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History and Genealogy
of
Clayton County Iowa

 


Clayton County
Biographies

Charles S. Adams

Charles S. Adams has been for nearly thirty years one of the representative business men and popular and influential citizens of Volga, where he has been engaged in the general merchandise business since 1888, as senior member of the well-known and representative firm of Adams & White, in which his coadjutor is Edward W. White. He has been a resident of the Hawkeye state since he was a lad of six years and is a scion not only of one of the prominent and influential families of this commonwealth but also one that was founded in New England in the early colonial era of our national history.

Mr. Adams was born in the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, on the 7th of May, 1851, and is a son of Captain Shubael P. and Lydia E. (Stetson) Adams, both likewise natives of the historic old Bay State, where the latter passed her entire life, her death having occurred in 1853, and the subject of this review being the younger of her two children; the older child, Mary, is now in San Francisco, Cal.

Captain Adams was reared and educated in Massachusetts, where he became a successful representative of the legal profession and where he served as a member of the state legislature from 1845 to 1857. In the latter year he became one of the pioneer representatives of his profession in the city of Dubuque, Iowa, where he built up a practice that gave him distinction as one of the leading members of the bar of this state. He united with the Republican party at the time of its organization and was one of the most prominent and influential advocates of its principles and policies to be found in Iowa at the time of the climacteric period leading up to the Civil War. He was a specially forceful and effective stump speaker and did yeoman service in stumping Iowa in support of Abraham Lincoln when that great man became the Republican candidate for president of the United States. He gained his military title as provost marshal, Third Dist. Iowa, in the great conflict through which the integrity of the Union was perpetuated, and he was one of the venerable and honored pioneer members of the Iowa bar at the time of his death, which occurred in 1894.

Charles S. Adams continued his studies in the public schools until he had completed the curriculum of the high school and supplemented this discipline by a course of higher study in Bayless College, at Dubuque. In 1872, shortly after attaining to his legal majority he entered railway service, in the employ of the C. D. & M. Railroad Company, now part of the C. M. & St. P. system, and for a period of sixteen years he was in active service as a skilled locomotive engineer.

In 1888 he established his home at Volga, Clayton county, where he has been engaged in the general merchandise business during the long intervening years and where the high reputation of the firm of Adams & White has ever constituted its best commercial asset.

Mr. Adams has been liberal and loyal in the supporting of those enterprises and measures that have contributed to the civic and material prosperity of the community, is a Republican, though never a seeker of political preferment. He served as a progressive and valued member of the board of education of Volga for the long period of twenty-six years and has otherwise been quietly but effectively influential in local affairs. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, the Brotherhood of American Yeomen and the Modern Brotherhood of America.

On the 12th of May, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Adams to Miss Emma E. Grain, who was born in this county on the 23d of May, 1861, and who is a daughter of James and Harriet Grain, who were born and reared in England and who became pioneer settlers of Clayton county, Iowa, where they established their home on a farm near Volga in the year 1854, both passing the remainder of their lives in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Adams became the parents of four children, of whom the first was Harriet, who was born July 8, 1881, and whose death occurred in the following month; William J., who was born November 2, 1882, was a student in U. I. University for four years and is now one of the principals in the Collier-Adams Manufacturing Company, at St. Joseph, Missouri; Shubael P., who was born June 18, 1885, was graduated in U. I. U., class '07, also in historic old Yale University, 1910, and he likewise is with the Collier-Adams Manufacturing Company, of St. Joseph, Mo.; and Edna, who was born September 30, 1889, was graduated in the Volga high school, after having made a record of twelve years' attendance in the village schools without a single mark of absence or tardiness: she was later in the Upper Iowa University and she is now at the parental home, a popular figure in the representative social life of the community.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


S. C. Ainsworth, M. D.

S. C. Ainsworth, M. D., has secure vantage-place as one of the representative physicians and surgeons of Clayton county, where he has been engaged in the practice of his profession since 1901, with residence at Volga, from which village he controls a large and influential practice that extends throughout the splendid territory normally tributary to the village. The doctor is upholding most effectively the high prestige gained by his honored father in the medical profession, in which his success has been unequivocal and in connection with which he insistently carries forward the study and research that keep him in close touch with the advances made in medical and surgical science.

Dr. Ainsworth was born in the city of Syracuse, New York, on the 6th of January, 1877, and is the elder of the two children of Dr. E. A. and Ellen (Stanton) Ainsworth, both of whom were born and reared in the state of New York. The younger of the two children is Fannie L., who is the wife of Charles W. Dickens, with whom she is successfully associated in the practice of law at West Union, the judicial center of Fayette county, Iowa, both having been graduated in the law department of the University of Iowa. Dr. Ainsworth of this review was about seven years old at the time when his parents came to Iowa and established their residence at West Union, Fayette county, in 1882. There his father continued in active practice as one of the leading physicians and surgeons of that section of the state, until 1914, since which time he has there lived virtually retired, though many of the families to which he long ministered with all of ability and unselfish devotion still insist upon having recourse to his counsel and professional attention.

His cherished and devoted wife was summoned to eternal rest in 1903, secure in the affectionate regard of all who had come within the compass of her gentle and gracious influence.

At West Union Dr. S. C. Ainsworth was reared to adult age and after profiting duly by the advantages afforded in the public schools, including the high school, he became imbued with the earnest ambition of emulating his father in the choice of a career. His preliminary study of medicine was carried on under the effective preceptorship of his father and to fortify himself still further he then entered the well-known medical college in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, in which institution he was graduated as a member of the class of 1899, and from which he received his well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. His professional novitiate was served at West Union, Fayette county, where he continued to be associated in practice with his father until 1901, when he came to Clayton county and established himself in practice at Volga. Here he now controls a large and representative practice, based alike on his recognized ability and the unqualified personal popularity which he has gained.

The doctor is one of the wide awake and loyal citizens of Clayton county and is found aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Republican party. He is an active member of the Clayton County Medical Society and the Iowa State Medical Society, and at Elkader is affiliated with Lodge No. 72, Ancient Free & Accepted Masons. He and his wife are popular figures in the leading social life of their home community and Mrs. Ainsworth is a zealous member of the Presbyterian church.

In September, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. Ainsworth to Miss Katherine Hartman, who was born at Fayette, in the Iowa county of the same name, and who is a daughter of M. J. and Emma (Weber) Hartman, whose five children all survive the honored father. Mr. and Mrs. Hartman were born and reared in Germany and upon coming to the United States they established their home in Chicago, where they met their full share of hardships incidental to the great Chicago fire of 1871, and whence they came a few years later to Iowa and established their home at Fayette, where the death of Mr. Hartman occurred in 1915, and where his widow still resides. Dr. and Mrs. Ainsworth have three children, whose names and respective dates of birth are here indicated: Dortha E., February 5, 1903; Sidney E., December 3, 1908; and Katherine L., December 17, 1913.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Albert Allen

Albert Allen, an automobile dealer of Elkader, is a native of the Hawkeye State, having been born in Clayton county, Iowa, September 20, 1872, and is a son of Hans and Annie (Olson) Allen, who came from Norway to America, locating in Clayton county, Iowa. Mr. Allen passed to the other life in the year 1896. They were the parents of twelve children, and eleven of them still survive.

Albert Allen was reared on a farm, and after reaching young manhood, began the occupation of drilling wells with his brother, Ole, and then ran threshing machines through the harvesting season. In 1902 he went to Elkader, his brother, Ole, joining him a year later, where they organized the firm of Allen Bros., which has grown to such large proportions that they have erected a building sixty by one hundred and twenty feet in size, and two stories in height, to house their machines. They deal specially in the Buick, machine, but also handle the Oldsmobile and Cadillac automobiles.

He is united in marriage with Nettie Hirsch, who was born in Clayton county, and three children, two sons and a daughter, have been born to them, Raymond, Alvin and Maurine.

Mr. Allen is a Republican, though not particularly active in political work; he is affiliated with the Congregational church, and is a member of the fraternal order of Masons, and of the Modern Woodmen.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Oley Allen

Oley Allen, who with his brother, Albert, a sketch of whose life appears in another portion of this work, was born near McGregor, Clayton county, November 28, 1865. He is a son of Hans Allen and Anna (Olson) Allen. Hans Allen accompanied his parents to America as a boy of sixteen years, the voyage consuming over five months, which, in this day of six-day steamers, helps us to realize the difficulties and hardships they endured to make living easier for their descendants. They came direct to Iowa via rail as far as Galena, Illinois, the end of the railroad in the west, thence up the Mississippi to McGregor's landing, where his father took up a government claim of 160 acres about six miles from what is now the town of McGregor. Hans Allen assisted his father in reclaiming the land and later he took up a claim on his own account near his father's land and reclaimed it, and having improved it, sold it at a considerable profit, afterward returning to the home farm, which he continued to work until his father's death, at which time he bought the other heirs' interests and continued on the domain until his death, in the year 1896.

In 1864 occurred the marriage of Hans Allen and Anna Olson, whose parents were also pioneers of Clayton county, coming to Iowa in the early days. There were born to them 12 children, Oley, Carrie, Anna, Albert, Mary, Christine, Andrew, Lemuel, Helma, John, Esther and Katherine. They are all living with the exception of Anna, who passed to the other life in 1904.

Oley Allen had his early education in the Mendon district school, walking over two miles in winter, often when the thermometer was thirty degrees below zero. Later a new school was built in Clayton township, nearer his home, which he attended until he was nearly twenty years of age. It is interesting to note that in the early days of Clayton county the boys and girls could only attend the winter term of school, being too busy helping their parents during the summer season.

After leaving school, in conjunction with his brother, Albert, they entered business life by operating a drilling outfit, and also owned three threshing machines, which they ran during the harvest season and they also owned and operated a sawmill near McGregor.

In 1903, the brothers disposed of their interests in these outfits and Oley Allen came to Elkader, Iowa, being preceded by his brother Albert, who arrived in Elkader in 1902. They started a machine repairing shop, making repairs on all kinds of machinery and coming into contact with the majority of the farmers in Clayton county. They gradually drifted into the automobile business, beginning by making repairs on the single cylinder machines, which were practically the only ones on the market; later they took the agency of the Oldsmobile car, and in 1907, accepted the agency of the Reo car; also, in the spring of 1910, they secured the agency for the Buick automobile. Their business grew so rapidly that they were forced to build to meet its requirements and erected a two-story structure with a floor space of about 18,000 feet and in 1916 put in a sprinkler system which was the first one installed in Clayton county. They are the largest automobile dealers in Clayton county and, on the Buick machines, do the largest business of any county agency in the Chicago territory.

On Dec. 20th, 1895, Oley Allen was united in marriage with Emma Hulverson, a daughter of Gustav and Gertrude (Peterson) Hulverson, both of whom were pioneers of Clayton county and to them were born two children, William, age 18, and Ruth, 16 years of age. Mr. Allen is a member of the Modern Woodmen and of the Odd Fellows lodges, and both he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


William M. Allyn

William M. Allyn is a sterling representative of an honored pioneer family given to Clayton county by historic old New England, and holds prestige as one of the vigorous and upright citizens who aided in laying broad and deep the foundations for the fine superstructure of civic and industrial prosperity now in evidence in this attractive division of the Hawkeye State. He whose name initiates this paragraph has been a resident of Clayton county for more than sixty years and is now one of its venerable and highly esteemed citizens, the while he has not only been a prominent figure in connection with the development of the agricultural resources of the county, but his also is the distinction of having been one of the gallant patriots who represented Iowa as a soldier of the Union in the great civil conflict through which the nation's integrity was perpetuated. Though he has relegated to others the more arduous and exacting labors and responsibilities that were long his portion as one of the world's productive workers, he still resides on his fine homestead farm of 280 acres in section 2, Garnavillo township, and his residence is within easy access of the village of St. Olaf, from which he receives service on rural mail route No. 2.

William M. Allyn was born in New London county, Connecticut, on the 28th of December, 1828, and in that staunch commonwealth of New England his parents, Abel and Polly Allyn, passed their entire lives, both having been representatives of fine old colonial stock. Of the eight children Mr. Allyn is the younger of the two now living, and his sister, Margaret, is the widow of James Billings, and now a resident of New London county, Connecticut.

Mr. Allyn was reared and educated in his native state, where he gained his early experience with the work of the home farm and where he continued his residence until he had attained more than his legal majority.

In April, 1859, when 32 years of age, he came to Clayton county, Iowa, where he secured a Mexican soldier's claim in Garnavillo township, and on this original place he has continued to live and labor during the long intervening years, which have been marked by his faithful stewardship and by his successful achievement in connection with the basic industries of agriculture and stock- growing. His financial resources when he came to Iowa were merely nominal, and through his own well ordered endeavors he has gained large and worthy success, as indicated by his ownership at the present time of a valuable and specially well improved landed estate of two hundred and eighty acres. It is a far cry to revert to the primitive log cabin which he erected for his original abiding place to the fine modern residence which he now occupies, and all other permanent improvements which he has made on his farm are of the best type.

When the dark cloud of civil war cast its pall over the national horizon, Mr. Allyn was one of the loyal and patriotic citizens of Clayton county who subordinated all other interests to go forth in defense of the Union, and his service during the great fratricidal conflict was such as to reflect perpetual honor upon his name and memory. In the spring of 1862 he enlisted as a private in Company E, Twenty-seventh Iowa yolunteer Infantry, with which he proceeded to the front and in which he rose to the office of sergeant. His regiment was assigned to the army of Tennessee and within his service of nearly three years he took part in numerous engagements, including a number of the sanguinary battles marking the progress of the war. In an engagement at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, he received a severe wound in his left foot, and after having been confined to a hospital for several weeks he was mustered out and received his honorable discharge. He then returned to his farm and during the long years that have since elapsed he has here continued as one of the staunch and influential representatives of the agricultural and live-stock interests of Clayton county, with inviolable place in popular confidence and good will. He is a stalwart in the local camp of the Republican party and has shown a loyal interest in all things pertaining to the communal welfare, but he has had no desire for public office, his only service having been that of school director, of which office he was the incumbent for several years.

Soon after his service as a soldier in the Civil war had been terminated Mr. Allyn wisely girded himself the better for the active duties and responsibilities of life by taking unto himself a wife. He wedded Miss Juliette Eddy, who was born in the State of Vermont, as were also her parents, Joseph and Celeste Eddy, with whom she came to Iowa in the pioneer days, her parents passing the remainder of their lives in this state.

Mr. and Mrs. Allyn shared with mutual solicitude and loyalty the joys and sorrows of life, and their ideal companionship found its greatest glory in the gracious evening of their lives, the silver cord of their devotion being severed in 1901, when Mrs. Allyn was summoned to eternal rest, her memory being revered by all who came within the sphere of her gentle influence and her mortal remains resting in the cemetery at Kandallville, Winneshiek county, not far distant from her old home. She is survived by two children, William, who has practical charge of the old homestead farm, and Juliette, who remains with her father and presides over the attractive home; she is popular in the social life of the community and was graduated in the high school at McGregor.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Conrad Andreae

Conrad Andreae has maintained his home in Clayton county from his boyhood and has here brought his energies to bear so effectively as to win for himself a large measure of material prosperity in connection with the basic industries of agriculture and stock raising, of which he is now one of the prominent and honored exponents in Sperry township. His parents were pioneer settlers of this county and still reside here, venerable in years and established in a home in which they find peace and comfort in the gracious evening of their long and useful life.

Conrad Andreae was born at Dubuque, Iowa, on the 20th of November, 1856, and is a son of Albert and Magdalena Prottengeier Andreae, who were born and reared in Germany and who immigrated to America in the early '50s. They established their home in Dubuque, Iowa, and about 1853 they came to Clayton county and settled on a farm in Sperry township. Later they removed to Wisconsin, but about two years later they returned to Clayton county, where they have since maintained their home. Of their nine children seven are living.

Conrad Andreae remained at the parental home until the time of his marriage, and in the meanwhile had made good use of the advantages of the common schools. At the age of twenty-three years he wedded Miss Anna Weege, who has the distinction of having been the first white child born in St. Sebald, Sperry township, this county, where her parents established their home in the early pioneer days.

After his marriage Mr. Andreae farmed on rented land for two years and he then purchased a portion of his present well improved farm of two hundred acres, in Section 19, Sperry township, the excellent improvements on the place having been made by him and his well directed efforts having resulted in his developing one of the really model farmsteads of this favored section of his native state. He is one of the prosperous farmers and highly esteemed citizens of Clayton county, is a Democrat in politics, takes a lively interest in community affairs, but has never sought or held public office.

Both he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran church, and of their eight children the last two died young; Henry is cashier of the Volga Savings Bank; George, Herman, Katherine, Albert and Frederick remain at the parental home.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Henry C. Andreae

Henry C. Andreae is the efficient and popular cashier of the Volga Savings Bank and is known and valued as one of the representative business men of the younger generation in his native county.

He was born in Sperry township, this county, on the 7th of October, 1883, and is a son of Conrad and Anna (Wege) Andreae, the former of whom was born in Dubuque, this state, and the latter of whom was born in Clayton county, both families having been founded in Iowa in the pioneer period of its history. The parents now reside in their pleasant home near Arlington, Fayette county, and the father has been a prominent and influential exponent of agricultural enterprise in this section of the Hawkeye state, both he and his wife being zealous communicants of the Lutheran church and the lineage of both tracing back to staunch German origin. Of the eight children the eldest is George, who remains with his parents on the home farm; Henry C., of this review, was the next in order of birth; Katherine is at the parental home, as are also Herman and Albert; Philippina is deceased; Frederick is the youngest member of the parental home circle; and William died in early childhood.

After having profited fully by the advantages afforded in the district schools Henry C. Andreae continued his active association with agricultural industry for three years, and he then fortified himself more fully for the practical affairs of life by completing a two years' course in the Upper Iowa Business University, at Fayette. For a short time thereafter he was identified with the general merchandise business and he then assumed a clerical position in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company, his service having been continued in Clayton county for a period of four years, after which he held for six months the position of money clerk in the office of the Wells Fargo Express Company in the city of Milwaukee. The impaired health of his loved mother caused him to resign this position and return to the parental home, and in 1910 he accepted his present responsible post, that of cashier of the Volga Savings Bank, an incumbency in which he has shown marked discrimination and executive ability.

His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party and both he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran church in their home village of Volga, where also they are popular factors in the leading social activities of the community.

On the 2d of May, 1913, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Andreae to Miss Selma Piehl, who was born and reared in Clayton county, and they have a winsome little daughter, Mary Elizabeth, who was born May 12, 1915.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


George Aulerich

George Aulerich was a youth of nineteen years when he came with his widowed mother from his German Fatherland to America and established a home in Iowa, where it has been his to gain through earnest and honest endeavor a generous measure of success and to become one of the most substantial landholders and exponents of agricultural industry in Clayton county. Here he has maintained his home for half a century and here he resides upon his fine homestead farm in Farmersburg township, though the autumn of the year 1916 will record his attainment of the psalmist's span of three score years and ten. The gracious prosperity that attends him in his venerable years enables him to put aside the heavier burdens and labors that were so long his portion. He is one of the substantial and honored citizens of the county, is the owner of a large and well improved landed estate of nearly six hundred acres in this county, and none is more clearly entitled to representation in this history.

Mr. Aulerich was born in Germany, on the 30th of September, 1846, and is a son of George and Dora (Schultz) Aulerich, the former of whom passed his entire life in Germany, where his vocation was that of farming.

In 1866 the widowed mother came with her three children to the United States and established a home in Clayton county, Iowa, where she passed the remainder of her life and attained to the venerable age of 81 or 82. Of the children two are living. He whose name introduces this review gained his early education in the excellent schools of his native land and was nineteen years of age when he accompanied his mother to the United States and to Clayton county. Here he found employment as a farm hand for several years, and in the meanwhile he carefully saved his earnings and bent every energy to the gaining of independence and worthy prosperity. Finally he purchased a farm of seventy acres, in Farmersburg township, and upon the same he continued his residence sixteen years, his energy and good management having brought to him such measure of success that he was then enabled to sell his farm to advantage and purchase a portion of the fine homestead on which he now resides. With increasing prosperity he continued to add to his landed estate until he became the owner of two hundred and fifteen acres of fine land in section 6, Farmersburg township, upon which splendid domain he still retains his residence and to the supervision of which he still gives his vigorous attention, as the years rest lightly upon him. At a later period he purchased other land to the amount of three hundred and sixty acres, situated in Monona township, and this property is given over to the care of his oldest son, who is a substantial agriculturist and progressive citizen of his native county.

Mr. Aulerich has been deeply appreciative of the opportunities which have been afforded him in the county and state of his adoption, and has stood exponent of loyal and liberal citizenship. He is a staunch Democrat in politics but has had no desire for public office, the only position of the sort in which he has consented to serve having been that of member of the school board of his district. He and his wife are earnest communicants and liberal supporters of the Lutheran church at Farmersburg.

In 1872 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Aulerich to Miss Minnie Klinge, who was born in Germany, one of a family of six children, all of whom are living and all of whom came with the parents, Frederick and Elizabeth (Holtz) Klinge, to the United States in the year 1871, the family home being established in Clayton county, where the father became a substantial farmer and where he passed the rest of his life, the venerable mother being still a resident of this county and being nearly ninety years of age at the time of this writing, 1916.

Of the seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Aulerich the eldest is George, Jr., who is one of the progressive farmers of this county, as is also Henry, who remains at the parental home and is associated with his father in the management of the farm; Bertha is the wife of Charles Engelhardt and they reside in the state of South Dakota; Matilda is a trained nurse by profession and resides in the city of Chicago; Amelia and Emma remain at the parental home; and Emil is another of the aggressive young farmers of Clayton county, where he has a farm of one hundred and fifty acres in Monona township.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Herman A. Axtell

Herman A. Axtell may well consider himself fortunate in being the owner of one of the fine farm estates of Clayton county and further interest attaches to his prestige as one of the progressive and successful agriculturists and stock-growers of the county by reason of the fact that he was an infant at the time of the family removal to this county and was reared to manhood on the farm which he now owns and on which he has an ideal rural home.

Mr. Axtell was born in Lorain county, Ohio, on the 17th of September, 1862, and in the following year his parents came to Clayton county and settled on the farm now owned by him. He is one of the five surviving children of Augustus E. and Martha (Bartlett) Axtell, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of the state of New York. After

having maintained their residence in Ohio for a term of years the parents came to Clayton county, Iowa, in 1863, as previously noted, and the father proved a resourceful and broad-minded member of the pioneer community, in which he developed and improved the splendid landed estate now owned and occupied by his son Herman A., of this review. Here he died at the age of 85 years and here his venerable widow still resides, she having celebrated her eighty-fourth birthday anniversary in 1916 and being one of the revered pioneer women of the county.

Reared to the sturdy discipline of the farm, Herman A. Axtell was not permitted to neglect in the least the advantages afforded in the public schools of the locality and period, and his individual ambition along this line was indicated by his later completing an effective course of study in a business college at Fayette. He continued to be associated with the work and management of the home farm until he was 21 years of age, and thereafter he was employed for a total of five years in a creamery at Cresco, Howard county, and Clayton county, where he gained expert knowledge of this line of industrial enterprise. For twenty years thereafter he rented the old homestead farm of his parents and proved himself one of the specially alert, progressive and successful farmers and stock-growers of the county. At the expiration of the period noted he purchased the fine property, which comprises two hundred acres of land, in sections 24 and 25 Cass township which is improved with the best type of farm buildings and supplied with the most approved modern facilities. In connection with diversified agriculture Mr. Axtell has been specially prominent and successful in the breeding and raising of fine Shorthorn cattle and Duroc-Jersey swine. He has served consecutively since 1910 as township clerk, has been secretary of the school board of his district since 1902, and served fourteen years as township assessor. These preferments denote alike his loyal interest in public affairs of a local order, his ability and the high estimate placed upon him in the community that had always represented his home.

He gives his political allegiance to the Democratic party, is affiliated with the Modern Brotherhood of America and he and his wife attend and support the Baptist church at Strawberry Point, from which village their attractive and hospitable home has service on rural mail route No. 1.

In 1888 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Axtell to Miss Leah Lamphiear, who was born and reared in this county and who is a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Maxwell) Lamphiear, the former of whom is deceased and the latter of whom still maintains her home in this county. Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Axtell the first, Fern C., died at the age of 12 years; Lloyd W. now has the management of the fine farm of three hundred and forty-five acres which his father owns in Stutsman county, North Dakota; Fannie M. was graduated in the Teachers' Institute at Cedar Falls and is now a popular teacher in the public schools of Riceville, Iowa; Meron A. is a member of the class of 1918 in the Iowa State Agricultural College, at Ames; Howard I. is attending the high school at Strawberry Point; and the two younger members of the ideal home circle are Herma R. and Martha E.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Henry C. Baars

Henry C. Baars is associated with his next younger brother, Fritz, in the operation of the fine old homestead farm, in Section 36 Highland township, that figures as the place of their birth, and they are known as progressive and energetic young agriculturists and stock-growers of their native county, with secure place in popular esteem.

Henry C. Baars was born on this farm on the 29th of August, 1888, and is a son of Henry and Augusta (Adam) Baars, the former of whom was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, and the latter in West Prussia.

Henry Baars was a young man when he came to the United States, and in 1869 he came to Clayton county and established his home in Cox Creek township. He later removed to and improved one of the fine farms of Highland township, and he and his wife now reside at Elkader, the county seat, where he is living retired, after having won substantial prosperity through his long and effective association with farm industry. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are earnest communicants of the Lutheran church.

Herman, the eldest of their seven children, is a prosperous farmer in Sperry township; Henry C. and Fritz, as already noted, are associated in the operations of the old home farm, which comprises two hundred acres, and Fritz was here born on the 17th of November, 1890; Albert died in childhood, as did also Hilda; and Alfred and Carrie remain at the parental home.

Henry C. Baars is indebted to the public schools of his native county for his early education, and he continued to assist in the operation of the home farm until he was twenty years old. He passed the following years in South Dakota, then resumed his association with the work of the home farm and one year later he and his brother Fritz assumed the active control and management of the fine old homestead, upon which they have since continued their successful operations in diversified agriculture and the raising of excellent live stock.

The subject of this review is serving as school director of his district, is a Democrat in his political adherency and both he and his wife hold membership in the Lutheran church.

Mr. Baars is married to Miss Katherine Kuehl, daughter of Joseph J. Kuehl, of whom individual mention is made on other pages of this work.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


John Bahr

John Bahr is actively associated with one of the representative business enterprises of the vigorous little city of Elkader, judicial center of Clayton county, and has made an excellent record in his chosen vocation. He is a skilled artisan, and has entire charge of the plumbing and heating departments of the substantial hardware establishment in which he owns a half interest, as junior member of the firm of Brown & Bahr, in which his co-adjutor is H. D. Brown.

From infancy he has borne the name of his step-father, and he is a son of Frank and Sophie (Muller) Schornable, being an only child. By his father's previous marriage there was one son, Frank, and his mother later became the wife of Peter Bahr. Of the children of this last marriage the following brief record is consistently given at this point: Mary and Lena reside at Elkport, this county; Sophia is the wife of George Smith, and Clara the wife of John Wittman, both likewise residents of Elkport; Annie resides in the city of Cedar Rapids, this State; Eliza is the wife of Ernest Heuschen, of McGregor, Clayton county; and one daughter died in infancy.

John Bahr, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born in Volga township, this county, on the 14th of December, 1870, and there he attended in boyhood the district schools, though his broader education has been that gained under the direction of that wisest of all head-masters, experience. As a lad of fourteen years he became virtually dependent upon his own resources, as he then left the home rooftree and found employment at farm work. One year later he established his residence in Elkader, where he entered the employ of his present business associate, Mr. Brown, and served a practical apprenticeship to the tinner's trade. Later he purchased a half interest in the business, to the expansion and definite success of which he has contributed effectively, and it is interesting to record that he became a partner in the thriving enterprise before he had attained to his legal majority. Fidelity, consecutive industry and sterling integrity have marked his business career, and have given him inviolable place in popular esteem, besides which he has won substantial place as one of the vigorous and enterprising business men of his native county. He has shown deep interest in community affairs and has been a member of the board of aldermen of Elkader for thirteen years, his services in this office having been marked by the same spirit of progressiveness and loyalty that has dominated his course in his private business.

He is a stalwart in the local camp of the Republican party, is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the Woodmen of the World, and both he and his wife are communicants of the German Lutheran church.

On the 21st of March, 1893, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bahr to Miss Kate Wertley, who likewise was born and reared in this county, and of their two children the first, a daughter, died in infancy, the surviving child, Harry John, having been born February 21, 1903, and being at the present time, 1916, a duly ambitious student in the public schools of Elkader.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Edward E. Bauder

Edward E. Bauder is one of the representative younger exponents of agricultural industry in his native county and his progressiveness is shown in his availing himself of the most modern and approved facilities and methods in carrying forward the operations of the fine old homestead farm, in section 7, Marion township, where additional interest attaches to his activities by reason of the fact that the farm that thus receives his attention was the place of his nativity, his birth having here occurred on the 4th of August, 1885. He is a son of Samuel and Caroline (Riorke) Bauder, the former of whom was born in the fair little republic of Switzerland and the latter of whom was born and reared in Iowa, a member of one of the sterling pioneer families of this commonwealth. Samuel Bauder came to America when a youth and he became one of the successful agriculturists and representative citizens of Marion township, Clayton county; his widow maintains her home in Elgin, Fayette county. Of the six children the eldest is Alfred, who is now a resident of the city of Cedar Rapids, this state; Mary is the widow of Knudt Scarshaug of Elgin; Emma is the wife of Ole Olson, of Clermont, Fayette county; Anna is the wife of Lewis J. Grouth, of Elgin, Fayette county; Edward E. is a successful farmer of Marion township and figures as the immediate subject of this sketch; and Ernest is now a resident of the city of Detroit, Michigan. The father of these children died when Edward was a boy of nine years.

Edward E. Bauder was reared to adult age on the home farm of which he now has the active management and is indebted to the public schools of Clayton county for his early educational discipline. His career as an independent agriculturist was initiated when he was twenty years of age and he has shown remarkable circumspection and progressiveness in the directing of the operations of the old homestead farm. Under his supervision have been installed many improvements of the best modern type, including a silo that has a capacity for the storage of one hundred tons, and a gas engine for supplying water for both farm and domestic purposes. Mr. Bauder has made his general farm operations distinctively successful and in connection with diversified agriculture he is giving special attention to the raising of the large type of Poland-China swine, the best specimens of this breed being found in appreciable numbers on his farm. He has insistently bred to the best type, as is shown by his paying one hundred and ten dollars for one pure-bred and registered brood sow and eighty dollars for another, besides which he is the owner of the well-known boar, "Big Black Orange," the registered number of which is 226,579, and thus he has the best breeding stock, with resultant prominence as one of the leading breeders of Poland-China swine in this part of Iowa.

As a citizen Mr. Bauder is loyal and progressive, even as he is in connection with the affairs of business, and he is aligned as a supporter of the principles and policies of the Republican party. His home place receives mail service on a rural route from the village of Elgin, which is his postoffice address.

On the 24th of February, 1910, Mr. Bauder wedded Miss Alma Bakeman, who was born and reared in this county and who is a daughter of Nicholas and Mary (Underwood) Bakeman.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Frederick W. Bauer

Frederick W. Bauer. - The admirable agricultural resources of Clayton county have constituted the secure basis of its progress and prosperity, and as exponents of the great fundamental industry of farming there are found at the present time a goodly number of alert and valued representatives of the second generation of families whose names have been prominently and worthily linked with the development and advancement of this section of the state.

Frederick W. Bauer is one of the native sons of Clayton county, who holds prestige as one of the substantial agriculturists and representative citizens of Boardman township, where he owns and operates a well improved farm of one hundred and eighty acres.

Mr. Bauer was born in Garnavillo township, this county, on the 31st of August, 1869, and is a son of William and Emma (Hochhause) Bauer, both of whom were born in Germany. William Bauer was a child when he accompanied his parents on their immigration to America, and the family home was established in the State of Ohio, where he was reared to adult age and received a good common school education. As a young man he came to Iowa and numbered himself among the pioneers of Clayton county. He purchased a tract of land in Garnavillo township and reclaimed the same into a productive farm. In the late '80s he sold this property advantageously and soon afterward purchased the farm now occupied by his son, Frederick W., the immediate subject of this sketch. Here he continued his successful activities as a thrifty and progressive agriculturist and stock-grower until about 1906, since which time he and his wife have maintained their residence in the city of Dubuque, where he is living virtually retired, in the enjoyment of the tangible rewards of former years of earnest toil and endeavor. He contributed his quota to the development of Clayton county along both civic and industrial lines and both he and his wife have a wide circle of friends in this county. They are zealous communicants of the Catholic church and his political affiliation is with the Democratic party. Of the children the eldest is he whose name introduces this article; Elizabeth is the wife of Max Ovitz and they maintain their home at Elkader, the judicial center of this county; Otilla is the wife of Joseph Schiltz, of Dubuque; Agnes is the wife of Paul Schammel, of Waterloo, this state; Charles and Irma are with their parents in Dubuque; and Amelia died in childhood.

Frederick W. Bauer reverts to the excellent public schools of his native county as the medium through which he acquired his early education, and his initial experience in connection with the practical affairs of life was that gained in his early association with the work of the home farm. This discipline, continued through the period of his youth, well fitted him for the responsibilities which he assumed when he engaged in farming and stock-growing in an independent way and has contributed materially to his winning of precedence as one of the thorough-going, ambitious and successful farmers of his native county. He continued his association with his father in the work and management of the farm until his parents left the homestead to enjoy urban life, and thereafter he rented the place of his father until 1906, when he purchased the property, which now comprises a farm of one hundred and forty acres, equipped with a substantial and attractive modern house of two stories, and with excellent barns, fences and other accessories of a model farmstead. With much of discrimination and enterprise Mr. Bauer carries forward his operations along the line of properly diversified agriculture, and he likewise gives attention to the breeding and raising of high-grade live stock.

As a public spirited citizen of well reinforced political convictions, he is aligned as a staunch supporter of the Democratic party, both he and his wife being communicants of the Catholic church, in the faith of which they were reared.

On the 16th of November, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bauer to Miss Eva Fryetich, who likewise was born in Clayton county, where her father has long been a prosperous farmer, and the five children of this union are: Florence, Evaline, Clarence, Helen and Marian.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Fred A. Beckett

Fred A. Beckett passed virtually his entire life in Clayton county, as he was an infant at the time when his parents became pioneer settlers of the county, and here it was his to achieve definite independence and success through his effective association with the basic industries of agriculture and stock-growing and to win and retain the confidence and good will of all with whom he came in contact. He was one of the representative farmers of Clayton township at the time of his death, which occurred on the 24th of April, 1908, and his widow still resides upon and has the general supervision of the affairs of the fine homestead farm, which comprises one hundred and five acres and which is most pleasingly situated in section 34, Clayton township.

Mr. Beckett was born at Belvidere, Illinois, on the 13th of September, 1858, and is the only deceased member of a family of four sons born to Peter B. and Charlotte A. (Wayman) Beckett. His parents were born and reared in England and immigrated to America in 1852. They were residents of Ohio about one year and thereafter maintained their home at Decatur, Illinois, until 1854, when they removed to Rock county, Wisconsin, where the father initiated activities as a farmer, of which line of enterprise he became an exponent a few years later in Boone county, Illinois, where the birth of the subject of this memoir occurred and whence soon afterward the family came to Clayton county, Iowa, where Peter B. Beckett eventually became one of the substantial and prominent farmers of Clayton township and where he continued to reside, a sterling and honored citizen, until his death, which occurred in 1901, his devoted wife having passed away in 1894.

Reared to maturity upon the farm of his father, Fred A. Beckett early learned the valuable lessons of practical industry and availed himself simultaneously of the advantages afforded in the public schools of the locality. He was a young man when he initiated his independent career as an agriculturist and stock-grower on the fine farm upon which his widow still maintains her home and which he developed into one of the model places of Clayton township. Here he continued his well ordered activities until he was called from the stage of life's mortal endeavors, a few months prior to his fiftieth birthday anniversary, and he left as a gracious heritage the untarnished reputation and the record for worthy accomplishment that indicate the finest sense of personal stewardship, his mortal remains having been laid to rest in the cemetery at Clayton. He was a loyal and public spirited citizen, was a Democrat in his political allegiance and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his widow.

In the year 1881 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Beckett to Miss Bessie Robinson, who was born in England and who came with her parents to the United States and became a resident of Clayton county in the year 1873. She is a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Drake) Robinson, both representatives of fine old English lineage, and her parents continued their residence in Clayton county until their death, their five children still surviving them.

Mr. and Mrs. Beckett became the parents of ten children, concerning whom brief record is made in conclusion of this memoir: Cora E. is the wife of August Saacke and they maintain their home at McGregor; Hettie May is the wife of Percy Anderson, of McGregor; Bessie is the wife of James Duval and they reside in South Dakota; Albert drowned at the age of 9 years; Anna R. is the wife of John McWilliams, a representative farmer of Clayton county; Beatrice is the wife of Frederick Sibell, of Madison, Wisconsin; Peter F. and George remain with their widowed mother and are associated in the work of the home farm; Lucile likewise remains a member of the home circle; and the tenth child died in infancy.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


John T. Beckett

John T. Beckett has been a resident of Clayton county from the time of his nativity and owns and resides upon the fine old homestead farm, in Clayton township, which figures as the place of his birth and which under his energetic and judicious management has been made one of the well improved and valuable landed estates of the county.

Mr. Beckett is a scion of staunch English stock in both the paternal and maternal lines and was born in Clayton on the 25th of December, 1863, when he became a right welcome Christmas arrival in the home of his parents, Peter B. and Charlotte A. (Wayman) Beckett, both natives of England. He whose name introduces this article was the fourth in order of birth in a family of four sons, of whom three are living. Peter B. Beckett was born on the 25th of October, 1821, and was reared and educated in his native land, where his marriage was solemnized. In 1852 he came with his young wife to the United States and they passed the first year in the state of Ohio. They then established their residence at Decatur, Illinois, where Mr. Beckett entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad Company, in the service of which he continued until 1854, when he removed to Beloit, Wisconsin, where for a short interval he was engaged in the manufacturing of brick, after which he was for two years a representative of agricultural enterprise in that vicinity. During the ensuing year he was engaged in farming in Boone county, Illinois, and he then, about the year 1858, came to Clayton county, Iowa, where he turned his attention to the butchering business, of which he was a pioneer exponent and with which he continued his identification for a few years. He then purchased a tract of land in section 34, Clayton township, where he reclaimed and developed a productive farm and where both he and his wife passed the remainder of their long and useful lives - sterling citizens to whom came a merited prosperity and the greater reward of the confidence and good will of the community in which they long maintained their home. Mrs. Beckett was summoned to eternal rest in 1894 and her venerable husband passed away in 1901, their remains resting side by side in the cemetery at Clayton. Both were reared in the faith of the Church of England and their lives were guided and governed by the Christian principles which they thus professed.

John T. Beckett was reared to adult age on the farm which he now owns and operates, and in the meanwhile he gained due reinforcement for the battle of life by attending the common schools of the locality in which he gained the education that proved ample foundation for the broader and more practical discipline that has come to him through association with men and affairs in later years. Shortly after attaining to his legal majority he rented the old homestead farm, and later he purchased the property, which comprises one hundred and fifty-six acres and upon which he has made many excellent improvements of permanent order. This is one of the good farms of the county and it has been the stage of his well ordered activities during his entire adult career, the while he is known as a progressive and successful representative of agricultural and live-stock industry in his native county as well as a loyal and steadfast citizen who is well upholding the honors of the name which he bears. He is now serving his second term in the office of township trustee, was treasurer of his school district for some time, and is aligned as a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party. He is affiliated with Oakleaf Camp, No. 2875, Modern Woodmen of America, at Clayton, in which he has passed various official chairs, and both he and his wife hold membership in the Christian Science church.

In the year 1892 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Beckett to Miss Caroline Allen, who likewise was born and reared in this county and who is a daughter of Hans and Anna (Olson) Allen, both of whom were born in Norway, whence they came with their parents to the United States when young. Mr. Allen became one of the substantial farmers and highly esteemed citizens of Clayton county and here his death occurred in 1896, his wife still surviving him.

Mr. and Mrs. Beckett have two children, - Leslie, who is now employed at Elkader, the county seat, and Veva A., who is attending the McGregor high school.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Frederick G. Bell

Frederick G. Bell maintains his residence in his native city of McGregor, Clayton county, and has gained prominence and influence as one of the representative factors in connection with the important operations involved in the grain industry in this section of the Union, as he is now the incumbent of the responsible position of manager at McGregor of the interests and extensive business of the firm of Gilchrist & Company, which maintains a great chain of grain elevators throughout Minnesota and northern Iowa.

Mr. Bell is one of the alert business men and popular and public spirited citizens of McGregor and is a member of a family whose name has been long and worthily identified with the annals of Clayton county. He was born at McGregor on the 12th of May, 1874, and is the second in order of birth of the three children of Colin F. and Lacy (Sloan) Bell, the former a native of the State of New York and the latter of Illinois. Of the three children the first-born was a son who died in infancy, and the youngest of the number is Miss Elizabeth Bell, who still maintains her home at McGregor. Colin F. Bell came to Clayton county in the pioneer days and was for many years engaged actively and successfully in the buying and shipping of grain, with residence and business headquarters at McGregor, where he died Feb. 1st, 1905, when about 82 years of age, and where his wife passed away May 1st, 1906.

Frederick G. Bell acquired his early education in the public schools of McGregor and supplemented this discipline by an effective course in the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, at Troy, New York. After his return to McGregor he became associated with his father in the grain business, with which he has since continued to be identified and in connection with which his experience has been such as to give him authoritative knowledge of all conditions and details. As manager for Gilchrist & Company he has supervision of a large and important business in the buying and shipping of grain, and his progressiveness and loyalty are further shown in the lively interest which he shows in all that touches the welfare of his native city and county. His political allegiance is given to the Republican party. Mr. Bell holds membership in the Congregational church, his wife following the precepts of the Christian Science church.

August 8,1911, was the date that recorded the marriage of Mr. Bell to Miss Emma Farnum, who was born and reared at Mason City, Cerro Gordo county, this State, and they have four children - Farnum, Colin, Lyman and Lacy. It should be noted that Mr. Bell's interest in and prominent association with the grain business is further evidenced by his holding membership in the Board of Trade of the City of Chicago.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Sam Bennington

Sam Bennington. - Notwithstanding all the advancement that has been and yet shall be made in all other domains of human enterprise, it is certain that the great industries of agriculture and stock-growing, most closely allied with the earth itself, must ever figure as the basis of prosperity and progress along both material and civic lines. Thus that man may well be considered fortunate who stands exemplar of progressive enterprise in connection with these all-important phases of industrial activity, and such an alert, vigorous and successful man is Sam Bennington, who has won precedence as one of the representative agriculturists and stock- raisers of his native county, where he is associated with his brother William in the ownership and operation of one of the finely improved and extensive landed estates of Clayton county, the same being specially well known by reason of its prestige in the production of the best grades of live stock, and the brothers having gained high reputation for the energy, discrimination and advanced policies which they have effectively brought to bear in connection with their operations.

Sam Bennington was born on a farm in section 36, Sperry township, this county, and the date of his nativity was August 29, 1872. He is a son of Samuel and Esther (Bidwell) Bennington, both of whom were born in England - representatives of sterling old families of the "right little isle." Samuel Bennington was reared and educated in his native land and his entire active career was one of close and favored association with the great fundamental industry of agriculture. He was a young man when he came to the United States and in 1856 he numbered himself among the pioneer settlers of Clayton county, Iowa, where he obtained land and, with characteristic energy and circumspection, instituted the development of a farm, in Sperry township. He was a man of strong and upright character, was possessed of much business acumen, and through his well ordered endeavors he achieved a large and worthy measure of success. He gained assured place as one of the influential agriculturists and valued citizens of Clayton county at the time of his death, which occurred March 3, 1906; he was the owner of a valuable landed estate of nine hundred acres. His devoted wife passed to the life eternal on the 7th of April, 1880, and concerning their children the following brief data are entered: Charles is now a resident of Rago, Kingman county, Kansas; Annie is the wife of Thomas Butcher, of Lawrence, Van Buren county, Michigan; Esther is the wife of Edward W. Griffith, of Marion, Lynn county, Iowa; William and Sam are, as previously noted, associated in successful operations as prominent farmers and stock-growers of Clayton county. He whose name initiates this article is indebted to the public schools of his native county for his early educational discipline, and he became actively associated with the work and management of the home farm, in connection with which he gained broad and exact knowledge of all details of practical and scientific agriculture and stock-raising and proved a valued coadjutor of his honored father until the latter's death. He and his older brother, William, now own a valuable landed estate of seven hundred and seventy acres, in Highland and Sperry townships, and he occupies on the same the old homestead residence of his parents. The Bennington Brothers give special attention to and have achieved marked success in the raising of the best errades of Shorthorn cattle, Shire horses and Shropshire sheep. The permanent improvements on the extensive farmstead are of the best order, including a large and attractive house, excellent barns, and minor buildings, and the equipment throughout is of the most advanced type, indicative of the progressiveness and thrift that make the model farmer. William Bennington, who is a bachelor, occupies a house of his own, and this building likewise adds to the attractions of the fine fraternal domain, which is one of the admirable rural estates of this section of Iowa. The brothers pay unequivocal allegiance to the cause of the Republican party and are loyal and public-spirited citizens who command the high regard of the people of their native county.

Sam Bennington is affiliated with the camp of the Woodmen of the World at Volga, which city constitutes his postoffice address and from which he receives service on rural mail route No. 2.

On the 22d of December, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bennington to Miss Clara Chapman, who likewise was born and reared in Clayton county and whose parents, Engel and Mary (Jellings) Chapman, both now deceased, were born in England. Mr. and Mrs. Bennington have no children.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


August Benson

August Benson is another of the sterling sons of the fair Norse-land who have found in America the advantages and opportunities for the achieving of definite independence and prosperity, and he has been a resident of Clayton county for over thirty years. Here his industry and progressiveness are indicated in his ownership of one of the fine farms of Highland township, and he is specially worthy of representation in this publication.

Mr. Benson was born in Goteberg, Sweden, on the 5th of August, 1855, and is a son of Bengt Anderson and Bertha (Larson) Anderson, who passed their entire lives in their native land, their son August receiving the surname of Benson, in accordance with the ancient custom of Sweden, that of giving to children for surnames the full or a derivative from the personal name of the father. He whose name initiates this review was reared on his father's farm and gained his early education in the schools of his native land. He was the eighth in order of birth in a family of twelve children, of whom the eldest, Anna Breta, remains in Sweden; Christina and Andrew died in their native land; Lars and Johannes still reside in Sweden; Carl and August (first of the name) are deceased, the latter having died in infancy and the same name having been given to the subject of this review, who was the next child; Magnus is deceased; Johanna is the wife of Halvor Torkleson, a progressive farmer of Clayton county; John resides in the city of Chicago, as does also Emma, who is the wife of August Jacobson.

August Benson remained at the parental home until he had attained to the age of twenty-one years, when he severed the ties that bound him to his native land and came to America, fortified with energy and ambition and determined to make advancement through his own efforts. He resided for some time in the state of New York, maintaining his home first at Brockton and later at Dunkirk, and incidental to his work at this period of his career it is interesting to record that he had the distinction of driving the first spike in connection with the construction of the line of the Nickel Plate Railroad in the Empire state. Later he was for five years in the employ of a physician, Dr. Williams, at Dunkirk, and he then, in 1885, came to Clayton county, where he worked one year on a farm. He had carefully conserved his earnings during the period of his residence in the United States, and thus he found himself at the expiration of this first year justified in the purchasing of his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres, in Section 1, Highland township. He has made the best of improvements on the place, has a substantial and modern residence of two stories, and in addition to the homestead he now owns a tract of twenty acres of timber land, in Highland township.

Mr. Benson is a practical, industrious and progressive farmer, gives special attention to the raising of clover, and propagates also the other crops best suited to the soil and climate of this section of Iowa, including alfalfa, which he has grown quite successfully in a small way for the last few years, besides raising fine grades of live stock. The splendid prosperity that has attended his indefatigable efforts is further attested by his having in recent time purchased in Highland township an additional tract of one hundred and ninety-seven acres, in which he has given to his sons a partnership interest. He is a staunch Republican, is serving as school director of his district and he and his wife are earnest communicants of the Lutheran church.

In 1884 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Benson to Miss Elizabeth Jacoby, who likewise was born in Sweden, and she has proved his devoted helpmeet during the years of their gracious companionship. Of the children born to this happy union, all received the advantages of the excellent schools of Clayton county. Hilma, the oldest, is married to Mr. Levy M. Erickson of Farmersburg; Charles August is a graduate of the Iowa State College of Agriculture at Ames, and is the present deputy clerk of the District Court of Clayton county. Jerda is a successful and popular teacher in the district schools, and Oscar Arthur is preparing himself for a collegiate course at Ames College. It is planned soon that Charles shall resign his official position and that father and sons shall join in the improvement of the old homestead and their newly acquired land, which is all in one body, and convert it into a first-class stock farm.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Ben M. Benson

Ben M. Benson holds precedence as one of the representative farmers of Highland township, and is well worthy of recognition in this history of his native county. He was born in Marion township, on the 22d of July, 1862, and is a son of Michael and Bergat (Olson) Benson, both of whom were born in Norway. Michael Benson was reared to manhood in his native land and in 1859 he immigrated to the United States and established his residence in Marion township, Clayton county, in 1861. After due experience as a pioneer farmer in that township he removed to section 3, Highland township, where he developed a fine farm of one hundred and twenty acres, this old homestead having continued as his place of residence until his death, which occurred January 10, 1891, the devoted wife of his young manhood having been summoned to rest on the 5th of June, 1875, and both having been earnest members of the Norwegian Lutheran church. Of their five children the first, Ben, died in infancy, and the second child is Ben M., the immediate subject of this review; Ole is a prosperous farmer in Wagner township; Carrie is the wife of Nels E. Nelson, of Lyon county; and Isabel is the wife of Henry Embertson, of Wagner township.

Ben M. Benson has resided on the old homestead farm from the time of his birth and now owns a well improved landed estate of two hundred and sixty acres, devoted to diversified agriculture and the raising of approved grades of live stock. He has at all times taken a loyal interest in community affairs, is a Republican in his political adherency, served two terms as township trustee and is now a member of the school board of the home district in which he himself acquired his early education. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Norwegian Lutheran church in Highland township and he is serving as its treasurer His attractive home, with modern conveniences and appointments, receives mail service on rural route No. 2 from the village of Elgin.

On the 8th of March, 1889, was recorded the marriage of Mr. Benson to Miss Berdelia Lein, who likewise was born and reared in this county, where her parents, Lars and Josand (Olson) Lein, established their home upon their immigration to America from Norway, in 1857, her father becoming one of the sturdy and honored pioneer farmers of Highland township. He died in 1870 and his widow now resides in the state of Minnesota. They became the parents of eleven children, of whom the first, Ivan, is deceased; Ole resides at Grand Forks, North Dakota; Emily is the wife of Bertines Hulverson, of North Dakota; Isabel is the wife of A. Storeland and they reside in Minnesota; Bertha is the wife of Hans Hanson, of Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Lars is deceased; Mrs. Benson was the next in order of birth; Georgina is the wife of Henry Highfield, and they reside in the state of Idaho; Julia is the wife of M. T. Paulson, of Austin, Minnesota; Caroline is the wife of Rev. N. G. Peterson, who is now pastor of a Lutheran church in the city of Des Moines; Laura is the wife of M. O. Swinstad, of Devil's Lake, North Dakota.

In conclusion is given brief record concerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Benson: Leonard Elmer was born September 22, 1889, and is associated in the management of the home farm; Betsy Maria, born November 7, 1890, is the wife of Lars Larson, of Boardman township; Adelia Louisa, who remains at the parental home, as do also Josephine Ida, Melvin Enoch, Cornelia Betina, Belva Belinda and Luella Geneva.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Frank Bente

Frank Bente is a scion of the third generation of the Bente family in Clayton county, with whose annals the name has been identified since the early pioneer days, and he is now one of the extensive and representative agriculturists and stock-growers of his native county, where he is the owner of a well improved landed estate of three hundred and twenty-seven acres, in sections 11 and 12, Boardman township and with free mail service on one of the rural delivery routes from Elkader, the county seat.

Mr. Bente was born in Cox Creek township, this county, on the 17th of February, 1876, and is a son of William and Margaret (Kress) Bente, both of whom were born in Germany but reared and educated in the United States. William Bente was a child of three years at the time of his parents' immigration to America and he became one of the pioneer settlers in what is now Cox Creek township, Clayton county, Iowa, where he reclaimed and improved a valuable farm and where he continued his residence until his death, which occurred in 1910. He was one of the substantial and highly esteemed citizens of this county, was a Republican in politics and was a communicant of the Lutheran church, as is also his widow, who now maintains her home at Elkader, the county seat. Of their ten children the eldest is Henry, who is a prosperous farmer in Read township; Louis resides at Elkader; George is engaged in farming in Boardman township; Mary is the wife of Adolpli Altschul, of Duluth, Minnesota; Frank, of this review, was the fifth child; Annie is the wife of Edward Messe, of Littleport, this county; Michael is a farmer in Cox Creek township; Katherine is the wife of Robert Englart, and they reside in the city of Chicago; Ida is the wife of John Miller of that city; and Elizabeth is the wife of Morris Hesner, of Strawberry Point, Clayton county.

Frank Bente passed the period of his childhood and youth on his father's farm and in the meanwhile fortified himself in mental discipline by attending the public schools. He continued to be associated with the work and management of the home farm until he was twenty-three years of age, and in his independent career as an agriculturist and stock-grower he has shown himself ambitious, resourceful and progressive, with the result that he has gained distinctive success and is to be designated as one of the representative farmers of his native county. In 1907 he purchased his present fine farm of three hundred and twenty-seven acres, and he is making the same one of the model places of the county, with a consistent application to diversified agriculture and the raising of good grades of live stock. He is aligned as a staunch supporter of the principles of the Republican party, is affiliated with the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, and both he and his wife are communicants of the Lutheran church.

On the first of August, 1900, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bente to Miss Lena A. Scheer, who has likewise born and reared in Clayton county and who is a daughter of Frederick and Lena Scheer, both natives of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Bente have two children - Florence Mary, who was born October 30, 1902; and Ralph William Edward, who was born December 19, 1903.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


James W. Bentley

James W. Bentley is a representative of the second generation of one of the well-known pioneer families whose name has been worthily linked with the social and material development and progress of Clayton county, and, loyal to and appreciative of the manifold advantages and attractions of his native county, James Wilbert Bentley has had no desire to sever his allegiance thereto, for he has here continued an exponent of the important and basic lines of industry under whose influence he was reared and is one of the substantial and enterprising farmers of Highland township.

He was born in this township on the 26th of December, 1861, and is a son of Albert and Sarah Jane Bentley, who became residents of the county in the earlier '50s and who here passed the remainder of their lives - folk of strong individuality, invincible integrity and that appreciation of the true value of human thought and action that made them account well for themselves in all of the relations of life. Of their children the first-born, Albert, died in infancy; Emma, the widow of George Keeland, resides in the state of North Dakota; Charles E. is deceased; Mrs. Mary Bateman resides in the city of Minneapolis, where her husband is identified with business enterprise; and James W., of this review, is the youngest of the children.

After having made good use of the advantages afforded in the public schools James W. Bentley continued as an active and resourceful assistant in the work of the home farm until he had attained to the age of nineteen years, when he went to West Union, Fayette county, where he worked about one year. He then made his way to the State of Michigan, but in the following spring he returned to his native county, where he worked on a farm until the ensuing autumn. He then went to Minnesota, where he amplified his experience, but after an absence of a year he showed his continued loyalty to his home county by resuming his residence within its borders and by renting the old homestead farm of his father. He remained with his widowed mother until her death, and shortly afterward, in 1883, he purchased his present farm, which is eligibly situated in section 23, Highland township, and which comprises two hundred and thirty-five acres of the fine land for which this section of the Hawkeye state is famed. Since assuming possession of this domain Mr. Bentley has made many high-grade improvements on the place, including the erection of a house and other buildings of the most approved modern type. He has had no aspiration for the honors of political office but has shown loyal interest in all things touching the well being of the community and gives unequivocal support to the principles and policies for which the Republican party stands sponsor. In a fraternal way he is affiliated with the Modern Brotherhood of America. His splendid rural home is about four miles distant from the village of Volga, from which place it receives service on mail route No. 1.

On the 22d of June, 1884, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bentley to Miss Margaret Waltenbaugh, who was born in Clayton county, April 28, 1865, and of the five children of this union the eldest is Mabel, who is the widow of Frederick Heiden and who now resides at Elkader; Delia is the wife of William Davis, of Manchester, Delaware county; Hattie is the wife of James Meyers, of Volga; and Blanche and Mildred remain at the parental home.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Elmer E. Benton

Elmer E. Benton. - No history of Clayton county could be written without frequent mention of Elmer E. Benton and of his father, Willard A. Benton, both of whom served the county in the office of sheriff and both of whom took active part in all the affairs of Clayton county's civic life. Willard A. Benton, father of Elmer E. Benton, was born in Afton, New York, and was the son of Orange Benton, a descendant of one of the oldest families of New England. The life of Willard Benton was filled not only with good deeds and substantial accomplishments, but with adventure and travel such as fall to the lot of but few. He was born on the farm which was the ancestral home and received his preliminary education in the schools of the county. At an early age he started to earn his own livelihood and first worked as an apprentice at the tanner's trade. It was while he was working at this trade that the discovery of gold in California filled all the east with dreams of a golden El Dorado. The bold and adventurous nature of the youth was at once fired with these reports of fabulous riches and he joined the exodus to California and, with a companion, George Church, he made the voyage "around the Horn," landing in San Francisco in 1853. Three years were spent by him in the gold fields of California, and he suffered all the hardships and partook of all the excitement and vicissitudes of the early days of placer mining. His fortunes were varied and his golden dreams were not fulfilled, but his spirit was undaunted and he resolved to push on, across the broad Pacific, to the gold fields of Australia. He traveled through this new continent for about six months, finally reaching the gold fields. He arrived with no resources save strong and willing hands and a knowledge of mining gained in California. He immediately staked a claim, and fortune smiled on him, for the result of his first day's labor was an ounce and a half of virgin gold. While moderately successful in Australia, Mr. Benton longed for his native land and within six months he was again on the Pacific, returning to America. The good ship "Yankee Blade," on which he embarked, suffered a most tempestuous passage and was finally wrecked off -the coast of Southern California. The passengers and crew were rescued by the ship "Goliath," and Mr. Benton was enabled to resume his voyage and to return to his home in the Empire State. His next, and most fortunate adventure was on the sea of matrimony, and, in 1856, he was married to Anna Maria Buck, also a descendant from an old New England family, who proved a model help-mate in every way and who was for many years one of the most popular and beloved women of Clayton county. Two children were born to them, Nellie M., who died at the age of three years, and Elmer E., whose name heads this brief biography. In 1857, shortly after their marriage, this brave young couple decided to move to the wider opportunities of the middle west and settled on Iowa as their future home. Arriving at Prairie du Chien, they crossed the Mississippi at McGregor's Landing, and Mr. Benton bought a farm in Howard county, which he cultivated for about a year. This was in the "Golden Era" of McGregor's history and Mr. Benton decided to cast his lot with the promising young metropolis. He engaged in the commission and real estate business and soon established himself as one of the leading spirits of that progressive city. He was an ardent union man, and, in 1861, he was appointed postmaster of McGregor. As the magnitude of the war increased and the call for troops became more pressing, McGregor, like hundreds of other cities, was hard pressed at times to fill its quota. It was in such an emergency that Willard A. Benton volunteered to raise a company of infantry. The story of his work, how he fairly stormed the town with martial music and with stirring patriotic appeals, has been told in volume one of this history. In a short time a company of more than one hundred men had been raised and Willard A. Benton was the unanimous choice for captain. He accepted this call to duty and, amid the cheers of the people of McGregor, he and his gallant company embarked on the "War Eagle," and glided from the peace of Iowa to the grim scenes of war. The company proceeded to Camp Franklin, where it was mustered into the regular army. Captain Benton took part, with his company, in the battles of Hartsville, Mo., Port Gibson, the charge of Black River Bridge, near Vicksburg, and various other engagements under General Grant. Sickness compelled him to leave his command, to the great regret of his brave company, and he returned to McGregor, where, as soon as he had regained his health, he was reinstated as postmaster, during his absence the position having been efficiently filled by his capable wife. He was postmaster at McGregor for eight years and upon retiring from that office he undertook a large contract to supply wood to the C., M. & St. P. Ry., and also conducted a flourishing real estate business. It was at this time also that he introduced a unique industry into Clayton county, devoting his spare time to the raising of trout in a hatchery which he conducted for several years, thus being a pioneer in the great work now undertaken by the Government at North McGregor and many other stations. In 1873, Willard A. Benton was elected sheriff of Clayton county, serving with greatest efficiency for three terms in that important office. Retiring from this position he returned to McGregor, where he spent the remainder of his life. His useful, patriotic and successful career ended on this earth September 9, 1905, when he died at the age of seventy-six years, having been preceded in death by his wife, who passed to the other life, March 26, 1894.

Elmer E. Benton received his preliminary education in the public schools of his native city, McGregor, and later was a student of the high schools. Before graduation, however, being ambitious to make his own way in the world, he obtained a position with his father as deputy sheriff. In 1880, at the close of his father's term of office, he went to Butte City, Montana, taking a position in the mines, and later prospecting for about two years. He returned to McGregor in June, 1882, and engaged as a traveling salesman for John Elbling, being employed in this capacity for about five years. He then accepted the position of deputy sheriff under J. J. Kann, and he later served in the same capacity under Sheriff George Cook. In 1895 he was elected to the office of sheriff on the democratic ticket. He was thrice re-elected, serving a total of eight years. Such was his popularity that for his fourth term he had no opposition, the Republicans conceding his election, and no candidate caring to stand against him. Mr. Benton is today serving his country as field deputy revenue collector, in which work he has proven an efficient and incorruptible public servant. His name, like that of his father before him, is synonymous with kindliness, good fellowship, efficiency and ability.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


James Bergan

James Bergan pays no divided loyalty to Clayton county, Iowa, though he claims Macoupin county, Illinois, as the place of his birth, which there occurred on the 27th of July, 1862. He has been a resident of Clayton county since he was a child of about four years and here he is now associated with his brother John in the ownership of one of the large and splendidly improved farms of Sperry township, where they stand forth as enterprising and influential exponents of agricultural and live-stock industry in this favored section of the Hawkeye state. The parents, Patrick and Elizabeth (Stulley) Bergan were born and reared in Ireland and came to the United States in 1848. They continued their residence in Illinois until 1866, when they came to Clayton county, Iowa, and settled on a farm in Highland township. There they passed the remainder of their lives, earnest, kindly and upright folk who won independence through their own endeavors and who commanded the high regard of the community in which they long lived and labored, both having been communicants of the Catholic church. Of the eight children six still survive the honored parents.

James Bergan was reared on the old homestead farm and gained his early education in the schools of Highland township. He remained at home until the death of his parents and he and his brother John then purchased the farm upon which they and their families now reside, the same comprising a fine estate of two hundred and forty-five acres, in section 16, Sperry township, and the brothers having improved the property with substantial and essentially modern buildings. They are associated also hi' the ownership of twenty acres of land within the corporate limits of the village of Volga.

James Bergan has been loyal and liberal in the support of measures and enterprises tending to advance the communal welfare, is a staunch Democrat in politics but has never been imbued with any ambition for public office. He and his wife are zealous communicants of the Catholic church, and prior to her marriage Mrs. Bergan has been a successful and popular teacher in the district schools of Clayton county. They have no children.

In 1912 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bergan to Miss Katherine Minihan, who was born in Highland township, this county, in the year 1870, and whose parents, Patrick and Mary (Gaynor) Minihan, were well known and highly esteemed citizens of this county at the time of their death, both having been born in Ireland and having been children at the time of the immigration of the respective families to the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Minihan became the parents of seven children, all of whom are living except one.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Embert Bergemeyer

Embert Bergemeyer, the present efficient and popular sheriff of Clayton county is a Norwegian by birth but a thorough American at heart. He was born in the city of Christiania, Norway, June 8th, 1877, the son of Elias Bergemeyer. He came to America with his parents, landing in New York July 14, 1888, and the family came at once to McGregor, where they had relatives among the early Norwegian pioneers. As a lad he worked on the farm and attended the rural schools of Clayton and Mendon townships. His has been a life of hard work and his younger days he spent farming and threshing in the northern part of the county.

He was married in 1899 to Miss Anna Allen of McGregor and to them one son, Clinton Bergemeyer was born. The death of his wife ended this happy union. On November 24th, 1903, he was married to Miss Sarah Margaret Bertsinger of McGregor and they have a charming daughter, Marjorie Regina.

For a number of years Mr. Bergemeyer was in the drayage and ice business at McGregor which business he sold in 1908. For five years he was city marshal of McGregor and also a constable for Mendon township. It was his efficiency as peace officer and his genial good-heartedness which makes him highly popular with all the men, that led to his nomination for sheriff on the Democratic ticket in 1910. There were three candidates in the primary election, Mr. Bergemeyer winning by a plurality of thirty-six votes. At the election, however, in November, 1910, he defeated his opponent, Doug. Brown, by a majority of 1,078. In the primary of 1912 he had no opposition and in the election of that year he received one of the largest majorities ever given a candidate for sheriff, being elected over Frank Wood, republican, by a majority of 1,764. Again, in 1914, he had no opposition in his own party at the primary and he was elected by a majority almost as large, he receiving 1,689 more votes than his opponent, J. P. Hurley, the Republican candidate. In the primary of 1916 there was a four-cornered fight in which Mr. Bergemeyer was the winner by 125 over his nearest opponent, and he is at present the Democratic nominee for sheriff. There is no question but that he has been a faithful, efficient and capable officer and a worthy successor to such men as James Davis, W. A. Benton, E. E. Benton, Martin Dittmer, and others who have made Clayton county noted for its excellent sheriffs. During the year of 1915 from some unknown cause a fire broke out in the roof of the county jail which is also the sheriff's residence, and at this time he lost a large portion of his household goods. As an officer, Mr. Bergemeyer has been eminently successful. There have been no jail deliveries during his term and all the work of his office has been attended to promptly and with courtesy, but with due firmness and proper regard for law.

While, fortunately, there have been no serious crimes committed in the county during the past few years where the criminals were unknown, nevertheless Mr. Bergemeyer is entitled to much credit for his clever detective work in a number of instances. One clever capture, due largely to his detective ability was the breaking up of an arson gang which set fire to a new residence in the eastern part of the county in 1913. Mr. Bergemeyer followed the clews in the case and succeeded not only in capturing those guilty of this crime but in unearthing the burning of the Haggen barn in which horses and live stock were ruthlessly burned to death.

Mr. Bergemeyer is one of the best liked men in Clayton county. He is capable, both physically and mentally, for the exacting office which he holds, and while he is inexorable in the performance of his duty, he has a kindness of heart and a sympathy for his fellows which makes him an ideal officer. He has taken an active part in all civic movements at McGregor and Elkader and throughout the county, and his friends predict that he will be triumphantly elected this fall.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Ernest A. Bergman

Ernest A. Bergman. - A progressive and popular citizen of McGregor, which has represented his home from the time of his birth, holds place as one of the sterling business men of his native city, with a circle of friends that is limited only by that of his acquaintances. With recognized eligibility, Mr. Bergman appeared in the spring of 1916 as a candidate for nomination for the office of sheriff of Clayton county, on the Democratic ticket, and the result of the primary election was that he was defeated by 41 votes.

Mr. Bergman was born at McGregor on the 12th of November, 1875, and is a son of Frederick and Margaret (Daubenberger) Bergman, both of whom were born in Germany. Frederick Bergman immigrated to the United States when a young man and for a time maintained his residence in the State of Pennsylvania, whence he removed in an early day to Wisconsin and established his residence at LaCrosse, where he remained about two years. In 1865 he numbered himself among the pioneer settlers at McGregor, Iowa, where for many years he successfully conducted a meat market, though he lived virtually retired for a number of years prior to his death, which occurred in May, 1910, the wife of his youth having passed away in 1874, and their children having been ten in number: Frederick, the first-born, is deceased; Frank still maintains his home at McGregor; Henry is deceased; Edward resides at McGregor; Albert is deceased; Ernest A., of this review, was the next in order of birth; William likewise maintains his home at McGregor; Odilda is the wife of John A. Walters, of McGregor; and Misses May and Charlotte still reside in their native place.

Continuing his studies in the public schools until he had duly profited by the advantages of the McGregor high school, Ernest A. Bergman then became associated with the operation of his father's meat market, and later he was engaged in the hotel business at McGregor for a period of about five years. He then resumed his connection with the meat-market business, of which he has since continued a prominent and successful representative in his native place. He has been a zealous supporter of the cause of the Democratic party and an active worker in its local ranks, though he never appeared as a candidate for public office until he announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination for sheriff of his native county, in the spring of 1916. He is affiliated with the local organizations of the Masonic fraternity, the Woodmen of the World, and the Modern Brotherhood of America.

On the 22d of August, 1913, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bergman to Mrs. Clara (Nelson) Elder, widow of Howard Elder and daughter of Nels Nelson. By her first marriage Mrs. Bergman has one son, Howard.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Theodore Berns

Theodore Berns became the owner of the fine old homestead on which he was born, in Jefferson township, and long held precedence as one of the representative agriculturists and stock-growers of his native county. He still retains possession of his fine landed estate, but since 1910 he has lived virtually retired in the little city of Guttenberg, where he erected a fine brick residence which has since been his place of abode and which is one of the most modern and attractive homes in this part of the county.

Mr. Berns was born in Jefferson township on the 6th of November, 1860, and is a son of Theodore and Mary Berns, who were born in Prussia and who became sterling pioneers of Clayton county, Iowa, where they continued to reside on their old homestead farm until their death, both having been zealous communicants of the Catholic church and the father having been a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party.

Theodore Berns was reared and educated in his native land and came to the United States and to Clayton county, Iowa, about the year 1845. He purchased a small tract of land in Jefferson township and by his indefatigable energy and excellent business ability he achieved substantial success, as indicated in his accumulation of one of the large and valuable landed estates of Jefferson township. Of the children the eldest two, Herman and Peter, now reside at Garnavillo, this county; Mary is deceased; Theodore, Jr., of this review, was the fourth child; Joseph resides at National, this county; Henry is a substantial farmer of Jefferson township; and Yetta is deceased. Theodore Berns, Jr., was favored in having the advantages not only of the district schools of Jefferson township but also those of the excellent Catholic parochial schools at Guttenberg. His entire active career was marked by close association with the work and management of the old homestead farm upon which he was born and into the ownership of which he came when he was about 14 years of age, by purchasing the interests of the other heirs. This fine rural domain comprises seven hundred and ten acres and is one of the more extensive and valuable farm properties of Clayton county, with permanent improvements of an order that mark it as a veritable model. While on the farm Mr. Berns gave special attention to the raising of high-grade live stock, including Shorthorn cattle and Poland-China swine. He was known for his distinctive energy, progressiveness and good judgment and made himself known as one of the representative agriculturists and stock-growers of this section of the Hawkeye state, the while his well ordered enterprise gained to him large and substantial prosperity. He has always taken loyal interest in community affairs of a public order, is a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party but he has never been deflected from his course by aught of ambition for political office. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Catholic church, as was also his first wife, and he is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus, as a member of a splendid lodge in the city of Dubuque. A

April 16, 1887, recorded the marriage of Mr. Bern to Miss Mary Lueck, daughter of Henry and Mary Lueck, of Guttenberg, and she survived her marriage by only four years, as she passed to the life eternal on the 8th of October, 1891. Mary, the one child of this marriage, is now the wife of John Hoeger, of Jefferson township. On the 16th of February, 1894, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Berns to Miss Clara Lueck, daughter of Benjamin Lueck, of New Union, Iowa, and of the six children of this union all remain at the parental home except the youngest, Elizabeth, who died in childhood. The names of the children of the attractive home circle are here designated in respective order of birth; Edward, Hilda, Raymond, Melania and Eugenia.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


James M. Berry

James M. Berry owns and conducts the Berry Hotel at North McGregor, and has proved himself one of the efficient and popular exponents of this line of enterprise in Clayton county. His hotel caters to a large and appreciative patronage and is maintained at a high standard of excellence, while he has a wide circle of friends among the traveling public as well as in his home county. He is one of the substantial and progressive citizens of the county and is well entitled to representation in this publication.

Mr. Berry is a scion of fine old Irish stock in both the paternal and maternal lines and claims the Badger State as the place of his nativity. He was born in Waukeshaw, Wisconsin, on the 16th of November, 1868, and is a son of John and Bridget Berry, both of whom were born in Ireland and both of whom were children at the time of the immigration of the respective families from the Emerald Isle to America. The marriage of the parents was solemnized in Waukeshaw, Wisconsin, and they removed to Prairie du Chien when the subject of this sketch was but one year of age. Later they moved to North McGregor, where the mother passed into the other life December 31, 1915, after a residence in North McGregor of twenty- two years. The venerable father is still alert and vigorous of mind and body, and now has the distinction of being the oldest employee of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul R. R. Co., he having given a life time of faithful service to this great corporation. He maintains his home at North McGregor, and of his nine children, six are living.

James M. Berry was a lad of ten years at the time of the family removal from Wisconsin to Allamakee county, Iowa, and he was there reared at Waukon, the county seat. In 1885, while still in his teens, he made his way largely by stage coach, to the Black Hills of South Dakota, and for three years followed the free and invigorating life of a cowboy. With the advent of the railroad, he embarked in the restaurant business at Oelrichs, South Dakota, and subsequently at Hot Springs, and he has been engaged in the restaurant and hotel business since that time. The winters of 1891 and 92 were spent as clerk in the hotel San Marino, "Southerland," Florida. He was engaged in hotel business at Chicago during the World's Fair and, on August 27, 1894, he purchased from the late Charles Huffschmitt the furniture and lease of the C., M. & St. P. R. R. hotel and lunchroom at North McGregor, which he successfully conducted for fourteen years. Careful and effective service brought to him decisive success and he finally erected the handsome three-story brick hotel that bears his name and that is conducted by him according to the most approved modern standards. This hotel has the unique distinction of being the most valuable property of the kind in a town of less than six hundred population in the United States that is conducted on the European plan. The hotel is well equipped in all departments and has a large and representative patronage, being especially in favor with the commercial travelers who have occasion to visit Northeastern Iowa.

Adjacent to the village Mr. Berry owns a well improved farm of fifty-seven acres, besides which he is the owner of a good farm in Allamakee county. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party, which he has served as precinct committeeman for the past fifteen years, and he is now a member of the Democratic State Finance Committee. For fifteen years also he has been a member of the City Council of North McGregor.

Broad-gauged and progressive in his civic attitude, Mr. Berry has been especially prominent and influential in the promotion of the National Park which it is hoped to have established near North McGregor, on the shores of the Mississippi River. It is not too much to say that he has been foremost in the agitation of this important project, and has spent much of his time and means bringing it before the State and nation. In recognition of his ability and enthusiasm in this matter, he has been made chairman of the Executive and Publicity Committee of the Mississippi Valley National Park Association. He is also interested in the good roads movement and is superintendent of the northern division of the Eastern Iowa Scenic Highway, and is a committeeman of the Upper Mississippi River Improvement Association. In the city of Dubuque he holds membership in the lodge of the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks. In his youth he attended St. Johns, now Campion College at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, and in later years, in recognition of many sterling qualities, he was made an honorary alumnus of that famous school.

In the city of Chicago, on the 16th of October, 1902, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Berry to Miss Anna D. Brophy, who was born and reared in Clayton county, Iowa, and who is a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Sweeney) Brophy. She received excellent educational advantages in her youth and graduated from St. Mary's Academy at Prairie du Chien, Wis.; both she and her husband being communicants of the Catholic Church. Mr. and Mrs. Berry have four children, Donald John, James Stanton, Margaret Virginia and Elizabeth Marie.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Mrs. Eugenie S. Birkholz

BIRKHOLZ, Mrs. Eugenie S., author, born in Garnavillo, Clayton county, Iowa, in 1853. She is the daughter of Dr. F. Andros, who was the first physician and surgeon, regularly licensed to practice, who settled west of the Mississippi river and north of Missouri. He settled in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1830

Mrs. Birkholz was educated in the school of the Catholic sisters in Benton, Wis., and was in her early life a woman of original thought and sent many literary contributions to the periodicals and papers of the day.

In 1881 she was married to John Birkholz, of Chicago, Ill, in which city they both resided, and whence they emigrated to Grand Forks, N. Dak., where she has since made her home. Mrs. Birkholz devotes considerable time to literary work.

(American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume 1, Publ. 1897 Transcribed by Marla Snow)


Hiram C. Bishop

Hiram C. Bishop has wielded large influence in the forming and directing of popular sentiment and action in Clayton county, both through his services in public office and through his editorial utterances as in the columns of the Clayton County Democrat, of which representative paper of northeastern Iowa he was the founder and of which he is still editor and publisher. He served with marked efficiency and progressiveness as superintendent of schools of Clayton county for six years and later represented his district in the Iowa State Senate for two successive sessions. He gained definite prestige in the pedagogic profession, of which he continued as a representative for a long period and as an exponent of which he first came to Clayton county. The former Senator is a native of northeastern Iowa and stands definitely exemplar of the fine element of citizenship that has made this one of the most advanced and opulent portions of the Hawkeye commonwealth. He is a scion of an honored pioneer family of Iowa and this fact emphasizes the consistency of according to him a special tribute in this publication, for it has been his to lend much of distinction to a name that has been signally prominent in this part of Iowa since the time when this portion of our great national domain was virtually on the very frontier.

Hiram Crusan Bishop was born on a farm near West Union, the judicial center of Fayette county, Iowa, on the 10th of March, 1852, and is a son of Franklin Park Bishop and Cynthia Ann (Commack) Bishop, the former of whom was born in Kentucky, on the 31st of March, 1818, and the latter of whom was born in Virginia, on the 18th of June, 1819, she having been a child at the time of her parents' removal to Kentucky, where she was reared and educated and where her marriage to Mr. Bishop was solemnized. In the year 1839 Franklin P. Bishop came with his family from the old Bluegrass State to Iowa and became one of the early pioneers of Fayette county, where he obtained a tract of government land, near West Union, and where he eventually reclaimed one of the valuable farms of the county. As a man of sterling character and strong mentality, he was an influential figure in connection with the social and material development and upbuilding of Fayette county, and both he and his wife were venerable and revered pioneer citizens of that county at the time of their death, he having passed away in 1902 and she in 1909. Both were zealous members of the Baptist church and in politics he was first a Whig and later a Democrat. Their marriage was solemnized in the year 1839 and they became the parents of twelve children, whose names are here recorded in the respective order of birth: Susan Mary, James Thomas, Sarah Ann, Elizabeth Matilda, William Hamilton, Hiram Crusan, Solomon Wayne, Sabitha Jane, Martha Catherine, Eliza Adelaide, Harry Wilson, and Franklin. Of the children six sons and three daughters are now living.

The vigilant and resourceful pioneers of Iowa early made the best possible provisions for the education of their children, and it is matter of record that there have been few states in the Union that have continuously maintained so low a percentage of illiteracy. Thus it was the privilege of Hon. Hiram C. Bishop, the immediate subject of this review, to receive in his youth the best of scholastic advantages. He was reared under the invigorating influences of the home farm and while contributing his quota to its work he applied himself diligently to his studies in the district school near his home until he was eligible for the initiating of higher academic study.

At West Union he attended Ainsworth Academy, and after leaving this institution he prosecuted his studies in Upper Iowa University, at Fayette. He put his scholastic attainments to effective test and utilization by entering the pedagogic profession, in which he gained unequivocal success and popularity. He taught seven terms in the rural or district schools and thirty-one terms in town public schools, in which connection his services finally became enlisted in Clayton county. That he made his benignant influence felt in connection with educational affairs in this county needs no further voucher than the statement that he served from January 1, 1888. to January 1, 1894, as county superintendent of schools, his administration having been diligent in advancing the general standard of the work of the schools and by progressive policies that did much to conserve this end.

Mr. Bishop has always been a stalwart advocate of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stand sponsor, and he has given yeoman service in furtherance of its cause in northeastern Iowa. He served as a member of the State senate from 1900 to 1905, and was recognized as one of the dominating figures in the deliberations on the floor of the upper house and in the councils of the various committees to which he was assigned. On the 4th of July, 1893, he founded the Clayton County Democrat, at Elkader, the judicial center of the county, and during the intervening period of nearly a quarter of a century he has maintained for his representative paper a high standard as an exponent of local interests and a director of popular sentiment. He and his wife are members of the Universalist church of Elkader, and he is affiliated with the local organizations of the Brotherhood of American Yeomen, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America.

June 14, 1882, recorded the marriage of Mr. Bishop to Miss Emma Kern, who was born at Elgin, Fayette county, this state, on the 13th of March, 1864, and the four children of this union are: Arthur C., Max B., Clint G., and Ruth. All of the children were graduated in the Elkader high school, in which the only daughter was a member of the class of 1916, besides being also a graduate of St. Joseph's Musical School at Elkader. All of the sons maintain editorial association with newspaper publishing, and Max and Clint are graduates of the law department of Drake University, in the city of Des Moines.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Verner F. Blake

Verner F. Blake is one of the popular and influential business men of the younger generation in his native county, and in the thriving village of Volga he has for the past fifteen years had the control and management of the well-established furniture and undertaking business that was founded by his mother, who is now one of the honored and venerable pioneer citizens of this county.

Verner F. Blake was born in Sperry township, Clayton county, Iowa, on the 3d of March, 1880, and is a son of Morris L. and Cynthia C. (Hawthorne) Blake, the former of whom was born in the state of Vermont and the latter of whom was born in Clayton county, Iowa, where her parents settled in the very early pioneer days. Morris L. Blake came to this county when a young man, has been prominent in connection with business and civic affairs and is now living virtually retired in the village of Volga. He and his wife became the parents of four children, all of whom are living, and both Mr. and Mrs. Blake are well known and highly esteemed pioneer citizens of Clayton county.

In the public school Verner F. Blake continued his studies until he had completed the curriculum of the high school, and since leaving school he has been actively associated with the properous furniture and undertaking business of which he now has the sole management. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America, he and his wife attend and support the Presbyterian church in their home village, and for the past twelve years he has been giving most loyal and efficient service as a member of the village council of Volga, his political allegiance being given to the Republican party.

On the 11th of January, 1905, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Blake to Miss Elsa Waitenbaugh, who was born in Howard county, this state, and who is a daughter of James E. and Caroline (Perkins) Waltenbaugh, who now maintain their home at Rockford, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Blake have two sons, Russell Eugene, who was born October 9, 1906; and Merton James, who was born September 26, 1915.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Sven Blockhus

Sven Blockhus. - In a spot far removed from the fair Northland in which he was born, a scion of a long line of sturdy and upright Norse ancestors, it has been given to Sven Blockhus to achieve through his own ability and efforts the well earned rewards of independence and definite prosperity. He is one of the enterprising and successful farmers of Marion township, where he exemplifies excellent judgment and progressiveness in the carrying on of his diversified agricultural operations and in the raising of good grades of live stock, and he is a sterling citizen who is entitled to definite recognition in this history of the Hawkeye state.

Mr. Blockhus was born in Norway, on the 30th of November, 1872, and is a son of Ole and Mary Blockhus, the former of whom passed his entire life in Norway, where he followed the mason's trade, his widow having continued at the old home since his death. Of their eleven children all are living except one and seven of the number are residents of America.

The subject of this sketch gained his early education in the schools of his native land and remained at the parental home until he was fifteen years of age, when he found employment at farm work. To this vocation he applied himself until he had attained to the age of nineteen years, when he came to the United States and made Iowa his destination.

In the early period of his residence here he found employment on farms in Fayette and Clayton counties during the summer months and gave evidence of his ambition and good judgment by attending school during the winter terms for the purpose of gaining effective knowledge of the English language and otherwise extending his education. During two winters he was a zealous and appreciative student in Breckenridge Institute, at Decorah. Applying himself diligently to the work to which he set his hand, Mr. Blockhus carefully saved his earning and finally, in 1900, he was able to institute independent operations as a farmer. He purchased in that year his present farm, which comprises one hundred and forty-one and one-half acres and which is situated in section 7, Marion township. Here he has since continued his vigorous and successful activities as a general farmer, and he made his place give forth patent evidence of thrift and prosperity. He is a man of strong mentality and well fortified opinions, is a Republican in politics, and has served six years as justice of the peace, besides which he has been assessor of Marion township since 1914. Both he and his wife are active members of the Norwegian Lutheran church.

On the 13th of March, 1903, Mr. Blockhus wedded Miss Gina Holt, and they have six children, all of whom remain at the parental home - Ida, Otto, Severin, Bessie, Fridjof and Herbert.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Albert Boleyn

Albert Boleyn. - In America the true patent of nobility that is viewed with the greatest respect is that held by the man who has depended upon his own powers and exertions in making his way to the goal of worthy success, and such achievement has significantly characterized the career of Albert Boleyn, who became virtually dependent upon his own resources when he was a mere boy and who has pressed forward to the mark of large and well ordered prosperity. The evidences of his temporal success are shown in his ownership of one of the large and well improved landed estates of Clayton county, by his prominence as a buyer and shipper of live stock on a large scale and by his being a stockholder and director of the Volga Savings Bank, with which he has been thus identified from the time of its organization. He is one of the substantial and honored citizens of Clayton county, a man whose life has been guided and governed by integrity and resolute purpose, and none is more clearly entitled to recognition in this history.

Mr. Boleyn was born on a farm near Wadena, Fayette county, Iowa, on the 17th of December, 1866, and is the eldest of the three children born to Joseph and Mary (Poor) Boleyn, both natives of Pennsylvania. The second child, Amelia, is now the wife of Frank Jones, of Oelwein, Fayette county; and the third child, Inez, died in infancy. The subject of this review was not yet three years old at the time of his mother's death, which occurred in May, 1869, and his father continued to reside in Fayette county until his death, at the age of about sixty years. Joseph Boleyn was a young man at the time when he came from the old Keystone state and numbered himself among the pioneer settlers of Fayette county, Iowa, where he was long actively identified with agricultural pursuits, as one of the substantial farmers of the county, and he passed the closing years of his life in the village of Oelwein, where he died on the 8th of April, 1904.

Albert Boleyn may consistently be said to have been graduated in the college of his own practical and varied experiences, and such were the exigencies of time and place that in his youth he was enabled to attend the schools of his native county in only a desultory way. When but seven years of age he began to provide for his own maintenance, and his early compensation for his work on a farm was the princely stipend of five dollars a month. During the summer seasons he thus worked for wages during his boyhood and youth, and in the winters he worked for his board and availed himself of the privilege of attending the district schools.

On the 21st of September, 1886, about three months prior to his twentieth birthday anniversary, he married Miss Margaret Lowe, the devoted young woman who was to be his helpmeet and zealous coadjutor in his efforts to achieve independence and enduring prosperity, she having been born and reared in Clayton county, where their marriage was solemnized and where they have maintained their home during the long intervening years. During the first year after his marriage Mr. Boleyn was employed at farm work by his wife's father and he then purchased one hundred and fourteen acres of land in Sperry township, where he instituted his independent operations as an agriculturist and stock-grower. It will not strain the imaginative powers to appreciate that in the years that followed in their course Mr. Boleyn was found applying his energies with unstinted zeal and circumspection, with the result that increasing prosperity attended his efforts and he was able to make appreciable advancement. All this is most clearly demonstrated in his ownership at the present time of a finely improved landed estate of three hundred and fifty-six acres, in Sperry and Highland townships, where he has long stood well to the front as one of the most progressive and energetic agriculturists and stock-growers of this county. Though he still gives his general supervision to the operations of his farm property he and his devoted wife have maintained their home in the village of Volga since October 17, 1906, when they took possession of their newly erected and modern residence, which is one of the most attractive in the village, with fine grounds comprising an entire block, and with a genuine hospitality that equals its physical charm. Since his retirement from the farm Mr. Boleyn has not permitted his energies and activities to wane, as he has developed a large and prosperous business in the buying and shipping of live stock. The extent of his operations along this important line of industrial and commercial enterprise may be appreciated the better when it is stated that during the months of August and September, 1915, he bought and shipped stock to the value of $127,576, the incidental financial transactions having been effected through the medium of the Volga Savings Bank, of which, as previously noted, he has been a stockholder and director from the time of its incorporation.

Mr. Boleyn is a stalwart advocate of the cause of the Republican party and while he has not been troubled by office-seeking proclivities he has given most effective service in the position of justice of the peace. He is affiliated with the Modern Brotherhood of America and both he and his wife are zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Volga, of which he is a trustee.

David and Elizabeth (Dempster) Lowe, the venerable parents of Mrs. Boleyn now maintain their home at Volga and are honored pioneer citizens of Clayton county. Of their children Mrs. Boleyn is the eldest; Daniel likewise resides at Volga; Clarence, Harry and Susana are deceased. Of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Boleyn all remain at the parental home except the third, Walter M., who was born August 21, 1896, and whose death occurred November 21, 1898. The names and respective birth-dates of the surviving children are here noted: Benjamin H., July 15, 1888; David E., November 4, 1891; Vena, September 21, 1898; and Neva, September 11, 1903.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Henry C. Bothmer

Henry C. Bothmer is able and gratified to pay to the Hawkeye state the allegiance and loyalty of a native son and he has been a resident of Clayton county since his childhood, being one of the six surviving children of a family of seven born to Henry and Caroline (Lozier) Bothmer, both of whom were born and reared in Germany, whence they immigrated to America in 1852 and were married in Pennsylvania. The parents first established their home in Pennsylvania, but a few years later they came to Iowa and numbered themselves among the pioneers of Fayette county. At Westfield, that county, as a practical miller by trade, the father operated one of the pioneer flour mills of northeastern Iowa, and a few years later he came with his family to Clayton county and assumed charge of the mill in the village of Clayton, where he passed the residue of his life, his wife having died here also.

He whose name introduces this article was reared to manhood in Clayton county, availed himself consistently of the privileges afforded in the public schools of the locality and period, and as a youth he initiated his independent career by assuming a position as clerk in a general store at Clayton. Here he later engaged independently in the farm implement business, and since about 1885 he has given the major part of his time and attention to the buying and shipping of live stock, of which important line of industrial enterprise he is one of the prominent, successful and popular representatives in this section of the state, his operations involving the shipping of an average of sixty carloads of live stock each year. In addition to owning a fine modern residence at Clayton and a farm of thirty acres in Clayton township, this county, Mr. Bothmer has a valuable tract of seven hundred and forty acres of land in the State of Michigan and a well improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres in South Dakota. He has manifested no desire for public office or political activity, but gives his support in national and state affairs to the Democratic party. At Garnavillo he is affiliated with Garnavillo Lodge, No. 90, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and his wife is a communicant of the Lutheran church, which he attends and supports.

In 1888 Mr. Bothmer wedded Miss Kate Specht, who was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, and who is a daughter of Herman and Sarah (Spiese) Specht, both now deceased. Of the three children of Mr. and Mrs. Bothmer the second child, a daughter, died in infancy; Benjamin H. is now a resident of Montana; and Clyde H. is employed as a clerk in a Clayton mercantile establishment.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Jackson E. Bowman

Jackson E. Bowman is one of the alert and popular young business men of his native county and is now the general manager of the well ordered department store conducted at Volga by the firm of Pohl & Bink.

He was born in Mallory township, this county, on the 18th of June, 1888, and is a son of Silas and Martha (Walters) Bowman, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the latter of whom was born in Clayton county, a member of one of the sterling pioneer families of this favored section of the Hawkeye state. Silas Bowman came to Clayton county when a young man and was one of the substantial farmers and honored and influential citizens of Mallory township at the time of his death, which occurred on the 24th of June, 1912. He was a Democrat in politics and his religious faith was that of the Congregational church, of which his widow, now a resident of Guttenberg, this county, likewise is a zealous member. Walter, the eldest of the five children, is now a resident of Cedar Bluff, Nebraska; Frank died in childhood; the subject of this review was the third in order of birth; Leroy resides at Guttenberg; and Dolly is the wife of August Bendschmidt, of Elkport, this county.

Jackson E. Bowman furthered his preparation for the active duties and responsibilities of life by making good use of the advantages afforded in the excellent public schools at Guttenberg, and as a youth he found employment m the grocery store of A. W. Latta, at Osterdock. After being thus engaged about one year he there entered the employ of the firm of Walters & Company, engaged in the general merchandise business, and about a year later he there assumed a clerical position in the general store of John Mosher, with whom he remained about three months. With marked circumspection and judgment he then decided to advance himself in fitness for business life by taking a course in a commercial college in the city of Cedar Rapids, and he there continued his studies eight months. He applied himself with characteristic diligence and appreciation and after having thus more effectually equipped himself for executive service he entered the employ of the representative mercantile firm of Pohl & Bink, of whose well equipped general merchandise or department store at Volga he has been manager since May 26, 1915, the enterprise having most signally prospered under his careful and progressive direction. Mr. Bowman is found aligned with the Democratic party and both he and his wife hold membership in the Congregational church at Volga, the while they are popular factors in the representative social life of their home community.

On the 24th of August, 1914, Mr. Bowman wedded Miss Ida Neihause, who was born and reared in this county, and their one child, Ruth, was born January 2, 1915.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Warren A. Boynton

Warren A. Boynton is one of the representative farmers of the younger generation in Clayton county and is known for his civic and industrial progressiveness and for his vigorous mentality and well fortified opinions. He shows a high sense of personal stewardship in connection with community interests and is one of the well known and distinctively popular citizens of Clayton county, within whose borders the major part of his life has been passed.

Warren Adelbert Boynton was born in Grundy county, Iowa, on the 1st of December, 1879, and is a son of Charles Henry and Sarah Ellen (Cole) Boynton, the former a native of the state of New York and the latter of Iowa, where her parents settled in the early pioneer days. Charles H. Boynton was the son of Charles Sherman Boynton, who was born at Rodman, New York, January 16, 1822, and who died at the home of his son at Strawberry Point, May 27, 1916, at the age of ninety-four years, five months, eleven days. In 1856, he came with his wife Clarissa and his family to Iowa and settled five miles east of Strawberry Point on the farm now owned by his son Charles H. and operated by his grandson Warren A. Boynton. Charles H. Boynton, the father of the subject of this sketch, came with his parents to Iowa in 1856, and resided in Clayton county until his marriage. He then settled on a farm in Grundy county, after having resided for two years in Clay county, and he continued his activities as a successful farmer in Grundy county for seventeen years. In 1890 he purchased the farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Clayton county, this being the old homestead farm situated in Section 20, Lodomillo township. Of the children of Charles H. and Sarah Ellen Boynton, the first born, a daughter, died at the time of birth; Charles D. now resides near the city of Spokane, Washington; Alma M. is the wife of George Maresh, M. D., of Riverside, Iowa; Raymond Scepter, a talented artist, maintains his home at San Francisco, Cal.; and the sixth child, a daughter, died in infancy; Warren A., of this review, having been the third in order of birth.

After having gained due preliminary discipline in the rural schools, Warren A. Boynton supplemented this by an effective course in the High School at Strawberry Point. That he made good use of his educational opportunities is indicated by the fact that he became a successful teacher in the district schools of Clayton county. He continued as a popular representative of the pedagogic profession for one year, and he passed the ensuing two years on a farm in Grundy county. Upon his return to Clayton county he assumed the management of his father's farm in Lodomillo township, and after two years he married and removed to Wisconsin. He remained in that state only nine months, and since that time he has had the active management of his father's farm in Lodomillo township, where he has successfully given his attention to diversified agriculture and the raising of fine live stock.

Mr. Boynton is not constrained by strict partisan lines in politics but gives his support to the men and measures meeting the approval of his judgment, his attitude thus being that of an independent voter. He is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America; both he and his wife are earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

On the 5th of April, 1904, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Boynton to Miss Agnes Judett, who was born at Central City, Linn county, Iowa, and their six children are Charles Floyd, Ellen Margaret, Hazel, Adel, Howard Raymond, Edwin Russell, Faith.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Elmer H. Brandt

Elmer H. Brandt has given distinctive evidence of his progressiveness and good judgment in connection with the ownership and operation of one of the fine farms of his native county, for the major part of the splendid improvements on the place has been made by him and the pervasive atmosphere of thrift and prosperity marks the owner as a man of energy and enterprise.

Mr. Brandt was born in Garnavillo township, this county, on the 5th of November, 1890, and is a son of Henry and Mary (Nieman) Brandt, who are now living retired in the village of Garnavillo, both being natives of Germany. Henry Brandt was a boy at the time of the family immigration to America and his parents became early pioneer settlers of Clayton county, where they passed the remainder of their lives and where he himself gave his entire active career to effective operations as a farmer and stock-grower, through the medium of which industries he gained the success that enables him and his wife to pass the gracious twilight of their lives in peace and prosperity. He is a Republican in his political adherence and both he and his wife are devoted communicants of the Lutheran church.

Elmer H. Brandt was reared on the home farm and after completing the curriculum of the district schools he continued his studies in turn in the Garnavillo high school, took a business course and an agricultural course. After reaching his legal majority he became associated with his brother Louis H. in the management of the home farm, and three years later he removed to his present fine farm, of which he is the owner and which comprises two hundred and nine acres, in section 7 and 12, Garnavillo township. Though he gives his attention to diversified agriculture and utilizes the most approved scientific methods in this connection, Mr. Brandt has specialized in the raising of high grade cattle of the Shorthorn type and has made this department of his farm enterprise notably productive in financial returns. He is a Republican in politics and is serving as secretary of the school board of his district.

On the 11th of February, 1914, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brandt to Miss Laura M. Kregel, daughter of Edward W. Kregel, concerning whom detailed mention is made on other pages of this work. Mr. and Mrs. Brandt are the parents of a fine pair of twin sons, Gerald and Harold, who were born on the 9th of October, 1915. Mrs. Brandt has been a resident of Clayton county from the time of her birth, attended the Garnavillo high school and both she and her husband have a host of loyal friends in their home county.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Louis H. Brandt

Louis H. Brandt is admirably proving his resourcefulness and progressive policies as a representative of agricultural and livestock industry in his native county, and it is gratifying to record that he has the direct control and management of the fine old homestead farm on which he was born and reared and which is now known as Sunny View Farm. This admirably improved landed estate is situated in section 24, Garnavillo township, and comprises three hundred and four acres of as fine land as is to be found in this favored section of the Hawkeye state.

Mr. Brandt's unwavering loyalty to and appreciation of his native county are manifested not only in his active and successful association with its agricultural interests but also by his enterprise and public spirit as a citizen. He is aligned firmly and consistently with the Republican party and his personal popularity in the community which has ever represented his home is definitely signified by the fact that in 1916 he is found serving as township clerk and as school director of his district. Both he and his wife are earnest communicants of St. Paul's Lutheran church at Garnavillo.

Louis H. Brandt was born June 23, 1886, and is a son of Henry and Mary (Nieman) Brandt, both of whom were born in Germany and both of whom are living in gracious comfort and retirement in the village of Garnavillo, secure in the high esteem of all who know them. Henry Brandt was but a boy at the time when he came with his parents from Germany to America, and soon afterward the family home was established in Clayton county, where he was reared to manhood under the conditions and influences of the pioneer days and where he eventually gained a place of prominence as one of the representative farmers of the county. Both he and his wife, now venerable in years, are devout communicants of the Lutheran church and he has given unwavering allegiance to the Republican party. Of the eight children, two sons and six daughters, all are living, save one daughter who died in infancy.

Louis H. Brandt early began to lend his aid in the work of the home farm and in the meanwhile he made good use of the advantages afforded in the public schools of his native county, his educational discipline thereafter being effectively supplemented by a two years' course in the college of agriculture of the great University of Wisconsin, at Madison. He has continuously been identified with the operations of the fine farmstead on which he was born, and he assumed charge of the same shortly after his marriage, which occurred on November 23, 1910, when he was twenty-four years of age. As a farmer and stock- grower he has fully upheld and even added to the high reputation long sustained by his honored father, and he is essentially one of the broad-minded, energetic and progressive exponents of these basic lines of industry in his native county. He has been distinctively successful in the breeding and raising of full-blood Shorthorn cattle, to which branch of farm enterprise he is giving special attention.

In the year 1910 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Brandt to Miss Amanda Matt, who was born and reared in Farmersburg township, this county, where her father, Joseph Matt, is still actively identified with agricultural pursuits, the mother having passed to eternal rest when about 35 years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Brandt have two fine little sons - Valmah H. and Robert J.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Harrison Douglas Brown

Harrison Douglas Brown, familiarly known to all as "Doug." Brown, is a native Iowan, born in McGregor, June 24, 1861, and was the son of Mathias J. Brown, born in New York State and Bertha (Amundsun) Brown, a native of Norway. They came to McGregor in Clayton county about 1850, where the father followed the trade of plasterer until his death June 3, 1885. The wife survived her husband ten years, dying September 19, 1895. They were the parents of seven children. Clara, the oldest living child, is the wife of John R. Rallton of St. Louis; George W. resides in Lakeport, Florida; Douglas, the subject of this sketch; Bertha, deceased; Alma, who is now Mrs. George Heilma of McGregor; and Cyrus, deceased.

Douglas Brown received his elementary education in the McGregor public schools, but at the age of thirteen he was obliged to give up his studies and begin the making of his own way in the world. In 1877, he, together with his brother, went to Minnesota, where for three years he was employed by a railroad company. Abandoning railroading as a business, he went to McGregor, Iowa, in 1882, where he took up the tinner's trade, engaging in that work until 1884, spending two years in McGregor and three in Elkader. At the end of that time he entered into business for himself, opening a hardware store, which is the oldest and most complete of its kind in Elkader, dealing in hardware and stoves of all descriptions, and which includes thoroughly up-to-date tinning and plumbing departments.

He was united in marriage to Emma Heilman, May 11, 1886, a native of Clayton county, and the daughter of Jacob and Eliza (Schmidt) Heilman, both natives of Germany, but who immigrated into America in their early youth, joining the sturdy pioneer colonies which have done so much to place Iowa in the front rank of the states of our Union.

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Brown have but one child remaining of the four that were born to them. Their firstborn were twins, one of which died in infancy, and the other, Hazel, reached the age of eight years; and H. Douglas, the only survivor, is affectionately called "Doug., Jr."

Mr. Brown takes an active interest in the affairs of the Republican party, of which he is a member, and has served on the city council as alderman, and on the school board. He belongs to the Masonic Lodge, is a thirty-second degree member of the Ancient and Accepted Order of Scottish Rite, and affiliates with the Congregational church, in all of which he holds a deservedly high standing.

Notwithstanding his varied time absorbing occupations, our subject finds opportunity to wield a poetic pen, and has given glimpses of the great pleasure afforded him in his favorite pursuit of railroading in several poems, entitled, "The Old Elkader Line" ; "On the Old I. and D."; and "Beulah Land." While he claims no particular literary merit for these verses, yet the descriptions given in them are unexcelled and were read with great interest and appreciation by his many friends in Clayton county.

He describes the pioneer experiences of Mr. V. R. Miller, an old pioneer, most aptly in a poem, a portion of which is quoted below:

When the deer and bear and wildcat roamed the forests at their will,
And the voices of the Indians could be heard from hill to hill,
As they called out to their comrades for to join them in their play
Of romping, fishing and hunting just to pass the time away,
When through the stillness of the midnight you heard the coyotes howl,
And it made you kind of shaky to hear the hooting of the owl.

When around in the darkness stealthy shadows softly crept,
As the wild beast of the forest prowled around you while you slept.
When Uncle Sam was fighting and had Mexico on the run,
And before the California craze for gold had begun,
Allured by far spread reports that Iowa's soil was best
A young man left New England, and started for the west.

He has seen the ox-teams haul the wheat from a hundred miles away.
The old stage coach has come and gone, it too, has had its day.
And all the big warehouses that once were on the shore,
As they bulged with wheat and grain, clear to the door;
With dressed pork on the river bank, and every kind of game;
That was when the steamboat thrived before the railroad came.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Herbert C. Brownson

Herbert C. Brownson is one of a family of three children, who own one of the fine landed estates of Clayton county, and the property includes the original old homestead which was obtained by their paternal grandfather in the early pioneer days when this now opuleni section of the Hawkeye state was little more than an un-trammeled wilderness.

Herbert C. Brownson and his brother and sister own and reside upon the old homestead and as representatives of the third generation of the family in Clayton county they are well upholding the honors of a name that has been one representative of prominence and influence in connection with the civic and industrial development and upbuilding of the county. The eldest of the three children is Miss Lois Brownson, who was graduated in the Fayette Business College and who is now the popular chatelaine of the attractive home, the extensive farm being under the direct and effective management of her brothers, Herbert C. and Lloyd.

Herbert C. Brownson was born on the farm which now represents his home and which comprises two hundred acres of most productive land, in Section 22 Farmersburg township. The date of his nativity was February 5, 1884, and he was the second in order of birth of the three children who remain on the old homestead. His parents, Freeman and Rachel (Datisman) Brownson, were natives respectively of the state of New York and of Germany, and the latter was a child at the time of her parents' immigration to the United States. Freeman Brownson was a youth at the time when his parents established their home amid the pioneer wilds of Clayton county, and here he and his wife continued to reside until their death. He inherited the pioneer homestead of his father, Daniel Brownson, who came to Clayton county in 1846 and who acquired in 1849 a homestead of forty acres that is now included in the fine landed domain owned by his grandchildren. Freeman Brownson was a man of vigor and industry, known for his sterling character and his mature judgment, and he added to the area of the old homestead until he had accumulated one of the valuable farm properties of the county, the same being represented in the splendid farm now owned and occupied by his three children.

The Brownson brothers are known as progressive young agriculturists and stock-growers and are giving special attention to the raising of short-horn cattle and Duroc-Jersey swine. Both give allegiance to the Democratic party and Herbert C, the immediate subject of this review, is now serving as treasurer of the school district in which he gained his early education. He and his brother and sister are still unwed and in the attractive home they are fully upholding its long maintained reputation for generous hospitality. All attend and support the Congregational church in the village of McGregor, which is their postoffice address.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Jason D. Brownson

Jason D. Brownson. - One of the professional men of Clayton county, who has gained for himself not only the esteem and good will of the people of his community, but a high place in the ranks of his chosen profession, is Dr. Jason D. Brownson of Monona. Dr. Brownson is a worthy son of one of the pioneers of the county who by his progressive ideas left a deep impress upon the agricultural developments and especially upon the live stock industry of his community. Throughout the history of Clayton county as recorded in the first volume of this work, frequent mention has been made of Freeman Brownson, as one who was prominent in county affairs, in the promotion of agricultural interests and in the importation of thoroughbred stock, thus aiding in the establishment of the reputation which Clayton county proudly holds, today, for the high standard which it maintains in the production of cattle, horses and swine. Freeman Brownson and his wife Lana (Flanagan) Brownson were both natives of the state of New York, and together they came to Iowa at an early date and joined the colony of pioneers who were beginning that wonderful process of transformation which has made Clayton county the richest in Iowa. To Mr. Freeman Brownson must be given the credit of having imported the first thoroughbred Percheron horses ever owned in the county, and also of being the owner of the first full blood Poland-China hogs which the county had ever known. To this pioneer couple were born three children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the eldest, and two died in infancy. The mother died in 1870, when Jason Brownson was but three years of age, and a few years later his father was again married to Miss Rachel Datisman, and to them seven children were born: Frank, Lucy, Ruben and Una (deceased), Lois, Herbert C. and Lloyd, all of whom reside in the county in the vicinity of National.

Jason D. Brownson lived the life of the farm lad of his day, attended the public schools of the county and, being ambitious for a higher education and for professional training, after completing the course of study in the county schools, he matriculated in Cornell College at Mt. Vernon, Iowa, an institution which for many years has maintained the highest standard of excellence. From this institution he graduated in 1892, and to the excellent education there received Mr. Brownson added a course of four years' professional instruction in the famous Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois; here he received his professional degree, graduating with honor, in 1896, after which he immediately began the practice of his profession at Elkader. In 1900 he removed to the beautiful city of Monona and there for sixteen years he has continued in practice most successfully and has achieved not only a competency, but a high reputation both professionally and as a citizen.

He was married September 5, 1895, to Miss Minnie Penman of Rockton, Illinois, and their delightful home is one of the social centers of Monona. Politically, Dr. Brownson has affiliated himself with the Democratic party and socially he is a member of high standing in the Masonic Order and in the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Parke Buckley

Parke Buckley has the active supervision and management of a landed estate of five hundred acres, in section 19, Lodomillo township, and of this fine property - the splendid farm was accumulated and developed by his honored father - he owns through inheritance the major part, his personal holding comprising three hundred and sixty acres.

On this model farmstead of the twentieth century Parke Buckley has resided from the time of his birth, which here occurred on the 10th of July, 1856, and the old homestead at that time was but a pioneer farm that was of far less extent than the present estate and that was in process of reclamation from the frontier wilds. Mr. Buckley is a son of Franklin R. and Helen M. C. Turner) Buckley, both of whom were born and reared in the State of New York and both of whom became honored pioneers of Clayton county, Iowa, the venerable mother being now a resident of the village of Strawberry Point, where she has maintained her home the greater part of the time since the death of her husband. Franklin R. Buckley established his home in this county in the year 1854, his purchase of the original homestead place in Lodomillo township having been effected in the preceding year. A man of high character and virile progressiveness, he achieved large and worthy success in his farm operations and at the time of his death, May 10, 1901, he was the owner of more than seven hundred acres of valuable land in Clayton county. He was influential in community affairs, as a leader in popular sentiment and action, and he commanded secure place in the esteem of the people with whom he came in contact in the varied relations of life. His political support was given to the Republican party and he supported the Congregational church, of which his widow has long been a devoted adherent. Of their six children the eldest is Sarah, who is the wife of Jesse F. Taintor, of Ripon, Wisconsin; Parke, of this review, was the next in order of birth and is the only son; Eva is the wife of Byron W. Newberry of Strawberry Point; Jessie is the wife of Miles Alderson, of Stanley, Wisconsin; Mary is the wife of James Alderson, M. D., and they reside in the city of Dubuque; and Helen remains with her widowed mother.

After having made good use of the advantages afforded in the excellent public schools of his native county Parke Buckley entered Iowa College, at Grinnell, in which institution he was graduated as a member of the class of. 1881. He is a farmer and stock-grower. His political proclivities are indicated in his staunch support of the cause of the Republican party and he and his wife are members of the Congregational church at Strawberry Point, which place is their postoffice address.

The maiden name of Mr. Buckley's first wife was Nettie Williams, and she is survived by one daughter, Harriet, who is now the wife of Walter Hall, of Leroy, Minnesota. For his second wife Mr. Buckley married Miss Lucina Bixby, and no children have been born of this union.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Alonzo M. Burlingame

Alonzo M. Burlingame is the junior member of the ambitious and progressive firm of Tayek & Burlingame, which is engaged in the general merchandise business in the village of Froelich, with a well equipped store that gives effective service to the large patronage drawn from the thriving section of the county normally tributary to the village mentioned. He is a member of one of the well- known and highly esteemed families of Clayton county and is one of the loyal young men who has found in his native county ample opportunity for successful achievement.

Mr. Burlingame was born at North McGregor, this county, on the 20th of January, 1892, and is a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Kostle) Burlingame, the former of whom was born in the State of Massachusetts, and the latter of whom is a native of Bohemia, she having been a child at the time of her parents' immigration to America. Benjamin Burlingame has been a resident of Clayton county from boyhood and his parents were numbered among the sterling pioneers of this county. He was afforded the advantages of the public schools at McGregor and has been identified with agricultural pursuits during virtually his entire active career. Since 1895 he has owned and resided upon his well improved farm, in Giard township, and he is one of the popular and substantial citizens of that part of the county. He is a stalwart supporter of the principles and policies for which the Democratic party stands sponsor and his wife is an earnest communicant of the Catholic church. Of their three children the eldest is Edward, who is now a resident of Helena, the capital city of the State of Montana; Marjorie is the wife of Jacob J. Tayek; and the subject of this sketch is the youngest of the number.

After duly profiting by the advantages afforded in the district schools of his native township Alonzo M. Burlingame completed a course of high study in the high school at McGregor, besides which he was graduated in the celebrated Rasmussen Business College, in the city of St. Paul, Minnesota, as a member of the class of 1911. This last discipline well equipped him for the handling of the practical details pertaining to the business with which he is now identified, as a member of the enterprising mercantile firm of Tayek & Burlingame, in which his coadjutor is his brother-in-law, Jacob J. Tayek, concerning whom individual mention is made on other pages of this work.

Mr. Burlingame was married June 27, 1916, to Miss Mattie Fett, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fett, prominent farming people of Watson, Iowa; he is aligned in the ranks of the Democratic party and is a communicant of the Catholic church, in the faith of which he was reared.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916Submitted by Cathy Danielson


William J. Byrnes

William J. Byrnes is a popular bachelor, a progressive farmer and a substantial business man of his native county, and he is the owner of the fine old homestead farm on which he was born and reared: the gracious home circle includes also his venerable and revered mother and his sisters, Mary and Eunice. After the death of his honored father Mr. Byrnes assumed the active management of the home place, which comprised two hundred and forty acres, and by his ability and enterprise he has since added to his landed estate until he is now the owner of a finely improved property of five hundred acres, in Sperry and Cox Creek townships. The old homestead is in Sperry township and here he was born on the 20th of February, 1860, a date that indicates conclusively that his parents were numbered among the pioneer settlers of that part of Clayton county. He is a son of James and Margaret (McTaggart) Byrnes, both of whom were born in Ireland - members of fine old families of the fair Emerald Isle. As a young man James Byrnes came to the United States and established his residence in the city of Boston, where he found employment in a rolling mill, he having learned the trade of iron and steel rolling in his youth. About the year 1856 he numbered himself among the pioneers of Clayton county, Iowa, and here he achieved large and worthy success in connection with the basic industry of agriculture. He continued his residence on the old homestead until his death, which occurred July 20, 1896, and he was a man whose sterling character and worthy achievement gained and retained to him the confidence and good will of his fellow men. His political support was given to the Democratic party and he was an earnest communicant of the Catholic church, as are also his widow and their children. Of the children the eldest is Sarah, who is the wife of Daniel Thyne, of Doon, Lyon county; Mary remains with the family that now occupies a modern home in Strawberry Point; John passed to the life eternal on the 13th of January, 1895; the subject of this sketch was the next in order of birth; Eunice is a member of the old home circle; Catherine is the wife of Timothy C-+. Glennon, of Strawberry Point; and James died in the year 1880.

William J. Byrnes is indebted to the schools of his native county for the early educational discipline of which he made good use, and he gained in his boyhood and youth the fullest meed of experience in connection with the work of the farm, of which he assumed the management after the death of his father, as previously stated in this context. In addition to his successful operations as an extensive agriculturist and stock-grower he now conducts a substantial and prosperous business as a buyer and shipper of live stock with Strawberry Point as his business headquarters. His political allegiance is given to the Democratic party and he has served as trustee of his native township. He is an active communicant of the Catholic church and is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and the Modern Woodman of America.

The History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1916
Submitted by Cathy Danielson


Dr. Dwight W. Day

DR. Dwight W. Day, physician and surgeon, Eau Claire. Went to Iowa in May, 1866, and located at Elkader, Clayton County; remained there until he came to Eau Claire, in October, 1868, where he has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. He was born in the town of Eagle, Wyoming Co., N. Y., May 14, 1841, and graduated from Buffalo Medical College, Feb. 22, 1861. He was resident physician in the Buffalo General Hospital and Lying-in Hospital, and was surgeon of the 154th N. V. V. I. He went out as 1st assistant surgeon of the regiment, and in eighteen months was promoted to surgeon of the regiment, then to acting brigade surgeon. He served three years in the medical department and then returned to Arcade, N. Y., where he practiced until 1866, when he removed to Iowa. Dr. Day was married in Franklinville, N. Y., in April, 1867, to Tibb Smith, who is a daughter of William Smith, and was born in Olean, N. Y. They have lost two children.

[History of Northern Wisconsin (Eau Claire County, Wis.) 1881, page 320; submitted by FoFG mz]


John Joseph Harter

John Joseph Harter was born in the township of Jefferson, Clayton County, near Guttenberg, Iowa, March 17, 1874. He attended the public school in his home community and assisted on his fatherís farm until he became 21 years of age, and then spent two years in farmwork in the northwestern part of Iowa. Returning home, he purchased his fatherís farm and operated it until 1913, a period of 15 years, when he moved to a farm on Route 4, town of McMillan, where he has been located since. He is now serving his seventh term as treasurer of his school district.

Mr. Harter was married to Miss Elizabeth Pink of Guttenberg, by the Reverend Joseph Brinkman in St. Maryís Catholic Church, in that city May 16, 1899. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Harter, all of whom are living: Raymond, Auburndale; Mrs. Alois Eilers, Guttenberg, Iowa; Mrs. Alvin Schuld, Marshfield; and Mrs. Roman Kohlbeck, Herbert, Clarence, Dorothy and Helen, all of McMillan, ranging in ages from 10 to 28 years.

Politically, Mr. Harter is a Republican. His hobbies are hunting and fishing.

[Marshfield News Herald (Marshfield, Wood County, Wis.) 5 Jan. 1929; transcribed by Marla Zwakman]


Charles B. Towne

This representative citizen and capable agriculturist, and substantial and upright man is entitled to a place among the leading citizens of Latah county and it is with pleasure that we accord him such in this volume, being assured that he is one who has labored faithful and wisely for the up-building of this county and to make it what it is at this time, one of the leading counties of the state.

Charles B. was born in Clayton county, Iowa, on January 7, 1855, being the son of Ethamer S. and Ellen L. Towne, natives of New York and farmers there until they came west to Iowa and Minnesota, whence in 1876, they went to California, and eight months later came to Idaho, selecting a homestead adjoining that now occupied by our subject, which is five miles north from .Moscow. Here the father farmed until 1891 when he retired from active work and is now living with his son, Albert, in the vicinity of Moscow.

Our subject took his present place at the same time his father homesteaded the adjoining quarter. He had remained with his father up to that time and then he continued to live with the parents, working both places until 1887, when be removed onto his own and there he has dwelt since that time. He has devoted his entire attention to farming and stock raising and he has achieved a good success, having two hundred and forty acres, well improved and stocked, which produce abundant returns in crops.

On May 14, 1884, Mr. Towne took unto himself a wife, the lady of his choice being Miss Jennie E., a native of South Dakota, and daughter of Hezekiah and Mary J. Townsend, natives of Pennsylvania, but now farmers of South Dakota. To this and able and happy union there have been born two children, Edgar and Nettie.

Mr. Towne is a man of good ability and he has manifested commendable wisdom in the manipulation of his business affairs while also he has not failed to evince an active interest in the political matters and local doings, and he has ever shown a broad public spirit and characteristic uprightness and integrity.

[An Illustrated History Of North Idaho Embracing Nez Perces, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai, Shoshone Counties, State Of Idaho, Western Historical Publishing Company, 1903, submitted by Barb Z.]



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