Governor of Iowa
Pardons and Remissions
From January 18, 1872, To January 23, 1874.

J. C. Jerome

February 16, 1872. J. C. Jerome. Committed, July 4, 1871, from Butler county to penitentiary for one year, for larceny. He was pardoned for the reason that it was believed that the ends of justice had been fully answered for the offense committed by the time he had already suffered incarceration. He was an old man, being 60 years of age, and not of very strong mind. From all the evidence before me, I was satisfied that he was the victim, to some extent, of more wily criminals; and from the fact that he had plead guilty and by his evidence brought the real criminals to justice, in connection with the request of district attorney Powers, who prosecuted him; the district-judge, Hon. Geo. W. Ruddick; and many other good citizens, who agreed in the statement that this was his first offense, I have thought him a proper subject for clemency.

…..

John Heiser

Feb. 16, 1872. John Heiser. Committed, February 8, 1872, from Scott county to penitentiary for three mouths, for forgery. Pardon was issued for the following reasons, viz.: All the witnesses for the prosecution, with the district-attorney and the district-judge, united in the petition for pardon. The convict was represented to me by all the parties who knew him as an industrious and hard-working man; that at the time of committing the offense he was laboring under great trouble both financial and domestic, which had so wrought upon his mind as to render him almost unconscious of the consequences of his acts; and that he really committed this his first offense without realizing that it was a crime. When made aware of the criminal character of his act he plead guilty, alleging his innocence of guilty intent, and threw himself upon the mercy of the court. His sentence was for as short a term as it was possible for the court to affix, under the law. But in my judgment, in view of all the circumstances, his seemed a proper case for clemency, and I accordingly pardoned him.

…..

Fred Wagoner

March 14, 1872. Fred Wagoner. Committed, January 24, 1872, from Warren county to penitentiary for eighteen months, for feloniously aiding a prisoner legally confined in the county jail in an attempt to escape. He was sentenced to the county jail for six months for lewdness. Whilst serving his time in jail, a fellow-prisoner and himself broke out; and although he did not get outside of the building, after leaving the door of the cell, he was sentenced to a term in the penitentiary which seemed to be largely disproportioned to his original offense. And a large number of the citizens, believing he had suffered sufficiently for his crime, petitioned for his pardon. This request was indorsed by the district judge, district-attorney, all the county officers, and several of the jurors. He was therefore pardoned.

…..

Joseph Metz

March 18, 1872. Joseph Metz. Committed, February 1, 1870, from Des Moines county to penitentiary for three years, for burglary and larceny. He had served out more than half his time, his conduct as a prisoner being unexceptionable; when he was caught in some of the machinery of the polishing shop, was thrown several times violently around the main shaft against the ceiling overhead, and the neighboring journals on the shaft, until he was so severely injured that his life was despaired of for weeks, and was only saved by the amputation of both legs below the knees, from which he is disabled for life. In view of these facts, in connection with the fact that he had been a good prisoner, and a faithful observer of the rules of the prison, as testified to by the warden, I was of opinion he had suffered sufficiently for his crime, and he was accordingly pardoned.

…..

Charles W. Smith

March 27, 1872. Charles W. Smith. Committed, March 26, 1872, from Polk county to penitentiary for six months, for forgery. He was pardoned for the reason that he was but a boy a little over eighteen, was a foreigner by birth, and, having been in this country but a little over a year, had but limited knowledge of our language and customs. It was strongly suspected by many who were present at the trial that he had been made the dupe of older criminals; and as the forged check upon which he attempted to procure money was not paid, and as no one suffered by the attempt, it was thought several months' imprisonment in the county jail was a sufficient punishment. His pardon was requested by the entire bar present at the trial, by nearly all the jury before which he was tried, and by the grand jury that indicted him.

…..

Franklin P. Nott

April 5, 1872. Franklin P. Nott. Committed, September 16, 1871, from Page county to penitentiary for two years, for larceny. This pardon was granted on the ground of the extreme youth of the prisoner, the fact that it was his first offense, that he had not been much from home, and, being away from home at this time, falling in with one Charles Gould, an older man and conversant with the arts of crime, he was doubtless overreached by him, and became his dupe. These reasons are sustained by a petition by large numbers of the most respectable citizens of Hardin county, by several of the county officers, by Judge Chase, an acquaintance of the family, by Col. Hepburn, of Page county, who defended him, by Col. Morledge who prosecuted, by several of the county officials of Page county, and by Judge McDill, before whom he was tried. Thinking he had been sufficiently punished for his offense, he was fully pardoned.

…..

A. L. Dunn

May 10, 1872. A. L. Dunn. Committed, October 23, 1871, from Des Moines county to penitentiary for two years, for grand larceny. He was pardoned for the following reasons: It was represented to me as being his first offense, and that prior to the offense he had been sick for a long time, and had become so reduced as to have been sorely tempted; that he had a family needing his aid and partial support; that he had been a faithful Union soldier during the war for the suppression of the rebellion; that he was believed by petitioners for his pardon to be a reformed and repentant man, and it was also universally testified by his neighbors who signed the petition that before this offense he had always borne the character of an honest, industrious, and. temperate man. From these reasons, and from the fact that the judge before whom he was tried, the county officers of Des Moines county, the senator and representatives from that county, besides many more of its most reliable and distinguished citizens, asked his discharge from the penitentiary that he might return to their county and to his home, I granted a full and unconditional pardon, except that it will not work a remission of the costs of prosecution.

…..

James M. Bell

June 6, 1872. James M. Bell. Committed, July 22, 1870, from Pottawattamie county, to penitentiary for six years, for manslaughter. Pardoned on the ground that, from his youth when he committed the crime, from the very aggravated provocation which he seemed to have received from the person whom he killed, from his good behavior in the penitentiary, and from his manifest penitence, he seemed to me to have been sufficiently punished for his crime. The petition for his pardon was signed by the jury that convicted him, the district-attorney and the assistant district-attorney who prosecuted the case, the county officers of Pottawattamie county, and a large number of the citizens of the county, and by many other parties who interested themselves in his behalf. All these petitions were accompanied by a letter from the warden of the penitentiary certifying to his uniform good conduct while a prisoner.

…..

Chas. Deberg

July 22, 1872. Chas. Deberg. Committed, March 25, 18V2, from Henry county to penitentiary for five years, for larceny. Deberg was convicted mainly on the testimony of one Harrison McClain, who claimed that Deberg was his accomplice in the crime. McClain subsequently confessed under oath, and voluntarily, that the testimony he had given on the trial was false, and that Deberg was entirely innocent. The district-judge stated that this development only corroborated his own impressions received during the trial, and the attorney prosecuting the case asserted under oath that McClain's testimony on the trial was vital to the success of the prosecution; and, that failing, there was no evidence of guilt; the petit jurors condemning him made similar statements; and the county officers united with all the foregoing in asking the pardon. Moreover, the emphatic testimony of Ellwood Ozbun, with whom Deberg was living at the time of his conviction, as to the latter's character and habits, taken in connection with the other statements mentioned, left little doubt in my mind that Deberg was unjustly imprisoned.

…..

Patrick Dempsey

July 22, 1872. Patrick Dempsey. Committed, December 13, 1870, from Clinton county to penitentiary for two years, for larceny. The offense consisted in stealing some hams and shoulders, of which he plead guilty. His time, owing to diminution earned, being nearly out, and his family without means, he was pardoned at the solicitation of Rev. F. C. Jean, Rev. S. F. Wielaud, the district-judge, the district attorney, Hon. J. J. Mathews, N. Corning, J. S. Darling, and. Denis Danehy, the city recorder, and fifty-five other citizens of Lyons.

…..

George Edwards

July 26, 1872. George. Edwards. Committed, January 12, 1872, from Des Moines county to penitentiary for one year and nine months, for larceny. Convicted, with A. L. Dunn, pardoned May 10, 1872, of grand larceny upon his own plea of guilty. Released on petition of the district-attorney, Hon. B. J. Hall, the clerk of the courts, the county treasurer, the county auditor, Messrs. W. W. Baldwin, Samuel K. Tracy, T. J. Trulock, J. S. Dodge, D. Y. Overton, and other citizens of Des Moines county, setting forth the needy condition of prisoner's family, a belief that his punishment already endured (having been several months in county jail) was sufficient, and that the ends of justice would be fully subserved without his further confinement as a felon. The district-judge joined the petitioners in asking the pardon.

…..

Dan Simmons

July 27, 1872. Dan Simmons. Committed, December 1, 1870, from Linn county, to penitentiary for five years, for larceny. This was a conditional pardon granted upon the condition that Simmons should leave the State and remain permanently beyond its limits. It was granted upon the earnest recommendation to me of a brother of the convict, who desired to take him back to Connecticut, by Governor Jewell of Connecticut, also the State Treasurer, and other well-known citizens of that State. It was also recommended by Mr. Churchill, who had employed Simmons for years prior to his crime, and in whose employment he was at the time of his arrest; by Hon. J. S. McClure and many other citizens of Fairfax, Linn county; and Col. W. B. Leach and Hon. A. R. West, of Cedar Rapids; all of whom believed him not to be an evil-disposed person naturally, but that he had been led into crime by bad associations and temporary bad habits.

…..

Wm. A. Betts

August 19, 1872. Wm. A. Betts. Committed, December 23, 1868, from Cedar county, to penitentiary for five years, for forgery. He was pardoned upon the earnest solicitation, by petition, of a large number of the citizens of Cedar county, the county in which his family lived; also upon the application of Hon. W. G. Thompson, district-attorney, Hon. James H. Rothrock, district-judge, Hon. Sylvanus Yates, judge of the circuit court, and others. Betts was believed to be thoroughly reformed. He was a diminutive, deformed man, weak in body and mind; and in view of these facts, together with the statement of the warden of his uniform good conduct, I deemed it my duty to pardon him.

…..

Lambert Meyer

August 31, 1872. Lambert Meyer. Committed, January 1, 1867, from Dubuque county, to penitentiary for ten years, for assault with intent to commit a rape. He was, at the time the crime was alleged to have been committed, well along in years, was a carpenter by trade, and a German of industrious habits. On this occasion, he had, with several others, been drinking beer in a saloon, and was somewhat intoxicated, as were several more in the party, of whom the woman, who was the prosecuting witness, was one. It is thought by many that there was no real foundation for the accusation. But, if admitted to be true, the sentence, in view of the circumstances, was unusual in its severity, and as both Wardens Heisey and Craig recommended him for exceptionally good conduct as a prisoner, I have deemed it my duty to pardon him.

…..

John Oaks

September 11, 1872. John Oaks. Committed, May 11, 1870, from Buchanan county to penitentiary for one year, and to pay a fine of $100, f or manslaughter. Pardoned upon the application of the Board of Supervisors of Buchanan county, all the county officers, Hon. W. G. Donnan, Hon. G. W. Bernis, Hon. Maturin L. Fisher, of Clayton county (to whom the circumstances were well known), Hon. Win. Mills, of Dubuque, Hon. J. S. Woodward, Hon. Jacob Rich, Hon. James Burt, judge of the district court, before whom he was tried, and many others, as well as from my own sense of what was right under the circumstances, after thoroughly examining the evidence in the case. It was shown by this evidence that a number of men went to the house of Oaks, who was a very poor man, and who had recently moved into the county, to charivari a son-in-law and daughter, then recently married. They continued their semi-barbarous carousals about the house until after midnight, throwing stones upon the roof, pounding the door, yelling with unearthly hideousness, firing guns, &c. After this had continued for hours, Oaks mildly protested, but was told with curses and insults that they would be back the next-night, and expected to keep it up for two weeks. The next night they returned, and repeated the barbarisms of the night before, finally breaking in the door of the house. At this instant, Oaks, greatly frightened and excited, seized his gun and fired out into the darkness, killing the leader of the rioters. It is seldom that there is a justifiable homicide, but if one can be imagined this, in my judgment, is a case in point. And as Oaks had already been severely punished by imprisonment in the county jail, and the delays and embarrassments of a long trial, I believed him a proper subject for clemency.

…..

Andrew P. Sanderland or Suderland

October 21, 1872. Andrew P. Sanderland, or Suderland. Committed, June 14, 1871, from Winneshiek county to penitentiary for two years for assault with intent to commit a rape. I was informed by the warden and through him by the physician and surgeon of the penitentiary that S. was subject to hallucinations, which the physician thought would run into insanity. The mental troubles seeming to originate in anxiety about his family, it was believed by the authorities of the prison that a removal to the hospital for the insane would not benefit him, and that reunion with his family seemed to afford the only means for staying the progress of the mental disease. Concurring in these views I released him.

…..

Joseph Brannan

December 21, 1872. Joseph Brannan. Committed March 20, 1872, from Marion county to penitentiary for one year, for assault with intent to commit murder, and also for one year for assault with intent to commit great bodily injury. This offense was committed against O. B. Ayers, Esq., and resulted from a disagreement which had taken place during the trial of a lawsuit in which Ayers was attorney and Brannan a witness. The pardon of Brannan was petitioned for by nearly if not quite all his neighbors; was recommended by Mr. Ayers, the prosecutor; by Judge Sampson, before whom he was tried; by ex-Gov. Win. M. Stone, Senator McCormack, and a large number of citizens of Marion county who had long known Brannan and were conversant with the circumstances of the crime. In view of these facts, together with the age and infirmities of the man, and the helplessness of his family, I granted the pardon.

…..

George Barnum

January 9, 1873. George Barnum. Committed, December 16, 1869, from Lee county to penitentiary for ten years, for larceny. This was a boy at the time of his conviction arid sentence, who, owing to unfortunate family difficulties, had been left on the world to care for himself ; and, falling into bad company, was led into evil habits and into the commission of crime. Imprisonment at the penitentiary with its rigid but kind discipline seemed to have made a thorough change in him. His mother, who must lean on him for support in declining years, urgently appealed for his pardon, an appeal which was strongly indorsed by the present and late district-judges, before both of whom George had appeared for trial, the present district-attorney, Mr. John Van Valkenburg, special prosecuting attorney in the case, the adjutant-general of the state, nine of the trial jurors, the county auditor, Mr. Wm. Shaw, a sufferer by his crime, and others. Believing that, although the boy's offenses had been grave, his youth, and the years of punishment he had already undergone, fully warranted his release, I granted the pardon in full confidence that it would be the means of restoring to society one who would thus become a useful man.

…..

Margaret Adamson

January 14, 1873. Margaret Adamson. Committed, April 19, 1872, from Webster county to penitentiary for one year and six months, for assault with intent to commit murder. This was a conditional pardon, granted upon the application of the warden, and at the earnest solicitation of the late Mrs. Craig. The condition of the pardon was that Mrs. A. should leave the state, and remain without its jurisdiction, unless permitted by the Governor of the state to return.

……

Fred W. Mueller

February 13, 1873. Fred. W. Mueller. Committed December 14, 1872, from Dubuque county to penitentiary for six months, for seduction. Mueller to pay costs of prosecution. Made unconditional February 19, 1873. Mueller was tried in the district court of Dubuque county for the crime, of which a temporary inmate of his family was alleged to have been the victim, and sentenced to six months' confinement in the county jail. He had been a resident of the village of Epworth for years, was a wagon-maker by trade, and had always borne a spotless reputation, and was much devoted to his family. It was therefore believed, from these and various other circumstances within the knowledge of his neighbors, that it was doubtful as to his guilt. From the very general petition of his neighbors, and from the personal representations made to me by Hon. B. B. Richards, State senator, and Hon. Fred O'Donnell and General Booth of the House of Representatives, and also Judge Wilson, before whom he was tried, ex-Gov. Hempstead, county auditor, and the board of supervisors, I felt constrained to grant the pardon.

…..

Wm. Edwards

February 27, 1873. Win. Edwards. Committed, June 18, 1868, from Henry county to penitentiary for twenty years, for rape. Edwards, so far as he was known in Mt. Pleasant, where he had lived previous to this offense, was an inoffensive and industrious colored man. When pardoned, he had been five years in the penitentiary. His conduct, as certified by the warden and deputy, had been unexceptionable, and from many circumstances which had come to the knowledge of persons acquainted with the evidence and parties in this case it was believed that there was no truth in the original accusation. Therefore, upon the recommendations of Judge Beck, Hon. John P. Grantham, clerk of the court of Henry county at the time of the trial, W. T. Spearman, J. N. Allen, Rev. Joseph McDowell, chaplain of the penitentiary, and others, and in view of all these facts, I was impressed that it was my duty to pardon him.

…..

Henry Morton

March 8, 1873. Henry Morton. Committed September 17, 1872, from Lee county to penitentiary for three years, for manslaughter. He was pardoned on application of Col. Wm. Patterson, Mayor Rothert, and a large number of the citizens of Keokuk who had known the prisoner, and were conversant with the character of the crime and the circumstances which palliated the offense. The recommendation was indorsed by Judge Tracy, before whom the case was tried, and district attorney Sprague, who was the prosecutor. The pardon was upon the further ground, that it seemed to me there was very much to palliate an offense committed under circumstances of such aggravation; it appearing that the deceased, who had seduced Morton's wife, took occasion whenever he saw Morton to publicly taunt him with having a wife whom he had debauched.

…..

Frank Millmeier

March 10, 1873. Frank Millmeier. Committed, December 15, 1868, from Lee county to penitentiary for ten years for placing obstructions on railroad track. Pardoned at the earnest solicitation of a large number of the best citizens of Lee county, among them Chief Justice Beck, Hon. D. F. Miller, Gen. Clark, Lt. Wever, and Messrs. J. M. Casey, John Van Valkenburg, and Joseph Holhnan. It was also believed that the offense originally was the work of a young and weak-minded boy who did not fully appreciate the consequences of his acts, and was not really committed with criminal intent. He was also shown to have been a good boy, and it was hoped his pardon would aid in producing permanent reformation. Furthermore, there were good reasons, developed subsequent to the trial, to suspect perjury on the part of the leading witness for the prosecution, whereby M.'s conviction was secured.

…..

Jesse Knouse

March 10, 1873, Jesse Knouse. Committed, March 19, 1872, from Taylor county to penitentiary for five years, for manslaughter. The crime of which Knouse was convicted was committed in the county of Taylor, being removed to Ringgold county on change of venue. From the representations which were made to me, I regarded him as deserving the clemency asked for him. Hon. Henry O'Connor, Hon. D. C. Cloud, of Muscatine, (where he had formerly lived,) and Hon. T. V. Shoup, of Bedford, Taylor county, interested themselves in his behalf, whilst Mr. Jas. E. Houghland, and Hon. Charles Wilson, of Washington county, and Hon. J. Q. Tufts, of Cedar county, strongly recommended his pardon. In addition to this, I felt his case strongly appealed to me for clemency. He had always lived an honest life, and was a simple-minded and timid man; but was beset in a manner which drove him almost to desperation, and finally was attacked by armed men. Then at first he attempted to reach his house by flight, but was so nearly overhauled that he was afraid of his life and turned upon his pursuers; and after warning them not to come further, and they still advancing, he fired, and one of them was killed. He having left at home an aged wife and blind son, (who lost his sight in the war,) both dependent upon him for support; and having already suffered severe punishment by his imprisonment, besides having his property stripped from him during his trial, I deemed him a proper subject for executive clemency.

…..

Samuel Richards

March 14, 1873. Samuel Richards. Committed, November 21, 1871, from Hardin county to penitentiary for two and a half years for bigamy and adultery. The offense consisted of marrying and cohabiting with Eliza J. Hoover, although he had another living wife. He was sentenced to one year's imprisonment in the penitentiary on one charge, and a year and a half on the other. The petition for his pardon was presented more than a year before it was granted. It contains the names of a large number of his old neighbors and friends, the jury before which he was tried, most of the county officers, and was especially urged by Hon. James D. Thompson, on the ground that the said Richards was an ignorant man, and supposed that he had been divorced from his first wife, as he had sent her money upon the understanding that she would obtain a divorce; and that, in view of facts appearing subsequent to the trial, even if he was guilty of an offense against the law, the punishment which he had already suffered is sufficient.

…..

Edward E. Eaton

April 4, 1873. Edward E. Eaton. Committed, February 20, 1873, from Wapello county to penitentiary for six months, for aiding a prisoner to escape from jail. It appears that he was imprisoned in the county jail for the trivial offense of having had a dispute with a commercial traveler, who afterwards made oath that young Eaton had threatened his life. Upon this statement he was brought before a justice of the peace, and among strangers, without counsel or defense, was sent to jail in default of $300 bail to keep the peace. Breaking jail, and helping another prisoner to escape, upon recapture and a confession of guilt he was sentenced to six months' imprisonment in the penitentiary. The judge then ordered that he should be detained in the county jail for a time to allow his friends opportunity to make an effort to secure his pardon. Under this order he remained imprisoned in the jail for two months, which would leave him less than four months to remain in the penitentiary, if this time should be counted as part of his term of imprisonment. This being briefly the state of the case, and it being represented to me that Eaton is a young man without criminal intent, and having no thought of offending against the law in his original dispute, which led to his troubles, and that he had already received punishment enough for any indiscretions of which he might subsequently have been guilty; I therefore, in compliance with the earnest petition of Hon. Edward H. Stiles, Hon. H. B. Hendershott, Mr. E. L. Burton, Mr. O. M. Ladd, the clerk and deputy clerk of the district court of Wapello county, sheriff and deputy sheriff, and nine others, including all the members of the bar of the county, granted him a full pardon.

…..

Martin Polson

April 8, 1873. Martin Polson. Committed, August 23, 1870, from Decatur county to penitentiary for eight years, for robbery. He was pardoned for the following reasons: It was shown to me by petition, as well as by the evidence, that when the crime was committed he was comparatively a youth, being only some seventeen years old; that he had been led into the crime by two old and experienced criminals, who had been stopping at the house of young Polson's father, who was keeping at the time a kind of hotel; that the young man prior to that time had led a correct life, and had never been guilty of any crime; and that after his incarceration in the penitentiary he had conducted himself unexceptionably, as testified by the warden. Therefore, and in view of the almost unanimous petition of the neighbors and acquaintances of the young man—the following persons being among those asking for his pardon: J. W. Penney, John W. Harvey, Hon. C. M. Bridges, Geo. Woodbury, ex-sheriff, De Witt C. Hays, Dr. John S. Finley, and four hundred and nine others,—I deemed it my duty to remit a part of the time for which he had been sentenced.

……

B. N. Moore

April 16, 1873. B. N. Moore. Committed from Henry county to penitentiary for ten years, for murder in the second degree. Granted on the application of Hon. Joshua W. Satterthwaite, Messrs. James B. Shaw, (chairman of the board of supervisors of Henry county,) W. I. Babb, Leroy G. Palmer, W. D. Leedham, J. P., the chaplain of the penitentiary, G. L. Stempel, (formerly hospital steward of the penitentiary,) and over sixty others, who urged the pardon on the ground of sufficiency of punishment. The chief justice of the state also expressed the belief that Moore should be the subject of executive clemency. These views coincided with my own, formed upon seeing the prisoner and upon information derived from the prison authorities. Advanced in years, infirm, and to all appearance truly penitent, he impressed me as one who had been punished to the full extent of the demands of justice.

…..

John J. Shickle

June 27, 1873. John J. Shickle. Committed February 28, 1873, in Dallas county to county jail, for five months, for bigamy. The sentence was to pay a fine of $300, and to be imprisoned two months, unless fine was sooner secured, when stay would be granted; if not paid within two months, Shickle was to stand committed for ninety days. The release is conditioned upon his giving his parol, under oath before the clerk of the district court, that he will not, until the expiration of the term of his sentence, depart from within the corporate limits of the town of Adel, on pain of being again incarcerated for the remainder of the term of his sentence, including such period as he may have been at liberty under his parole.

…..

D. Warren Martin

July 17, 1873. D. Warren Martin. Committed December 1, 1870, from Linn county to penitentiary for eight years, for larceny. Jointly indicted with Dan Simmons, to whom was granted a conditional pardon July 27, 1872. Pardoned on application of thirty-three persons, among whom were Messrs. S. W. Rathbun, I. M. Preston, A. J. McKean, J. P. Coulter, and R. T. Wilson, setting forth the youth and inexperience of Martin at the time the offense was committed and that he was rather misled into the crime; and urging the case as one particularly deserving of clemency. After some hesitation, I became satisfied that the ends of justice would be fully subserved by the granting of the pardon, which was accordingly done, with the full approval and at the request of the district-attorney.

…..

Henry Bunt

September 19, 1873. Henry Bunt. Committed, April 10, 1872, from Henry county, to penitentiary for seven years for manslaughter. According to the statement of ten of the jurors who tried Bunt, Albert Bramble, the person killed, provoked the affray which resulted in his death; the blow given was without intention on the part of Bunt to produce death, or even great bodily injury; and the result was a very improbable one, more accidental than otherwise, and was immediately followed by such assistance and offices of humanity toward the injured person as were inconsistent with the idea of deep moral guilt on the part of Bunt. Other evidence went to show Bunt's uniformly good character and habits previous to his crime. He was a member of the Twenty-third Missouri Volunteers, and served four years, and, as a testimonial from his commanding officer showed, faithfully and honorably. The mayor of Mt. Pleasant, Messrs. John B. Lash, George B. Corkhill, T. H. Whiting, T. H. Bereman, Frank Hatton, George C. Van Allen, and some one hundred and twenty other citizens of Henry county, including the supervisors and other county officers, recommended the pardon, a recommendation which was concurred in by the district-judge and district-attorney.

…..

W. F. Kerr

December 22, 1873. W. F. Kerr. Committed, May, 7, 1873, for eighteen months, for larceny. Kerr was convicted on unsupported testimony of an accomplice, as was claimed and set forth in petitions of county officers and deputies, and two hundred and thirty-two citizens of Jones county. His health, owing to disease contracted during a term of service, in the army, was so seriously impaired as to incapacitate him for work. On the latter ground, the judge and district-attorney trying him recommended unconditional pardon. The prisoner was removed to the additional penitentiary shortly after his committal at Fort Madison, and was the first person released from the new prison by pardon.

…..

Terms of Punishment Nearly Expired

The following named persons, whose terms of punishment had nearly expired, allowing for diminution earned, were released for reasons set forth in the accompanying communication:

Wm. H. Hamilton

October 25, 1872. Wm. H. Hamilton. Committed to penitentiary from Madison county February 1, 1872, for larceny, for term of two years. Had only eight days to serve.

…..

William Hockingberry

December 21, 1872. William Hockingberry. Committed, January 15, 1870, to penitentiary for three years for larceny in Johnson county. Had only twenty-four days to serve.

…..

Thomas Foley

September 9, 1873. Thomas Foley. Committed to the penitentiary. May 6, 1873, for six months, for larceny in Marshall county.

…..

John H. Howe

November 14, 1873. John H. Howe. Committed, April 3, 1872, to penitentiary for two years for larceny in Jasper county. Had only fifty days to serve.

[Special Message of the Governor of Iowa to the Fifteenth General Assembly,
Communicating Report Of Pardons And Remissions From January 18, 1872, To January 23, 1874.]

………………………………………………………..

Remissions Of Fines And Forfeitures.

Fines.

Margaret McLean, N. B. Hall & Mary A. Hall

March 25, 1872. Margaret McLean, N. B. Hall, and Mary A. Hall. Jones county. Penalty, $150 fine and costs. Fine remitted.

…..

Barnett Sparks

May 13, 1872. Barnett Sparks. Polk county. Penalty, $400 fine and costs, and to be imprisoned until the same be paid. The penalty of imprisonment remitted on "condition that said Sparks shall refrain "from any acts in violation of law, and from the traffic in intoxicating drinks. Upon violation of this condition, or any part thereof, this "conditional remission to be liable to summary revocation."

…..

Joshua Redmond

February 13, 1873. Joshua Redmond. Polk county. Penalty. $300 and costs. Fine remitted.

Same date. Same. Penalty, $100 and costs. Fine remitted.

…..

John Butcher

September 2, 1873. John Butcher. Louisa county. Penalty, $100 fine and costs. Fine remitted.

…..

Henry Dennis

January 15, 1874. Henry Dennis. Davis county. Penalty, $20 fine and costs. Fine remitted.

Same date. Same. Penalty $50 fine and costs. Fine remitted.

…..

[Special Message of the Governor of Iowa to the Fifteenth General Assembly,
Communicating Report Of Pardons And Remissions From January 18, 1872, To January 23, 1874.]

Forfeitures.

Amos L. Shangle

March 11, 1873. Amos L. Shangle, Marion county. Forfeiture, $1,000. $500 remitted.

…..

G. A. & Mrs. Anna Salmon

March 25, 1873. G. A. and Mrs. Anna Salmon, Lee county. Forfeiture of $800 remitted.

…..

B. S. Bennett

May 8, 1873. B. S. Bennett, Mills county. Forfeiture $700, of which $350 was remitted.

June 17, 1873. Same. Remainder of forfeiture, viz.: $350, remitted.

[Special Message of the Governor of Iowa to the Fifteenth General Assembly,
Communicating Report Of Pardons And Remissions From January 18, 1872, To January 23, 1874.]


Copyright © Genealogy Trails
All data on this website is Copyright by Genealogy Trails with full rights reserved for original submitters.