half of which is in cultivation. His farm is admirably located and with its natural facilities and sub-stantial improvements it is a very desirable home.
(HENRY M. HENLEY, farmer, was born in the house he now occupies, three-fourths of a mile e^st of Carthage, September 20, 1847. He was the son of Hezekiah and Ann (Maris) Henley, both of whom were natives of North Carolina) but both of whom are now deceased. They were formerly residents of Ripley Town¬ship, wher£ both died, the father on the 25th day of August, 1861, and the mother on the 28th day of March, 1872. He was reared upon the home place, and;on the 19th day of September, 1878, he was married to Miss Clara Dille, who is a native of Henry County, Ind., born December 18, 1854, and was the daughter of Squire and Margaret (Creath) Dille, both of whom were natives of Ohio. Her father was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Thompson) Dille, and her mother was the daughter of George and Nancy (Clark) Creath.\ Ever since their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Henley have continued to reside upon the old Henley homestead. His occupa¬tion is that of a farmer, though in his earlier manhood he taught school for several years.    His labors in that capacity were performed in Rush and Henry counties, and altogether he taught six terms. He and wife have had two children: Frank D. and Bonnie H., the former of whom is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Henley are members of the Friends' Church, and in politics, he is a Repub¬lican. He has a half interest in no acres of land, nearly all of which is in cultivation.
WILLIAM HENLEY, a young farmer of Ripley Township, was born on his father's old homestead east of Carthage, March 12, 1852, being the son of Hezekiah and Ann (Maris) Henley, a more extended mention of whom is given elsewhere. He was reared upon his father's farm, and in his early manhood he became a teacher in the public schools, which pursuit furnished him win¬ters' employment for five years. In addition to a common school edu¬cation, he attended the Lebanon, Ohio, normal school one term. He was married, August 8, 1883, to Miss Jennie M. Dille, who is a na¬tive of Henry County, Ind., born February 7, 1851, being the daughter of Squire and Margaret (Creath) Dille, whose parentage is given elsewhere. In addition to a common school education, Mrs. Henley was a student in the Spiceland Academy six months, and was also a student in the public schools of Knightstown nearly three years. At eighteen years of age she became a teacher in the public schools, and in all she taught seven years, her labors in that capacity all being performed in Henry County, Ind. Mr. and Mrs. Henley have had one child, a boy, that died unnamed. Mr. Hen¬ley is a member of the Friends' Church, and is a Republican in politics. He and his brother, Henry M. Henley, own no acres of land.
R. EDGAR HENLEY, a prominent young business man of Car¬thage and a member of the firm of Hill, Henley & Co., is a native of Ripley Township, born October 16, 1855, being the son of Thomas W. and Hannah C. (Williams) Henley, of Ripley Town¬ship. He was raised upon a farm and received in the district school a knowledge of the ordinary branches of learning. In ad¬dition to this he attended Spiceland Academy two terms, and Earl-ham College, of Richmond, one term. In the former institution he pursued a commercial course. During the winters of 1877 and'78, and 1S78 and '79, he taught public school in Ripley Township. On retiring from the school room he spent one season on a farm, and in the fall of 1880, he took a position as salesman in the general store of George H. Stone, of Carthage. He remained with him until in June, 1884; After spending a few months recruiting his health, he, early in September of the same year went on a prospect¬ing tour to Kansas, but not being pleased with the west, he re¬turned in October and engaged in merchandising at Carthage. He 20
 
584    RUSH   COUNTY.
has since been a member of the firm of Hill, Henley & Co., which is one of the substantial business firms of the county. He was mar¬ried December 18,1884, to Miss Alma L. Stone, who is the daugh¬ter of his former employer, George H. Stone. She is a native of Posey Township, this county, bora September 23, i860. Mr. and Mrs. Henley are the parents of an only child, whose name is Lavonne. By virtue of his birth Mr. Henley is a member of the Friends' Church. In politics, he is an ardent Republican. He is at present a member of the Town Council at Carthage, and is Secretary of the Natural Gas Company of that place. He is an enterprising young man, and he and his wife are citizens who are respected and esteemed by all. For a number of yeais Mr. Henley has been connected with the Rushville press, as Carthage correspondent. His communications which have appeared in the Republican and Graphic, have been read with interest, and they re¬flect very creditably upon him as a news gatherer.
HIRAM H. HENLEY, an industrious young farmer of Ripley Township, was born on the old Henley homestead just southeast of the village of Carthage, March 28, 1857. He was the son of Robert and Mary M. (Newby) Henley, the former of whom was the son of Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Henley, and the latter was the daughter of Henry and Sarah (Thornburg) Newby, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. He was reared upon the old homestead, and received in the public schools of Carthage, a good knowledge of the ordinary branches of learning. Later on he was a student in Earlham College two years. He was mar¬ried October 5, 1881, to Miss Ida Hill, who is a native of Carthage, born July 22, 1858, being the daughter of Isaac -and Elizabeth (Winslow) Hill, whose history is given elsewhere. For three years after their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. - Henle}r resided upon the old Henley homestead near Carthage. In November, 1884, they re¬moved to their present home one mile and a half east of Carthage. They have an only child, Bertha M., bora May 31, 1883. The oc¬cupation of Mr. Henley is that of a farmer, though he also gives considerable attention to the business of grain threshing. He owns a farm of eighty acres, about half of which is in cultivation. Mr. Henley is a member of the Friends' Church, and in politics he is an ardent Republican.    He is a well-to-do young farmer.
ALBERT HENLEY, a well-to-do young farmer of Ripley Town¬ship, was born one mile and a half west of his present home, April 1, 1859. He was the son of Robert and Mary (Newb}^) Henley, both of whom were natives of Randolph County, N. C, of English descent. His father was the son of Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Henley, and his mother was  the  daughter of  Henry and Sarah
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.
 
585
 
(Thornburg) Newby, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. He was reared upon the old Henley homestead, just southeast of Carthage. He received a good common school education, and later on he was a student in Earlham College one year. When he reached maturity, he engaged in agricultural pursuits for himself, and he has continued to devote his whole attention to that pursuit ever since. He remained upon the old homestead until November 30, 1887, when he removed his family to their present home. He was married April 7, 1886, to Miss Martha R. Hollingsworth, who is also a native of Ripley Township, born April 7, 1859. She is therefore one week younger than Mr. Henley. Her parents, Val-entine and Mary F. (Reid) Hollingsworth, were respectively na-tives of Henry and Marion counties, this State. Her father was the son of James Hollingsworth, and her motherwas the daughter of Earl and Elizabeth (Wolfe) Reid. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of two children: Robert R., and a twin brother that died unnamed. They were born February 8, 1887. Our subject and wife are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, both are Republicans. Mr. Henley performed the duties of Chairman of the Republican Central Committee of his township during the cam¬paign of 1884. He owns a farm of eighty acres, wrhich is in a good state of improvement and half of which is in cultivation. His farm has just been provided with an elegant new barn and residence, which makes it a very attractive home. Mr. Henley and wife are respected and esteemed by all who know them.
JESSE HILL, the oldest son of Thomas and Anna (Haskett) Hill, was born February 1, 1786, in North Carolina. In 1807 his father's family moved to Wayne County, Ind., near Richmond. His schooling was quite limited, and what schooling he received was in the Friends' schools of North Carolina. Soon after the family arrived in Indiana, Jesse's father and mother both died, leav¬ing him in charge of seven children younger than himself. The children were placed among the Friends. In 1809, Jesse was mar¬ried to Mabel Overman. They were obliged to go to Eaton, Ohio, to marry, as there was no civil organization in Indiana at that time. After he married he located northeast of Richmond, and soon after removed to a farm northeast of Cambridge City, which he entered from the government in 1813. In 1826 he removed to a new farm in Rush County. The children of this marriage were: Levi, Thomas, Reuben, John, Tamar, Elwood, Jonathan, Anna, Isaac, Emily, Huldah and Benjamin. Jesse Hill worked in the first woolen mill and grist mill in Carthage, which belonged to Robert Hill, of Richmond. He also conducted his farming interests, by the assist¬ance of his boys.    He assisted in organizing the Friends' meeting
 
586    RUSH COUNTY.
at Carthage, and was Overseer for many years. He never had any political aspirations, was public-spirited, and a power for good in the new country. He was a stockholder in the Knightstown & Shelbyville Railroad. After a life of usefulness he passed away on the 7th day of September, 1871. In politics, he was a Whig until the Republican party was organized in 1856, after which time he gave that party his zealous support.
THOMAS HILL was born in GuilfordCounty, N. C, November 30, 1797.    He was the son of Thomas and Anna (Haskett) Hill.    The family embraced the following named children:   Jesse, Thomas, Jonathan, Betsey (Jessup), Sarah  (Bentley), Hulda (Overman), Penninah (Lacy).    At an early age, Thomas was brought with the family to Wayne County, Ind., to a new home in the wilderness, about five miles from where Richmond now is.    His parents died soon after they arrived in Indiana, and Thomas went to live with his cousin Robert Hill, two miles east of Richmond.    In  1820 he entered a farm in Rush County, and the same year built a cabin on his new possessions.    The cabin stood on Section  24, Town 15 north, Range 8 east.    In September, 1821, he returned to his cabin, bringing with him his young wife.    As many of our people have never seen a marriage certificate, such as was used by the Friends, we here insert this one:   " Whereas Thomas Hill, of the State of Indiana and County of Wayne, son of Thomas Hill and Anna, his wife, both deceased, and Tamar Clark, daughter of John Clark, and Sarah, his wife, deceased, of the State and county aforesaid, having declared their intention of marriage with each other at the monthly meeting of the religious society of Friends, held at White Water, according to the good order used among them and having consent of parents and parties concerned.    Their said intentions of marriage were allowed of by said meeting.    Now these are to cer¬tify whom it may concern that for the full accomplishment of their said intentions this thirtieth day of the eighth month in the year of Our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-one, they, the said Thomas Hill and Tamar Clark, appeared in a publick meet¬ing of the said people, held at Orange, and the said Thomas Hill taking the said Tamar Clark by the hand, did openly declare that he took her the said Tamar Clark to be his wife, promising with Divine assistance to be unto her a loving husband until death should separate them; and then in the same assembly, the said Tamar Clark did in like manner declare that she took him, the said Thomas Hill, to be her husband, and promising, with Divine assistance, to be unto him a loving wife until death should separate them.    And moreover, they, the said Thomas Hill and Tamar Clark (she ac¬cording to the customs of marriage assuming the name of her hus-
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    587
band), did, as a further confirmation thereof, then and there to these presents set their hands.    Thomas Hill, Tamar Hill.   And we, whose names are hereunto prescribed, being present at the solemnization of the said marriage and subscription, have as witnesses thereto, set our  hands the day and  year above written: John Winslow, Susannah Keeslin, Jesse Davenport, John Clark, John Lacy, Jona¬than Hill, Robert Parker, Isaac Bonine, Zilpah Price, Karen Par¬ker, Nathan Pearson, Sarah Hill, Anna Hill, Peninnah Lacy, Alice Clawson, Robert Hill, Henry Hoover, William Clark."    Of the above names written on that day, there lives only one now, Tamar Hill, wrho was the blushing  young bride in that assemblage  of good people, sixty-seven years ago.    As above mentioned, they came to their log cabin in a short time; their children were born as follows:  Milton, born July 19, 1822 (the first white child born in Ripley Township); John Cark, born January 7, 1825; Sarah Ann, born May  10, 1827; Susannah, born September 29,  1829; Jane, married to Joseph Phelps, born July 23, 1832; Albert, born September 26, 1835, died August 13, 1837; Owen S., born Feb¬ruary 2, 1838; Enos B., born February 19, 1842.    The subject of this sketch, by his industry and honesty, accumulated a competenc}r and secured for himself a name among his neighbors which is as lasting as memory.    He assisted at the organization at the Walnut Ridge meeting, and  was always among the first in every good work.    The  need of schools for educating his own children and those of his neighbors, early received his attention.    The Boarding School at Richmond, under the care of the Friends, was organized in 1847.    In 1848, Thomas Hill was selected to take charge of it. He remained there two yea'rs.    He succeeded Barnabas C. Hobbs. This school was Earlham College in embryo.    Thomas Hill lived in Ripley Township long enough to see the wilderness developed into  a beautiful land dotted with many happy homes.    He died after  a  busy and useful life, May 2, 1879.    His aged widow, a cheerful and happy old lady of eighty-six years, lives in Carthage calmly  waiting the   change  when  the summons shall  be read, Come up higher.
MRS. MIRIAM HILL, an aged and venerable widow lady of Carthage, was born in Randolph County, N. C, October 8, 1802. She is therefore in the eighty-sixth year of her age. She was the daughter of Thomas and Mary Thornburg, who were respectively natives of Guilford and Randolph counties, N. C. Her father was the son of Thomas and Martha Thornburg, and her mother was the daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Phelps) Winslow, all of whom wrere natives of North Carolina. Our subject was married to Aaron Hill in September, 1823.   He was also a native of Ran-
 
588    RUSH   COUNTY.
dolph County, N. C, born December 2, 1785. He was the son of William and Mary (Smith) Hill, the former of whom was born in 1740, and the latter was born in 1745. The first wife of Aaron Hill was Mary Henley, daughter of John and Mary Henley, by whom he became the father of six children: Micajah, John, Mary, Margaret, Penelope and Henley, of whom, John, Mary and Henley are deceased. The first named, John Hill, was assassinated shortly after the late war by a bushwhacker, in Douglas County, Kan., whither he moved from North Carolina in 1861. Aaron Hill's first wife died in 1820, and after his marriage to Miriam Thornburg, he pursued the vocation of a farmer until his death, which occurred May 29, 1863. His second marriage resulted in the birth of eight children, as follows: Thomas T., William T., Nathan H., Aseriath H., Abigail N., Joseph B., Aaron O. and Miriam E., all of whom are living. In February, 1877, his surviving widow came to Rush County, and has since resided in Carthage. She is a mem¬ber of the Friends' Church, as was also her husband. Their chil¬dren are also members of the Friends' Church.
MICAJAH HILL, of Carthage, is a native of Randolph County, N. C, born October 26, 1808, being the son of Aaron and Mary (Henley) Hill, who also were natives of Randolph County, N. C, of English descent. His father was the son of William Hill, and his mother was the daughter of John Henley, and was the sister of Joseph Henley, who settled in Ripley Township, in 1837. He was reared upon a farm in his native county, and at twenty-one years of age he engaged in agricultural pursuits for himself and continued to farm in Randolph County until in December, 1855. In the meantime he was married to Miss Naomi Pugh, February 9,1830. She died on the 18th day of October following; and on the 24th day of February, 1832, Mr. Hill was married to Miss Sarah Jane Mendenhall, who was born in Guilford County, N. C, December 7, 1807, being the daughter of James and Miriam (Hockett) Men¬denhall, who also were natives of Guilford County, N. C. Her father was the son of Elijah Mendenhall. In December, 1855, Mr. Hill moved his family to Guilford County, N. C, and on the 10th day of September, 1861, he set out with his family for Rush County. Proceeding in wagons through West Virginia and Ten¬nessee, they continued unretarded until they reached the Cumber¬land River, in Kentucky, early in October, 1861. Here they found the ferry in control of Gen. Zollicoffer's Confederate troops, who forbade them to cross, lest they might make revelations detrimental to their plans, to the Union forces on the opposite bank. So, return¬ing a distance of seventy miles, they spent the winter near Knox-ville, Tenn.    On the 28th day of April, 1862, they once more set
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    589
out and proceeded on their journey undisturbed, reaching their des-tination in Ripley Township on the 20th day of May following. The family settled first upon a farm one mile and a half east of Carthage; but in April, 1875, they removed to Carthage, where our subject has ever since resided. Mrs. Hill died November 29, 1884. Mr. Hill is the father of nine children, as follows: Mary Ann, Naomi P., Miriam M., Daniel M., James M., Margaret F., Sarah J., Micajah A. and Rhoda M., of whom Naomi, Miriam, James and Micajah are deceased. Mr. Hill is a member of the Friends' Church. In'politics, he formerly affiliated with the Whig and Republican parties, but he is now an ardent Prohibitionist. Besides a comfortable town property where he resides, in Carthage, he is the owner of three farms, one of 100 acres in Posey Town¬ship, and two in Ripley Township, which contain forty and ninety acres, respectively. He is one of the well-to-do men of his town¬ship, and one of its worthy and honored citizens. His last wife, Mrs. Sarah J. Hill, was a minister in the Friends' Church for a period of about fort}^ years, commencing in about 1835. During that time she traveled a great deal, performing her ministerial la¬bors in North Carolina, West Virginia, Tennessee and Indiana. In this capacity she possessed quite a good deal of ability, and.was the means of accomplishing a great and good work. Two of Mr. Hill's daughters, Margaret F. and Rhoda M., have also engaged in the ministry, in which they promise to be successful.
NATHAN C. HILL, who has been a resident of Ripley Town¬ship for the past sixty years, is a native of Wayne County, Ind., born December 3, 1821, being the son of John and Dinah (Cox) Hill, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. His father was the son of Benjamin and Mary (Jessup) Hill, who emigrated from North Carolina to Virginia, thence to Wayne County, this State, where they were early settlers. His mother was the daugh¬ter of Joseph and Dinah (Rich) Cox. When he was six years old his parents came to Rush County and settled in Ripley Township, near where he now resides. There his early life was spent assisting to clear and cultivate a farm. On the 2d day of May, 1844, he was married to Miss Hannah Edwards, who was the daughter of Will¬iam and Elizabeth (Newlin) Edwards. Immediately after his mar¬riage Mr. Hill settled upon a farm in Section 10, Ripley Township. His wife died September 28, 1845, after which he returned to his father's and remained until his second marriage, which occurred Februaiy 28, 1849. The lady that then joined him in wedlock was Miss Asenath Hunt, who was born in Clinton County, Ohio, No¬vember 22, 1825, being the daughter of Ezra and Rebecca Hunt. For one year after this marriage Mr. Hill lived with his mother
 
59°
 
RUSH   COUNTY.
 
who had become a widow. He then settled on a farm in Sec-tion 23, where he has resided ever since. Mrs. Asenath Hill died November 30, 1881. On the 7th day of January, 1886, Mr. Hill was married to Miss Mary E. Harden, who is a native of Guilford County, N. C, born June 8, 1841, being the daughter of David and Isabella (Hackett) Harden, both of whom were natives of North Carolina. Her father was the son of Charles and Sarah Harden, and her mother was the daughter of James and Elizabeth (Gladstone) Hackett. The first marriage of Mr. Hill resulted in the birth of one child: Oliver, born June 1, 1845, died March 22, 1846. His second marriage resulted in the birth of five children: Cyrus E., born June 8, 1850; Ezra S., born December 9, 1851; Rebecca J., born December 3, 1853; John W., born July 22,1857, and Anna M., born January 17, 1861, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, the former is a Republican. He has given his whole attention to farming, and has earned a rank among the substantial farmers of Rush County. He at one time owned 423^ acres of land, all of which lay in Ripley Township. After providing good homes for his children, he is still the owner of a good farm and has a com¬fortable home.
MILTON HILL was born July 19, 1822, in Ripley Township, Rush County, Ind. He enjoys the distinction of being the first white child born in Riplejr Township. He is the son of Thomas and Tamer (Clark) Hill. He attended the first school at Walnut Ridge, the first held in the township. The Friends built the meet¬ing house in 1826, and conducted their school in it. Milton spent his whole life here excepting two years, when he was in the army. He belonged to Company E, Ninth Indiana Cavalry—Col. Jackson. After the war was over he returned to his native township, and was elected Justice of the Peace, an office he had resigned when he enlisted. He has served in that capactity almost contin¬uously for twenty-five years. In 1844, May 23, he married Amanda Hobbs, daughter of Samuel and Ruth (Parker) Hobbs. Amanda was born in Washington County, Ind. At the age of thirteen, in 1837, she came to Rush County, with her uncle, Elisha Hobbs, at the age of twenty she married the subject of this sketch. Their children are: Thomas C, Ruth, Susie, Ella M., Charles S., Emma J., William H. and Irvin. Mr. Hill is a Republican in poli-tics, and a representative citizen.
ISAAC HILL, who is a native-born citizen of Ripley Township, was born June 20, 1826. He was the son of Jesse and Mabel (Overman) Hill, who were natives of North Carolina, and who accompanied their respective parents to Wayne County, Ind. There
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    59I
they were married in 1809,  and in the fall of 1826, the\r came to Rush County, and became among the first settlers of Riple}r Town-ship.    Their home was the farm now occupied by the  subject of this sketch, where both spent the rest of their lives, the father dy¬ing September 7, 1871, and the mother dying April 1, 1876.    The subject of this sketch was reared up to the age of twenty-two upon his father's farm. " For some six or seven years thereafter he was variously employed.    He first became engaged with the Shelby-ville & Knightstown Railroad, which was  then being constructed through Carthage.    For two years he worked as a teamster, and for a short time following this, he was employed as brakeman.    He then spent between two and three years as clerk in a store and warehouse in Carthage.    For about two years following this he was engaged in a turning factory or a sort of novelty wrorks that once existed in Carthage.    In the meantime, while thus engaged, he was married to Elizabeth Winslow, November 14, 1856.    She was born in Washington County, Ind., December 10, 1836, being the daughter of Barnabas C. and Sarah   (Draper) Winslow, both of whom were natives of Washington County, Ind., the former be¬ing born March 28, 1812, and the latter August 2, 1817.    They were reared and married in their native county on March  7? *836. The father of Mrs. Hill died in Mercer County, Ills., May 4, 1846. Her mother still survives and makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Hill.    The occupation of Mr. Hill since his marriage has been pump manufacturing, farming  and grain threshing.     For the past five years his undivided attention has been given to the manufacture of pumps, having as a partner in that business, William Bundy.    Our subject and wife have had four children: Maggie A., Ida M., Ella S. and Mary T., of whom Maggie and Mary are deceased.    Mr. Hill is a member of the Friends' Church, and his wife is a member of the Methodist  Church.    In politics, our subject is an uncompro-mising Republican.    When the office was created he was elected Road Superintendent of Riple}r Township, and served until the office was abolished.
AMOS H. HILL, one of the prominent farmers of Ripley Town-ship, is a native of Wayne County, this State, born January 4,1827, being the son of William and Charity (Hawkins) Hill, the former of whom was born in Randolph County, N. C, of English descent, and the latter was born near Bush Hill Church, S. C, of Welsh descent. His father was the son of Benjamin and-Mary (Jessup) Hill, and his mother was the daughter of Amos and Anna (Comer) Hawkins. When he was a lad seven years old, his parents came to Rush County, and settled upon a farm in Ripley Township, near where he now resides.    There his early life was spent assisting to
 
592    RUSH   COUNTY.
clear and cultivate the farm. At the age of seventeen, he entered upon an apprenticeship with J. B. Hinshaw, of Knightstown, with whom he spent three years learning the blacksmith's trade. On completing his trade, he entered the employ of Mr. Hinshaw, for whom he worked a few months, when he then set up a shop for himself in Cartilage, this county. He continued to devote his en¬tire attention to his trade in Carthage for a period of twenty-five years. In the meantime he was married to Miss Peninnah Thorn-burg, November 22, 1848. She was born in Randolph County, N. C, October 24, 1826, being the daughter of Thomas and Sarah (Henley) Thornburg, both of whom were also natives of Ran¬dolph County, N. C, of English descent. Her father was the son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Winslow) Thornburg, and her mother was the daughter of Joseph and Peninnah (Morgan) Henley, all of whom were natives of North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Hill contin¬ued to reside in Carthage until the spring of 1876. In the mean¬time he had retired from his trade in 1871, and became a partner in a drug and grocery store, to which his attention was directed about sixteen months. In 1874, he was elected b}' the directors Presi¬dent of the Carthage Turnpike Company, of which he had been a stockholder since the construction of the road before the war. In the spring of 1876, Mr. and Mrs. Hill removed to the farm they now occupy four and one-half miles northwest of Carthage, where the former has since given his whole attention to agricultural pur¬suits. In this connection he has already earned a rank among the prosperous farmers of his township. He owns 240 acres of land, about 185 of which are in cultivation. His farm contains an elegant brick residence, and is in other respects substantially improved. He and wife have had four children, as follows: Mary A., Leora A., William B., and Lucy S., all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Hill and all of their children are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, the former is now an ardent Prohibitionist. He is one of the industrious and substantial men of his township.
HON. BENJAMIN HILL, son of Jesse and Mabel (Overman) Hill, was born in Ripley Township, on December 24, 1832, and is the youngest of twelve children. He grew to manhood on the farm of his father, and has since resided there. He cast his first vote with the great body of men who ushered into political life the Republican party. He was educated in the Friends' school, at Carthage, and in 1870, was elected to the Indiana Legislature, Joint Representative for Rush and Decatur counties. On March 14, 1861, Benjamin married Lydia M. Bowman, daughter of Jesse and Mary (Burcham) Bowman. Her parents were born in North Carolina.    Benjamin Hill is the father of three children: O. M.,
 
RIPLEY TOWNSHIP.    593.
born October 7, 1863; Gertrude, born January 20, 1S65, and Law¬rence S. born February 26, 1875. In 1873, the Legislature elected Benjamin Hill Director of the Southern prison, which position he filled satisfactorily for more than four years. Mr. Hill is a farmer, a member of the Society of Friends, and in politics is an uncom¬promising Republican.
JOHN R. HILL, who is a native-born citizen of Ripley Town¬ship, was born near where he now resides, August 24, 1834, being the son of William and Charity (Hawkins) Hill, who were natives of Virginia and South Carolina, respectively. He was reared upon a farm in his native township, and at the age of twenty-three, on May 20, 1858, he was united in marriage to Miss Peninnah Henley who was born in Carthage, this county, February 12, 1833. She was the daughter of Henry and Ruth (Morrow) Henley, whose history appears elsewhere in this work. Immediately after his marriage Mr. Hill engaged in agricultural pursuits for himself up¬on the old homestead where he was born, and continued with his father and mother until after their deaths, the former dying Feb¬ruary 26, 1861, and the mother survived him until the 16th day of March, 1882. In the meantime, in 1868, Mr. Hill became the sole owner of the old homestead, and it still remains in his possession. They continued to occupy this farm until the spring of 1883, when they removed to their present home. The life occupation of Mr. Hill has been farming, and in this connection his labors have been liberally rewarded. He owns in all 240 acres of land, all of which lies in Ripley Township, and about two-thirds of which is in culti¬vation. His home farm is in a substantial state of improvement and is very desirably situated. He and wife are the parents of two children, as follows: Amos L., born June 1, 1859, and Eunice,born November 17, i860, both of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Hill and both of their children are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, our subject is a Republican.
OWEN S.. HILL was born in Ripley Township, Rush County, Ind., February 2, 1838, son of Thomas and Tamar (Clark) Hill, on the farm his father entered. He attended school at Walnut Ridge, at the Friends' school, lived on the farm and spent his youth in assisting to develop the farm. At the age of twenty he began teaching school in Morgan County, Ind. He taught in the neighborhood of his home for four years, and was principal of the public school in Carthage in 1871. On September 13, 1866, Owen married Melissa A, Bales,vdaughter of John H. and Ann (Haskett) Bales. There were no children from this union. Mrs. Hill was a a member of the Society of Friends, a worker in every good en¬terprise.    She closed this life April 24,1886.    Mr. Hill has been in
 
594    RUSH   COUNTY.
the mercantile business in Carthage ten years, as a druggist.* In June, 1887, Mr. Hill married Lizzie Pierce, daughter of James and Christian (Perry) Pierce. Miss Pierce has been engaged in teach¬ing for several years in the public schools. She was in the schools of Dunreith, New Castle, Knightstown and Carthage. Mr. Hill has no children of his own, but Susie Lattmore has lived in his family for several years. Mr. Hill is President of the Carthage School Board, a public spirited citizen, a member of the Society of Friends, and in politics, is a Republican.
AARON O. HILL, the senior member of the firm of Hill, Hen¬ley & Co., of Carthage, is a native of Randolph County, N. C, born   October  20,  1840, being  the  son of   Aaron  and  Miriam (Thornburg) Hill, who were natives of Randolph County, N. C, both of English descent.   He was reared upon a farm and received in the district school a good common school education, and one that enabled him to teach public school.    During the winters of 1865-6 and 1866-7, ne taught school in Randolph County, N. C.    In April, 1868, he emigrated to Johnson County, Kan., where for a period of ten months he was in the employ of the Government in the capacity of a teacher of Indian children.    In the spring of 1869 he returned to his native county, but in March, 1870, he came to Rush County, and for nearly five years he was employed as a farm hand in Ripley Township.   In the fall of 1875, he returned once more to his native county where he was engaged at farming and teaching until March, 1877? when he again came to this county, and for two years thereafter, he acted as clerk for the Henley Brothers, merchants, of Carthage.    In September, 1879, he entered the em¬ploy of Gwynne, Johnson & Co., of the same place, and continued with them as salesman until the death of Mr. Gwynne, in Septem¬ber, 1884.    Shortly after that event the business passed into the hands of the firm of Hill, Henley & Co., of which our subject is the senior member.    It possesses a rank among the largest and most successful business firms of the county.    February 11, 1885, he was married to Miss Eliza Henley, daughter of Thomas and Abigail Henley, formerly of Ripley Township, but who are now deceased.    She was born in Ripley Township, October 11, 1840. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are members of the Friends' Church, and, in politics, the former is an ardent Republican. For a number of years he has served as a member of the Town Council in Carthage.
Miss MIRIAM E. HILL, of Carthage, is a native of Randolph County, N. C, being the daughter of Aaron and Miriam (Thorn¬burg) Hill, who were also natives of Randolph County, N. C, of English descent. When she was fourteen years of age she went to West Chester, Pa., and made her home with her sister, Mrs.
 
RIPLEY   TOWNSHIP.    595
Asenath H. Reece, for a period of twelve years. At about the age of eighteen she became a teacher in the public schools of West Chester, Pa., and taught in that place one winter term. Dur-ing the four years which followed, she was engaged in teaching in Lycoming County, Pa. She then took a position as teacher in White's Institute, of Wabash County, Ind., a position she retained two years. Returning to West Chester, she spent one \rear with her sister. In September, 1874, she accepted a position as in¬structor in the Penn's Charter School, Philadelphia, where she re¬mained two years. In the fall of 1876 she came to Rush County, and has ever since been a resident of Carthage. On the 17th day of March, 1883, she assumed the duties of Postmaster of Carthage, wThich office she filled in a creditable manner until in June, 1886. Since retiring from the postoffice she has given her entire attention to her book and stationery establishment, which she has conducted since May, 1883.    She is a member of the Friends' Church.
ALLEN HILL, a farmer, is a native of Ripley Township, born August 13, 1853, being the son of John C. and Mary (Phelps) Hill, the former of whom resides, in Carthage, and the latter of whom died in about 1856. He was reared in his native township,, upon a farm. For a number of years after he became of age, he was employed upon a farm by the month. He was married No¬vember 10,1881, to Miss Fannie Bennett, who was born in Missouri, February 27, 1859, being the daughter of Richard and Caroline (Tygart) Bennett. Their marriage has resulted in the birth of two children. Both were daughters who died in infancy, unnamed. Our subject is a member of the Friends' Church, and is a Republi¬can in politics. He owns seventeen acres of land, which adjoins the village of Charlottesville, and all of which is improved.
CAPTAIN DAVID S. HOLLOWAY, deceased, was the son of Dayton and Barbara M. (Smith) Holloway. The father was one of the early comers to Rush County, and, having located at Carth¬age, assisted in erecting the first mill at that place. Of this he subsequently became one of the proprietors. Their family consisted of the following children: Sarah, Margaret, David S-, Edward, Benjamin F., Hannah, William W., John R., and Dayton J. David S. was born on his father's farm in Ripley Township, July 16,1826. The business of his life was that of an agriculturist. His educa-tion was obtained in the schools of his neighborhood, and more especially at Walnut Ridge. In 1861, when the country called for volunteers, he was- among the first to offer his service as one of its defenders. He enlisted as a private, and so well did he discharge the duties of a soldier, that he was promoted through the various grades to the rank of Captain.    His Company was D, in the Nine-
 
596    ■    RUSH   COUNTY.
teenth Regiment of Indiana Infantry. Some of the important en-gagements in which he participated were Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Five Forks and Appomattox. He belonged to what was known as the "Iron Brigade." At Gettysburg, he was wounded and taken prisoner, but was afterward paroled and exchanged. At the close of the war, he returned, home and renewed the business of farming, and in addition to that he later added milling, all of which he conducted successfully. His marriage with Sue Bently occurred August 25, 1849. She was a daughter of Reuben and Sarah (Hill) Bently, and was born April 11, 1832, in Maryland. They began house¬keeping-at the place where the family yet resides. Their children were born as follows: Dayton R., December 8, 1851; Sarah M., October 13, 1855; David E. E., June 15,1861; Dahlia, August 10, 1865; Ruth, August 9, 1873; Dayton and Sarah, died September 19th and April 9, i860, respectively. Captain Hollo way was one of the most conspicuous men in his community for probity of char-acter and fearless integrity. His death occurred July 18,1887, and was the result of an accident that happened him while engaged in operating a reaper. He was universally mourned as a loyal and upright citizen. His portrait, as it appears in this volume, repre¬sents him as at the close of the war, in which he was so active a participant.
LIBNI HUNT was born in North Carolina in 1791, came to Ohio in 1805. ^n Clinton County, Ohio, he married Jane Hockett, and in 1837 removed to Ripley Township, Rush Co.-, Ind. He was the father of the following children: Alfred, Eber, died in in¬fancy; Ann, deceased; Miriam, deceased; John, Margaret, died in infancy; Priscilla (Fries), Rebecca (Cloud), Isaac, deceased; Jo¬seph R. and Jane (Harold). Mr. Hunt had charge of a saw mill on Six-mile Creek for many years, and the needs of himself and neigh-bors prompted him to attach a grist-grinding department, which need he supplied. He was a successful farmer, a member of the Society of Friends, and on January 8, 1875, ne died. His wife preceded him, having departed this life on October 21, 1873. They are laid at rest in Walnut Ridge Cemetery.

JAMES G. JEFFRIES, a prominent farmec of Ripley Township, is a native of Green County, Ohio, born May 15,1830, being the son of Macklin and Mary (Turner) Jeffries, whose history appears elsewhere in this work. He was but eighteen months old when his parents came to Rush County and settled in Riple}- Township, in which he still resides. The subject of this sketch was reared upon a farm in Ripley Township, and at about the age of twenty-two, he took up the avocation of a farmer for himself, and he has
ever since continued to follow that pursuit in Ripley Township. On the first day of April, 1S60, he was united in marriage to Miss Clarissa Brown, who was born in North Carolina, being the daughter of Allen and Elizabeth (Keen) Brown. She died December 23, 1864, and on the 14th of March, 1S67, Mr. Jeffries was married to Miss Henrietta F. Roberts, who is a native of Hamilton County, this State, born July 12, 1847, being the daughter of Elias and Mariah (Chibes) Roberts, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, of English descent. Her father was the son of "Willis and Marthaline Roberts. The first marriage of Mr. Jeffries resulted in the birth of three children: Samantha M., Izzeta M. and Joseph A. J.,of whom the lasttwo are deceased. He and his present wife have had nine children: Izora, Ollie M., Icannis, Alma A., Elsie M., Nora A., Eunice B., Milton M. and Orval W., of whom Izora, Icannis and Orval are deceased. In politics, Mr. Jeffries is an uncompromising Republican. He takes an active part in poli-tics, and will use all honorable means. to promote the welfare of his party. He owns a farm of seventy acres, which is nearly all in cultivation.

SAMUEL H.  JESSUP,  an  old   and  honored  citizen  of  Ripley Township, was born in the house he now occupies, just opposite the town of Carthage, August 27, 1834.   He was the son of Jonathan and Elizabeth (Hill) Jessup, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, of English descent.    His father was born August 6, 1785, and was the son of Jacob and Rachel Jessup.    His mother was born August 7, 1789, and was the daughter of Thomas and Ann Hill.    His grandparents were all natives of North Carolina. He was reared upon his father's farm, and continued with his father until the latter's death, which occurred March 25,1861. His mother survived his father until in July, 1864.    At her death our subject became the owner of the old homestead, which is still in his possession, and which has been his home all his life.   His first marriage occurred December 29, 1875, when Miss Sarah E. Wilson became his wife.    She was born in this State, July 30, 1844, being the  daughter of  Thomas T. and Mary Jane (Clawson) Wilson. She became the mother of one child,  a daughter that died in infancy.    Mrs. Sarah E. Jessup died January 20,1878.    On the 30th day of December, 1880, Mr. Jessup was married to Miss Mary E. Nicholson, who is a native of Ripley Township, born October 23, 1845, being the daughter of Nathan P. and Miriam (Hunt) Nich¬olson, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter a native of Ohio, both of English descent.    Her father was born July 25,1816, being the son of Nathan and Peninnah (Parker) Nicholson. Her mother was born September 18, 1821, being the daughter of Libni and Jane (Hockett) Hunt. Her grandparents were also all - natives of North Carolina. Her mother died in Ripley Township, October 5, 1848. Her father died in Hancock County, this State, March 8, 1868, his death resulting from injuries received three days previously while helping to move a barn. He left a widow, whose maiden name was Asenath H. Cloud, to whom he had been married October 2, 1850. She died May 14, 1878. Mr. Jessup and his present wife are the parents of three children, as follows: Walter, born March 25, 1882; Idarborn November 14, 1883; and Miriam E., born August 1,1886, all of whom are living. Our sub¬ject and wife are members of the Friends' Church. In politics, the former is a Republican. He owns 105 acres of land about sixty-five,of which are in cultivation. He is a well-to-do farmer, and he and wife are respected citizens. ^The paternal great grandparents of Mrs. Mary E. Jessup, were Nicholas and Sarah Nicholson, and John and Joel Parker. Her maternal great grandparents were Asa and Priscilla Hunt and Joseph and Ann Hockett.

DAVID W. KIRKWOOD, a prosperous farmer and native born citizen of Ripley Township, was born near where he now resides, November 25, 1841. He was the son of Thomas and Amanda M. Kirkwood, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, and the for¬mer of Harrison County, of Irish and Scotch descent. His father died October 3, 1851. His paternal grandparents were David and Rhoda (Shields) Kirkwood:, who were natives of Virginia. His mother's maiden name was Amanda W. Mcllvaine. When he was yet a young child, less than a year old, his parents removed to Jas¬per County, 111., where his mother and father both died, the former when he was but six years old, and the latter when he was but nine years old. His mother died November 6, 1848, and his father died in October, 1851. In May following his father's death, he and his sister, Nancy E., younger than he were brought to Rush County by their uncle, Joseph Power, of Center Township, in whose family our subject remained until he reached the age of twenty-one. For some two or three years after he became of age he was engaged a part of the time working by the month upon a farm, and during the rest of the time he was employed upon the farm of his uncle, Joseph Power. He was married September 27, 1866, to Miss Mary M. Siler, who is also a native of Ripley Township, born June 27,1841, being the daughter of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reddick) Siler, both of whom were natives of Ohio, of German descent. Her father was the son of Peter and Elizabeth (Ruby) Siler, and her mother was the daughter of John and Susan Reddick, all of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Kirkwood, entered upon their married life in Carthage,  this county, where
 
 










Return To The Main Index