SING
Genealogy Trails
SPENCER COUNTY, INDIANA
BIOGRAPHY SKETCHES
OHIO TOWNSHIP

H. L. AMBROSE, M. D., is a native of Hartford, Ohio Co., Ky., his birth occurring June 22, 1843. He is the youngest in family of seven children born to Jacob and Maria (James) Ambrose, both natives of Kentucky. Jacob Ambrose was reared, educated and married in his native State, following cabinet-making and furniture dealing until his death, which occurred in Muhlenburgh County in the spring of 1879, preceded by his wife in Ohio County about the year 1854. The immediate subject of this biography, H. L. Ambrose, received more than the ordinary education in youth, and on the breaking out of the Rebellion in 1861 enlisted in Company F, Third Kentucky Cavalry, was wounded at Shiloh and also at Tunnel Hill, and served until the close of the war. He then clerked in a dry goods house at Evansville for a time, then began the study of medicine at Owensboro, Ky., with Dr. A. C. Wood. The session of 1866-67 he attended the Medical University at Ann Arbor, Mich., and the spring of 1869 graduated. From 1874 to 1880 he was connected with Dr. I. L. Milner in the practice of his profession at Rockport, since when he has been alone. He has acquired a comfortable practice, and as a physician ranks second to none in the county. He is a stanch advocate of the principles of the Republican party ; is a member of the K. of P. and G. A. R. fraternities, and himself and wife belong to the Presbyterian Church. April 5, 1874, he wedded Johann daughter of Ziba H. Cook, a prominent early settler of Evansville, and two children have been born to them, named John G. and Edward P.

JOSEPH D. ARMSTRONG, ex-County Auditor, was born February 27, 1837, in Meade County, Ky. At fourteen years of age he began life's battle on his own responsibility, and from 1852 to 1854 was ' employed in a Louisville tobacco warehouse. After farming a year he became book-keeper and salesman in a wholesale grocery house of Louisville, but in 1857 came to Spencer County, Ind., and until 1864 was employed in the store of William Thompson. For the succeeding two years he resided at Grandview as book-keeper and salesman for Parker & Verhoeff, and then became Deputy-Auditor of the county. In 1872 he was appointed County Examiner by the County Commissioners, and in 1873 was elected County Superintendent. In 1875 he again became Deputy-Auditor, and in 1878 was elected principal to that office. Mr. Armstrong is self-educated, and what prosperity has come to him has been entirely due to his own exertions. In October, 1858, he wedded Amanda Heveron, who died in May, 1865. He married Maggie R. Allen in November, 1867, and since 1868 has resided at Rockport. He has always been a Democrat in politics. In 1882 he bought the Spencer County Advance which he merged into the Rockport Sentinel, a periodical of which he was the editor and publisher until December, 1884, when he disposed of it to fill another position.

WILLIAM FREDERICK ATKINSON, farmer and stock-raiser, is a son of John Atkinson, a native of Mayview, Parish of Castle Conner, County of Sligo, Ireland, born April 10, 1812. John Atkinson came to the United States in 1837, locating in New York and later in Illinois, where he practiced law and taught school until 1849, when he came to this county. Here he practiced law and for several years was County Surveyor. He was a graduate from a law and literary college of Dublin, Ireland. In 1838 he married Maria Antoinette De Hule, of Albany, N. Y., who died April 16, 1876. His death occurred April 24, 1861. They had five children: Phillip A., William F., Robert, John V. and Maria Theresa (deceased). William F. was born in Bullitt County, Ky., January 19, 1843. He came to this county with his parents in 1849, locating at Rockport, where he received a. good education. March 4, 1862, he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-eighth Regiment, First Indiana Cavalry, and served until April 1,1865. He returned home and has since followed farming in this county. He owns 375 acres of good land, and has one of the best country residences in the county. In addition to his farming from 1868 to 1877 he taught school during the winter months, and from 1876 to 1880 carried the mail from Rockport to Boonville. May 22, 1873, he married Susanna J. Kerr, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio. They have five children: George K., Allen V., Roy S., Theresa J. and Herbert J. Mr. Atkinson is a stanch Republican, a member of the G. A. R., and of the Presbyterian Church of which his wife is also a member.

HARMON G. BARKWELL, retired Attorney, Rockport, Ind., is a native of Kentucky, born December 23, 1807. He grew to manhood in his native State, receiving a common school education. On attaining his majority, he engaged in the saddlery business at Troy, Ind., where he remained until about 1836, when he came to this county, and acted as Deputy for Thomas P. Britton, County Clerk, for one year. After studying law for one year at New Harmony, he went to Evansville, where he completed his legal studies, and was admitted to the bar in 1846. He then practiced law at Mount Vernon for a year, after which he returned to Rockport, where he acquired a large practice, and had the reputation of being among the foremost members of that bar. The Judge was originally a Whig in politics, but since the disappearance of that party, has been a Democrat. He was Judge pro tem, by appointment at various times in this circuit, and was elected by his party in 1855, as Prosecuting Attorney. March 19, 1839, Miss Parmelia Alldredge became his wife, by whom he is the father of ten children, five of whom are living. Mrs. Barkwell died April 1, 1858; and he was married April 3, of the following year to Rachel S. Shields, who died September 28, 1876. She was a daughter of Col. Jesse Shields, of Harrison County. The Judge's parents were Joseph and Elvira (Freeman) Barkwell, both natives of the " Old Dominion."

JAMES M. BARNETT, one of the prominent pioneer citizens of the county, is a native of Logan County, Ky., born September 29. 1814. He is the fourth of eight children in the family of John M.. and Sallie (McNeely) Barnett. They came to Spencer County in 1816, and located on a tract of land entered on Section 19 of this Township, where they passed the remainder of their lives. The father was called to his last resting place in August, 1854. and his companion in the same month sixteen years later. John M.. Barnett was a man well and favorably known, having been Magistrate, an Associate Judge of the Probate Court, and was a local preacher in the Methodist Church. James M. remained at home until twenty-one years old, receiving such an education as could be obtained by attending a subscription school for a few months each year. He began farming for himself on land deeded to him by his father, and has continued in agricultural pursuits ever since. June 21, 1838, he wedded Hannah Meyers, a native of Adams County, Ohio, and a daughter of Jacob Meyers, a prominent early citizen of the county. By this union he is the father of eight children: John F., William W„ Jacob O. (deceased), James W., Sarah E., wife of Louis Snyder; Minerva M., H. Belle, and George W. Mr. Barnett has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for over half a century. His wife is also a member.

WILLIAM WESLEY BARNETT, son of the above, was born in this county July 9,1842. He remained at home, working on the farm until July, 1861, when he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-eighth Regiment, First Indiana Cavalry, serving his country faithfully until September, 1861. He participated in the battles of Fredericktown, Mo.; Helena, Ark.; Little Rock; Pine Bluff, and numerous skirmishes. After the war he attended' the Rockport schools for a time, and clerked in his brother's store for a year. In 1866 he engaged in farming, continuing until 1878, when he moved to Rockport and followed teaming until 1882, when he embarked in the livery business, which he still continues. December 19, 1865, he married Mary M. Shackleford of this county, by whom he is the father of five children : Harry C. (deceased), Stella C., Samuel L., Washington, S., and Shinkle W. Mr. Barnett is a member of the G. A. R., and K. of P. His wife is a member of the Methodist Church.

FRIEND HARRISON BARNETT, one of the oldest native residents of the county, was born November 26, 1818. He is a son of John M. and Sarah (McNeeley) Barnett. He was raised on the farm, receiving his education at the primitive log schoolhouse of his times. May 26v 1841, he married Elmira Evans of this county, and settled on the farm where he has since resided. It was then covered with the primeval forest, inhabited by wolves, deer and other wild animals. This he has cleared and improved, undergoing all the hardships and privations of the pioneer's life. His wife died in June, 1855, having borne him five children, three of whom Melissa, William O., M. D.. and Sarah E., are living. August 25, 1859, he again entered the marriage relation with Eliza E. (Jones) Bell, a native of Nelson County, Ky. They have three children living, namely: John J., Eva E. and Grace G. In politics Mr. Barnett is a warm advocate of the principles of the Republican party. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOHN BASYE, druggist of Rockport, was born in Spencer County, Indiana, April 19, 1827, and is the oldest but one and the only living of three children born to Taylor and Adoshea (Duel) Basye. The father was born in Virginia in 1788, from whence he moved with his parents to Kentucky when a boy and from there, about the year 1820, removed to Grass Township, this county, and later to Hammond Township. In 1829, he moved to New York, thence to Kentucky, thence to Tennessee and in 1839 settled at Troy, Indiana, where for many years he conducted merchandising extensively and successfully. He served Perry County as Commissioner two terms and died August 31, 1857, esteemed by a large circle of acquaintances. His widow yet resides at Troy. John Basye was raised by his parents, and secured in his youth a fair education. At twenty-five years of age he embarked in the drug trade at Troy, remaining there three years. Removing to Rockport in 1858, he was engaged in the dry goods trade three years, but since 1862 has conducted a drug trade. Mr. Basye is one of the oldest, best known and most reliable merchants of Rockport, and is one of the substantial men of the place. He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Royal Arch degree in Masonry and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church. November 20, 1860, Elizabeth M. Sampson became his wife and to their union four children have been born, the following named three yet living: Taylor C., who is connected with his father in the drug trade, Edith and Blanche.

JOHN BAUMGAERTNER, proprietor of the Veranda Hotel, is a native of Canton Graubuenden, Switzerland, his birth occurring May 1, 1843. He is the second of four children born to the marriage of Simon Baumgaertner and Anna Fluetsch, both parents being natives of that country. His youth and early manhood were passed in the vicinity of his birthplace, attending the common schools and also a teachers' seminary of which he is a graduate. He taught school in his native town until 1865, when he immigrated to the United States, and in December of that year settled in Tell City, Perry Co., Ind., where he taught German school a period of seven years. The spring of 1872 he was elected Town Marshal, serving two terms of one year each, and in 1874 engaged in the wharf boat business, continuing until the fall of 1879. The spring of 1880 he removed to Rockport, Ind., and in April of that year assumed control of the Veranda Hotel, which under his judicious management has become one of the traveling public's favorite hotels of southern Indiana. Mr. Baumgaertner was married in 1867 to Hedwig Knecht, a native of Prussia, by whom he is the father of two children, only one, Alma H., now living. The mother dying November 8, 1870, the father, on the 7th of July, 1871, wedded Phillipena Neuhart, by whom he is the father -of four children, three yet living, named Otto, Henry and Frederick. Mrs. Baumgaertner is a native of Bavaria. Mr. Baumgaertner is a radical Republican and himself and his family belong to the Evangelical Church.

JOHN BEELER, an old resident of Spencer County, was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, November 13, 1826, being the youngest and only living member of the family of Daniel and Sarah A. (Meyers) Beeler, also natives of Hamilton County, Ohio. The father married in that county, and followed flat-boating on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. His death occurred when John was eighteen months old, and a few years later his mother married Robert Woods, a minister. At the age of thirteen he came with his mother and step-father to this county, where they lived on a farm northwest of Rockport. When he was in his twenty- first year he attended school one year in his native county, the educational facilities here being very meager. He then returned to this county, and began farming for himself in Grass Township, but soon after bought a tract of land near the homestead farm, which he cleared and improved. He lived there until 1876, when he met with some reverses and sold that farm, purchasing a smaller one upon which he lives. Mr. Beeler is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church. He was married November 30, 1848, to Nancy Richards, a daughter of John Richards, an early pioneer of this county. They have seven children : William R., Arvilla (now Mrs. William T. Boyd), Viola (now Mrs. James B. Mattingly), Claude D., Netter, Frank and John H.

JONATHAN BEELER, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, was born August 28, 1828, being one often children in the family of Samuel and Anna (Myers) Beeler. (See sketch of Henry Beeler of Warwick County.) The subject of this memoir was reared on a farm in his native county, receiving a common school education. At the age of twenty-two he engaged in farming for himself in that county, and a year later came to Spencer County, where he located on a farm in Grass Township. In 1855 he sold his farm, and bought the Lake Mills, which he operated with fair success until 1868, since which time he has given his attention to farming. In 1850 he wedded Mary A. Gaston, of his native county, who died October 8, 1865, leaving six children : Newton M., Lizzie, Susanna, Daniel, Samuel and John E. April 1, 1866\ he was united in marriage with Catharine Day, a native of Spencer County, by whom he is the father of nine children. Those living are Arthur W., Sarah B., Worden L., Joseph E., Frederick W., and James B. In politics Mr. Beeler is a stanch Republican. Both he and wife are members of the Baptist Church.

HENRY W. BIEDENKOPF (deceased) was born near Hagerstown, Md., February 10, 1834, being one of seven children born to William and Eva Biedenkopf, natives of Germany. He came to Cincinnati when he was two years old, and received both an English and German education in the schools of that city. He learned the cigar-makers' trade when a youth, and followed it until he came with his parents to this county. They bought a farm in Grass Township, where his father died March 6, 1857, and the mother July 20, 1860. In 1861 Mr. Biedenkopf moved to Rockport, where he engaged successfully in conducting a bakery, grocery, restaurant, a confectionery store and saloon until 1870, when he erected a hotel, which he managed with good success until his death, which occurred May 11, 1880. He was united in marriage March 3, 1861, to Catharine Scherer, a native of Germany, by whom he was the father of four children: Eva C. (wife of George Hibbs), William T. (deceased), Catharine R. (wife of J. Morris), and Henry P. Since Mr. Biedenkopf s death, his widow, assisted by her son, has conducted the hotel, it being known as the Occidental House.

REV. JOHN W. BOOK, rector of St. Bernard's Church of Rockport, is a native of Clark County, Ind., born October 21, 1850, a son of William and Mary (Engel) Book, who were natives of Hanover and Prussia,' respectively. The father came to America in 1844. and followed agricultural pursuits in Clark County, until his death in 1869. The mother still resides on the old homestead. Father Book, subject of this brief notice, remained with his parents, on the home farm until fifteen years old, when he entered St. Meinrad's Seminary, where he remained four years. For two years thereafter, he was a student at St. Joseph's College of Birdstow, Ky., then returning to St. Meinrad, completed his education, and November 2,1873, was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop at St. Palais. January 15, 1874, betook charge of St. Bernard's Church of Itockport, and is also pastor of St. Martin's Church of Centreville, and St. Rupert's Church of Yankeetown. Father Book has been an indefatigable worker in the cause of Christianity, and is regarded by Protestants and Catholics alike with veneration and love.

HENRY BRAND, is a native of Jackson Township, in the county where he now resides, his birth occurring January 22, 1842. He is the oldest but one in a family of eight children born to the marriage of Abraham J. Brand and Margaret Hesson, who were both natives of Kentucky. The Hessons are among the pioneers of this county, the mother of Henry immigrating hither with her parents in 1828. Abraham Brand went to Evansville, Ind., at an early day, but in 1836 removed with his widowed mother to this county, following farming until his death in May, 1861. Henry Brand, subject of this memoir, was raised on a farm in his native township, receiving the limited education afforded by the schools of his boyhood days, which has been developed into a good practical knowledge by private study. He was a brave and efficient soldier of the late war. serving in Company D, Sixty-fifth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, through the battles of Resaca, Buzzard Roost, all through the Atlanta campaign, including many other hard fought engagement. At the close of the war he returned home, and February 25, 1866, wedded Hannah E. Bridges, by whom he is the father of eight living children, named Mary J., Elizabeth, William Everett, John Franklin, George W., Katie, and Nora and Cora, twins. Mr. Brand has followed farming in his native township until November, 1884, when he was elected Recorder of the county, and is now satisfactorily serving in that capacity. He is a prominent and active Democrat in politics, and is an enterprising and energetic citizen.

BENJAMIN F. BRIDGES, a native of the county, was born February 7, 1844. He lived with his parents until his mother's death, which occurred when he was six or seven years old. He then went to live with his grandparents in Hamilton County, Ohio, with whom he remained in that, and in Clermont County, for about six years. He returned to this county with them,but lived with his father on the farm until in July,1861,when he enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served one year and eight months. He lost a limb at the battle of Hatchie River, and was discharged. After recovering from the wound, he attended school and prepared himself for teaching, which occupation he followed for four terms. In 1867, he was elected Auditor of Spencer County, and served one term of four years. He was a candidate for re-election, but was defeated. Four years later, he was again elected to the office, and held it until 1879, since which time he has been engaged in managing his farm where he lives. March 24, 1868, his marriage with Elizabeth Cooper was solemnized. Four children have been born to them, only two of whom are now living. They are Gertie E. and Frank Carroll. Mrs. Bridges is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Bridges is a son of Silas and Eliza J. (Tuley) Bridges, natives of Ohio and this county respectively. The father came to this county with his parents about 1840. He followed the business of farming all his life, and died in January, 1869. He was twice married.

AUGUST BRIZIUS, a native of Birkenfeld, Prussia, born April 28, 1855, is the fifth of seven children born to Charles and Louisa (Kunz) Brizius, both natives of Prussia, where the father, who was a butcher by trade, died lamented by all, and where the mother still resides. August was raised by his parents in his native country, receiving the ordinary compulsory education the laws of that land confer. He learned of his father the butcher's trade, and the fall of 1878 immigrated to the United States, living a short time at Evansville, Ind., and then going to Newburgh, this State, where he was employed in a brewery a few months. He then returned to Evansville where he worked at the tinner's trade four years. In 1877 he again went to Newburgh, and for over three years worked for a brother at the butcher's trade. In 1881, he came to Rockport, and, opening a meat-market has, by keeping the best of meats and selling them at reasonable prices, built up a good trade. He also owns his own slaughter house and a steam sausage chopper. He is a Democrat, a member of the I. O. O. F., and an enterprising citizen.

CADMUS VINCENT BROWN, one of the oldest living pioneers of the county, was born December 20, 1807 in Nelson County, Ky. His father, Richard Brown, a native of Pennsylvania, moved with his parents to Kentucky, where he married Nancy Hughes, and in 1818 came with his family to this county. He entered 160 acres of land, and made the first payment of $80, but on account of hard times for the ensuing ten years, was unable to pay the remainder. About 1827 he became disabled from paralysis, and the whole support of the family devolved upon our subject, who, at the age of twenty-one, flat-boated on the river long enough to pay for eighty acres of the land his father had entered. His father then lived on the place and was supported by him the remainder of his life. November 27,1832, Mr. Brown married Sarah Dodgeman, a native of Kentucky, by whom he is the father of eleven children. He now owns 212 acres of improved land of which 150 is under cultivation. In the spring he removed to Rockport, where he intends to live a retired life the remainder of his days. In politics Mr. Brown was formerly a Whig, but now holds himself entirely independent of party affiliations. Since the above was written, the subject of this sketch died April 22, 1885.

WILLIAM T. BULLOCK, a native of Rockport, was born October 16,1842, being the eldest of five children born to the marriage of George B. Bullock and Emiline Drury, natives of Virginia and Maryland. The father who was a tailor came to Rockport about 1838, was married and followed his trade for a number of years. He also followed flat-boating on the river before the war. During the war he was Provost-Marshal at this point, and since that time has been Trustee of Ohio Township several terms. He is now living a retired life at Rockport. William T. Bullock received his education in the town schools. He followed clerking in a dry goods store for some years, and was engaged in this occupation when the war broke out. In June, 1862, he enlisted in Company D, Sixty fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving for three years. He was on the Atlanta campaign, and Burnside's campaign in East Tennessee, and after the battle of Nashville, was taken to Washington, thence to Fort Fisher. He was also present at the capture of Wilmington, and Fort Anderson. After the war he returned to Rockport and resumed his work as a clerk. In 1870 he was appointed mail agent on the Ohio River between Louisville and Evansville, which position he held until 1875. Since that time he has been engaged in farming. October 6, 1874, he wedded Eliza A. Gentry, a daughter of James Gentry, whose sketch appears in this work. By this union he is the father of three children, Lizzie, Emma and George Bradford.

EDWARD M. BURR, grocer, was born June 24, 1829, in Hamilton County, Ohio, and is one of five children born to William P. and Cynthia (Brown) Burr. The father, a native of Long Island, moved to the vicinity of North Bend, Ohio, where he married our subject's mother, who died in 1834. Mr. Burr married Lydia Morehead for his second wife, and by her is the father of two living children. The parents yet reside in Ohio in comfortable circumstances. The first settlement made in this country by any of the name of Burr, was by Jehu Burr, who came with Winthrop's celebrated fleet early in 1630. From him there are a great many descendants, among them being soldiers, statesmen, mechanics, preachers, farmers and merchants. Among the most noted of this family is Aaron Burr, a great soldier, a brilliant statesman, and at one time Vice-President of the United States. The immediate subject of this sketch, Edward M. Burr, is directly descended from Jehu Burr, the pioneer, and Aaron Burr. He received but limited educational advantages; was married at twenty-four years of age, and in February, 1853, settled with his wife in Spencer County, Ind. During the late war he served nearly two years in Company F, First Indiana Cavalry, and was then appointed Quartermaster of the Forty-sixth Regiment United States Colored Troops, retaining his position until October, 1864, when he resigned because of ill health. After the war he served two years as " tally boss " for the coal mine of Spear & Co.; then returned to farming. In 1874 he removed to Rockport, where he has since resided, engaged in the grocery trade. Mr. Burr is a Republican, and a member of the G. A. R. He married Frances B. Richey, August l-4, 1853, and by her is the father of five children: Edward, William C., Bessie, Robert A. and Frank. The parents belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

FREDERICK BUTLER, a native of Perry County, Ind., and one of the progressive and well-to-do farmers of Ohio Township, was born August 6, 1858, and is one in a family of three sons and five daughters born to the marriage of George W. Butler and Linda Thresher, both of whom were natives of Indiana. George W. Butler followed farming as an occupation, first beginning business for himself in Perry County. About the year 1860 he moved to Spencer County, and purchasing 260 acres of land on Section 7, in Hammond Township, resided thereon until his death, which occurred in May, 1879. Mrs. Butler died in October, 1878. The subject of this sketch, Frederick Butler, was raised by his parents to manhood, and April 4, 1880, united in marriage with Emma Biggs, a native of Missouri, and by her is the father of three children, named Bertha, Leslie and Christopher. In 1883 Mr. Butler purchased ninety-two acres of land in Section 7 of Hammond Township, and 110 acres in Ohio Township, where he now lives. He is one of the intelligent and enterprising young men of the county, is a Republican in politics and a first-class citizen.

JAMES M. DAILEY, M. D., is a native of Breckenridge County, Ky., born March 8, 1842, a son of John H. and Elizabeth (Glasscock) Dailey. (See sketch of Dr. T. G. Dailey, of Boonville.) Our subject was raised on the home farm in his native State, and after attending the common schools was a student at the S. W. Normal College at Lebanon, Ohio, for several terms. He removed to Warrick County, Ind., and on the breaking out of the war enlisted, and was chosen second lieutenant of Company E, One Hundred and Twentieth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, participating in the entire Atlanta campaign. Owing to failing health he resigned his commission in 1864, after having served one year, and returning to Boonville, read medicine with his brother. The term of 1865-66 he attended Rush Medical College at Chicago; then began practicing at Derby, Perry Co., this State. The fall of 1868 he entered the State Medical University of Pennsylvania, which graduated him in 1869. Returning to Indiana he practiced his profession ten years at Richland City, in Spencer County, and since April, 1879, has resided in Rockport, where he has won a large and successful practice. He attended the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati, which granted him a diploma in 1879. Dr. Dailey is a Republican, a member of the Masonic and K. of P. fraternities, is Surgeon of the G. A. Post, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. July 15, 1866, he married Mary F. Whitmarsh, daughter of Dr. Ira Whitmarsh, of Perry County, and five children have been born to them, only two—Thomas M. and Travis L.—now living. The mother belongs to the Catholic Church.

CAPT. JOHN R. DOUGHERTY, a prominent pioneer of Spencer County, was born on the banks of the Ohio River, seven miles below Rockport, September 26, 1824. He is the only surviving member of a family of eight children, born to John and Rebecca (Aikin) Dougherty, natives respectively of Ireland and Scotland. The father, who was a school teacher, married in his native country, and came to America a short time before John R. was born, locating on a farm in this county, where he lived until 1829. He then moved to Rockport, where he taught school and farmed until his death, July 30, 1857. The mother died April 11, 1834. At the age of sixteen the subject of this sketch began fiat-boating between here and New Orleans, which business he continued until 1819. He has since owned and managed a wharf-boat at the lower landing, at which he has been fairly successful, having dealt extensively in grain and produce. He now owns considerable property in the town and township, in addition to the building and business of the lower landing. November 10, 1873, he married Rose (Knott) Davis, a native of Daviess County, Ky. They have no children, but have reared two orphan girls. In politics Capt. Dougherty is a stanch Republican, has served a number of terms in the Town Council, is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is one of Spencer County's most enterprising citizens. He has paid considerable attention to gathering relics, and has a valuable collection of arrow-heads, hatchets, and other instruments made by the Mound-Builders.

CHAMPION EDWARDS is a native of Grayson County, Ky., born January 19, 1838. He is one of a family of thirteen children born to Jackson and Elizabeth (Decker) Edwards, also natives of Grayson County, where they lived until they came to this county in 1862. The father is still living on a farm in Hammond Township. The mother died in September, 1859, and the father married Mrs. Mary Parsons, in the following December. Champion Edwards grew to manhood in his native county, receiving only a limited education. November 22, 1859, he married Elvira L. Gilmore, a native of Crawford County, Ind. After marriage he followed farming in his native county until 1861, when he enlisted in Company L, Third Kentucky Cavalry, serving thirteen months. In 1862 he removed to Spencer County, and in the spring of 1865 he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving until the close of the war. Since that time he has been engaged in farming in this county. He bought the farm upon which he now resides in 1882, and makes a specialty of dairying. Mr. Edwards is a Republican, a member of the G. A. R. and I. O. O. F., and is an energetic and highly esteemed citizen. His wife is a member of the United Brethren Church. They have two children : Katie B., wife of George M. Barnett, and D. Isabel (deceased).

EDWARD D. EHRMAN, a prominent Homoeopathic physician of the county, is a native of Lexington, Ky., born November 8, 1853, being one of nine children in the family of Christian and Sophia (Withers) Ehrman. The father was born in Wurtemburg, May 26, 1810, and came to America in 1833 with his parents, locating at York, Penn. He studied medicine, and graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College at Philadelphia, previously, however, practicing in Lancaster and Harrisburg, Penn. In 1852 he removed to Lexington, Ky., and a year later to Louisville, where he remained until 1869. In that year he went to St. Louis, and assisted in organizing the Homoeopathic College in that city, in which institution he was Professor of Theory and Practice until 1873. He then returned to Louisville, and remained until the death of his wife in 1882, since which he has resided with Edward, who is engaged in the same profession as his father. He received a fair literary education in the schools of Louisville, and in 1872 began the study of medicine with his father. He afterward attended two courses of lectures at the Homoeopathic Hospital College of Cleveland, Ohio, and received his diploma in 1875. After practicing his profession one year at Hanover, Penn., he in 1876 came to Spencer County, and located at Rockport, where he remained until 1880, when he removed to his farm. He is now managing his farm and attending to a fairly large practice. September 22, 1877, he married Eugenia De Bruler, a native of the county, and a daughter of L. Q. De Bruler. Two sons are the fruits of this union. He is a prominent member of Rockport Lodge, K. of P.

PHILLIP H. FEIGEL, butcher, was born September 2, 1833, in Bavaria, Germany, being the eldest of eight children born to Martin and Barbara (Dietrich) Feigel, both of whom are natives of Germany where the mother died about the year 1849. The father married Mary Rapp a year later, and in 1854 immigrated to the United States, landing at New Orleans, and from there came direct to Rockport, Ind., whece he died in 1855. Phillip H. was reared to manhood in his native country, receiving a good education, and in 1851 leaving friends and relatives behind him he turned his face westward and came to the United States. After beginning the shoe-maker's and blacksmith's trades at Rochester, N. Y., he abandoned them and in 1852 removed to Rockport, Ind, where he worked at brick-making and other manual labor two years. He carried the mail between Rockport and Evansville thirteen months, then followed teaming three years. In 1860 he engaged in the manufacture of brick which he has ever since continued, In 1884 he opened a meat market which he conducts in connection with his other pursuits and in both he has made a success. Mr. Feigel is a Republican and has served two terms in the Town Council. In 1858 he wedded Caroline Klinck, a native of Germany who has borne him eight children, these three yet living : Mary, Carrie and Phillip H. The mother is a member of the Evangelical Church and Mr. Feigel is one of the progressive, intelligent business men of the county.

GEORGE ADAM FEIGEL (deceased), son of Martin Feigel, was born in Bavaria, February 26, 1835, (see sketch of Phillip H. Feigel.) He came to the United States with his father, when a youth. He received a fair education in German in. his native country, and in English after coming to America. In 1856 he came to Rockport, and after attending school for three years he taught in the schools of the county. He afterward engaged in the grocery business until 1872, when he opened the hotel which he conducted until his death, March 30, 1885. April 19, 1868, he married Julia Hamson, a native of Daviess County, Ky, who, with four children still survive him. He was a successful business man, and highly respected by the community in which he lived.

JOHN FEIGEL, liveryman, is a native of Bavaria, Germany, his birth occurring May 8, 1842. He was raised in the town of Balheim where he received a fair knowledge of the common branches of education, and in 1855 immigrated to the United States, locating in Rockport, Indiana, where his parents had previously settled in 1853. He worked on a farm three years, then* in a brickyard and at various other pursuits until 1861, when he espoused the Union cause and was enrolled a volunteer in Company K., Twenty-fifth Indiana Regiment, and served his adopted country faithfully until the war closed. Returning to Rockport, he followed teaming until 1879, with the exception of one year while Constable of Ohio Township. Beginning in 1879, he served as Town Marshal one year, then teamed until 1881, when he embarked in the livery business. In 1883 he built a substantial brick barn, and is well situated in business. From May to November, 1882, during the campaign, he edited the Rockport Journal. He is a stalwart Republican, a member of the G. A. R., and the Encampment of Odd Fellows. In 1864 Barbara Elzer became Mrs. John Feigel, and by him the mother of six children, only the following named now living: William S., Gertrude and John R. The parents belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ROBERT FISHER is a native of Johnstone, Renfrewshire, Scotland, his birth occurring in the month of June, 1822. He is the third in a family of seven children, born to the marriage of Robert Fisher and Marian Cameron, both of whom were natives of Scotland, where they lived and died. The subject of this memoir was reared in his native country, receiving a very limited education, and there followed coal mining, which was also his father's occupation. In 1852 he immigrated to the United States, and for one year mined coal in the collieries of Schuylkill County, Penn. He then mined at Hawesville and Cloverport, Ky., and elsewhere until 1855, when he sought the gold fields of California, and mined gold with reasonable success for three years and a half. In 1860 he came to Spencer County, Ind., and leasing a tract of coal land in Ohio Township, engaged in coal mining until 1872. In partnership he then bought about thirty acres of coal land at Centerville, operating the same until the present time. (For particulars concerning this mine, see Geology of Spencer County.) Mr. Fisher is prosperous and enterprising, and is a stanch Republican in politics. He was married November 5, 1867, to Mahala Shrode, a native of Spencer County, Ind.

HENRY FRANK, a highly-respected farmer of Ohio Township, is a native of Breckenridge County, Ky., born January 12, 1819, being the oldest of eleven children in the family of John and Phebe (Miller) Frank, also natives of Kentucky, where they passed their lives upon a farm. Henry Frank remained at home until he grew to manhood, receiving a limited education in the primitive schools of his day. In 1851 he came to Spencer County and bought a tract of laud on Section 36, Ohio Township, which he cleared and improved. He now owns 233 acres of well improved land, and is a very successful farmer. March 4, 1850, he was joined in marriage with Catharine Wagner, a native of the county, by whom he is the father of eight children. Those living are Harriet A., wife of Caspar Gaker; Theodore, Euphena, wife of Wesley Niles, William S. and Posey. Both Mr. Frank and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are highly esteemed by the community in which they live.

CHARLES W. GABBERT, M. D., born March 29, 1823, is a son of James and Martha L. (Thrasher) Gabbert, who resided in Spencer County, Ind.. about one year, at an early day, but who passed the greater part of their lives in Kentucky. Raised on a«farm, Dr. Gabbert received but the common schooling in youth, which he afterward bettered by a course at Owensboro (Kentucky) Seminary. He afterward taught school for a time, but for one year (1848) read medicine at Lewisport, and then took a course of lectures at the Medical Department of the University of Louisville. Until 1861 he practiced medicine at Tobin's Landing, in Perry County, Ind.; then returned to his former place of learning, which graduated him in 1852. From that time to 1864, with but about one year's exception while in Missouri, Dr. Gabbert practiced his profession at Cloversport, Ky.. and from December, 1864, to December, 1884, he was actively engaged in like pursuits at Rockport. Since then, by reason of ill-health, he has been retired from active professional labor. In every respect Dr. Gabbert has made his profession a success. He was a Republican in politics until 1872, since when he has been a Democrat. He was married May 15, 1866, to Mary E. Lightfoot, by whom he is the father of five sons: Melvin L., Russell N., Charles L., Forrest and J. D. (deceased). Dr. Gabbert and wife belong to the Baptist Church.

AURELIUS DEWITT GARLINGHOUSE, of Rockport, is a son of George B. Garlinghouse, a brief sketch of whom is as follows : He was born November 15, 1815, in Ontario County, N. Y., a son of John and Louanna (Bennett) Garlinghouse. In 1818 he immigrated to Switzerland County, Ind., with his parents, the greater portion of the succeeding ten years they resided in Kentucky and Ohio. In 18£9, moved to Vermillion County, this State, and when eighteen years old G. B. completed the erection of a mill owned by his father in return for which, and a sum of money, he was allowed to begin life for himself. He went to Mississippi and made considerable money working on the State House. Returning to Indiana he purchased a tract of land and a team which he presented to his father. Having performed this filial duty he went to Tippecanoe County, learning the tanner's trade, then went to Switzerland County, where he attended school and worked at carpentering until twenty-five years old. At that age he married Isabella J. DeWitt, by whom he became the father of eight children, all living but one, and after this lady's death married Serena Crusan, who bore him four children—all living. Mr. Garlinghouse farmed and worked at other pursuits in Switzerland County until 1866, excepting one year, when he resided in this county, and since then has resided at Mailison, Ind., until his death, which occurred April 14, 1885. A natural mechanic, he devoted considerable attention to inventions, and is the patentee of a hay rake and loader, mowing machine, road scraper, grader and ditcher, the Pittman connection with knife in the Champion Mowing and Reaping Machines, and other useful inventions. On the Pittman connection alone he realized about $10,000. A. D. Garlinghouse, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born in Switzerland County, this State, February 24, 1844, and was raised on a farm in his native county, securing a good education. In 1863 he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving his full term of enlistment, being promoted to sergeant of his company and also serving as company clerk. In 1865 be came to Spencer County, but shortly afterward graduated from Bryant & Stratton's Commercial College of Cincinnati. In company with a brother, George P., he owned and operated a farm in Spencer County until 1867, and the year following embarked in merchandising at Rockport, which occupation he continued successfully until 1879. Since then he has conducted a general agency business at Rockport, but the past year has re-engaged in the drug business which is his favored profession. From 1872 to 1875 he read medicine, and in the latter year attended Miami Medical College of Cincinnati. He has never wholly turned his attention to the practice of medicine, but to some extent has practiced since 1875. From the fall of 1883 to the spring of 1884, he ably edited the Rockport Journal in connection with a partner, and is a stanch Republican in politics, and a member of the F. & A. M. and the G. A. R., and is at present commander of his post. His life throughout has been one of scrupulous integrity, and he is one of the county's ablest, most enterprising and most highly esteemed citizens. He has served in various local positions of honor and trust, but is by no means a chronic office seeker. December 13, 1869, Miss Mary De Bruler, a daughter of the late T. F. De Bruler, became his wife, and by him the mother of two children—Lucy L. and Franklin B. Both parents are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HON. JAMES GENTRY, Sr. The earliest trace known of the Gentry family is found in North Carolina, where James Gentry, father of the subject of this sketch, was born on the Yadkin River in 1779. Nothing is definitely known of his ancestors. At the age of seventeen he left home and went to Barren County, Ky., where he followed farming and hunting, making the latter quite profitable. After some years he removed to Ohio County, Ky., where he married Elizabeth Hornback, the date of which is unknown. From there he moved to Daviess County, Ky., and in April, 1818, located on a tract of land containing over 1,000 acres in Spencer County, Ind., near the present site of Gentryville. He afterward purchased several hundred acres more of land surrounding him. He was remarkable for his energy and industry, and the interest which he took in the welfare of his neighbors, and the community in general. He had eight children : Matthew, who died at his father's home in this county; Agnes, who married Benjamin Romine; Allen (deceased), who married Anna Roby ; Hannah, wife of John Romine ; Joseph, who lives near Lincoln City; Sarah (deceased), who married Madison Hall; Elizabeth (deceased), who married Enoch Lane, and James, who was born near the town bearing his name, February 4, 1819. He was reared on the farm, receiving a very good education. November 7, 1839, he married Elizabeth Montgomery, and has ever since been engaged in farming. He was also for a time in the mercantile business at Gentryville, and is now living on what is known as the old Shackleford farm. He has had six children who arrived at maturity, namely : Allen, Robert, James W., Eliza A. and Mary. (See sketches of Allen, Robert and James W. in this work.) Eliza A. married W. T. Bullock (see sketch); Elizabeth is the wife of Col. James S. Wright (see sketch); Mary is the wife of J. W. Haines. Mr. Gentry is a Democrat and represented this county in the Legislature from 1870 to 1873.

JAMES GENTRY, Jr.. one of the leading farmers of Ohio Township, was born December 18, 1828 in Spencer County, Ind., being the eldest of six sons and five daughters, born to the marriage of Allen Gentry and Anna C. Roby who were natives of Kentucky and North Carolina respectively. In the year 1813, Allen Gentry came with his parents to what is now Spencer County, Ind., and settled near the present site of Gentryville in Jackson Township. He was there reared to manhood, and after his marriage with our subject's mother, removed to Ohio Township, and located the land, a part of which is known as Mt. Pleasant and Gentry's addition to the town of Rockport. He followed farming, merchandising and flat-boating throughout life, was prominently connected with the early prosperity of the county, having served as Commissioner several years, and at one time was the owner of some 1,500 acres of land.
He was an honest man, a kind neighbor, and loving husband and father He died September 24, 1862, followed by his widow January 21, 1883* James Gentry Jr., the immediate subject of this biography, received a limited education in youth, and selecting farming as his vocation in life has steadily followed that occupation successfully, in connection with other pursuits at various times, and now owns over 200 acres of valuable land, besides other property. January 6, 1859, he married Ann Haines, daughter of Garrett Haines, who died January 10. 1881, after bearing her husband a family of seven children: Caddie A. (deceased), Anna Belle, James A., Ida. E., Ollie, Edwin W., and Frederick W. Mr. Gentry is one of the well known and highly esteemed men of Spencer County and is a Democrat in politics.

ABSALOM R. GENTRY, one of the children of Allen and Anna C. (Roby) Gentry, appropriate mention of whom is made in the biography of James Gentry Jr., is a native of the county in which he yet resides, his birth occurring September 7, 1830. He assisted his parents on the old home farm near Rockport during his boyhood, and secured only such education as was afforded by the common schools. February 10, 1853, he united in matrimony with Eliza M. Snyder, a native of this county, by whom he is the father of eight children: Anna E., Lewis Allen, Hannah P., Elmer Grant, Absalom R., Rose M., Mary E. and Jay Gould. Mr. Gentry has made a success of farming, now owning 100 acres of nicely improved land where he resides, 160 acres in various other portions of this township, several lots in the town of Rockport and 360 acres of good land about sixty miles from St. Louis, in Missouri. For fifteen years beginning in 1866, Mr. Gentry merchandised in Rockport, and followed flat-boating and operating a wharf-boat on the Ohio River. H# is a Democrat in politics, was a strong Union man during the war, and he and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

CAPT. ALLEN GENTRY, son of Hon. James Gentry Sr., a sketch of whom precedes this, was born March 3,1842, and is the eldest of his father's family. His birth occurring near the town of Gentryville, which was named in honor of his grandfather James Gentry, he was there raised on the farm, and in youth received a good common school education. On the breaking out of the Rebellion in 1861, he volunteered his services in his country's cause, and October 21 of that year became a private in Company fl, Forty-second Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served three years and three months. After the battle of Murfreesboro he was commissioned a second lieutenant serving as such until after Chickamauga, when he was promoted captain of his company. After being mustered out with his company and regiment, Capt. Gentry returned to his native county and engaged in farming. May 20, 18^0, Cordelia Wilkenson became his wife, and together they lived happily on his nicely improved farm of 200 acres. As a Democrat, Mr. Gentry was elected by his party in 1879 as sheriff of the county, and creditably filled the requirements of that office. He is one of the county's best citizens.

ROBERT M. GENTRY, a son of the Hon. James Gentry, Sr., whose biography precedes this, is a native of Spencer County, Ind. His birth occurring November 16, 1844, in Jackson Township. He assisted his parents on the home farm until he attained his majority, and then began farming on his own responsibility. The year following he moved to Ohio Township, and located a tract of land in Section 7, which he cleared and improved, and where he has since resided. He owns 255 acres of excellent land and one of the best country residences in the county. Mr. Gentry was married March 8, 1868, to Anna Lamar, a native of this county and daughter of Allen Lamar, a prominent pioneer of Spencer County. Three children have been born to their union, and are named Ada, Lida and Bobbie. Mrs. Gentry is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while Mr. Gentry is a Democrat in politics, an active worker in the interests of his party, and an enterprising and highly respected citizen of the county.

JAMES W. GENTRY, a prominent farmer and stock-dealer of Ohio Township, was born in Jackson Township, Spencer County, Ind., May 29, 1848, and is a son of the Hon. James Gentry, Sr., appropriate mention of whom is made elsewhere herein. After receiving a good practical education in youth, James W. taught school one year, and at the age of twenty years began farming for himself on his father's land, where he remained several years. The spring of 1877, he moved upon the farm where he now resides, three miles above Rockport, on the river, and where he owns 306 acres of good land, 200 acres being under cultivation. Like the majority of those who compose the Gentry family, he is a Democrat in politics, firmly believing in the principles and aims of that organization. He takes considerable pride in farming and dealing in stock, outside of the lucrative returns it brings him, and in this respect he is a decided success. Mr. Gentry selected for his wife, Miss Sarah Littlepage, a native of this county, and to their marriage, which occurred March 11, 1875, three children have been born to them as follows: Dell F., Helen and James B.

LUMAN S. GILKEY, Rockport's worthy postmaster, was born November 12, 1820, in Hamilton County, Ohio, and is the eldest of a large family born to Ebenezer and Elizabeth (Liggett) Gilkey. A brief biography of Ebenezer Gilkey is as follows : A native of Maine, he emigrated to Ohio in 1816, and was offered employment in the construction of the old court house in Cincinnati, at $1 per day. one-half to be paid in cash and the balance in quarter-acre lots, situated now in the heart of the city, and then valued at $100 per lot. Considering the lots worthless he refused the terms offered and settled on a farm in the county, in addition to the care of which he worked sit carpentering. Here he married, and his death occurred in 1854. His widow afterward moved with a married daughter to Gasconade County, Mo., where she died about the year 1875. Luman S. Gilkey was reared to manhood in his native county, and at nineteen years of age moved to Butler County, there learning the cooper's trade. He afterward worked at carpentering in Cincinnati and vicinity until the fall of 1851, when he came to Rockport, Ind., and began working at his trade of carpentering. About a year later he was assailed with malarial fevers, and for four years suffered considerable with its ravages, which greatly impaired his sight. Recovering, he read law for a time, and in 1856 was elected Justice of the Peace, serving four years as such, and one year as Constable. From 1861 to 1866, he was Rockport's postmaster; was deposed by President Johnson and reappointed in 1869, since when he has ever occupied that position, filling the requirements of the office to the entire satisfaction of all concerned. Mr. Gilkey has but one living son—Samuel C., a resident of Hamilton County, Ind. Ho is a stanch Republican, a Freemason, and one of the county's most worthy citizens.

JAMES R. GILLETT, one of Rockport's most enterprising and energetic business men, is a native of Marshall County, Ill., his birth occurring July 31, 1854. Isaac Gillett, his father, was born in Steuben County, N. Y., December 12, 1824, being one in a family of eleven children born to Michael and Laura (Mix) Gillett, both natives of Connecticut. In 1836, Isaac moved with his parents to Michigan, where he learned brick making, which was his occupation until 1850. In 1848 he married Lucy Miner who died in 1852, after bearing two children, Jasper and Elmira. In 1850 he engaged in the grocery business at Henry, Ill., but in 1854 came to Rockport, and the spring following again engaged in the grocery business which he has successfully continued to the present time. In 1853 he married for his second wife Mrs. Eliza (Bullock) Shackleford, a lady who has borne him two sons and one daughter: James R., Thomas C. and Anna L. The oldest of these, James R. Gillett, is the immediate subject of this sketch. He was raised and educated in the town of Rockport, and in 1869 became a partner of his father in the grocery business, and this is one of the strongest and most successful mercantile houses in Rockport. In January, 1877, he married Rosa, daughter of John F. Richardson, and Lillie B. and Carrie are the names of his two children. Mr. Gillett is a Republican in politics; a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. fraternities and Mrs. Gillett belongs to the Presbyterian Church.

HON. JOHN W. GRAHAM (deceased) was born March 11,1791, in Nelson County, Ky., and was a soldier of the war of 1812. July 12, 1817, he wedded Mary Duncan, and two years later he and wife removed to Spencer County, Ind., Mr. Graham joining the Methodist Episcopal Church the year following his settlement here. Of an uncommonly well balanced mind and of excellent judgment, he soon became one of the foremost men of the county, and his views and opinions were often sought far and near. He was elected to the Lower House of the State Legislature from Spencer County, and for about fourteen years was an Associate Judge of this circuit. He was never known to have done a dishonorable act, and his intercourse with neighbors and acquaintances was one of harmony and happiness. On first coming to the county he farmed in Ohio Township, but later removed to Rockport and for a number of years was engaged in mercantile pursuits. An earnest worker in the cause of Christianity, he died in the Methodist Episcopal faith February 20, 1855, honored and respected by all who knew him.

JOHN W. GRAHAM, of the firm of Wesseler & Graham, was born in Rockport, Ind., March 24, 1860, the youngest of four children born to Robert and Sophia (Stocking) Graham. He is a grandson of Judge John W. Graham, whose biography precedes this. Robert Graham was born in this county and always made it his home. For about twenty-five years he was in partnership with his brother, Samuel D., in mercantile pursuits in Rockport, and he was one of the county's best citizens. He died July 8, 1874, preceded by his widow, October 13, 1872. The subject of this sketch was raised by his parents and educated in the schools of Rockport and Evansville. After his father's death, he lived with his uncle, Samuel D., and for a time sold papers, and later opened a news stand. This, in 1882, he merged into the present business conducted by himself and partner, and together they do a good business.

SAMUEL D. GRAHAM, well known as a pioneer merchant of Rockport, was born in Spencer County, Ind., March 10, 1823. and is the fourth in a family of six sons and four daughters, born to the marriage of John W. Graham and Mary Duncan, appropriate remarks of whom is made elsewhere herein. Samuel D. received his youthful education from the subscription schools of that early day and, while a young man, made hunting an. occupation, deer, turkey, otter, wolves and other wild animals abounding. At thirty years of age he began dealing in clothing, boots and shoes, etc., in Rockport, which occupation he continued for about a quarter of a century, and since that time has been as much retired from active business pursuits as is possible for a man of his energy to be. He has made life a decided success, and although by no means rich, he owns 200 acres of valuable land in the county, and a good business house and residence in Rockport. Mr. Graham, in politics, is a firm supporter of the principles of the Republican party, his father before him having been a Whig. He has served in the Town Council, several terms, and in public as well as private life, his character has been above reproach. April 14,1859, he wedded Julia Huncilman, a native of Floyd County, Ind., and to their union two children have been born: Elizabeth, now a young lady, and a son that died in infancy unnamed. Mrs. Graham and daughter are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JAMES GRAHAM, one of the well known men of Spencer County, and at present engaged in the livery business at Rockport, is a native of the county in which he now resides, his birth occurring October 6, 1832. He is a son of Hon. John W. Graham (deceased), appropriate mention of whom precedes this. When a small boy James removed with his parents to Rockport, receiving at this place such education as was afforded by the town schools. He farmed and engaged in teaming until about the close of the war, when he engaged in the livery business, which he has ever since continued. Mr. Graham is a stanch Republican in politics, an enterprising and esteemed citizen, and his wife belongs to the Christian Church. August 9,1876, Eliza C. Hardesty became Mrs. James Graham, and to this marriage one son has b en born, named Richard H.

JAMES S. GREATHOUSE, a descendant of some of the earliest and most prominent pioneers of Spencer County, was born in the county May 13, 1833. His father, John B. Greathouse was born February 12, 1797, in Kentucky, where he learned the tanner's trade. When about twenty-one years old he came to this county, where he followed his trade in connection with farming the remainder of his life. He died May 2, 1857. Elizabeth Grass, the mother of our subject, was born in Kentucky, December 22, 1803. She was a daughter of Judge Daniel Grass, who came to this county between 1800 and 1805. His parents were murdered and his sisters captured and killed by the Indians in Kentucky. After that occurrence, he lived with William R. Hynes in Nelson County, Ky., and may have come to this section to attend to the possession of that gentleman, who was a large land owner here. Daniel Grass married Jane Smithers, in Daviess County, Ky., and soon after located on land near the present site of Rockport, and later settled on a farm near the line of the township which now bears his name. He was a member of the Indiana Legislature, and Judge of the County Court for a number of years. James S. Greathouse received a limited education in youth, but afterward attended the Rockport school and acquired a good practical education. April 6,1862, he married Catharine W. Scammahorn, a daughter of Rev. Jacob Scammahorn, a United Brethren preacher, who came to the county in 1850. This union has been blessed with five children: John F., James V., Tina M., Nellie D. and Jacob S. Mr. Greathouse is a stanch Republican, a member of the Royal Arch Degree of the Masonic fraternity, and is one of the most enterprising and highly esteemed citizens of the county.

FRANCIS M. HACKLEMAN, M. D., a native of the county in which he now resides, was born May 30, 1844. His grandparents removed to Grass Township, Spencer Co., Ind., in November, 1819, and on the 23d of December of the same year Absalom Hackleman, our subject's father, was born. Absalom Hackleman was a farmer by occupation, and was one of the foremost men in the county during his day. A man of sound judgment and proper discretion, he was often called upon to officiate in some capacity of honor and trust, and for twelve or fifteen years was a commissioner of the county. He married Lucetta McCarnish, who bore him ten children, and in 1884 he and wife moved to Indian Territory, where they lately resided. The father, who was afflicted with cancer of the face, died in Grass Township at the residence of his son, William R., March 18, 1885, being here on a business trip from his home in the Indian Territory. The subject of this sketch received a good common school education, and at twenty years of age began the study of medicine with Dr. R. Peregrine, of Centerville, this county, afterward taking a course of lectures at the E. M. Institute in Cincinnati. He first began j-racticing at Centerville, remaining there until 1878, and in the meantime, 1870, returning to Cincinnati, and graduating from his old alma mater. In 1878 he removed to Rockport, where he ranks among the best physicians. He is a Democrat, a member of the I. O. O. F., is secretary of the County Board of Health, and belongs to the National E. M. Association. He was married December 5, 1866, to Lucy A. E. Smith, a native of Rockport, who bore him nine children, these five yet living: Clement L., Bertha, Gertrude, Frederick W. and Blanche. The mother died February 12, 1885, leaving a record to her bereaved family of a well-spent Christian life. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

FREDERICK C. HAHN, jeweler, of the firm of F. C. Hahn & Co., of Rockport, was born in Troy, Perry Co., Ind., November 19, 1859, a son of Frederick C. and Elizabeth (Baum) Hahn, who were both natives of Germany. These parents were married in their native country, and about the year 1852 immigrated to the United States and settled in the town of our subject's birth. Here the father died in 1870, after living an honest, upright life, followed by his widow one year later. Frederick C. Halin, the immediate subject of this memoir, was raised by his parents in Troy, receiving only such education as the public schools afforded. For a time he was employed as clerk in a dry goods store, but in 1875 came to Rockport and clerked in the hardware and other business until 1878, when he went into the jewelry store of Louis J. Heid. August 1, 1882, the store passed into the hands of the present managers, who have since conducted the business with more than ordinary success. Mr. Hahn, at the head of this firm has, by his courteous dealings and strict business integrity, made his the leading business of the kind in Rockport. He is a Democrat, a member of the German Lutheran Church, and is one of the rising young men of the county. Later.—Since writing the above, Mr. Hahn has died June 17, 1885, of congestion of the brain. He had so won the confidence of the community, and had so endeared himself by noble ties to the young people of the town, that his untimely death cast a gloom over the entire place. He was to have been married in a few weeks to a beautiful girl of Rockport, upon whose young heart in the morning of life is cast the shadow of deep disappointment and sorrow.

WILLIS HAINES, one of the foremost citizens of Ohio Township, and a leading farmer of the county, was born March 7, 1828, in Carroll County, Ky. He is the second of nine children born to his parents, who were Garrett and Nancy (Chadwell) Haines, natives respectively of Kentucky and Virginia. The father was born in the same county as the son, in the year 1800, on the 13th of September. In 1847 with his family he came to Spencer County, and located on the farm now owned by John G. Haines. From 1824 to 1844 he followed flat-boating. In his business engagements he was nearly always successful, and at the date of his death, May 12, 1852, he owned considerable property and was esteemed as an upright man. The mother's birth was in Culpepper County, Va., in 1803, and her death occurred February 24. 1863, at the homestead in this county. Willis Haines was raised with his father's family in his native State, receiving but a limited education, although he much improved in later years by industrious study and reading. He followed farming and flat-boating with his father until he was of age. In the spring before his father's death he bought a small farm, upon which he moved and has ever since resided. He has engaged in farming and boating on the river with good success, but since 1873 has not followed the latter occupation. He owns 215 acres of good land in the county, and has besides this given each of his married children a good start in life. Ever since the organization of the Republican party he has been identified with it, and one of the warmest advocates of its principles. During the Rebellion he held strong sympathies with the Union, and was an ardent supporter of its cause. Official honors he has never courted, but in 1878 he consented to be a candidate for County Commissioner, and at the election ran ahead of his ticket, being defeated by only forty-four votes. Mary B. Gentry became his wife January 27, 1853. She is a daughter of Allen Gentry, whose name appears elsewhere in this volume. Of their eight children these six are now living: James A.. Addie (Brown), Josiah, Ella, John and Livingston. Both father and mother are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are highly respected by all who know them.

JOHN G. HAINES, a native of Carroll County, Ky., was born May 9, 1830. At the age of seventeen he came to Spencer County with his parents, and worked on his father's farm until the latter's death. He then worked the farm with his brother, and followed flat-boating for a number of years. In the summer of 1877 he built a handsome dwelling in the suburbs of Rockport, where he has since lived, but still retains possession of his farm. Mr. Haines has been quite successful in financial matters, and is one of the substantial men of the town. He takes an active interest in politics and belongs to the Republican party. His parents, Garrett and Nancy (Chadwell) Haines were natives of Kentucky. (See sketch of Willis Haines.) In October, 1865, he was united in marriage with Louisa Gentry, who died fourteen months later. March 20, 1866, he married Margaret R. Payne, a daughter of Benjamin Payne, by whom he is the father of two children—Pearl and Theresa. Mr. Haines and daughters are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His wife is a Presbyterian.

CHARLES W. HALBRUGE, of the firm of T. J. Taylor k Co., is a native of Baltimore, Md., his birth occurring May 30, 1853. He is the eldest of four living children born to the marriage of Charles H. Halbruge and Ursula B. Reichel, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father immigrated to America in 1845, locating in the city of Baltimore, where he learned the shoe-maker's trade, and where he continued to reside until 1864, when he came to Rockport, Ind., where he has since resided engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes. The subject of this sketch lived in Baltimore with his parents and with them removed to Rockport. He received a fair education, and at thirteen years of age began his career in the dry goods business as clerk. In 1874 he became a partner in the firm of T. J. Taylor & Co., but in 1879 the partnership was dissolved by limitation, Mr. Halbruge, however, continuing as clerk until 1882, when he again became a member of the firm of T. J. Taylor & Co., which has continued to the present time. He is a Democrat in politics, a charter member of the K. of P. and is one of Rockport's most enterprising and energetic young men.

BAILEY W. HAMILTON, Trustee of Ohio Township, was born December 10, 1837, in Spencer County, Ind., and is the fourth of eight children born to Barney and Margaret (Frank) Hamilton. He was reared to manhood in his native county, and in early years received the common district schooling. At twenty years of age he left home and for two or three years he worked as a farm hand in the neighborhood. He then took possession of his share of the estate bequeathed him by his father and has since resided thereon actively engaged in agricultural pursuits at which he has been fairly successful. October 8,1862, when rebellion was threatening the overthrow of our country, he enlisted in Company A, Twenty-eighth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served faithfully until June 22, 1865, when he was honorably mustered out of the service. He participated in the engagements at Helena, Ark., Little Rock, and Oakland, Miss., and various other battles. As a Republican in politics he was elected Trustee of his township in 1884, and is now the efficient and obliging principal of that office. Mr. Hamilton is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of P. and G. A. It. fraternities, and himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. In January, 1860, he married Susan H. Iglehart and by her is the father of eleven children, nine of whom are yet living, named: F. Wallace, James A.. Mary L., Louis Frank, Calvin, Eula, Grant, Katie and Ida.

WILLIAM W. HAMILTON, one of the oldest native residents of the county was born June 29, 1829. The family of Hugh and Maria A. (Wright) Hamilton, of which he is a member consisted of fifteen children, seven of whom are now living. The father came to this county from Kentucky in 1809, and worked on the home farm until his marriage. He then farmed on the river below the homestead until 1840, when he settled on land near the present site of Oak Grove Church. Here ho raised his large family, undergoing all the hardships of those early times. He was known as a successful farmer, a Christian gentleman and a leading member of the Methodist Church. He was called to his last resting place April 7, 1881, at the advanced age of eighty years. His wife followed him March 2, 1881, at the age of seventy seven. William W. Hamilton remained at home until he was twenty-five years old, when he bought the land where he has since resided. He has been fairly successful in business, and now owns 160 acres of land. March 20, 1855, he married Margaret M. Murphy, who died February 7, 1867. Four of the six children born to this union are living. They are Samuel F., Hugh G., Ada A. and William H. April 6, 1869, he was married to Sarah E. Woodruff, by whom he is the father of four children, three of whom, Christopher G., Fred C. and Ura are living. During the Rebellion Mr. Hamilton served in Company F, One Hundred and Twentieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry from December, 1862 to January, 1865, being engaged in the battles of Kingston, N. C., Franklin, Tenn., and numerous lesser engagements.

CHARLES HAMMOND, a pioneer farmer of Spencer County, is a native of the township which bears his name; born July 19, 1819, being the second of six children in the family of Samuel D. and Sythia (Springston) Hammond. Samuel Hammond came from Maryland with his father and stepmother to this county in 1811, and settled near the present site of Grandview, where the elder Hammond and wife died. Samuel had learned the tanner's trade in his native State, and on arriving here in company with his brother, he opened a tanyard, which he continued in connection with farming until 1847, when he retired from business. He was twice married, his second wife being Elizabeth Wood, who bore him nine children, and who is still living on the farm where her husband died. Charles Hammond received a fair education, and taught school for two or three winters. February 8, 1842, he was joined in marriage with Ann E. Sharp, a daughter of Mathias Sharp, a prominent citizen of the county. After marriage, Mr. Hammond followed farming in Hammond Township until 1873, when he located on the farm where he now resides. He is the father of ten children, only three of whom, Eunice E. (the widow of William Sidwell), Margaret A. (now Mrs. James A. Haines), and James W., are living.

EDWARD P. HARRISON, M. D., of Patronville, is a native of Lewiston, Del.; born January 1, 1845. He is the eldest of nine children in the family of William H. and Catharine L. (Long) Harrison, natives of New Jersey and Delaware respectively. They now reside at Paoli, Orange Co., Ind. Edward P. received his education in the schools of Philadelphia and New Albany, Ind. At the age of thirteen he removed with his parents to Washington County, Ind., where he lived until the war broke out, when he enlisted in Company C, Twenty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving his country faithfully until August 27, 1864, when he was honorably discharged. At the close of the war he went to Paoli, Ind., where his parents then lived, and began the study of medicine with Solomon Dill, a leading physician of the place. In 1866 he began practicing his profession at Hayesville, Dubois Co., Ind., and afterward was located successively in Pike, Gibson and Spencer Counties, coming to the latter county in 1873. He practiced two years at Enterprise, since which he has been at Patronville, where he is postmaster. January 18, 1876, he married Isabel Mackey, a daughter of Mathias Mackey, by whom he is the father of three living children, Ernest C., Virgie L. and Eva M. He also has a son, Harry E., by a former marriage. Dr. Harrison is a member of the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., K. of P., and G. A. R. and himself and wife are members of the Methodist Church.

WESLEY HATFIELD, grocer, is a native of Hamilton County, Ohio; born November 1, 1840, the third in a family of ten children born to Job and Sarah A. (Heath) Hatfield. The father, at present an attorney at Grandview, was born February 6, 1815, near Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was raised, and learned the chair-makers' trade, at which he worked in Newtown for a number of years. About the year 1845, he settled at Rono, Perry County, Ind., where he resided many years, engaged in merchandising, but in 1863 removed to Grandview, where he merchandised until 1868, since when he has engaged in legal pursuits. He has taken an active part in the public affairs of the day, and as a Democrat served as Treasurer of Perry County two terms, as State Representative one term, and as State Senator one term. Wesley Hatfield, the immediate subject of this sketch, passed his early youth in his father's store and attending the neighborhood schools. At sixteen years he began an attendance at the State University, which was discontinued six months later because of ill health. When twenty-four years old he became his father's partner in merchandising, but from 1868 to 1876 was engaged in clerking. During the latter year, he removed to Rockport, and embarked in the grocery and provision trade, at which he has ever since continued, and at which he has an established trade. Mr. Hatfield is among Rockport's most worthy and enterprising citizens, is a Democrat and a member of the Masonic and I. O. 0. F. fraternities. October 31, 1867, he wedded Miss Annie M. Lloyd, by whom he is the father of one son, Clarence L. The mother belongs to the Baptist Church.

WILLIAM H. HARDESTY, editor and proprietor of the Indiana Pocket, is a native of Gallatin County, Ky., born December 29, 1840, the youngest but one of four children born to the marriage of Richard Hardesty and Amelia Rudd. In 1856 the father removed from Kentucky to Missouri, and there engaged in merchandising. When Kansas City was in its infancy Richard Hardesty removed to that point, and erected the first business building back from the levee. He has resided there to the present time, and in the combined pursuits of farming and merchandising has amassed a comfortable fortune. Our subject's mother dying about the year 1843, his father several years afterward married Jane Peak, by whom he became the father of four children, only two of whom are now living. William H. Hardesty passed his youth with his parents in his native county, receiving such education as only the common schools afforded. In 1857 he went to Kansas City, clerking in his father's store a year and in a drug store until 1860, when he went to Denver, Col., with the tide of gold hunters drifting to that place. Shortly thereafter he returned to Kansas City, and until the breaking out of the war traveled through the South. From Memphis, Tenn., he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, as a Southern refugee, and enlisting in Company I, First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, served his country faithfully three years through hard fought battles and campaigns, being twice slightly wounded, and was then honorably discharged, wearing a sergeant's chevrons. After the war he was engaged in merchandising at Jeffersonville, Ind., a short time, and for a number of years thereafter ran a sleeping car between Louisville and New Orleans, on what was called the " Rip Van Winkle Line." He then merchandised in Kentucky until the spring of 1877, when he came to Rockport, Ind., which has since been his home. For the last seven years he has been very closely connected with the business interests of the place, and is at present operating one of the best drug stores of Rockport, in addition to looking after the best interests of the Pocket. In politics he is a Republican, and an active, influential worker in the interests of his party, and a member of the G. A. R. To his marriage with Mollie V. Rush, which was solemnized in , 1868, three children have been born : Rudd, James C. R. and William H. The parents are Christian and Baptist respectively.

THOMAS R. HARDY, a native of Perry County, Ind., was born April 15, 1836, the eldest of five children, only two of whom are now living, born to J. and Eliza B. (Royston) Hardy. The father was born and raised in Bracken County, Ky., and in 1830 removed to Rome, Perry Co., Ind., where he engaged in merchandising, and later conducted a similar business in Stephensport, Ky. He died at that place in 1850. His widow was a native of Maryland, and died at Rockport, Ind., in February, 1883. Our subject was raised to years of maturity by his parents, receiving his education from the common schools and graduating from a business college at Indianapolis. He clerked in his father's store in boyhood, and later engaged in a like occupation at Henderson, Ky. In 1858 he came to Rockport, Ind., and engaged in the grain trade along the Ohio River for a Louisville firm. In 1860 he embarked in the dry goods trade here, and has been actively engaged in that business and dealing in tobacco, grain and general produce to the present time. In these combined pursuits he has been very successful, and as he began life a poor boy he can justly be considered a self-made man. In 1855 Mr. Hardy married Kate Semonin, by whom he is the father of one son. In 1858 he was left a widower, and the year following united in marriage with Jennie Ellis, and to their union have been born three children, named Thomas R., Harry E. and Annie P. In politics Mr. Hardy has been a Republican since the war, and is at present president of the Citizen's Bank of Rockport. Mrs. Hardy is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

JAY HARDY, one of Rockport's leading dry goods merchants, was born in Henderson County, Ky., June 19, 1855, being the only issue to the marriage of T. R. Hardy and Kate Semonin. After his mother's death, when he was yet an infant. Jay lived with his grandmother in Kentucky until the age of eight years, when he came to Rockport to live with his father. He was here educated, and when fifteen years old began clerking in his father's store. On attaining his majority he embarked in the dry goods, clothing and gentleman's furnishing trade in Rockport, continuing the same until 1877, when he began a similar business at Carmi, White Co., Ill. Three years later he returned to Rockport, Ind., and assumed the management of his father's store, in which occupation he has continued to the present time. In 1884 he accepted the position of secretary and treasurer of the Rockport Knitting Factory, and is filling that position in connection with his other duties. Mr. Hardy is a member of the K. of P. of Rockport. October 16, 1877, he married Sophia B. Ayer, of McLean County, Ky., and Ida M. is the name of their only child.

MATTHEW HIRSCH, manufacturer of Rockport, was born July 9, 1840, in Bavaria, Germany, being one of three sons and two daughters born to Jacob Frederick and Mary Ann (Rose) Hirsch, who were also natives of Germany. In 1847, the family immigrated to the United States, landing at New Orleans, and while on their way up the river to Indiana the father died of cholera, near Vicksburg. Matthew received the greater part of his schooling in the city of Evansville and at seventeen years of age began the blacksmith's trade, at which he worked in Evansville until 1863. He then came to Rockport, and opening a blacksmith shop began working at his trade, which has increased and enlarged to such an extent that he now owns a large building where he manufactures wagons, buggies, carriages, harness, etc., and is doing an extensive business. He is a Democrat, has served as town councilman three terms and president of the same one year. He advocates the advancement of all laudable public enterprises and is an enterprising citizen. From his marriage with Martha Limberger, which occurred May 20, 1867, there are five living children, named Joseph Benjamin, Katie Gertrude, John Henry, Francis Silas and Matthew Edward.

SIMON HONIG, of the firm of Honig, Killian & Co., furniture manufacturers and dealers, is a native of Baden, Germany, born July 28, 1836, a son of Jonas Honig, who was a cabinet-maker in Baden. When six months old, our subject's mother died, and at eleven years of age he was left fatherless. He made his home with a relative and when thirteen years of age began an apprenticeship at the cabinet trade serving two years and a half. May 1, 1852, he landed in New York after an eventful trip from his native country, and for two years worked at his trade in that city. In July, 1854, he came to Rockport, Ind., and in 1860 embarked in the furniture and undertaking business upon his own responsibility. Ten years later the firm of Honig, Killian & Co. was organized, and although a year later they were burned out they immediately rebuilt and have since conducted a large and remunerative business. Mr. Honig was married September 20, 1857, to Miss Mary Killian, a native of Germany, by whom he is the father of ten children, five sons and three daughters now living. Mr. Honig is a Democrat in politics and himself and family belong to the Catholic Church.

DR. OSCAR F. HOWARD, present Circuit Clerk of Spencer County, is a native of Muhlenburgh County, Ky., born February 26, 1849, the youngest but one in a family of ten children born to Nathaniel and Eliza (Fintress) Howard. The father was born and raised in Ohio County, Ky., learned the saddler's trade, and when a young man went to Muhlenburgh County, where he married his wife, being a native of that county, and they both resided until their respective deaths —April, 1865 and March, 1880. Oscar F. was raised in the village of South Carrolton by his parents, receiving a good common school education. He clerked in his native town one year, and in December, 1865, went to Patoka, Ind., where he clerked nearly a year longer. He then took a trip to New Orleans on a flat-boat, returning to his native town in Kentucky in 1867 and beginning the study of medicine. The winter of 1870-71 he attended the Louisville Medical College, than located, at Selvin, Ind., where he practiced his profession until April, 1873, when he located in Rockport as a partner of Dr. W. T. Hougland. The spring of 1874, he removed to Selvin but two years later returned to Rockport and engaged with his father-in-law, Wilmer Hyland, in the grocery and hardware trade. In May, 1884, he sold out, and the fall of that year was elected as a Democrat to the clerkship of Spencer County. In 1880, he was an unsuccessful candidate for the same position. Dr. Howard is a genial, intelligent and enterprising gentleman and a member of the K. of P. January 8, 1874, he wedded Miss Mary M. Hyland and by her is the father of five children, four living named—Bessie, Oscar F., Sallie Bruce and Wilmer W. The parents belong to the Presbyterian Church.

JOHN HOWK, a native of Prussia, came to the United States with his parents in 1850, and located in Kentucky, where he worked on the farm at home until the war, when he enlisted in Company D, Fourth Kentucky Cavalry, serving three years and eight months. Since the war he has followed farming and stock-raising, making a specialty of draft horses, of which he has some very fine specimens. He came to this county in 1872. At the age of thirty he married Lavina E. Deckert, a native of Virginia, who has borne him five sons, three of whom—Joseph L., John J., and George W.—are living. Mr. Howk is a Democrat in politics; is a member of the I. O. O. F., and he and his wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. He was born March 9, 1835, being the only child of Benjamin and Hannah (Miller) Howk. His father, who was a miller by trade, died in Kentucky in 1852, and his mother afterward married Casper Gleichman. Mr. Howk is an enterprising citizen, and has done much to improve the stock of this county.

JOHN M. HUFFMAN, a prominent farmer of Ohio Township, is a native of Spencer County, born June 16, 1844. He is the youngest of five children in the family of Jacob and Catharine Huffman, natives of Kentucky, from which State they came to this county about 1830. When John M. was an infant two or three weeks old his mother died, and four years later his father married Martha Johnson, who still resides on the home farm. Our subject received only an ordinary education, and remained at home until January, 1864, when he enlisted in Company H, Forty-Second Indiana Volunteer Infantry. With his regiment he was in the Atlanta campaign, participating in many of its battles, and went with Sherman on his famous march to the sea. Since the war he has been engaged in farming in this and Grass Townships. He has been very successful as a farmer, and now owns over 270 acres of good land. He is a Democrat in politics, and a warm advocate of the principles of his party. Mr. Huffman was married January 31, 1869, to Mary Rasor, a daughter of County Commissioner James Rasor. They have two children—Grace E., and John A.

WILMER HYLAND, a prominent citizen and early settler of Rockport, was born in Cecil County, Md., November 5, 1820, being the youngest of seven children born to the marriage of Jacob Hyland and Elizabeth Thackery, both of whom were natives of Maryland. The father, a soldier of the war of 1812, always resided in his native State, where he followed farming, fishing and merchandising, in which combined pursuits he was reasonably successful. He died when our subject was a lad of about five years old, followed by his widow in Burlington, N. J., in 1843, while on a visit to friends in New York. Wilmer Hyland was raised in his native county to years of maturity, receiving a good business education. In 1844, he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, with a Polk delegation, and concluding to remain, embarked in the dry goods trade, at which he continued until 1846. He then took a stock of goods to Mundy's Landing, Mercer County, Ky., after selling which he came to Rockport, Ind. He here engaged in the dry goods business until 1852, and from that time to May 14,1884, dealt in hardware, groceries, wooden and willow-ware, and seeds. Mr. Hyland has been an enterprising citizen and a successful merchant. In politics Mr. Hyland is a Democrat. He now owns 400 acres of good land in the county, besides valuable property in Rockport. June 29, 1853, he united in matrimony with Mary S. Mears, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, and by her is the father of four children, three yet living: Mary M., Kate A., and Wilmer.

WILLIAM JACOBS, a native of Prussia, was born March 11, 1834, a son of George and Mary (Kramer) Jacobs, who were natives of Germany. The father was a miller by trade, an occupation he followed in the old country until his death in 1847. Our subject was raised in Germany, receiving in youth such education as the compulsory attendance at the common schools afforded. After the father's death, he assisted in the care of the family, residing on a small farm, and in 1854, immigrated with them to the United States. They purchased a farm in Grass Township, Spencer Co., Ind., where Jacob was engaged in agricultural pursuits some six or seven years. He then embarked in general merchandising at Centerville, is Grass Township, continuing there with considerable success until 1870, when he was honored by an election to the office of Treasurer of Spencer County. So faithfully and efficiently did he administer to the duties of this office that after two years he was re-elected, serving in all four years. Since that time he has officiated as deputy treasurer for almost every treasurer elected and is now serving in that capacity. He owns a good farm in Clay Township, besides other property ; is a Democrat in politics and him-self and family belong to the German Luthern Church. He was married February 2, 1862, to Catharine Bender, of German descent, and by her is the father of four children, named Mary, Caroline, Henry and Emilie.

JOHN JAMES, one of the prominent old citizens of Spencer County, was born December 28, 1808, in South Wales, being the eldest of seven children born to James and Catharine (Howell) James, who were also natives of Wales where they lived and died. John James was reared in his native country and was liberally educated in Welsh and English. Learning the woolen manufacturer's trade, which was his father's occupation, he continued that in Wales until twenty-three years old, when he immigrated to the United States, landing at Quebec, and until the Canada rebellion broke out, resided near the city of Detroit. Then moving to New York, he worked as a machinist that point, Pittsburgh, Zanesville, and New Albany, and then moved to Harrison County, Ind. In 1852, he went to Cannelton, this State, and about 1869, moved on a farm in Hull Township, this county. In 1868 Mr. James and son, Samuel T., engaged in running a line of packets between Evansville and Cincinnati, at which they were very successful. In 1874 he moved to Rockport, where he has since continued to reside, retired from active labor and at peace with all mankind. Mr. James has met with many reverses in life, but indomitable pluck and energy has always brought him through with a general favorable result. He and his sons at present own 1,400 acres of land besides other valuable property. Of the ten children born to his marriage with Margaret Jones, a native of North Wales, which occurred August 12, 1835, these six are yet living: John W., Samuel T., Hannah M., Benjamin E., Alice and Hiram Franklin. Mr. James is a man of sterling honesty and integrity, is a Sir Knight in Masonry and he and wife are members of the Old School Presbyterian Church.

HON. CALVIN JONES, editor and proprietor of the Rockport Democrat, was born May 25, 1821. in Daviess County, Ky., being the eldest of two surviving members of a family of six sons and five daughters born to the marriage of James Jones and Rebecca Kirk, both of whom were natives of North Carolina, where they were raised and married. Previous to 1820 these parents removed to a farm in Daviess County, Ky., with their family, but in 1827 or 1828 came to Ohio Township, Spencer Co., Ind., locating on a farm two miles south of Rockport, now owned by Sheriff E. M. Payne. The father resided on this place engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1847. He was well and favorably known throughout this region, and was identified with the early prosperity of the county, having served as county commissioner, and in other positions of trust. The mother died in Rockport in 1860. Calvin Jones, the immediate subject of this biography, was raised in Spencer County, receiving but a meager education at subscription schools. He was engaged in farming until 1850, then he went South with corn, horses and cattle to New Orleans, which he disposed of to a good advantage. The spring of 1851 he settled at Rockport, and for two years clerked, then opened a family grocery establishment on a small scale. In 1855 he began his journalistic career by assisting R. S. Hicks in establishing the Rockport Democrat, and two years later purchased the paper, although still retaining Mr. Hicks as editor for about five years. Since that time he has conducted the Democrat with ability and success. In 1858 he was elected by his party to the State Legislature, serving in the called session of that year and the regular session of 1859. Mr. Jones is at present wholly engrossed in the management of the Democrat, being ably assisted by his three youngest sons who are efficient compositors and newspaper men. He was married July 23, 1850, to Susan Caroline Cavin, a native of the same county as himself, and by her is the father of five living children: Franklin G., McClellan, Royal S., Thomas L. and Mattie C., now Mrs. M. N. Cortner, of Terre Haute.

JAMES A. JONES, foreman of P. & J. H. Hamilton's tobacco stemmery, of Rockport, was born February 19, 1844, in Spencer County, Ind., being the youngest of two children, born to Atlas and Mary (Hevern) Jones, who were natives of North Carolina and Ohio respectively. The father came to this county when a boy with his parents, was here married, and followed farming until his death in 1846. The mother still survives, and resides with our subject. James A. was reared to man's estate in his native county, and at seventeen years of age began farming in this county, on the old Lincoln farm. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, Twenty-eighth Regiment, First Indiana Cavalry, and serving through the battles of Helena, Pine Bluff, Little Rock and other engagements, was honorably discharged July 5, 1865. Returning to Rockport he followed house painting a number of years, together with working in the stemmery. In 1875 he was made foreman of the factory, which position he has ably and efficiently filled to the present time. Mr. Jones is a Democrat, has served as town councilman two terms, and is a member of the K. of P. Four children have been born to his marriage, with Ary Snyder, which occurred September 19, 1867, and are named Lydia, Belle, Bunnie and Jamie.

CONRAD KEHRER, of the firm Vogel & Kehrer, retail liquor dealers, of Rockport, is a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, born August 7, 1848, being the youngest of a family of four children. When Conrad was about four years old his father died, and his mother married again. A few years later he came with his mother to America, and settled on a farm in Grass Township, this county. From that time, until 1873, he followed various occupations, as working on the farm, clerking in the store, flat-boating on the rivers, etc. In 1873 he engaged in his present business with James Doyle, who the following year sold his interest to Conrad Vogel. Mr. Kehrer has been fairly successful, and is the owner of considerable property in Rockport. He and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church. He was married May 16, 1874, to Caroline Mohr, a native of Warrick County, Ind, who has borne him seven children, six of who are living, namely : Henry A., Daniel G., John A., Caroline B., Eva M. and Christian F., the last two being twins.

HON. ROBERT KERCHEVAL, born in Campbell County, Ky., April 3, 1824, was married January 21, 1847, to Anna M. Silverthorn, a native of Virginia, and in 1853 came to Spencer County, Ind., and for about four years was engaged in school teaching. Previous to coming to Indiana he served a three years' apprenticeship at blacksmithing, and also worked at that trade in his native State. In 1857 he was elected Justice of the Peace for Hammond Township, this county, and in 1861 was appointed route mail agent on the Ohio River, and also United States Secretary for all government goods shipped on the river between Evansville and Cairo. In 1864 and in 1866 he was elected Treasurer of Spencer County, and 1869 was elected to the Lower House of the State Legislature. In 1869 he helped organize the Rockport Banking Company, and was also identified with other public and private enterprises. Four of the seven children born to his marriage are yet living : Samuel E., Lavenia A., Mary Alice and Maria W. Mr. Kercheval is one of five sons and nine daughters born to James and Ann (Dicken) Kercheval, both of whom were natives of the Old Dominion.

JOHN KERR, a prominent farmer of Ohio Township, was born on the farm where he now resides, May 21, 1843. He is the third of seven children born to George and Jane H. (Johnson) Kerr, both natives of Scotland. The father, born May 11, 1809, was reared in his native country and learned the carpenter's trade. In 1831 he came to America and worked for a number of years at Cincinnati, and in Butler County, Ohio. He returned to Scotland, was married, and brought his wife to Ohio, thence in 1842 to Spencer County, where he had entered a tract of land three years previous. The remainder of his life was passed upon this farm, which he cleared and improved. He died August 21, 1858. His wife survived him until October 19, 1874. John Kerr was reared at home, receiving an ordinary education for the times. September 17, 1867, he wedded Nancy H. White, a native of Perry County, Penn. After marriage he conducted his father's farm, which came into his possession at the latter's death. He now has one of the best improved farms in the county. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic party, is a member of the Encampment of the I. O. O. F., and both he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which he is an Elder.

WILLIAM Y. KINCAID, an enterprising farmer of Ohio Township, is a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, born October 10, 1837. He came to Spencer County with his parents in 1853, and was brought up to hard work on the farm. After marriage he followed the carpenter's trade in connection to his farm work. Up to 1882 he lived on Section 1. In that year he bought the farm of 200 acres where he now resides. March 8, 1863, he wedded Mary F. Stillwell, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, by whom he is the father of four living children, Clara A. Charles C., Willis B. and Claude A. Mr. Kincaid is one of a family of ten children born to James and Frances (Yauney) Kincaid, natives of Virginia and Switzerland respectively. The father located in Hamilton County, Ohio, about 1820, where he married his wife, and followed farming until he came to this county. His death occurred November 9, 1862. He was a member of the United Brethren Church, and was known as an honest, upright citizen. His wife preceded him to the grave two years, having died November 11. 1860.

JESSE W. KINCHELOE, the only living representative in a family of seven children born to the marriage of Allen L. Kincheloe and Susan Marlay, was born March 5, 1841, in Meade County, Ky., his parents also being natives of that State. Allen L. Kincheloe was raised in Breckenridge County, and prepared himself for the teacher's profession, which was his life's occupation. About the year 1835 he came to Spencer County, Ind., and began teaching in the public schools of the county, and later, for years, had charge of the schools of Rockport. He was recognized as one of the ablest educators of the day in southern Indiana, and for many terms occupied the position of superintendent of the public schools of the county. He was an earnest advocate of Christianity, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died honored and esteemed by all, in February, 1874, preceded by his wife two years. Jesse W. was raised in the town of Rockport after his twelfth year, and at eighteen years of age began his father's profession. He only continued that about three years, then for the succeeding six years was engaged in clerking, after which he embarked in business on his own responsibility. He sold out after a few years and clerked in the drug store of A. D. Garlinghouse and J. W. Cunningham until November, 1883, since when he has been the efficient deputy auditor of Spencer County. Mr. Kincheloe was out in the late war as a member of Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry, one hundred days' service, and was discharged at its close. He is a stalwart Republican, has been clerk of Rockport several years, is treasurer and a trustee of the town school board and is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of P. and G. A. R. fraternities. He wedded Henrietta G. Thompson, a native of Ohio, July 16, 1874, and four children have blessed them, these yet living : Wendell J., Allen L. and William. The parents belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

HON. HENRY KRAMER, born in Rhine Province, Prussia, on the 23d day of June, 1847, is a son of John H. Kramer (deceased), appropriate mention of whom is made in the biographical department devoted to Grass Township. At the age of seven years, our subject removed with his parents to this country and county, and was reared on the old home farm in Grass Township, where his mother yet resides. He received a good education in both English and German, attending the Rockport Collegiate Institute, and the Owensboro Academy. In 1870 he was appointed deputy county treasurer, by Treasurer William Jacobs, and for four years so efficiently filled the requirements of that office, that in 1874, he was elected its principal, and two years later re-elected, serving in all four years. In 1878 he was honored by an election to the State Senate, from Spencer and Perry Counties, a position he occupied for four years. In the meantime he had devoted considerable time to the study of law, and in 1881, associated himself in partnership with H. M. Logsdon, at Rockport, to practice his profession. This partnership has remained unbroken to the present. Mr. Kramer in an active Democrat, a Freemason, and he and wife belong to the Lutheran Evangelical Church. November 16, 1872, Catharine Bretz, a native of Dubois County, Ind., became his wife, and by him the mother of six children: Karl W., Otto, Catharine, Helen, Clara and John H.

FREDERICK ALEXANDER KUNATH, confectioner, is a native of Germany, born November 20, 1827, being the third of seven children, born to the marriage of Frederick G. Kunath and Charlotte Madler, both of whom were also natives of the old country, where they lived and died, their respective deaths occurring in 1848 and 1855. The subject of this sketch was raised in Grimma, receiving the education compulsory attendance afforded, and learning the confectioner's trade, followed that occupation in his native town until 1854, when he immigrated to the United States. For two years subsequent to his arrival, he worked at his trade in Cincinnati, Ohio, and for a few years thereafter followed the same business in various cities throughout the country. In 1860 he embarked in business at Louisville, Ky., but in 1863 removed to Georgetown, Ind., where he merchandised until 1882. The spring of that year, he came to Rockport, and opening a restaurant, bakery and confectionery store, has by courteous ways and gentlemanly conduct, won himself a place among the best merchants of the town. Mr. Kunath was married in 1857, to Anna Goettheim, who died about eighteen months later. In 1859 he wedded Mary Wagner, a native of Germany, and by her is the father of seven children, these five yet living: Laura C., Anna M., Bruno H., Ida C. and Emma A. Mr. Kunath is a Republican, a member of the K. of H. and A. O. U. W., fraternities, and he and wife belong to the German Lutheran Church.

CAPT. SAMUEL LAIRD, a native of Giles County, Tenn., was born August 26, 1828, being the youngest of seven children born to the marriage of Matthew Laird and Mary Leaper, both of whom were natives of Ireland, where they were also wedded. After two children had been born to these parents, they removed from their native country to Scotland, and from the latter place, about the year 1827 immigrated to America. After a short residence in Canada, they removed to the United States, and settled in Tennessee, where the subject of our sketch was born. In 1834 the family moved to Clark County, Ohio, and at this place the father was called to his final resting place about a year later. The mother survived the death of her husband until 1873, when she died in Hamilton County, Ohio. Samuel Laird was raised on a farm to manhood, and in youth secured a fair education. In 1852 when the gold excitement of the Pacific Slope was yet raging, he contracted the fever, and crossing the plains to California, worked in the mines for a time, and later was engaged in blacksmithing and wagon-making at Sacramento. In 1856 he returned to the States, and the same year began "store boating" down the Ohio River. At Rockport, lnd., his boat became frozen in the ice and sank, but not before he had transferred his goods to the town where he began merchandising. This he continued two years, then engaged in brick-making, farming and flat-boating on the river. He was at Vicksburg when the war broke out, but returning to Spencer County, he helped recruit Company K, of the Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, of which he was elected first lieutenant. In September 1861, he was promoted to the captaincy of his company, in which capacity he served until October, 1862, when he resigned on account of disability, caused by a severe wound received at Fort Donelson. In 1863 he was elected Auditor of Spencer County, by the Republican party, serving as such four years. He subsequently was engaged in the grocery trade two years, and since has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1874 he was elected trustee of Ohio Township, by his party, being afterward re-elected serving until 1880. Capt. Laird has been fairly successful in the acquisition of this world's goods, having secured by good management and industry 330 acres of good farming land in Ohio Township, besides valuable property in Rockport. He has added to the advancement of all laudable public enterprises with a liberal hand, and is one of the county's best citizens. December 25, 1862, Irena Snyder became his wife, and by him the mother of three sons and three daughters. He is a member of the Blue Lodge in Masonry, the G. A. R., and is a stanch Republican in politics.

WILLIAM S. LAMAR, merchant, of Rockport, was born November 16, 1856, in Spencer County, Ind., being the sixth of ten children born to the marriage of John W. Lamar (see sketch in Biographical Department of Clay Township) and Millie Barker. Our subject was raised on his parents' farm, receiving a good education in the public schools of the county, Holbrook Normal School, at Lebanon, Ohio, and also the State Normal School, at Terre Haute. Preparing himself for the teacher's profession, he followed that occupation in this county from 1877 to 1881, and from the latter year to 1884 served as deputy sheriff under John R. Huffman. Embarking then in the hardware trade at Rockport, he continued until he was burned out, January 13, 1885, and after that disaster again embarked in the same business, at which,he has ever since continued. December 31, 1883, he married Maria W., daughter of Hon. Robert Kercheval, who has borne him one son, Robert W. Mr. Lamar is a Republican, a member of the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. fraternities, and he and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

P. S. LASHBROOK, one of the well-to-do men of Rockport, was born January 25, 1852, in Daviess County, Ky., being the seventh of eleven children born to Grayson and Emily (Fearman) Lashbrook, both of whom were natives of the Blue Grass State. In 1865 the fimily came to Rockport, Mr. Lashbrook making his home in the county from that time until his death, which occurred about 1870. Our subject was raised by his father, receiving only a common education. On attaining his twenty-first year, he began farming in Ohio Township, continuing that occupation until the fall of 1884, when he moved to Rockport and opened a meat market. In this he has since continued, and by strict business integrity is winning a good trade. March 9, 1882, he united in marriage with Mattie J. Shrode, a native of Ohio Township, and.by her he is the father of one son, named Joseph Allen. Mr. Lashbrook is a Republican, a member of (the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a firstclass citizen. Mrs. Lashbrook belongs to the Presbyterian Church.

H. M. LOGSDON. November 19, 1820, Samuel Logsdon, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Hart County, Ky., came to Spencer County, Ind., when thirteen years old, settled in Luce Township, and there, May 15, 1851, married Cyrena Osborn, who was born in the same township and county, October 27, 1830. He followed merchandising at Taylorsport and other places many years, and was known as an honest, industrious citizen. He died January 30, 1877, and his widow is yet living on the old homestead. H. M. Logsdon, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born June 28, 1852, and is the oldest living of eight children. He passed his youth and early manhood on his father's farm and assisting in the store, attending the district schools and the Rockport Collegiate Institute. The fall of 1871 he entered the literary and law department of the State University, at Bloomington, graduating from each of these departments in June, 1875. Being somewhat broken down in health, he traveled for a time throughout the Southern and Western States, but in 1877 returning to Rockport, where he embarked in the practice of his profession. He is at present associated with Henry Kramer in legal pursuits, a"nd this is one of the ablest law firms in the Second District. Mr. Logsdon is a Freemason, a member of the K. of P., and is one of the leading Democrats of the county, having officiated four years as chairman of the Democratic Central Committee of the county.

HENRY MAAS, blacksmith and wagon-maker, was born April 21, 1840, in Baden, Germany. To his parents, Jacob and Eva Catharine (Shoemaker) Maas, there were three children born, the second one being our subject. The father was a boot and shoe-maker by trade, following that occupation in the old country until his death about the year 1844. In 1848 the mother and family immigrated to the United States and settled at Rockport, Ind., where Henry was raised and educated. When eighteen years old he went to Newburgh and worked two years at the blacksmith trade, and one year at the same occupation in Evansville. He then worked at his trade in the country of this county until he enlisted for the war in Company K, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was honorably discharged in September, 1865. He embarked in business in Rockport at the close of the war and has continued to the present time. Mr. Maas has made his business a success and is in all respects a self-made man. Beginning with but $500 capital at the close of the war, he has by untiring energy, economy and enterprise, succeeded in acquiring valuable property and in establishing a wide trade for the buggies, wagons, plows, etc., which he manufactures. In politics he is a Republican, having served two terms as town councilman, and is a member of the Evangelical Association and the Albright Church. April 15, 1866, he married Catharine Fundes, a native of Germany, by whom he is the father of six children, these four yet living: Henry, Annie, John and Catharine.

GEORGE W. MARSH, a native of Gallatin County, Ky., was born July 17, 1830, being the youngest child born to William and Abi (North) Marsh. The father, who was a blacksmith by trade, lived in Kentucky until 1847, when he moved to Polk County, Iowa, and three or four years later to Chillicothe, Mo., where he died seven or eight years ago. The mother who was a native of Indiana died in Kentucky about 1847. At the age of seventeen, the subject of this sketch, came from Kentucky to Switzerland County, Ind., where he worked as a farm hand three years. He then came to this county and bought land on Section 24, Ohio Township. This he cleared and improved, and bought adjoining land until he now has a farm of 312 acres. Both he and wife are members of the Methodist Church. He is a stanch Republican and a warm advocate of the principles of his party. He was married December 24, 1851, to Sarah Ishum, a native of Boone County, Ky., who has borne him eight children. Those living are Alonzo, Emma (now Mrs. Proctor Wright), Olive (now Mrs. John S. Barnett), John, George W. and Cora.

CHRISTOPHER JACKSON MASON, a prominent pioneer of Spencer County, Ind., is a native of Ohio County, Ky., born May 5, 1813, the third of eleven children born to John H. and Elizabeth (Jackson) Mason. The father moved from Virginia, his native State, to Breckenridge County, Ky., when a youth and was there married. He afterward moved to Ohio County, that State, farming many years, and finally died September 22, 1862, in Hancock County, aged eighty years. His widow died in Union County in December, 1865. C. J. Mason received a limited youthful education in subscription schools, but in later years, by desultory study, has acquired a fair knowledge of the lower branches of education. At twenty years of age he began farming for himself in his native county, following that occupation summers and flat boating on the river winters for twenty years. In March, 1837, he removed to Spencer County, Ind., locating on a farm in Grass Township. He resided there ten years, when he moved to Luce Township, where in addition to farming he dealt largely in produce, pork and tobacco, shipping these products on flat-boat to New Orleans, where he found ready markets for his goods. Having secured a competency in this way he moved to Rockport in 1877, where he has since resided retired from active business pursuits. Besides valuable property in town Mr. Mason owns about 1,200 acres of good farming land in the county. He is a stanch Republican in politics, serving as county commissioner from 1860 to 1863; is a member of the Masonic fraternity and himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was married April 16, 1835, to Ellen Morgan, of Daviess County, Ky., and five children have been born to their union, only the following named now living : Lycurgus C., Cordelia J. (widow of John Hougland), William T. and John H. The mother dying in July, 1848, Mr. Mason was again married in February, 1849, to Martha Thomas, of Mercer County, Ky., by whom he was the father of five children—all dying in infancy. He settled in the wilderness, and cleared and improved his land, undergoing all hardships incident to pioneer life, there being only about a dozen wagons in the county, people using sleds and trucks for hauling.

JUDGE CHARLES H. MASON, born at Walpole, Cheshire Co., N. H.. August 9, 1827, is the third of nine children born to the marriage of Joseph Mason and Harriet Ormsby. who were natives respectively of Massachusetts and Connecticut, and of English descent, the Masons being of old Puritan stock. The subject of our sketch was raised on his father's farm in his native State, receiving a good academical education, attending Hancock Literary and Scientific Institute of Hancock, N. H. At twenty-one years of age he emigrated West, locating first at Louisville, Ky., where he was employed as tutor in a private family, studying law between school hours with Hamilton Smith. When twenty-two years old he was admitted to the bar at Louisville, and removing to Perry County, Ind., embarked in the practice of his profession, also acting as agent for the American Cannel Coal Company. In 1849 he established the Cannelton Economist, the first newspaper in the county which he conducted two years and a half. He was also connected with various other enterprises and industries, but never relinquished legal pursuits. On the breaking out of the Rebellion, he was appointed Colonel of the Fifth Regiment (Legion), which he resigned in 1861, to accept the judgeship of the Court of Common Pleas for the district composed of Spencer, Perry, Crawford,
Dubois and Orange Counties, a position he retained two years. In 1865 he was appointed collector of revenue for Perry County, serving as such ten years, and was also appointed a member of the Ohio River Commission by Gov. Baker. He has always retained his law practice however, and since 1880 has made his home at Rockport, and is recognized the peer of any attorney in the Second District. A stanch Republican in politics, he has been a faithful worker for his party, and by it has been honored at various times. He has actively worked for his county and town's advancement, and in every way is a worthy and highly esteemed citizen. March 21, 1852, Rachel D., daughter of J. B. Huckaby, became his wife, and after a happily wedded life of over thirty years, Mrs. Mason died February 26, 1883, a member of the Episcopal Church.

SAMUEL H. MILLER, sm influential farmer of Ohio Township, is a native of the county, born December 21, 1835, being one of two living children of Nicholas and Catharine (Frank) Miller, both natives of Kentucky. The father, who was a successful farmer, came to Spencer County after his marriage. He owned a large amount of land in the county, and was known as an honest and industrious citizen. When our subject was two years old his father died, and the death of his mother followed a year later. He was reared with Barney Hamilton, receiving such an education as could be obtained by a three months' attendance at a subscription school each year. He lived with the Hamiltons until attaining his majority, when he farmed for himself until the war. He then for a short time followed flat-boating, but in 1862 he enlisted in Company F, Twenty-eighth Regiment First Indiana Cavalry, serving his country faithfully until July, 1865. After his return he farmed in various parts of the county until March 21, 1875, when he married Belle Iglehart, by whom he is the father of one child—Eula. After marriage he settled on the farm where he now lives. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church.

ISAAC L. MILNER, M. D., an early settler of Rockport, was born in Breckenridge County, Ky., February 17, 1828, and is one of five children born to Patrick D. and Mary Ann (Wilkerson) Milner. The father, with his parents, settled in the county where our subject was born about the beginning of the present century, and there died, August 7, 1859, aged fifty-eight years. The mother still resides in Breckenridge County, at an advanced age. Dr. I. L. Milner was raised to manhood on his parents' farm, receiving the education afforded by the schools of that day. At twenty-two years of age he began life's battle upon his own responsibility, and about a year thereafter began the study of medicine in Hardin County with Dr. H. H. Wale, remaining with him nearly two years. He then took a course of instruction at the Medical University of Louisville, and in March, 1855, came to Spencer County, Ind., and began practicing at Centerville, where he remained over eight years. During this time he again attended lectures at his old alma mater, which granted him a diploma in March, 1859. The fall of 1862 he moved to Boonville, but in February, 1863, removed to Rockport, wh.ch has since been his home. Dr. Milner has made his chosen profession an emphatic succesi, not only in the acquisition of this world's goods, but in the skillful treatment of the various diseases incident to humanity. He is a Mason of the Royal Arch Degree, a stanch Republican, and is non-sectarian in religion, being what might be termed a " free thinker " and a firm believer in one Supreme Being. February 2, 1860, Martha M. King became his wife, and by him the mother of two children : Kate and an infant that died unnamed.

GEORGE L. MOTTELER, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes at Rockport, is a native of the town, born April 29, 1857. He is the second of ten children in the family of John G. and Sophia (Easley) Motteler, both natives of Germany. The father when a young man came to America and followed blacksmithing near Philadelphia for a short time, after which he came to this county and learned the stone-cutter's trade which he still follows. George was reared at home and received a good business education in the schools of Rockport. At the age of eighteen he began a three year's apprenticeship to the shoe-maker's trade, after completing which he worked one year in Evansville. He then returned to Rockport and opened a shop,' which he conducted with such good success, that in 1883 he added a stock of ready-made boots and shoes. He is a member of the Knights of 'Pythias fraternity and of the Lutheran Church. June 13, 1879, he was united in marriage with Delia Rodgers, a native of the county. They have thiee children, John A. Pansy K. and Owen S.

CHRISTIAN HENRY MOTTELER, is a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, born September 15, 1825. His parents George and Margaret (Schneider) Motteler, never left the " Fatherland." He came to the United States in 1852 and worked as a farm hand in Pennsylvania a few months, then came to Rockport. The next spring he went to California as a gold seeker. He remained there and on Vancouver's Island until 1860, when he returned to his native country on a visit. He soon after came to this county again, and bought a coal mine at the Knobs, which he operated about a year. He afterward was engaged in mercantile pursuits at Rockport until 1873, when he moved to the farm where he still resides. It consists of 240 acres, and has on it one of the best orchards in the county, from which he manufactures peach and apple brandy, cider and vinegar. March 12, 1863, he married Katharine Easley, by whom he has four living children: Mary A., Kathrina, William H. and Frederick M. Mrs. Motteler died March 27, l883, and May 30 of the same year, he was married to Mary Easley. They have one child, Henry J. He and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church.

JACOB T. NANEY, a pioneer native of the county, was born December 10,1827, being the sixth of nine children born to the marriage of John Naney and Eleanor Williams. The father came to Spencer County from Kentucky about 1820, and located southwest of Rockport. Soon after, he entered 236 acres of land where he lived until his death, which occurred when Jacob T. was about ten years of age. He was a prominent Whig in politics, and held various township and county offices. His wife died in the county about ten years ago. The subject of this memoir received only a limited education in youth. In 1847 he enlisted as a private in Company E, Fourth Indiana Infantry, and served in the Mexican war war until July 1848. January 5, 1851, he was joined in marriage with Lucy Burdick, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, by whom he is the father of eight children, now living, as follows : Amerfcus I., Isaac W., Mary A. (wife of Robert Hartley), Laura A. (wife of B. M. Craig), Emma L., Nellie E., Jesse C. and Lucy M. Mr. Naney has lived upon the home farm all his life with the exception of two years when he was keeper of the county poor. He was not a soldier during the late war, but was a Union man and an active member of the Home Guards. He is a Republican; a successful farmer and an upright and highly respected citizen.

LLEWELLYN NIBLACK, proprietor of the Novelty Roller Mills and a thorough master of his trade, was born in Dubois County. Ind., January 18, 1826, the eldest of ten children born to Willis and Jane (Armstrong) Niblack, who were natives of Kentucky. As early as 1820 the father emigrated to Indiana, then a State of only four years growth, and settled in Dubois County, where he married and where he successfully farmed until 1847, when he removed to Spencer County and buying a farm died thereon the fall of the same year. This place is the old Niblack homestead in the county. Mrs. Niblack died of cholera in 1854 at Grandview. Llewellyn Niblack is a proper subject representing what a young man can make of himself by industry and good habits. He was reared to manhood by his parents on the home iarm, securing such education as the common schools of that day afforded. After remaining with his parents until about the time of his mother's death he began farming for himself. Previous to this time, however, he learned the tanner's trade in Dubois County, but his father dying about the time he never made it pa occupation, as he thought best to aid his mother on the farm. After beginning for himself he worked at saw-milling and shingle-making in conjunction with farming until January, 1866, when he purchased an interest in the mills of which he is now sole proprietor. He continued as a partner in these mills until 1875, when he built a large frame mill near the upper landing, which he operated successfully until February, 1884, when it was consumed by fire. Having repurchased an interest in the Novelty Mills in 1882, Mr. Niblack soon secured business therein, and remodeling the entire concern by placing in the best and latest improved machinery, including ten sets of Steven's rolls, now owns one of the best flouring-mills in southern Indiana. He is one of Rockport's enterprising and energetic business men, is a stanch Republican, a Council Degree member of the Masonic fraternity and is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. June 13, 1852, he married Julia Ann Green, and by her is the father of six children, these yet living: Warren C., Flora Zella, Ellis H. and Willie E.

JOSEPH W. NOURSE, superintendent of the schools of Spencer County, was born at Bardstown, Ky., October 81, 1841, and is a son of Charles and Rosanna (Logan) Nourse, who were the parents of four sons and two daughters. The father was born August 5, 1792, at Bardstown, Ky., and for about sixty-five years resided at that place engaged in mercantile pursuits. In 1857 he moved to Jefferson County and settled on a farm where he died in 1864. The mother, a daughter of William Logan, who was the first white male child born in Kentucky, was born February 2,1805, in Shelby County, and is now living in the city of Louisville. Joseph W. Nourse attended the public schools of his native town in youth, and later the Collegiate Institute. He also completed the junior course at the Louisville College, and in 1861 taught his first term of public school in Jefferson County, continuing subscription schools until 1866. He carried on a trade in books and stationery in Louisville five years, and the spring of 1872 removed to Rockport, Ind., and embarked in the drug and book business, continuing the same until 1877. He then sold out, taught one term of school, but in 1879 was elected county superintendent. During 1881 he was principal of the High School at Rockport and in 1882 was deputy county auditor. In 1883 he was re-elected county superintendent and is now serving in that capacity. October 5, 1875, Mr. Nourse wedded Nettie Fee, a native of Ohio, and by her is the father of three children: Archie L. (deceased), Robert F. and Myra M. Mr. Nourse is a Democrat, a charter member of the K. of P. of Rockport, and himself and wife belong to the Presbyterian Church.

JAMES W. PARSLEY, one of the oldest pioneers of the county now living, is a native of Rutherford County, Tenn., born September 19,1805, being one of two surviving members of a family of fourteen children born to the marriage of Abraham Parsley and Elizabeth Gray. He grew to manhood in his native State, receiving no education in his youth, but after his marriage, he learned to " read, write and cipher " In 1829 he came to this county with his parents, and settled on the land where he now lives. He cleared and improved the place, undergoing all the hardships of a pioneer life, and provided for his parents as long as they lived. August 15, 1839, he married Sarah Moran a native of Kentucky, by whom he is the father of twelve children, six of whom, William F., Emiline A. (wife of L. C. Frisbie). George W., Andrew J., Richard M. and Mary J. (widow of A. L. Carlisle), are living. Mr. Parsley has always been an enterprising and prosperous farmer, and now owns a farm of 200 acres. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and his wife is a Methodist. It is needless to add that they are highly esteemed by the communitv in which they have so long lived.

WILLIAM L. PARTRIDGE, born October 11,1818, in Bedfordshire, England, is the third of eleven children born to Richard and Ann (Linnel) Partridge. In 1830 the family immigrated to the United States, residing the first five years after their arrival in New York State, and then settling in Erie County, Penn., where the father farmed until his death, followed by his widow some twelve years later. The subject of this sketch received a fair education from the common schools, afterward taking a three years' course at Allegheny College. In 1837 he went to Kentucky, where he taught school nearly two years, then returned to Pennsylvania, where he married and engaged in farming. He afterward sold out, went to Arkansas and taught school, and in 1850, having in the meantime again returned to Pennsylvania, came to Rockport, Indiana, and building the first steam saw-mill operated the same over three years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K, Twenty-fifth Regiment, Indiana Infantry, was promoted orderly sergeant, and serving through the battles of Fort Donelson and Shiloh, was honorably discharged by reason of disability after nearly two years of service. He taught school and worked at the plasterer's trade for a number of years. In 1875 he was appointed governinent store-keeper of this district,under Gen. Veatch, and later, served two terms as trustee for Rockport. In 1879 he engaged in the flour, feed and plaster's supply business, at which he has since continued. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, G. A. R., and is a stanch Republican. In 1845, Olivia Turner became his wife, and by him the mother of five children, these three yet living: William A., Caleb M., and Rosalie. This family is among the first of Spencer County.

EDWARD M. PAYNE, sheriff of Spencer County, was born March 8, 1841, the eldest of three children born to Benjamin and Eleanor (Liggett) Payne, who were also natives of Maryland. The father was a farmer, following that occupation in his native State until 1846, when he moved to Daviess County, Ky., and in 1858, removed from there to Spencer County, Ind., purchasing a farm in Ohio Township, where he died August 17, 1873, being over eighty years old. He was an honest, energetic farmer, and a moral, religious citizen, having lived and died in the Presbyterian faith. Mrs. Payne died in March, 1870. Edward M. was reared by his parents to manhood on a farm, receiving in youth a good common school education. October 20, 1861, he united in marriage with Arminda E. May, a native of this county, and five children have been born to them, as follows: James A., Nannie B., Cullen E., Kate and Myrtle. After marriage our subject remained with his parents on the home farm, buying a portion of the farm and managing the entire homestead until the fall of 1884, when he was elected sheriff of the county. He is now filling the requirements of that office, although still residing on his farm of 350 acres near Rockport. Mr. Payne is one of the most progressive and enterprising citizens of the county.

ISAAC A. PECKINPAUGH, born April 11,1847, is the seventh of twelve children born to Peter and Susan J. (Goldman) Peckinpaugh, natives of Kentucky and Indiana respectively. The father when a small lad moved with his parents to Crawford County, Ind., where he married and where our subject was born. His occupation was farming throughout life, and he died in November, 1881. His widow yet survives him. Isaac A., subject of this biography, after attending the country schools of his native county in boyhood, completed his education by two years in the Leavenworth schools, and nearly three years in Harteville University. He clerked and taught school in Crawford County until March, 1878, when he came to Rockport and was employed as wharf-boat clerk at the upper lar.ding until 1880, when he became one of its proprietors. In February, 1883, he became sole proprietor, continuing as such to the present time. Since 1880, he has also been station agent for the L. E. & St. L. Ry. Company, and in these combined pursuits is doing a creditable business. He owns a good farm in this county, besides other property in Rockport; is a Republican and a member of the I. O. O. F. October 23, 1877, Laura Belle Merithpw became his wife, and by him the mother of one daughter—Lillie A. Mrs. Peckinpaugh is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JAMES' W. PEDIGO, of the firm of Pedigo Bros., proprietors of Lake Mills, was born in Hart County, Ky., September 27, 1850, being the sixth of nine children born to Jesse S. and Jane (Richardson) Pedigo. (See sketch of D. L. Pedigo.) He grew to manhood in his native State, receiving a good business education. He learned the carpenter's trade with his father, and followed it in connection with farming in Kentucky until 1872. From that time until 1878 he was carpenter for the railroad company in this county, At the latter date he entered into partnership with his brother in grist and saw-milling, and contracting and building. He married Anna Lopez, a native of Webster Uounty, Ky., and to this union four children have been born, namely: Lida, Jesse S., Chester A. and May E.

DUDLEY L. PEDIGO, of the firm of Pedigo Bros., proprietors of the Lake Mills, is a native of Hart County, Ky., born August 16, 1848. Having received only a limited education, at the age of seventeen he began to learn the carpenter's trade, which he followed until 1870, when he came to Rockport and learned the milling business at the Novelty Mills. In 1878 in company with his brother, James W., he bought the Lake Mills, which they have since successfully operated. They own considerable property in the vicinity besides the mill. Mr. Pedigo's parents, Jesse and Jane (Richardson) Pedigo, natives of Kentucky, lived in that State until the death of the latter, March, 1874. Since that time the former has been a resident of this county, living a retired life. February 14, 1869, the subject of this sketch was united in marriage with Mattie Murray, a native of Kentucky, who has borne him five children. Those living are Emma J.. William T., Bessie and Lucy. Mr. Pedigo is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is a Democrat in politics. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.

HENRY C. PENTECOST, a prominent hardware merchant of Rockport, is a native Hoosier born January 22, 1840 in Posey County. He is the youngest but one in a family of twelve children born to Scarborough and Mary B. (Jones) Pentecost both of whom are natives of Virginia. These parents were married in Kentucky where the father followed merchandising a number of years, when he went to Mt. Vernon and there engaged in mercantile pursuits until his death in 1847. Mrs. Pentecost departed this life in 1872 at Mt. Vernon. Henry C. Pentecost was educated in the common branches of learning, and during early manhood was engaged in clerking. At nineteen years of age he began clerking in a wholesale hardware store at Cincinnati but in 1874 came to Rockport and opened a hardware, tinware, stove and agricultural implement store, and this he has conducted to the present time, establishing a large and lucrative trade. He is a mason of the Royal Arch Degree, is a Republican in politics and his wife is a member of the Episcopalian faith in religion. Mr. Pentecost was married July 22, 1868, to Elizabeth W. Brown and a son and daughter have been born to them named Henry S. and Lizzie.

DAVID A. PEREGRINE, one of the leading dry goods merchants of Rockport, is a native of Ontario, Canada, his birth occurring in York County, November 21, 1852. He is a son of David M. and Martha (Wilson) Peregrine, the father being a native of Wales, removing from that country to Canada with his parents in 1815, he at that time being only one year old. David M. Peregrine has always resided in the county where his parents first settled, engaged in farming and stock-raising. It was there the subject of this sketch grew to manhood and there he secured a good literary education. At seventeen years of age he left home to clerk in a general merchandising establishment in New Market, a town in his native county where he remained eight years with the exception of six months while clerking in Toronto. In June, 1877, he immigrated to Louisville, Kentucky, and while there seeking employment saw an advertisement of salesman wanted at Rockport. He applied for the place and for four years was in the employ of William Landsberg & Son. In September, 1881, he embarked in business for himself and has remained here to the present time. He started with limited capital and by untiring energy and strict business integrity has succeeded in building up a good business which is steadily increasing. Mr. Peregrine was married January 26, 1880, to Amanda L. Fisher, a native of Floyd County, Ind., by whom he is the father of three children. Mr. Peregrine is a Republican, an Encampment Degree Odd Fellow and himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE J. PROCASKEY, confectioner and baker, is a native of Hawesville, Ky., his birth occurring December 14, 1842, being the eldest but one of five children born to George and Barbara (Lory) Procaskey. The father, who was a native of Poland, came to America about the year 1838, and for three years followed the baker's trade at Louisville, Ky. From there he went to Evansville where he engaged in business un.il his death, which occurred in June, 1849. The mother was a native Bavarian and died in Evansville in 1854. Our subject lived in Evansville until the death of his parents when he went to Kentucky, and after a trip South on a flat-boat began farming and going to school winters. Receiving a good ordinary education he returned to Evansville in 1859, and remained there until 1868 thoroughly learning all the details of the confectionery business. Removing to Rockport he embarked in the business with a very small capital and by industry and strict business integrity has won an exceptionally good trade and the respect and confidence of the entire community. The January fire of 1885 was a serious loss to him, burning him out of home, household goods, store, etc., but with commendable enterprise he has rebuilt and is now once more controling a ^*» flourishing trade. Mr. Procaskey is a Democrat, is the secretary of the County Central Committee and has served in the town council. In February 1864 he married Elizabeth Schaefer, a native of Germany, and nine children have been born to them as follows : Albert G., Elizabeth M., Clara B., Sadie, George M., Ida, John W., Louis F. and Frederick. Mr. Procaskey and family are Roman Catholics.

ANDREW J. RASOR was born in Ohio Township December 16, 1825. He is the sixth of nine children born to Simeon and Mary (Allingsworth) Rasor. He was reared on the farm, and on account of the meager facilities received but a very limited education in his youth. After attaining his majority he in company with his brothers followed flat-boating on the Ohio River, and rafting cypress timber in Arkansas until 1849. From that date until 1858 he was engaged in running a sawmill in this township. In the latter year he located on a farm on Section 32, Ohio Township, which he cleared and upon which he has since resided. He is an enterprising and successful farmer, and an intelligent and upright citizen. December 2, 1858, he was joined in marriage with Mary E. Huffman, a native of Harrison County, Ind. To this union five children have been born, four of whom, John E., Debie Ann, Mary E. and Eliza S. are living.

JOHN O. REAY, proprietor of Reay's tobacco stemmery, was born June 13, 1832, in Louisville, Ky., being the youngest of three children born to the marriage of William Ueay and Caroline Meriwether, who were natives of Virginia and Kentucky respectively. The father, who was a carpenter by trade, settled at Louisville about the year 1823, where he married and worked at his trade until his death in 1835. Mrs. Reay died in that city in 1840. John 0 Reay, after his parents' deaths, was raised on a farm near the city, completing his schooling with a course at South Hanover College at Madison, Ind., and the Indiana State University at Bloomington. At twenty years of age he left his adopted home and for a number of years farmed in Kentucky, Tennessee and Rockport. In 1864 he came to Rockport, Ind., and erecting the first stemmery in the county has since been engaged in the tobacco business. He employs about forty-five hands, and annually handles about one and a half million pounds of tobacco. Mr. Reay is a Democrat, a Council Degree Mason, and he and wife belong to the Presbyterian Church. September 5, 1860, he wedded Martha Neville, a native of Clarksville, Tenn., and John O. and Neville are the names of the two children born to them.

JUDGE GEORGE L. REINHARD, of Rockport, was bora in Bavaria, Germany, July 5, 1843, and until fourteen years old attended the primary schools of his native country. In 1857 he immigrated to the United States, and for some time attended the schools of Cincinnati, where he also was employed in an extensive spoke and wheel factory owned by an uncle. In 1860 he moved to Union County, Ind., where he followed manual labor until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when he volunteered his services among the very first, and was made a private in Company I, Sixteenth Regiment Indiana Infantry, his company being afterward transferred to the Fifteenth Regiment. He served three years and four months, participating in the battles of Greenbrier, Perryville, Pittsburg Landing, Stone River and others without being wounded, and on receiving his discharge returned home in shattered health. Determined to secure a good education he entered a high school of Cincinnati, and from 1868 to 1869 attended Miami University at Oxford, Ohio, clerking and teaching school at intervals to defray his expenses, and also teaching German among the students at the University. Mr. Reinhard in this way secured an excellent education. In 1868 he began the study of law, and in September of the year following was examined and admitted to practice at Owensboro, Ky. The winter of 1870 he removed to Rockport, Ind., where he has since resided. Being a close student and naturally possessed of many mental attainments of a superior order, Mr. Reinhard was not long in securing a select and extended practice, and was soon recognized as one of the ablest attorneys of southern Indiana. In 1876 he was elected as State's Advocate for the second judicial circuit by 1,200 majority of votes, and so acceptably did he fill the office that he was re-elected in 1878 without opposition. In November, 1882, he was elected to the bench of the second judicial district for a period of six years, and is now satisfactorily filling the requirements of that responsible office. Judge Reinhard is a Democrat, and a member of the brotherhood of Odd Fellows. His family belong to the Presbyterian Church. He has, to some extent, been engaged in literary pursuits, his principal effort being " Reinhard's Indiana Criminal Law." This work is recognized by the legal profession throughout Indiana as a valuable addition to the legal literature of the State, and is justly meeting with high encomiums from individuals, among whom is Supreme Judge W. E. Niblack. Socially, Judge Reinhard and family are among the first in Rockport. He was married the fall of 1869 to Miss Mary E. Wilson, and four children have been born to them, one son and one daughter yet living.

FRANCIS J. REINHARD, attorney and counsellor-at-law, was born April 25, 1854 in Cincinnati, Ohio. John Casper Reinhard, his father, was a native of Bavaria, Germany, came to the United States in 1848, located in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he married Elizabeth Schatz, and in 1857 removed to St. Paul, Minn., where he died August 22, 1866. He was a stone-cutter by trade, and while in this country made large contracts. His widow died at St. Paul, July 4, 1881. Francis J. received a good education in the city's schools, and for two years succeeding his father's death, clerked in wholesale and retail boot and shoe houses of St. Paul. He then learned his father's trade, following that occupation until 1875. In 1870, 1876 and 1877, he attended St. John's College in Stearns County, Minnesota, and the spring and summer of 1877 read law in St. Paul. He then was employed for a time as book-keeper in Sauk Rapids, but in August. 1878 came to Rockport and read law with his cousin, Judge G. L. Reinhard. The fall of 1879 he was admitted to the Spencer County bar, and in 1880 located in Jasper, Ind., to practice his profession. In 1882 he returned to Rockport, and since July, 1883, has been a partner of Judge C. H. Mason. Mr. Reinhard belongs to the F. & A. M., K. of P., and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Alice K. James became his wife June 28, 1882, and one son named John J. has been born to them.

R. M. RICHARDS is a native of Harrison County, Indiana, born July 30, 1827. He is one of seven children, born to the marriage of John Richards and Nancy Montgomery, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. The father who was a soldier in the war of 1812, came to Indiana about the time it was admitted as a State, and located in Harrison County, where he was married and lived until 1833. Meeting with financial reverses and being in ill-health, he resolved to leave the county, and accordingly in that year he removed his family to this county where he died seven months later. His widow, who died in 1875, afterward married Raphael Johnson. Our subject was reared by his maternal grandparents. At the age of twenty-three he married. After renting land for two years, he bought the farm where he has since resided. He has been quite successful in business, and now owns 200 acres of good farming land. May 10, 1883 his wife died, leaving five children, John, Fredonia, wife of Eldridge Palmer, Frank M., William S. and Robert W. She left her family a record of a noble Christian life.

JOSEPH C. RICHARDSON, born November 7, 1816, in Nelson County, Ky., is the sixth of eight children born to John and Nancy (Castleman) Richardson, who were natives respectively, of West Virginia and Kentucky, their births occurring in 1783. The father removed with his parents to Mercer County, Ky., at an early day, was there married, and afterward removed to Nelson County, where he farmed and preached the Baptist religion. In 1817 he built a flat-boat, and in company with a few neighboring families and their household goods, floated down the Ohio River to where Grandview now is, where they disembarked. Mr. Richardson settled near where the village of Lincoln now is situated, but shortly thereafter removed to near the present site of Newtonville, where he died in 1822. His widow survived him until 1868, when she died in Clay Township. Joseph C. has made Spencer County his home mostly through life. He was raised a farmer, secured but a limited schooling in youth, but has acquired a good education in later years. In 1834 he engaged as clerk in merchandising at Gentryville, afterward becoming a partner, but in 1854 selling and becoming a partner in merchandising at Rockport. For a short time during the late war he was sutler with the Fifty-third Indiana Regiment, but ill health compelled his return, and he then worked at insurance until 1868. In that year he was defeated by J. W. Laird for Circuit Court clerk by 68 votes, but in 1872 was elected over his former adversary for the same office by 216 votes. In 1876 he was again defeated for the same position, but in 1880 was again elected, thus serving eight years. Mr. Richardson is one of the county's oldest and best known citizens; is a Republican, and his wife belongs to the Baptist Church. He was married April 8,1847, to Nancy A. Burkhart, of his native county, and four daughters and one son have been born to them, only two daughters now living named Abbie and Alice.

WILLIAM H. ROBERTSON, an influential citizen of Ohio Township, is a native of Nottoway County, Va., born February 9, 1818. His parents were also natives of the Old Dominion when they were married, and where the father, Jennings Robertson died February 8, 1819. The mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Craddock, removed a year later to Ohio County, Ky., where she died in 1828. The children, of whom William H. was the youngest, then came to this county. In 1839 he married Letitia Miller, and a few months later settled on a tract of land where he now lives. He has added to his first purchase until he now has over 330 acres of good farming land. He for several years also, owned and managed a livery stable at Rockport. He still owns the latter, but rents it to other parties. For the past three years Mr. Robertson has practically retired from active business, and his extensive farm is managed by his son William H. Robertson, Jr., January 17, 1846. His wife died having borne him four children, two of whom Nancy J., now Mrs. W. H. Anderson, and Mary E., widow of Ford Wilkinson, are living. June 7, 1846, he married Mary Miller, a sister of his former wife, by whom he is the father of five children living: They are Margaret Li, widow of J. W. Skaggs, Wflliam H., Sarah A., wife of C. W. Barrows, Henrietta, H., wife of George Brown and Harriet N., wife of Robert Mackey. During the war, Mr. Robertson was a member of the Home Guards and is now a stanch Republican. Since the above was written, the subject of this sketch died April 30, 1885.

HENRY A. ROETZEL, of Rockport, is a native of Prussia, born January 3, 1837, being the second of five children in the family of Franz and Mary (Weller) Roetzel, .who were also natives of Prussia. The father, who was a farmer, came to America with his family in 1854, and landed at New Orleans, where they remained a few months. They then came to this county and located on a farm in Grass Township, where the father died a short time after the close of the Rebellion. The mother survived her husband about two years. Henry A. Roetzel received the ordinary compulsory education in his native country, and at the age of fifteen he went to work in a mine, where he continued until coming to this country with his parents. He then worked on his father's farm until 1865, when he engaged in the grocery business at Centerville, which he continued until 1872. Since the latter date he has been engaged in conducting a 8:iloon, restaurant and boarding-house at Rockport. He was married to Magdalena Kehrer in October, 1865, and is the father of eight children—four sons and four daughters. He and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church.

EDMUND JAMES ROGERS, one of the oldest living pioneers of southern Indiana, was born December 7, 1800, in Connecticut, being the only son of three children born to Jonathan and Orphania Rogers. His father was a lieutenant in the war of 1812; came west with his family in 1818, and located at Carlisle, Ind. In 1824 he moved to Posey County, Ind., where both he and wife afterward died. The subject of this sketch received an academic education, and when sixteen years old taught his first term of school. He was engaged in the general merchandise business and tanning in Posey County, this State, with his father, and after the latter's death continued until 1870. when he moved to Rockport. He embarked in the grocery trade at this place, and so continued until 1875, and has since been practically retired from active business pursuits. His life has been one of success in every respect, and has been a busy one as well. Although a member of no church organization, he has contributed liberally from his means in the support of charitable and benevolent organizations of various kinds. For a wife, he selected Celia Guild, a native of Hartford, Conn., who died in Posey County, this State, after bearing two children, only one—Celia, widow of Jesse Laird—now living.

BENJAMIN K. SALLEE, a native of Ohio County, Ky.. was born February 6,1824, being the eighth of thirteen children born to the marriage of Oliver P. Sallee and Elizabeth Johnson, both natives of the Old Dominion. They came to this county about 1832, and located on. a tract of land in the Barnett neighborhood, where they lived until 1842, when they went to White County, Ill. The father died there in 1872, and the mother two or more years previous. Benjamin K. Sallee came to this county with his parents, but when they went to Illinois he remained and worked on a farm as a laborer until November 11, 1846, when his marriage with Elizabeth Hamilton took place. After marriage he worked on rented land until 1850, when he settled on a tract of land in the woods on Section 9, which he cleared and improved, and upon which he has since resided. Both himself and wife are members of the Methodist Church. They have eight living children : William B., Maria (widow of Samuel Knox), Nancy I. (wife of William Pool), James H., Samuel F., Hugh M., Narcissa, and one name not learned.

CAPT. WILLIAM H. SARGENT, county Auditor, was bom January 18, 1844, in Spencer County, Ind., a son of John M. and Eliza (Sharp) Sargent, both natives of Ohio. The father was born July 27, 1812 ; married September 9, 1835; died in August, 1859. The mother was born February 18, 1816; bore her husband five children, and died in September, 1881. About the year 1839 the family settled in Hammond Township, this county, following farming there until 1846, when they moved to Ohio Township, and farmed south of Rockport. In 1834 they removed to Rockport and kept the Sargent House for many years, where our subject now lives. William H. made his home with his parents during youth and early manhood, receiving such education as the public schools afforded. In 1858 he began the printer's trade in the office of the Rockport Democrat, and there received a practical education which has benefited him greatly in later years. In July, 186l. he enlisted as private in Company K, Twenty-fifth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving until April 25, 1862, when he was discharged for disability contracted in the service. In May, 1864, he formed a company for the 100-days' service, was made captain, and merged into the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Indiana Regiment, serving the full term of enlistment. Since the war he has been engaged in varied pursuits, principally clerking, boating, printing, marshal of Rockport, railroading, and acting as deputy postmaster. In 1882 he was elected auditor of the county, and the year following assumed control of the office and is now the efficient, agreeable and popular principal. Mr. Sargent is an active worker in the ranks of the Republican party, and is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of P., and G. A. R. fraternities. He married Margaret H. Kincheloe September 2, 1866, who died December 26, 186^, leaving one son—John A. September 22, 1873, he married Fannie B. Hawkins, and by her is the father of four children: Lida R., Mary Cecil, William H. and Belle (deceased). Mrs. Sargent belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

JOSEPH SCAMMAHORN, born June 24, 1829, in Hamilton County, Ohio, is a son of Rev. Jacob Scammahorn, one of the pioneer preachers of the United Brethren Church in Spencer County. Joseph Scammahorn is one of tbe successful farmers of Ohio Township, and beginning life as a poor boy deserves considerable credit for the energy he has displayed in making life a financial success. In 1850 he united in marriage with Miss Annabel Hearn, and to their union tbe following-named children have been born: Jesse, Jacob, Clara, Josephine and Viola. During early manhood Mr. Scammahorn began teaching school winters, an occupation he continued for a period of thirty years. In politics he became a Republican at the organization of that party in 1856, and since that time he has always advocated its principles. During the Rebellion he was sergeant-major on Col. Crook's staff of the State militia.

JAMES SHOURDS is a native of Tuckerton, N. J.; born August 19, 1807, being one of twelve children born to Solomon and Hannah (Howell) Shourds. He was reared at home with his father, who was a carpenter, but James chose a farmer's life. December 31, 1827, he married Mary A. Adams, a native of New Jersey, by whom he is the father of four living children. They are Samuel, John W., Marion L. and James 0. Several years after his marriage he came to Ohio, where he remained a few months, and afterward went to Keokuk, Iowa. About 1840 he came to Spencer County, and located on a farm near the river, five miles below Rockport. This he traded for the farm where he now resides with his son, Marion L. Mr. Shourds has been very successful in his business, and is well and favorably known in the county. In politics he was formerly a Republican, but now considers himself independent of any party affiliation.

WILLIAM STATELAR, one of the oldest and most highly respected residents of Spencer County, was born in the county, March 1, 1820. His parents, George and Elizabeth (Smethers) Statelar, were natives of Pennsylvania and Tennessee respectively. The father, born in 1766, came to Ohio County, Ky., about the beginning of the present century, where he was engaged in farming until 1808. He then went to Daviess County, the same State, was married, and lived there until 1818, when he came to this county. He bought a tract of land in Ohio Township, which he cleared and improved, and upon which he lived until his death, September 19, 1836. The mother died December 9, 1859. William Statelar received his education in the primitive log schoolhouse of the frontier. At the age of eighteen he took charge of his father's farm, which he managed until a year after his marriage. He then farmed in various parts of the township, when he bought the place upon which he resides. January 29, 1843, he married Mary A. McCollum, a native of Ohio, who died May 1, 1864. By this marriage he is the father of four children now living. March 16, 1865, he was united in marriage with Elmira Lashbrook. They have one child, Roy, now living. Mr. Statelar has been a member of the Methodist Church for nearly half a century. His wife is also a member.

ELIJAH C. STUTEVILLE, a member of one of the prominent pioneer families of Spencer County, was born March 8, 1832. He is the third of seven children born to John A. and Mary (Clarkston) Stuteville, both natives of Kentucky. The father, when a young man came to this county, and entered a tract of land on Section 4, Ohio Township, upon which a few years after his marriage he located. Ho was a very successful farmer, and at the time of his death owned several . hundred acres of land. He was magistrate of the county and associate judge of the Probate Court for a number of years, also held the office of county treasurer. He died January 13, 1872. His wife preceded him about fifteen years. Elijah was reared at home, receiving but little schooling. On reaching his majority, he began farming for himself on his father's land, where he continued until 1869, when he built his present residence. He and three brothers own a large tract of land adjoining each other, and up to within a few years have worked their land together. He now owns 250 acres, and makes a specialty of raising fine stock, especially short-horn cattle. March 5, 1854, he married Nancy Tramel, a native of Green County, Ind., who bore him three children, all deceased. She died in the spring of 1861, and June 5, 1864, he was united in marriage with Amanda E. Brady. They have four children now living, Katie M., Caroline B., William 0. and Grace D.

MARTIN STUTEVILLE (deceased), youngest son of John A. Stuteville, was born March 6, 1840. (See sketch of E. C. Stuteville.) He was reared on the farm, and for a number of years was engaged in farming, ani' running farm machinery as threshers, corn shelters, hay bales, etc. In July, 1862, he enlisted in the Fourth Indiana Cavalry, He had served only a few months, however, when he was taken sick, and lay in the hospital, until he was discharged on account of disability. He died August 17, 1883. His death was a great loss, not only to the bereaved wife and family, but to the entire community, where he was known as an enterprising farmer, and an honest, upright citizen. He was married December 6, 1861, to Ann E. Hamilton, a daughter of Hugh Hamilton, whose sketch appears in this work. The children born to this union now living are Martin J., Nancy E., Susan B., Fannie C., Hugh H., Zona, Elijah C. and Ann E. Mrs. Stuteville still lives on the farm, which is the old homestead of her husband's father.

ELBERT M. SWAN, attorney and counselor-at-law, was born in Peoria, Ill., May 30, 1848, the younger of two children born to Thomas J. and Laura A. (Wyman) Swan. The father was a native of the capitol of West Virginia, and there began the study of medicine. He went to Europe, and attended lectures in one of the most renowned medical colleges of France, then returned to this country, and located at Kalamazoo, where he married, his wife being a native of Oswego, N. Y. In 1847 he moved to Peoria, Ill., and about ten years later removed to Wolfe Creek, Ky. From the beginning to the close of the war he was stationed at Louisville, as surgeon of the Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry, and about 1866 came to Spencer County, Ind., making his home here until his death, May 29, 1.881. He was an honest, industrious and esteemed citizen, a moral, upright man, and during his latter years followed the ministry of the Baptist Church. His widow yet survives him, and resides in Rockport. Elbert M. Swan, the immediate subject of this sketch, at sixteen years of age accepted a position in the Quartermaster's Department at Louisville, where he remained until the close of the war. He clerked in Louisville until 1867, when he came to Rockport and attended the Collegiate Institute about two years, afterwards teaching subscription school three years. During this time he completed the Sophmore year of the Indiana State University, also reading law, and in 1874 graduated from the law department of the Cincinnati College. Returning to Rockport he began the practice of his profession, and although now alone in his practice, he has been associated with G. L. Reinhard and C. L. Wedding. June 13, 1877, he married Miss Helen Richardson, daughter of William D. Richardson, a prominent citizen of this county. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Masonic and K. of P. fraternities.

T. J. TAYLOR & Co., founded in 1858 by T. J. Taylor, has at present three partners—T. J. Taylor. B. M. Taylor and Charles W. Halbruge. The senior member of this firm was born September 1, 1811, in Hamilton County, Ohio, and was raised in the city of Cincinnati, where for a number of years he followed mercantile pursuits. He removed to Dearborn County, Ind., when a young man, married Mary E. Moore, and for years was a merchant at Aurora, Ind. In 1858 he moved to Rockport and engaged in the dry goods business, returning to Aurora in 1862, but has ever since retained an interest in the business at this place. B. M. Taylor is a son of T. J. Ta^'.or. He was born at Aurora, Ind., December 1, 1887, and is t^z eldest of four children. When twenty-one years of age he came to Rockport with his father, and since that time has contributed largely to the success of the firm. May 1, 1861, he united in marriage with Annie E. Bliss, a native of Portsmouth, Ohio, and the result of their union is a family of three sons and two daughters—all living. (For sketch of Mr. Halbruge see elsewhere in this volume.) The firm is one of the most reliable, enterprising and , energetic in Rockport, and justly enjoys a large and lucrative trade. f- WILLIAM H. THOMAS, born in Spencer County, Ind., July 25, 1851, is one of three children born to John F. and Mary Ann (Howell) Thomas. The father was born November 17, 1822, in Kentucky, and when quite a small child came with his parents to this county. He was raised on a farm in this county, married his wife here, and subsequently resided in Grass Township ten years, and the remainder of his life in Luce Township, his death occurring September 6, 1865. His father (and grandfather of our subject), William G. Thomas, was a prominent citizen of the county, serving as a Sheriff and Deputy Clerk many years. Mary Ann (Howell) Thomas was born July 28, 1827, a daughter of Mason J. Howell, one of the county's honored pioneers. She died May 10, 1854, he afterward marrying Martha J. Everton, who bore him four children. William H. Thomas was raised on the home farm in Luce Township, received an excellent practical education and taught school to some extent, a part of the time in Rockport. About the year 1875 he was admitted to the bar of the county, having previously read law with Judge De Bruler, and the same year entered into partnership with two prominent attorneys at Evansville, conducting business for the firm at Rockport about two years. For a time he was associated with George L. Rinehard in the practice of his profession, but since the latter's election to the bench has been alone. He is a Republican, a member of the F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., and K. of P. fraternities, and was married May 15, 1878, to Annie L. Asbury, by whom he is the father of two children: Curran A. and John Mason (deceased). Himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church.

DR. JAMES TURPIN, a native of Wayne County, Ky., was born July 17, 1828, the eldest and only surviving of four children born to George K. and Jennie (McDonald) Turpin, both natives of Kentucky. The father was a millwright by trade, his death occurring in Wayne County, in 1850, where also the mother died about the year 1838. The subject of this biography was raised in his native State on a farm, and when eighteen years old went to Evansville, Ind., where he read medicine about two years with Dr. Trafton. He then lived in Alabama one year with an uncle, and in 1850 came to Rockport, Ind., and embarked in mercantile pursuits, continuing about ten years. He helped raise the first company from Spencer County in the war, but owing to the quota then being full the company was not immediately sent into active service. Returning from Indianapolis to Rockport he enlisted in Company A, of the Twenty-eighth Regiment, and participated in the battles of Pine Bluff, Helena, Little Rock and other engagements, was honorably discharged in July, 1865, wearing a sergeant's chevrons. From the close of the war until 1876 he followed contracting and building, also practicing medicine to some extent. In 1878 he entered the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, which graduated him in 1880. Since then he has been engaged in medical pursuits. Dr. Turpin is a Republican and a Mason, and himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church. February 3, 1851, he married Harriet N. Woodward, a native of Ohio, and the following named of the three children born to them are yet living: William K. and Mary Alice.

GEN. JAMES C. VEATCH, born in Harrison County, Ind., December 19, 1819, is the youngest of seven children reared by Isaac and Lucinda (Ramsey) Veatch. The father was born and raised on a farm in Tennessee, and there married his wife who was also a native of that State. About the year 1811 he came to what is now Harrison County, Ind., with his parents, three brothers, and his family, there farming and preaching the Baptist faith until 1823, when he moved to Meade County, Ky., and from there, two years later, to Spencer County, Ind., settling in Luce Township. In 1831 he removed to New Albany, and a year later to Clark County, Ind., which was his home until death. He died of cholera at New Albany July 31,1833, his wife having previously departed this life in Harrison County, September 29, 1822. James C. Veatch resided with his father until the latter's death, securing a fair education from the common schools of that early day. About the year 1833 he returned to the county of his birth, but in March 1835, came to Spencer County where he farmed two years, then resumed educational pursuits, attending the country and Rockport schools and preparing for the teacher's profession. In 1838 he taught his first term of school in Luce Township, and in 1839 was elected principal of the County Seminary at Rockport. In 1841 he was elected Constable of the Ohio Township, but the same year was elected County Auditor in which capacity he served three successive terms. In 1855 he embarked in the practice of law, having for years previously studied privately, and until 1860 continued legal pursuits. la 1856 he was defeated for Congress on the Republican ticket, but in 1860 was elected State Representative. On the breaking out of the Rebellion he was appointed mustering officer and, returning from legislative halls, organized twelve companies of militia in Spencer County, securing for them 250 muskets and a six-pound field piece, giving his individual security to the State for the same. Having been lieutenant-colonel of militia before the war, he was commissioned colonel of the Twenty-fifth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry in August, 18*31, and repaired at once to the scene of conflict. After the battle of Shiloh he was promoted brigadier-general, and after the battle of Mobile was breveted major general. He was seriously wounded at Hatchie River, but with that exception was in active service during the entire war without being disabled. Having contracted rheumatism in the war, it was a number of years afterward before he was able to do active work. He resumed legal pursuits however, and in 1868 was again defeated for Congress. In 1869 he was appointed adjutant-general of Indiana by Gov. Baker, serving as such until 1870, when he was appointed Collector of Internal Revenue for the First District. In 1876 the Second District was added to his territory, but in 1883 it was done away with. Gen. Veatch has been an earnest worker in the ranks of the Republican party ; was a member of the Chicago convention in 1860 that nominated Lincoln for the Presidency, and again in 1884 when Blaine was nominated. He was also Presidential Elector on the Republican ticket in 1884. He is a Free Mason, a member of the G. A. R. and a gentleman well known and respected at home and abroad. June 2,1839. he wedded Eliza J. Anderson, by whom he became the father of nine children, three sons and three daughters now living.

CONRAD VOGEL, of the firm of Vogel & Kehrer, retail liquor dealers, of Rockport, Ind., was born in this county January 16, 1844, and is the youngest child of George Vogel, a native of Germany. George Vogel came to America in 1842, and located on a farm in Huff Township, Spencer County, where he soon after died. His widow married a brother of her first husband, by whom she bore six children. She died July 14, 1864. Our subject received his education in the old log school house of those times. He followed farming until 1872, when he came to Rockport and engaged in the saloon business with his half brother for one year. For a short time afterward he was in the grocery business, and in 1874 he entered into partnership with Conrad Kehrer, with whom he still continues. He began business with a small capital, but by economy and application he has succeeded in securing a good trade and considerable property. In March, 1874, he married Mary Kohler, a native of this county, by whom he is the father of five children. Those now living are Anna M., Maggie K. and Wilhelm C.

RICHARD A. WALKER, one of the oldest and best known merchants of Rockport, was born September 9,1823. in Yorkshire, England, and when eight years old immigrated with his father to the United States, and found employment as clerk in Evansville, Ind. In 1845 he came to Rockport, where he embarked in merchandising and flat-boating, also operating a wharf-boat many years. In April, 1851, he wedded Amanda M. Smith, and to their union six sons and two daughters were born, two of the former being prominent merchants of Rockport. When Mr. Walker first located here, Rockport was but a small village, and he assisted in graveling and grading the streets the first time, and has seen it increase in size and importance to the present time. He was fairly successful in business pursuits until 1868, when he met with reverses from which he is not yet fully recovered. Mr. Walker has seen considerable of the world, having made 103 trips to New Orleans, sixtythree times of which were by flat boats. He also, while in England, rode on the Manchester & Liverpool Railroad, the first in the world. Since 1875 he has been engaged in the grocery trade with his son, John H. He bears the high esteem of all who know him.

JOHN H. WALKER, the oldest son of Richard A. Walker, of whom proper mention is previously made, was born February 3, 1853, and after attending the public schools in youth, completed a good business education at the Rockport Collegiate Institute. He clerked in his father's store and that of E. J. Rogers, a prominent early pioneer of the county, until 1875, when he embarked in the grocery business for himself with a limited capital. Energy, economy and judicious management has increased his financial resources, his trade and his stock, which consists of a full and complete line of groceries, queensware, and in fact everything found in a first-class grocery store. Mr. Walker was married January 31, 1875, to Miss Ida Bodenhamer, a native of Ohio, and by her is tho father of one son, named Guy H. He is a stalwart Republican in politics, and has served two years as town clerk and one year as town treasurer.. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. fraternities, and although a member of no religious denomination, was raised in the Methodist Episcopal faith, his parents having been members of that church for a number of years.

FRED WALKER, dry goods merchant, was born May 5, 1855, being the oldest but one in a family of eight children born to Richard A. and Amanda M. (Smith) Walker, appropriate mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume. Our subject was raised in his native town by his parents, securing a fair education from the public schools in youth, which in later years was greatly increased by much desultory reading. At fourteen years of age he began clerking in a dry goods store in Rockport, but two years later went to Arkansas where he was engaged in clerking two years longer. Returning then to Rockport he was employed a year as a clerk, and as traveling salesman for Louisville shoe manufactory one year. At twenty-one years of age he embarked in the dry goods and gent's furnishing trade in Rockport, in which he has remained to the present time. He keeps a carefully selected and not over-large stock of goods, and by recommending only first-class goods, placing them for sale at reasonable figures and by gentlemanly conduct has made his business a decided success. June 24, 1880, Agnes Fisher, a native of Greencastle, Ind., became his wife, and by him the mother of one daughter—Nellie F. Mr. Walker is a Republican and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE WANDEL, Treasurer of Spencer County, is a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, his birth occurring August 22, 1844. He is the youngest of six children born to the marriage of George Wandel and Catharine Motzer, who were also natives of Germany and where their respective deaths occurred in 1845 and 1858. Under the compulsory law of his native country, our subject attended school until fourteen years old, and then served a short time at the cooper's trade. In December, 1859, he left the land of his birth, and in February, 1860, landed in New Orleans, La., from whence he came direct to Rockport, Ind. He worked at his trade in Grandview and farmed until October, 1861, when he espoused the Union cause and enlisted in Company D, Forty-second Regiment Indiana Infantry as private. He served faithfully until the close of the war and at the battle of Resaca received a severe wound in the head. Returning to Grandview he clerked until 1869, then married, and began in the grocery trade for himself which he continued until 1872, when he engaged in the dry goods trade. In 1882, he traded his store for a farm and in 1883 took a trip to his birth-place in Wurtemberg. Returning to Indiana he farmed until November, 1884, when he was elected Treasurer of the county in which capacity he is now serving. Mr. Wandel is the owner of 400 acres of valuable land, is a prominent Democrat in county politics and is a member of the I. O. O. F., and Masonic fraternities. February 6, 1869, Amelia Brautigam, a native of Germany, became his wife and by him the mother of one son—John E., who died August 4, 1880.

WILLIAM W. WELLS, a native of Brown County. Ohio, was born March 9, 1835. His parents, Jacob and Jemima (Rich) Wells, were natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively. The father located in Brown County,Ohio, with his parents, where he was reared on a farm. He was married, and followed farming in that county until 1847, when he removed to this county, where he lived on a farm in Huff Township until his death in 1862. He was a true Christian gentleman, and himself and wife were members of the Christian Church. William W. Weill, the subject of this memoir, received a good education in youth and prepared himself for teaching, which occupation he followed for five or six years, and during vacation worked on a farm. In 1858 he was elected Surveyor of Spencer County, and filled the office for six years, after which he followed agricultural pursuits until 1868 when, in partnership with James Ross, he engaged in the grocery business at Rockport. In 1875, he sold his interest in the store, and was again elected to the office of county Surveyor, holding the position until 1884, since which he has given his attention to his small farm west of Rockport. December 15, 1859, he wedded Elizabeth F. Stites, a daughter of George W. Stites, a prominent pioneer farmer of the county. Five children have been born to them, only three of whom. Herbert, George and May, are living. Mr. Wells has always been one of the leading Democrats in the county, and both he and wife are members of the Methodist Church.

ELIAS E. WESSELER, born November 27,1849, in Dubois County. Ind., is the youngest of six children of William and Elizabeth (Otting) Wesseler, both parents being natives of Germany. The father, who was a merchant tailor in his native country, came to the United States in 1836. residing two years at Baltimore, one year in Louisville, and until 1856 near Huntingburgh, Ind. In that year he entered into the ministry of the Evangelical Association, in which he has continued to a considerable extent to the present time, at present residing at Olney, Ill. His wife died at Elberfeld, Ind., March 1, 1880. At thirteen years of age our subject began farming in Illinois, at which he continued about three ye..rs. From 1865 to 1867 he attended the N. W. College at Plainfield, Ill., and in the latter year went to Evansville, Ind., and attended the high school of that city five years, working during vacations to defray his expenses. In 1872 he began school teaching in Warrick County, and in 1873 attended Wabash College, at Crawfordsville, one term. He then came to Rockport, taught German two years in the town schools, and was principal of the High School during the term of 1876-77. In 1877 he engaged in the book, stationery, wall paper and picture-frame business, continuing alone until 1882, when the firm of Wesseler & Graham was organized. Mr. Wesseler is a stanch Republican and a member of the K. of P. June 18, 1877, he married Libbie Cotton, who died May 1, 1880, leaving one son—Walter W.

DR. ARTHUR WHITE, one of the leading physicians of Rockport, was born in the city of Baltimore, Md., February 20,1832. He is a son of Samuel K. and Mary M. (Hoffman) White, the former being a native of Springfield, Mass., and of Puritan ancestors. The mother was a native of Baltimore, Md., and was married in her native city to our subject's father. Mr. White followed merchandising in various parts of Maryland with varied success, until his death near Baltimore, about the close of the Rebellion, his widow still living in that city. Dr. Arthur White in youth assisted his parents and attended the public schools, and later attended Alleghany County College, at Cumberland, Md., two years. He then read medicine under the tuition of Dr. Charles Ohr, of Cumberland, then entered the University of Baltimore, graduating from the medical department of that institution in 1854. Locating in West Virginia first, he there practiced nearly one year, and in December, 1854, came to Spencer County, Ind., arriving at Rockport on the 24th of that month Here he has ever since remained in active practice, with the exception of the time while serving as surgeon of the Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and to-day ranks among the ablest physicians of southern Indiana. October 16, 1856, he married Caroline M. Mears, of Hamilton County, Ohio, by whom he is the father of four children, named Mary Abbie, Esther Charlotte, Charles Raymond and Genevieve. Dr. White is a stanch Republican in politics, and himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.

DANIEL P. WILLIAMSON, a prominent farmer of Ohio Township, came to Spencer County in 1833, and worked as a wood-chopper in order to get money enough to enter a small tract of land near the place where he now resides. November 9, 1834, he was joined in marriage with Mary McKey, a native of Kentucky, and took up his residence on his land which he cleared and improved, undergoing the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life. He started in life with no capital, and by hard labor and strict economy has succeeded in accumulating quite a competency. His wife died September 7, 1876, leaving three children : Mary E., widow of Robert Miller; Leafy S., wife of John Sanders; and Alice A., wife of Charles F. Niles. Two children are deceased. Mr. Williamson is a stanch Republican, and has been a consistent member of the Methodist Church for forty years. He was born in Hardin County, Ky., February 17,1811, and grew to manhood in his native State. His father, a native of Ireland, came to the United States about 1800, and located in Pennsylvania, where he married Mary Martin. Later he moved to Virginia, thence to Hardin County, Ky., where he died in 1844. His wife died a year later.

COL. JAMES S. WRIGHT, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of Ohio Township, was born June 7, 1832, in Spencer Co., Ind., being the youngest of four children born to Jeffry and Narcissis (Barnett) Wright. The father was a native of Kentucky, but came with his parents to what is now Spencer County, Ind., in 1808, locating nearly a mile from the river and two and a half miles below the present site of Rockport. Here Jeffry Wright was reared, and here his parents died. After his marriage with the daughter of John N. Barnett, one of the earliest pioneers of this locality, he was, for a number of years an associate Judge of the Probate Court. He continued to reside in Ohio Township until 1840, when he sold out, moved to White County, Ill., but six years later returned to this county and farmed on Section 24 in Ohio Township until his death, March 12, 1868. Our subject's mother died when he was two years and a half old, his father afterward marrying a Miss Nancy Sallee, who bore him five children and died. Mrs. Emelie Roberts became Jeffry Wright's third wife, and by him the mother of four children. James S. Wright, the immediate subject of this biography, was raised on a farm to manhood, receiving a good ordinary education. Preparing himself for the teacher's profession, he made that his occupation until 1861, when he helped recruit the first company raised in Spencer County for the war. He was elected first lieutenant, and the company was designated E, of the Twenty-fifth Indiana Regiment Volunteer Infantry, a detailed history of which is given elsewhere in this volume. Mr. Wright served his country with fidelity and distinction until the close of the war, having been promoted from his first position to the captaincy of Company H, then major and then lieutenant-colonel of his regiment. After the war he followed flat-boating on the river a number of years, and also for six years during the time was engaged in merchandising at Rockport. In 1876 and 1877 he was government storekeeper under Gen. Veatch, his old cops commander, who was internal revenue collector for this district, but in the last-named year began farming, at which he has since continued with considerable success. November 30,1867, Col. Wright wedded Clara Williamson, who died of small pox, December 3, 1871, the only death of that disease in Rockport, after bearing one son—Will M. He was married December 20, 1877, to Elizabeth Gentry, his present wife, by whom he is the father of one son—James G. Mr. Wright is a stanch Republican in politics, and at the close of the war was elected to represent his county in the lower house of the State Legislature. He is enterprising and thorough going in all his efforts, and himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

ISAAC WRIGHT, a prominent pioneer citizen, is the only living representative of a family of five children born to the marriage of Isaac B. Wright and Clarissa Berry. The father came to Spencer County with his mother about the beginning of the present century, and located two miles southwest of the present site of Rockport. He was lieutenant of militia in the war of 1812, and was one of the first merchants of Rockport, where he continued in business until his death in 1825. The mother was a daughter of Capt. William Berry, a soldier of the Revolutionary war, and one of the prominent early settlers of the county. She died in 1842, as the widow of Peregrine Alpha, whom she married a few years after her first husband's death. Isaac lived for a number of years with Richard Brown, and at the age of fourteen began boating on the river, and; later in the Gulf of Mexico. He thus aided his mother in supporting herself and the children left by her second husband. After a few years he returned to this county, and engaged in farming on land entered by his father. In 1841 he married Eliza B. Hall, who died three years later, having borne him two children, both of whom died in infancy. Two or three years later he wedded Amanda Greathouse, who only lived one year. In 1850 he went to California as a gold seeker,* where he met with fair success. In 1852 he returned to Spencer County and married Eliza J. Woodruff, and lived on a river farm until 1865, when he bought the place where he now resides. By his last marriage Mr. Wright is the father of six living children. He has been very successful in business, and now owns over 600 acres of land. He is a Republican, and a member of the I. O. O. F. His wife is a member of the Methodist Church. JACOB YOUNG (deceased) was born in Hardin County, Ky., in 1801, and was a son of Adam and Rachel (Uncel) Young. He came to Spencer County when about twelve or fourteen years old, and lived on the farm with his brother-in-law, Barney Miller, until his marriage. That event took place October 3, 1834, when he wedded Phebe Hamilton, a daughter of Samuel Hamilton, and a native of the county. After marriage he located on a farm near Rockport, where he followed farming until his death, which occurred December 11, 1877. He was well known throughout the county as a very successful farmer, and an honest, upright citizen. He left a wife and five children: Parisade (now Mrs. John Harvey), Mary J. (wife of Miles H. Hamilton), Andrew J., James P. and Margaret R., wife of Edward Enoch. Mrs. Young is still living on her farm on Section 29, Ohio Township, with her son-in-law, Mr. Enoch, who manages the place.



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