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History and Genealogy
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Floyd County Iowa

 

Floyd County, Iowa Biographies

Henry C. Aldrich, MD & D.D.S.

Henry C. Aldrich, M. D. and D. D. S., one of the leading physicians of Charles City, was born in the city of Minneapolis, Minn. His parents were Cyrus and Clara A. (Heaton) Aldrich. She was a native of New York and he of Rhode Island, where he received his education. When a young man he emigrated to Northern Illinois, and was one of the owners of the Chicago & Galena stage line and helped build the Illinois & Lake Michigan Canal. He was a member of the Illinois Legislature and receiver of public moneys at the land office at Dixon, III. In 1856 he removed to Minneapolis, Minn., and engaged in the real estate business. He was elected a member of the Minnesota Legislature and a member of Congress from Minnesota, in 1S61. He died in October, 1871, aged sixty-three years. His wife resides in Minneapolis. She and husband had a family of three daughters and one son, two living, viz: Villa, wife of D. H. Wright, commission merchant at Minneapolis, Minn, and Henry C., subject of this sketch. He attended the Minneapolis High School and State University until 1877, when he began the study of dentistry graduating from the Dental Department of the University of Pennsylvania, then beginning the study of medicine, graduating from the Hahnemann Medical College, of Philadelphia. He located in Charles City, la., May, 1881, where he has since practiced the profession of medicine, establishing a large and lucrative practice. He is the city physician. Dr. Aldrich was married to Miss Mary Whitney at Minneapolis, Sept. 24, 1879. She was the first white child born at Clear Water, Minn., and in honor of that event was presented a lot in Clear Water, Minn. She was a daughter of Samuel N. and Abbie (Hay) Whitney. Dr. Aldrich and wife attend the Congregational church in Charles City. He is a member of and Medical Examiner in the Iowa Legion of Honor, and in politics a Republican.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Edgar F. Atherton

Edgar F. Atherton, one of the leading merchants of Charles City, is a native of Vermont, born in Moretown, Washington County, March 28, 1844; his parents were Joseph L. and Lucy B. (Adams) Atherton, natives also of the Green Mountain State. He resided in Moretown until 1858, when he came with his parents to Floyd County, Ia. They still reside on their farm in Cedar Township, and have a family of four children, three sons and one daughter, viz.: Ella A., who married John O. Adams; Eddie B., residing with his parents in Cedar Township; Walter E., also residing on the old homestead; Edgar F., subject of this sketch, was the eldest son; his parents moved to Floyd, Ia., when he was fourteen years old and resided there until 1870, when he went to Orchard Station, Mitchell County, and opened a store of general merchandise, remaining until the fall of 1879, when he sold out and located in Charles City, where he established his present business. He occupies a building 66 x 21 feet two stories in height and carries a full and complete stock of imported and domestic goods, ladies' goods, dry goods, notions, and clothes, hats, caps, gloves and mittens. Mr. Atherton married Miss Amelia Wilbur, June 6, 1869, at Floyd; she was born in Otsego County, N. Y., and was a daughter of Henry and Angeline (Moore) Wilbur, natives of New York, and of Quaker descent. Mr. and Mrs. Atherton are members of the Congregational church, and have had a family of two children, viz.: Earnest W., born Aug. 17, 1870, and Winifred L., July 11, 1877. Mr. Atherton is one of the enterprising representative1 business men of Charles City, and an old settler of Floyd County, having been identified with the county since 1858. He is a charter member of the V. A. S. Fraternity, Charles City Lodge. In politics rather independent and inclined to vote for the best man. He is of Scotch descent.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Edmund Austin

Edmund Austin, retired farmer, and Vice-President of the Charles City National Bank and Charles City Water-Power Company, was born in Skaneateles, Onondaga County, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1821} his parents were Silas and Mary A. (Patchen) Austin, natives of New York. He was a farmer and they were members of the Episcopal church, and had a family of five sons and two daughters; five lived to be men and women. Edmund, subject of this sketch, was the eldest child and soon after his birth his parents removed to Cayuga County, N. Y. where he farmed until his marriage to Eliza Browning, which occurred March 4, 1852. She was born in Sommersetshire, England; was a daughter of Mathew and Nancy (Davis) Browning, also natives of England. Soon after his marriage Mr. Austin moved to Skaneateles, N. Y., where he bought land and engaged in farming until the year of 1854, when he went to Winnebago County, Ill., and in the spring of 1855 came to Charles City, Ia., and purchased a farm in St. Charles Township which he still owns, and cultivated until March, 1882, when he rented it and moved into Charles City, where he bought a residence and has since lived, leading a life of retirement from active business.

Mr. Austin and wife are members of the Christian church and have had a family of three children; the eldest, John P., died in infancy, and two are living, viz.: Sarah N., born Nov. 28, 1856, resides with her parents, and Willis B., one of the proprietors of the Centennial Mills of Charles City, born Jan. 19, 1859. Mr. Austin was elected Vice-President of the Charles City National Bank upon its organization in 1876 and has been Vice-President of the Water-Power Company since Feb. 1880. He owns a farm of 365 acres in St. Charles Township and 240 acres in Union Township. He also owns property in Charles City, and stock in the Water-Power Company and in the Charles City National Bank. He is one of the few old settlers of 1855 now living and has seen Floyd County change from its old uncultivated state to its present prosperous condition. When he came to Charles City there were but three frame buildings and a few log cabins. In politics Mr. Austin is rather independent.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


V. W. Baker

V. W. Baker, carpenter, was born in Worcester County, Mass., June 12, 1820. His parents were Vickery and Priscilla (Walker) Baker, natives of Massachusetts. His father died in 1870 in Vermont, in which State his mother still lives, at the age of eighty-seven. The subject of this sketch received a common-school education in Vermont. He was married in 1852 to Sarah P. Durkee, a native of Vermont. They removed to Illinois soon after, and lived at Rockford until 1857, when they removed to Floyd County. They had four children, two of whom are living - Alice, teaching in Indianapolis, and Estella, at home. Mrs. Baker died in 1870, and he was again married, in 1871, to Estella M. Patton, a native of New York. They have had two children - Clifford, and Gracie (deceased). Politically, Mr. Baker is a Republican. He is a member of the Baptist church.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


William D. Balch

William D. Balch, of the firm of Reiniger & Balch, bankers, of Charles City, is a native of New Hampshire, born in the town of Claremont, Jan. 2, 1834. His parents were William S. and Adeline G. (Capron) Balch, natives of Vermont. He was a minister of the Universalist church and is still living, a retired minister, of Elgin, Ill., now in his seventy-seventh year. She died in 1855. They had a family of eight children, four sons and four daughters. William D., the subject of this sketch, was the eldest son. When a child, his parents removed to New York City, his father having charge of a church there. He attended school in New York City until fourteen when he entered the Clinton Liberal Institute, at Clinton, N. Y., remaining three years. He returned to New York City and engaged in banking, on Wall street, until the spring of 1865, when he came to Charles City, Ia., and started the first bank in the city, under the firm name of Mitchell, Fairfield & Balch, and in 1867, E. O. Chapin, now editor of the Davenport, Ia., Gazette, purchased Mr. Mitchell's interest, and the firm remained Chapin, Fairfield & Balch, until 1873, when Mr. Chapin retired from the firm, and in 1875 Judge Reiniger bought Judge Fairfield's interest and the firm has since remained Reiniger & Balch.

Mr. Balch married Miss Ellen M. Melville, Jan. 19, 1858. She was born in New York City and was a daughter of Henry B. Melville, a manufacturing jeweler, of New York City. Mr. and Mrs. Balch had four children, one living, viz.: Estelle L., born in New York City, in October, 1861. Their mother died in 1864. Mr. Balch married Miss Maria A. Palmer, at Charles City, Feb. 11, 1868. She was born in Maine, and is a daughter of Dr. William M. Palmer and Anna, nee Shaw. He was a physician, of Charles City. Mr. and Mrs. Balch have had four children, two living, viz.: Margaret and Stevens.

Mr. Balch is one of the old settlers and an enterprising representative business man of Charles City. He was elected Mayor of the city one year, has been Treasurer of Charles City and Floyd County Agricultural Society, and also Treasurer of the Independent School District, a number of years. He is Vice-President of the First National Bank, of Mason City, and active in its management. In politics he has always been a supporter of the Republican party.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Col. V. O. Barney

Col. V. O. Barney, formerly a marble manufacturer in Vermont, where he owned a quarry, is a native of the Green Mountain State, born in Swanton, Franklin County, Aug. 26, 1834, a son of George and Emma D. (Goodrich) Barney. They were also natives of Vermont and members of the M. E. church; they had a family of four sons and four daughters, Col. V. G. being the second son; he attended school until nineteen when he clerked in a store a couple of years, then took charge of the marble mills at Danby, Rutland County, Vt, and remained there three years;

then took charge of the mills at Swanton until 1861 when he enlisted in the Independent Company which afterward became Company A, First Vermont Regiment; enlisted for three months, and was Orderly Sergeant of the company; at the end of the three months returned to Swanton and soon after re-enlisted in Company A, Ninth Vermont Regiment, and was elected Captain of this company; remained as Captain one year, when he was Commissioned Lieut.-Colonel of the regiment, arid held that position until the close of the war, when he returned home and engaged in the marble business four years; when, owing to trouble with his lungs from exposure in army, went to Florida six months, then removed with his family to Minneapolis, Minn. He engaged in the real estate business there three years, then came to Charles City, in 1872, and has loaned money and speculated in land here since. Mr. Barney married Miss Maria L. Hadwen, April 21, 1857; she was born in Danby, Vt., and was a daughter of John and Abigail (Baker) Hadwen; they were Quakers, and natives of New York; they had a family of nine children, seven daughters and two sons. Mrs. Col. Barney is a member of the M. E. church. They have had four children, viz.: Caroline E., born Feb. 7, 1858; Fred E., Oct. 10, 1859, is Assistant Cashier in Commercial Bank of Minneapolis, Minn.; Bertha M., born July 9, 1866; Frank, Oct. 3, 1871. Mr. Barney is one of the representative business men and citizens of Charles City, and is one of the directors of the First National Bank here. He owns a farm of 200 acres in St. Charles Township, 160 acres in Sioux County, Ia., eighty acres in Chickasaw County, and 400 in Wright County. In politics he is a Republican and cast the first vote for John C. Fremont for President of the United States. He has been a supporter of that party since. He is of Welsh, English and French descent. His father put in the first American marble tile flooring in the United States; he is still living and actively engaged in business at Swanton, Vt.

Col. V. G. Barney's brother, Elisha L. Barney, was Colonel of the Sixth Vermont Infantry Volunteers, and was killed in the battle of the Wilderness, in Virginia, in 1864. Mr. Barney has always taken an active interest in educational matters, and for the past six years has been a member of the School Board. He has been a member of the City Council two years. He is liberal in his views politically as well as religiously; he has always taken an active interest in any thing that promised progression to Charles City.

He secured an appropriation from City Council to lay out city park and set out the trees, and lay out walks. Mr. Campbell and Mr. Barney own the Park House.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


J. A. Becker

J. A. Becker, Clerk of St. Charles Township and farmer, was born in Vernon, Oneida County, N. Y., on Dec. 24, 1837. His parents, Jacob and Melissa R. (Knox) Becker, were natives of New York, and had a family of two children, viz.: Melissa J., who married J. S. Freeman, and the subject of this sketch. His father died two weeks before he was born, and his mother afterward married Lyman Jacobs. J. A. lived in Vernon with his mother and stepfather on a farm and attended school until twenty-one, when he attended the Oneida Conference Seminary two terms; then took a three-months' course at Eastman's Business College Poughkeepsie. He then began teaching school, and taught winters and worked summers at the carpenter's trade seven years; then came to Charles City, Ia., in March, 1870. He has been engaged in farming since. He taught school in St. Charles Township the winter of 1871-'2. He married Addie L. Griswold, Oct. 23, 1867. She was born in Augusta, Oneida County, N. Y., and was a daughter of Warren H. and Aroxsa (Hart) Griswold. Mr. and Mrs. Becker are members of the M. E. church and have had one son, viz.: Warren Earl, born Aug. 30, 1881. In the spring of 1879, Mr. Becker was appointed Township Clerk, but by subsequent election has held that office since. He has held the office of Secretary of the School Board since 1872, and that of Assessor three years. In politics he is a Republican. He is one of the enterprising, representative men of Charles City, and farmers of Floyd County, where he has been identified since 1870. He is of Mohawk Dutch and New England descent.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


De Grand Benjamin

De Grand Benjamin, retired farmer, miller and manufacturer of cheese, was born in De Ruyter, Madison County, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1816, a son of Elias P. and Martha (Rich) Benjamin. She was from Connecticut, and he was a native of Dutchess County, N. Y. He was a miller and farmer. They were members of the Universalist church, and had a family of six sons and three daughters. De Grand, subject of this sketch, was the third son. He attended school - working on his father's farm - until twenty-one, when he engaged in teaching school in Madison County, continuing seven years.

He was married to Miss Roxalina Sexton, Sept. 23, 1843, at Union Valley, Portland County, N. Y. She was born there and was a daughter of Daniel and Nancy (Carpenter) Sexton. After Mr. Benjamin was married he located in Union Valley, and through his efforts a post-office was established here and he was appointed Postmaster. He also owned and conducted a farm there.

In 1849 he returned to the home of his boyhood and purchased a farm within two miles of his father, and engaged in farming and milling until his father's death. He inherited the old homestead of his father. The State changed the course of the river that propelled his mill for canal purposes, soon after, so he converted his mill into a cheese factory.

In March, 1874, he came to Charles City, Ia., purchased some property and has since resided here, engaged in speculating and loaning money. Mrs. Benjamin is a member of the Congregational .church. They have had three children, two living, viz.: Martha A., born March 27, 1847, and Alida H., born May 8, 1852.

Mr. Benjamin is one of the enterprising, representative men of Charles City. In politics, he was first a Democrat, but at the outbreak of the war became a strong Republican and has since supported that party. He is a man liberal in his views, original in mind, and a strong believer in all men having equal rights. He is of English descent. He owns a nice home and eight lots in Charles City, and a farm of 120 acres in Scott Township, most all under cultivation and well stocked.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Edward Berg

Edward Berg, one of the oldest and most prominent business men of Charles City, was born in Eutin, Oldensburg, Germany, on Aug. 6, 1844, a son of Adoph and Sophia Berg, nee Boessing, who had a family of seven children. They were members of the Lutheran church, and Mr. Adolph Berg was a Privy Councilor of the Government of Oldenburg. Edward attended school in Germany, making a specialty of the studies of chemistry and forrestry until twenty-two years of age, when he came to the United States, landed at New York, and from there went at once to St. Louis, Mo. He remained there a short time, and in December, 1867, came to Charles City, where he clerked for J. H. Stolle, until March, 1873, when he open his present store. He carries a complete stock of groceries, provisions and staple goods, also keeps a full line of crockery and chinaware. One department of his store is devoted to drugs and medicines of all kinds. This stock is valued at $3,000. He is agent for the German Fire Insurance Company, of Freeport, Ill., and has had the agency since 1871. Politically, he is independent in his views.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


F. A. Burton

F. A. Burton, proprietor of the Charles City livery, feed and sale stable, was born in Andover, Vt., March 7, 1854; his parents were Horace and Mary A. (Taylor) Burton. They were natives of Vermont and had a family of four sons and three daughters. Frank A., subject of this memoir, was the youngest; he attended school in Andover, Vt., until thirteen or fourteen years of age, when he emigrated with his parents to Black Earth, Dane County, Wis., where he attended school two years; then worked in the Wisconsin pineries on the Mississippi River one year; then came to Charles City, and attended the High School four years; then he purchased his present livery, feed and sale stable.

Mr. Burton married Miss Emma Henderson, at Charles City, Ia. She was born in Mount Carroll, Ill., in 1856, and was a daughter of Berry and Amanda C. (Youce) Henderson. Mr. and Mrs. Burton have one daughter Miss Jessie M., born June 24, 1879.

Mr. Burton is one of the enterprising, representative business men of Charles City. He was appointed Deputy Sheriff of Floyd County for four years. He owns and runs the largest and most complete stables in the city. He keeps from eighteen to twenty fine buggy and carriage horses and a full line of buggies and carriages. Mr. Burton has taken the premium for carriage horses at the county fair, ever since he came here. He is a thorough gentleman and has the confidence and respect of all who know him. Mr. Burton started at seventeen years of age to make his way in the world, and it is by his own efforts that he has educated himself and established his present business.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Joseph Clemens

Joseph Clemens, of the firm of Joseph Clemens & Co., manufacturers of wagons, carriages and buggies, Charles City, was a son of Jacob and Gertrude Clemens, nee Guble, and was born June 30. 1829, in Ediger, on the River Mosle, Prussia, Germany. He was the youngest of a family of six children, and was the recipient of a practical business education in his native country. He also learned the furniture-maker's trade there, and when twenty years of age, came with three of his brothers to the United States. They landed at New York, and from there went to Milwaukee, Wis., where Joseph worked at the cabinet-maker's trade three years, and at the wagon-maker's one year; then went to Dubuque, Ia. He opened a shop there, and remained until 1867, when he went to McGregor, Ia., continuing there his former business.

In July, 1872, he came to Charles City, where he has been prominently identified with the business interests since. In September, 1857, Mr. Clemens married Agnes Zumhof, a native of Hanover. Germany. They have five children - Joseph, Jr., who is employed in his father's shop; Michael, clerking in Mile's drug store; Mollie, Lucy and Augusta. Formerly Mr. Clemens was Republican in his political views, but of late has become rather independent, voting for principle rather than party.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Maurice S. Cole

Maurice S. Cole, one of Floyd County's early settlers, is one of the oldest wagon-makers of this county. He is a native of Vermont, and was born in Button, Orleans County, on Feb. 14, 1827. His parents, Andrew and Mary A. Cole, were natives of Providence, R. I., and had a family of six sons and one daughter. Maurice, subject of this sketch, was the youngest. He lived on the farm with his father until sixteen, then went to Charleston, Vt., and worked one year at his trade, that of a wagon-maker; thence to Holliston, Mass., where he spent two years, learning the boot and shoe trade; he then returned to Charleston, Vt., and worked at the wagon-maker's trade until January, 1854, when he went to Gasconade County, Mo., and teamed there on the Missouri Pacific Road until October, 1855, when he came to Charles City, Ia., and teamed from Charles City and McGregor, Ia., until May, 1856, when he opened his wagon-shop, and has been engaged in this business since, and is now the oldest wagon-maker in the county. Mr. Cole married Mary A. Ingram, at Charles City, in 1858. She was born in Vermont, and was a daughter of Henry Ingram - a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Cole have one child, a daughter - Celia. Mr. Cole is one of the early, few old settlers now living in Floyd County, when he came to Charles City there were but three frame buildings in the town, and he has seen its change from a wild, uncultivated state to the present prosperous condition. In politics Mr. Cole is rather independent, and inclined to vote for the best man.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Charles P. Collins, Jr.

Charles P. Collins, Jr., stone mason and contractor, Charles City, is one of the old settlers of Floyd County. He was born opposite the town of Newport, at the head of Memphremagog Lake, Canada, Feb. 18, 1829. His parents were Charles P. and Mary J. W. (Rever) Collins; he was born in Chicopee, Mass., and she was a native of Canada; he was a painter and stone cutter and a member of the Baptist church, and she was a member of the Universalist church. They had one child, viz.: Charles P., Jr., subject of this sketch. When he was an infant he removed with his parents to Lowell, Mass., where he attended school until nineteen, when he learned the stone-mason's trade; when twenty-three he went to Warner, N. H., and worked here and at Nashua until the spring of 1853 when he came West to Beloit, Wis., and worked at his trade here until the spring of 1857; then came to Iowa and located in Charles City.

In September, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twelfth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and was in the battles of Fort Henry, Fort Donelson and Shiloh and was taken prisoner at Shiloh, April 6, 1862, and was taken to Corinth, Memphis, Tenn., Jackson, Miss., Mobile and Montgomery, Ala., thence to Camp Oglethrop, Macon, Ga., where he remained in the rebel prison four months, then was removed to Columbia, S. C., thence to Wilmington, N. C., thence to Raleigh, N. C., thence to the "Libby Prison." He was paroled Oct. 20, 1862. He went first to Annapolis, Md., from there to Benton Barracks, St. Louis, Mo., where he joined the fifteen men that were left of his company; he was then in the fight at Springfield, Mo., when he returned to St. Louis and was mustered out of the service on account of disability, March 17, 1863. He returned home to Charles City, until the fall of 1864, when he re-enlisted in Company C, Thirteenth Iowa Infantry Volunteers, and went with Sherman on his march to the sea, around to Washington, thence to Louisville, Ky., and was discharged at Davenport, Ia., at the close of the war. He again returned home to Charles City, Ia., where he has since resided. Mr. Collins was promoted Orderly Sergeant of his company; at the battle of Fort Donelson he was wounded with a musket ball which passed through his right hand.

Mr. Collins married Miss Elizabeth Osgood, April 11, 1841. She was born in New Hampshire. The fruits of this marriage were three sons and one daughter, viz.: Chas. H., who married Miss Eveline Clark; he is a mason and they reside at Verndale, Minn. Ellen M. is the wife of Frank Kellogg; he is engineer of the Charles City Furniture factory. William C. Collins married Miss Catherine Allen; they reside in Charles City, where he works at his trade of brick mason, and Frank E. Collins, engaged in farming at Osage, Mitchell County, Ia. Mr. Charles P. Collins married his present wife, Miss Minnie Cold, May 28, 1868. She was born in Bennington, Bennington County, Vt., and was a daughter of Lorenzo Cold. Mr. Collins is one the few old settlers of Floyd County now living; he is one of the enterprising men and citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since its infancy. In politics he is a Republican and has always been a strong supporter of this party.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Amos M. Fluent

Born and reared to the age of twelve years in one of the populous and progressive counties of the great Empire state, then passing thirteen additional years in Iowa, one of the imposing agricultural states of the Middle West, and afterward mingling with human life as it is seen in all its picturesque and voluminous variety in North Dakota and Montana, Amos E. Fluent, secretary of the Miners' and Smelters' Union of Butte, has had a much more comprehensive and many-sided observation of American manhood, its industries and its products, than comes within the range of most men's experience.

Mr. Fluent was born in Bath, Steuben county, New York, on March 13, 1857, and remained there until 1869, attending a public school from the time when he was old enough to start until the family left that part of the country. He is a son of Amos B. and Matilda Emerson (Butler) Fluent, natives, also, of the state of New York, the former born in 1814. They were married in their native state, and engaged in farming there until the loud-sounding voice of the mighty west called them to its fruitful fields with the promise of better returns for their labor. In 1869 they moved their family to Floyd county, Iowa, and located on a farm near Charles City, the county seat.

They found that part of the great Hawkeye State still wild and largely unpeopled at the time, and easily took rank among its most valued pioneers. For the father was a man of force and intelligence, well informed as to public affairs, and able to render the infant township and county in which he took up his residence valuable services in connection with the establishment and further development of their civil, educational and religious institutions. He died on his Iowa farm in 1879 at the age of sixty-six years. The mother survived him seven years, passing away in 1886 at the age of sixty-nine.

Their son, Amos M. Fluent, continued his schooling in the district and more advanced schools of his new location, and after due preparation entered the University of Iowa, from the academic department of which he was graduated in 1873. He then matriculated in the law department of that institution, and in 1876 received the degree of LL. B. from that department. He did not, however, enter at once upon his professional career, but passed six years as a teacher in the public schools of the state. But the time devoted to this pursuit was not lost. His occupation provided for his immediate wants and enabled him to lay his plans with deliberation and accuracy for his future work, and also gave him extensive and definite knowledge of himself and human nature in general.

When he was ready to begin the practice of his profession he moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota, and there devoted himself to legal work for two years. At the end of that period he changed his residence to Devil's Lake in the same territory, where he remained five years. In 1889 he sought and found a larger field of opportunity by moving to Butte, Montana, and there he has ever since resided and extended his professional work. His first engagement in Butte was in the service of William A. Clark, and on November 1. 1907, he was elected secretary of the Millmen and Smelters' Union, a position which he still occupies and in which he has gained a wide reputation.

Mr. Fluent was married in Nashua, Iowa, on May 26, 1881, to Miss Maggie Critchfield. a daughter of Rev. Asa Critchfield, the well-known clergyman of that place. Four children have been born of this union: Floyd C, whose life began at Devil's Lake, North Dakota, on December 24, 1886. and who is now a student in the law department of the University of Michigan; Harvey. also born at Devil's Lake, on January 28, 1889; Lucinda, a native of Butte, Montana, born on August 18, 1892; and Russel, also born in that city on January 18, 1896, and who is now a student in its high school and making a fine record in his classes.

Mr. Fluent is a leading member of the Butte Camp of the Woodmen of the World. He also belongs to the great organization known as the Western Federation of Miners, and as has been stated, is secretary of the Butte Union of Miners and Smelters. He is a Republican in political faith and allegiance and a Presbyterian in church connection. He is universally regarded as a man of the strictest integrity, and is very popular in Butte, Silver Bow county and throughout the northwest, especially with the adherents of organized labor of all crafts.

["The History of Montana" by Helen Fitzgerald Sanders, Volume 3, 1913 - Sub. by a Friend of Free Genealogy]


George A. Fox

For more than sixteen years a resident of Wyoming, and during all of that time closely identified with the progress and development of the state, contributing of both brain and brawn to make her waste places glad, her mercantile interests prosperous, her civic life useful and true, and now conducting on a large and substantial basis a business of great service and importance to the community in which he lives, George A. Fox, of Gillette, may well be spoken of as one of the forceful and productive factors among the civilizing influences of this section. He was born on June 26, 1851, in Floyd county, Iowa, where his parents, John and Jerusha A. (Colson) Fox, were early emigrants from Illinois. There they settled when the county was on the frontier, and there they lived until it had yielded to the persuasive voice of progress and become an old and well-settled community. Then again they turned to the undeveloped West and removing to Richardson county, Neb., in 1865, they homesteaded on the unbroken prairie and redeemed their portion of it to fertility and productiveness. In 1885, renewing their love for the wilder phases of our great public domain, they took up their residence in Crook county, Wyoming, and there the mother died in 1887. The father then returned to his old home in Nebraska and passed the remainder of his days amid the scenes he had so long enjoyed, dying in 1899, after spending the sunset of a useful life in peaceful retirement from toil and care.

George A. Fox was educated in the schools of the place in which he lived from time to time as he grew to manhood, and worked on the farm with his father until he was eighteen. He then engaged in farming on his own account in Nebraska until 1882, when he opened a livery business in Humboldt, that state, and conducted it for two years.

In 1884 he removed to Sherman county, Kan., and there took up a homestead, but after two years of occupancy of this, came to Crook county, Wyo., where his parents were at the time, and "homesteaded" six miles from Sundance. On the land thus taken up he started a cattle industry, and also engaged in freighting between Rapid City,-S. D., and the Black Hills country. For five years he followed this exciting and profitable life, and thereafter devoted his energies entirely to the development and improvement of his cattle interests until 1896, when he sold both ranch and stock and came to Gillette to engage in the livery business. His progress in this enterprise was safe, but slow at first, owing to a vigorous competition, but in 1899 he bought the barn he now uses for his business and, enlarging it and his stock, he has since done an extensive work in his line, being one of the best-known men in all this part of the country. In addition to a business which necessarily brings him into contact with all classes and conditions of men, Mr. Fox gained knowledge and become known through his activity in politics as a Democrat and in local public affairs as a progressive and enterprising citizen for many years. He has been serviceablv interested in all projects for the advancement of the community, and has more than contributed his share in inspiration and in more substantial ways for their successful operation.

On July 1, 1877, at Forest City, Mo., occurred the first marriage of Mr. Fox, being then united with Miss Fannie Gird, who, after an unusually happy wedded life of nineteen years, was called from earth, leaving four children, Nora, Lottie, Eddie and Teddy. At Sheridan, Wyo., on May 23, 1900, Mr. Fox married with Mrs. Annie McClure, a widow, born and reared in Iowa, by whom he has had one son. Jay R. Fox.

In fraternal relations he is united with the lodge of Odd Fellows at Gillette, and, besides his livery business, he owns a ranch near the town, where he runs a considerable band of horses. He is as highly esteemed as he is widely known, and well merits his success in a commercial way and his hold on the regard of his fellows.

[Progressive men of the state of Wyoming, 1901 ... By A.W. Bowen & Co - sub. by K.T.]


William W. Dennis

William W. Dennis, Deputy County Recorder of Floyd County, is a native of Ohio, and was born on a farm in Wayne County, May 16, 1838. His parents were William and Rebecca (Luther) Dennis, natives of Pennsylvania. He was a member of the Universalist church, and was by trade a carpenter and joiner, and also followed farming. She was a member of the Lutheran church. They had a family of four sons and four daughters, William, subject of this sketch, being the youngest son. He attended school winters, working on his father's farm until seventeen, when his mother died. He then worked at the carpenter's trade during the summer, attending school winters until twenty-one, and on May 19, 1861, he married Miss Angie Isora Logan at Seville, Medina County, O. She was born in Pennsylvania and was a daughter of William and Mary (Beale) Logan, natives of Pennsylvania and members of the Baptist church.

After his marriage, on Nov. 14,1861, Mr. Dennis enlisted in Company D, Third Battalion U.S. Infantry, and remained in the service three years. He was in various battles, among them the first siege of Corinth, Miss., in the month of April and in May, 1862. He fought in the battle of Perryville, Kentucky, Oct. 8, 1862; Stone River battles Dec. 31, 1862, and Jan. 12, of 1863, and the battle of Hoovers Gap, Tenn., June 26, 1863. The last sixteen months of his service he was detailed as a recruiting officer at Toledo, O., and was discharged at Columbus, O., Nov. 14, 1864. He remained in Ohio some time then removed to Bourbon, Marshall County, Ind., and followed his trade until July 19, 1865, when he located in Charles City, Ia. He followed contracting and building here until 1878, when, owing to failing health, he abandoned his trade, and on April 8, 1879, he was appointed his present office as Deputy County Recorder.

Mr. and Mrs. Dennis are members of the Christian church, and have one son, viz.: Arthur W., born Feb. 19, 1862. He is clerk in the Charles City Savings Bank. Mr. Dennis is one of the enterprising representative men and citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since June, 1865. He is Secretary of St. Charles Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 141. and has held this office seven years. He has been a Mason since twenty-one years of age. In politics he is a Republican and cast his first vote for A. Lincoln, first term. He is of English, Irish, Scotch and German descent.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Gustavus B. Eastman

Gustavus B. Eastman, retired banker and First Assistant Internal Revenue Assessor for Floyd County, Ia., is a native of Vermont, born in New Haven, Addison County, Nov. 20, 1820. His parents were Silas N. and Amanda (Bird) Eastman; his father was a saddle and harness maker, and both were natives of Vermont and members of the Congregational church. They had a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters. Gustavus B., subject of this sketch, was the second son. When some three years of age he removed with his parents to Hopkinton, N. Y., where he lived three years; thence to Malone, Franklin County, where he attended school one year; then to Madrid, N. Y. There he attended school and worked in the harness-shop with his father until seventeen, when the family removed to Ogdensburg, N. Y.; one year later they moved to Heuvelton, and Mr. E. taught school in Morley, Canton Township, and other schools in the vicinity. He was Deputy Clerk of St. Lawrence County until 1846, when he came to Milwaukee, Wis.; remained here until the fall, when he went to Roscoe, Ill., and taught school one winter; thence to Rockford, Ill., and worked for William Hulin, County Recorder, one year, when he began to work for Robertson & Hall, lawyers and land agents and bankers at Rockford.

In the fall of 1852 he went to Dixon, Ill., and opened a bank and land office under the firm name of Robertson, Eastman & Co.; remained there until 1855, when he came to Dubuque, Ia., and engaged in buying and selling Iowa lands at Dubuque and Decorah, until the spring of 1856, when he moved to Charles City, Ia., where he has since remained; he engaged in the land and banking business until the fall of 1858, and since then has been operating in lands.

In 1862 he was appointed Assistant Internal Revenue Assessor of Floyd County, and held that position until Jan. 1, 1864, when he resigned to accept the office of County Recorder of Floyd County, and held that office eight years; since then has speculated in land and city property.

In 1857 Mr. Eastman, Duncan Ferguson, Samuel Riddill and Samuel Hackley built a saw-mill in the north part of Charles City, this being the second steam mill in Charles City.

Mr. Eastman married Eleanor S. Dixon at Rockford, Ill., Feb. 26, 1850. She was born at Geneva, N. Y., and was a daughter of George and Eleanor (Stevenson) Dixon. She is a member of the Congregational church. They had a family of three children, none of whom are living. Mr. Eastman is one of the old settlers, and one of the enterprising representative men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1856. He has always taken an active interest in anything that promised progression to this city. Though not a member of any church, has always been a liberal supporter, not only of one but all churches. In politics he was first a Whig, and since the organization of the Republican party has been one of its strongest supporters.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Rev. George Elliott

Rev. George Elliott, pastor of the M. E. church of Charles City, is a native of Ohio, born in Tucking County, near Pataskala, Lima Township, Dec. 14, 1851, a son of Alexander C. and Margaret (Hanawalt) Elliott. His father was a farner in early life, and afterward a minister of the M. E. church; she was also a member of this church. They had a family of three sons and five daughters, George, subject of this memoir, being the eldest. When five years of age he removed, with his parents, to Green County, Wis., and soon after his father entered the ministry, and traveled in the Wisconsin Conference until George was fifteen, when he was transferred to the Upper Iowa Conference and located in Maquoketa.

In 1868 George entered Cornell College, at Mount Vernon. Ia., a Methodist institution, graduating in 1872. He went to Sabula, Ia., and edited a newspaper for one year, the Sabula Index, and thence to Humboldt and edited the Humboldt Kosmos one year. He entered the Upper Iowa Annual Conference of the M. E. church at Charles City, in October, 1874, an was appointed pastor of a church at Parkersburg, where he remained one year, and was stationed at Lansing two years, Mitchell one year, Cresco three years, and appointed minister of the First M. E. Church of Charles City, in the fall of 1881.

Mr. Elliott married Miss A. M. Corfield, at Clinton, Ia., Nov. 12, 1875. She was born in Philadelphia, Pa., and was a daughter of William and Mary (Kemplon) Corfield. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have three children - George, born Dec. 18, 1876; Phillip, Sept. 7, 1878; Mary, Nov. 1, 1880. Mrs. Elliott is also a member of the M. E. church. He is of Scotch, Irish and Dutch descent. He was one of the active workers in the late temperance contest, in favor of the amendment prohibiting the sale and manufacture of intoxicating liquor. His great-grandfather served in the Revolutionary war.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Charles Engelhart

Charles Engelhart, business manager for his father, F. Engelhart, grocer, Charles City, was born near Gotha, Prussia, Germany, Nov. 7, 1846. His parents, Frederick and Mary (Otto) Engelhart, were natives of Prussia, and members of the Lutheran church. They had a family of four children, three sons and one daughter; Charles, subject of this sketch was the eldest. He came with his parents to America when seven years of age, landed in New York City, after being eleven weeks at sea in a sailing vessel; the family settled on a farm twenty-four miles southwest of Chicago.

Charles remained on the farm until twenty-two, when he married Johanna Grosskopf in New Bremen, Ill. They lived with his father one year, and he then ran a store of his own in New Bremen, one year, when he bought a farm and engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1872, when he came to Charles City, Ia. He farmed in St. Charles Township three years, since which time he has been engaged in the grocery business in Charles City with his father.

He and wife are members of the German M. E. church, and have had two sons and one daughter, viz.: Louisa, Frederick and Ernest. Mr. Engelhart is one of the enterprising representative business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1874.

In politics he is a Republican. He enlisted in Company G, Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteers, in the late Rebellion, and remained in the service until the close of the war. He was wounded twice: first at the siege of Vicksburg in front of the skirmish line in June, 1864, being shot in the hand and losing the fore finger of the right hand; and was wounded in the left thigh at Fort Craig in front of Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and he remained at Fort Monroe, Va., six months; was in all the battles of 1864 and 1865. At the close of the war he returned home to Illinois. His parents are living in New Bremen, Cook County, Ill.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


E. C. Egloff

E. C. Egloff, agent for the Illinois Central Railroad, is a native of Germany, born near Frankfort, on the Main River, June 17, 1851. His parent were William J. and Mary (Brandel) Egloff. The former was born in the eastern part of France, in the province of Alsace, April 9, 1804. At the age of five, he commenced study in a French school, where he continued until the age of thirteen. He then attended the University of Passau, in Bavaria, where he remained eight years, graduating as a classic student. He next took up the study of law, which he followed for three years, graduating with honors, afterward practicing his profession with success. He was appointed District Judge in 1850, which position he held until 1855, when he resigned to come to America. He came to Iowa, and settled in Delaware County, and farmed until 1859. He then opened a hotel and restaurant at Manchester, and in 1861 removed to Cedar Falls, Ia., and continued in the same business there for five years. In 1865 removed to Waterloo, Ia., and in the spring of 1868 came to Charles City and retired from active business. He removed to Mason City in 1871, and died there, April 22, 1881. His wife is still living at Mason City. She and husband had a family of ten children, eight living.

E. C., subject of this sketch, is the second son; he was but three years of age when he came with his parents to America, and eighteen years of age when he came to Charles City; he attended school here and assisted his brother, M. G. Egloff, who was the first station agent for the Illinois Central Railroad, at Charles City. E. C. remained here, studying telegraphy and station work until 1876, when he was given charge of Aplington Station; remained here some two years and three months, when his brother, M. G. Egloff, was appointed train dispatcher at Fort Dodge, Ia., and E. C. was appointed his brother's former position as station agent here at Charles City, which office he still retains.

Mr. E. C. Egloff married Miss Rusha Cilley, at Mason City, Ia., Nov. 8, 1880. She was born in Illinois, and was a daughter of Nathaniel P. and Louisa (Miller) Cilley. Mrs. E. C. Egloff is a member of the First Methodist Church, of Charles City. Mr. Egloff is a member of the V. A. S. fraternity, Charles City Lodge. In politics he is a Republican, and is one of the enterprising, representative citizens and business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1868.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


S. F. Farnham

S. F. Farnham, Cashier of the Charles City National Bank, was born in Palmyra, Somerset County, Me., May 23, 1846, a son of Samuel and Eliza C. Farnham, nee Robinson, natives of Massachusetts, S. F. being the eldest of a family of four sons and three daughters born of this union. He received his primary education in Palmyra, and at the age of sixteen he entered the preparatory school at Bucksport, Me., which he attended two years, and was then matriculated in the Maine Wesleyan College at Kent's Hill, graduating from that institution June 7, 1870.

He received the appointment of principal of the Old Town High School, which he accepted and retained five years, and in 1875 he came to Charles City. He was principal of the High School here one year, and upon the organization of the Charles City National Bank, he was elected its cashier, a position he has since held.

On Aug. 27, 1871, he was married to Miss Phebe F. Johnson, of Dixmont, Me. She was a daughter of H. C. Johnson and Susan B., nee Edgerly. Two children were born of this union - Le Roy S., born June 6, 1872, died May 30, 1874; and Ralph H., born Dec. 5, 1881. Mrs. Farnham died Dec. 21, 1881. She was a member of Eastern Star Chapter, Masonic fraternity of Iowa, of which she was Grand Associate Matron.

Mr. Farnham is a member of Lodge No. 172, A. F. & A. M., and Easter Chapter, A. O. U. W., Charles City Lodge. He was elected City Treasurer in April, 1878, and held the office one year, and was also elected Treasurer of the Water-Power Company, of this city, in 1878. He still retains the office, and is also one of the proprietors and directors of that company. Politically, he affiliates with the Republican party, and is one of the prominent business men of Charles City.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


John Ferguson

John Ferguson, of the firm of Woolley, Snyder, Ferguson & Bailey, proprietors of the Charles City Plow Company, is a native of Scotland, born in the city of Glasgow Jan. 18, 1834, a son of Duncan and Agnes M. Ferguson, nee Hope. His father was born in Crieft, Scotland, and reared and educated in Glasgow. His mother was born in the north of Ireland. They had a family of seven children of whom John was the second son. The family emigrated to America in 1837, and located in Erie, Pa., thence two years afterward to Rockford, Ill. John attended school, engaged in clerking and learned the carpenter and joiner's trade there, and in September, 1855, he came to Charles City, where he embarked in the mercantile business.

In 1857 he disposed of his stock to Wright & McKnabb and followed farming until 1874, when he again engaged in the mercantile trade, which he prosecuted until Jan. 1, 1882, when he sold out to his partner, S. H. Starr, and purchased an interest in the Charles City Plow Company, a prominent manufacturing interest.

He was married in Charles City, to Mary E. Strawn, of Rockford, Ill., on March 10, 1856. They have had three children, Ida E., born Aug. 7, 1858, died while yet in the full bloom of youth on July 15, 1874; J. A., born Aug. 30, 1861, is agent for the New York Life Insurance Company of this city, and Marie M., born Aug. 20, 1867.

The subject of this memoir is a member of St. Charles Lodge, No. 141, A. F. & A. M., and a member of the Chapter. He has served acceptably in many of the city offices and was a member of the City Council four years. Politically he favors the Republican party. He is one of the pioneer and enterprising citizens of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1855.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


E. J. Fisher

E. J. Fisher, of the firm of Stevens, Hering & Co., wholesale and retail dealers in and manufacture is of furniture, Charles City, is a native of New Hampshire, born in Franklin, Merrimack County, Oct. 9, 1837. His parents, Ellis Fisher, who was a farmer, and Hannah, nee Noice, were natives of the Green Mountain State, and had a family of nine children, of whom the subject of this memoir was the youngest son.

He was educated in his native State, and at the age of fifteen went to Lowell, Mass., to learn the machinist's trade. He followed that occupation four years, then went to Manchester, N. H., and remained there three years, learning the furniture trade. From there he went to Boston, Mass., and worked at the cabinet-maker's trade, until his marriage to Abbie Hay wood in December, 1861. She was born in Alexander, N. H., a daughter of Walter Haywood. Of five children born of this union three are living - Harry W., born Nov. 21, 1863, is working with his father in the factory; Frank, born Jan. 6, 1869, and Fred, born Aug. 6, 1873.

After his marriage Mr. Fisher removed to Two Rivers, Wis., thence to Appleton, that State, where he worked in a furniture factory one year, then established a factory of his own at Leeman, Wis., four years later he took charge of the furniture manufacturing department, at the House of Correction at Milwaukee, Wis.

In 1869 he became a resident of Charles City and a partner, in his present business. He is a prominent member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, National Lodge, No. 165. Politically he favors the Democratic party.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


William N. Fisher

William N. Fisher, Constable, sexton of cemetery, and farmer, was born in Washington County, Vt., June 13, 1829, a son of Silas W. and Emily (Peck) Fisher; father a native of New Hampshire, and mother of Vermont. Of a family of three children the subject of this sketch was the eldest, and is the only one living. He was brought upon a farm, and when within two months of age he left home and worked out two or three years, and in 1854 came West, to Rockford, Ill.

In the spring of 1857 he went to Minnesota with three yoke of cattle to break prairie; but hard times came on and he lost nearly all. He then located in Charles City and started a meat market, which business he prosecuted extensively. Some seasons he would kill as many as fifty or sixty hogs at a time, which were hauled to market at McGregor. But in the following spring he abandoned the market, and did odd jobs until 1860, when he started for Pike's Peak; at Denver, however, he learned such facts as discouraged him from going further, and he returned, footing all the way from Omaha to Charles City.

In the autumn of 1864 he was drafted and attached to Company G, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry; in the army, during the winter, he contracted rheumatism, and was sent to the hospital, where he remained until July. After the close of the war he returned home to Charles City. Except what time he was in the war, he has been Constable ever since 1858. The first time he was elected he had failed of a nomination in caucus by a vote or two, and he ran independently, and yet was elected almost unanimously. In 1862 he was appointed Constable, the elected man not qualifying. He ran independently again in 1868, and was again elected.

Mr. Fisher has done much for the interests of his community. In the way of fence-building he has done more than any other man in the county, and probably excels all in the neatness of his work. He has, by his business talent, accumulated considerable property and money, and is now independent and happy.

Oct. 3, 1867, in Rockford, this county, he married Miss Mary Rudd, of Rockford, Ill., daughter of Joe M. and Miranda (Palmer) Rudd, her parents having been early settlers of Buffalo, N. Y. She is a member of the Christian church. Of their two children, Victoria E. is living, and Chester S. is deceased.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Luther P. Fitch

Luther P. Fitch, one of the prominent physicians of Floyd County, was born in Groton, Middlesex County, Mass., March 26, 1836, a son of John and Lucy L. Fitch, nee Sawtell, natives also of Massachusetts. They had a family of five children, three living - Luther P. W. H., a practicing physician of Rockford, Ill., and A. Lizzie, at present traveling in Europe. When the subject of this memoir was about three years of age, his parents removed to Winnebago County, Ill., and settled on a farm. There his boyhood was passed and primary education received. He attended school at Rockford, Ill., two years; at Groton, Mass., eighteen months, and at Beloit, Wis., five years; four years was spent in the Beloit College, from which he graduated in 1860. He spent nine months in the medical department of Michigan State University, then entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at New York City, graduating with honors in 1863.

Upon leaving school he was appointed Surgeon of the Forty-seventh U. S. C. Infantry, and remained with this regiment until January, 1866, when they were mustered out of service.

He then formed a partnership with Dr. C. J. Taggert, at Beloit, Wis., which continued six months when Dr. Fitch went to New York City for the purpose of attending lectures and receiving instruction in special branches of medicine. Eight months later he located in practice in Rockford, Ill., remaining there until October, 1868, when he came to Charles City. He has met with deserved success as a practitioner, and is well and favorably known throughout the county as a skillful and reliable physician.

On Oct. 13, 1869, he married Martha Baker, of Berlin, Wis. Two children have blessed their union, viz.: Charles L., born March 29, 1873, and Lucy, Jan. 20, 1875.

Dr. Fitch is a member of the American Medical Association, of the Iowa State Medical Society, and is Secretary of the Upper Cedar Valley Medical Association. He was elected Director of the Independent District of Charles City School Board, in March, 1878, and still retains the office. Politically he favors the Republican party.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


William Giermann

William Giermann, proprietor of the German meat market, Charles City, was born in Preuzlau, Prussia, Germany, July 19, 1845. His parents were Christian and Caroline (Haman) Giermann. They had a family of five sons and four daughters.

William, subject of this memoir, was the youngest, and the only one in America. He attended school in Germany until fifteen, when he learned the butcher's trade four years; then served three years as soldier in the cavalry of the German army, and in 1870 came to America. He brought his girl with him, and they landed in New York and were married at New Bremen, Cook County, Ill., June 7, 1870. She was born in Germany, and was a daughter of Gottlieb and Caroline (Schultz) Frabel. Mrs. Giermann's maiden name was Emelia Frabel.

In December, 1870, Mr. Giermann located in Charles City, and worked by the day at different work till 1864, when he began to work at the butcher's trade, and in March, 1878, established his present market.

Mr. and Mrs. Giermann are members of the German M. E. church, and have five children, viz.: Miss Ida, born July 24, 1882; John, born May 25, 1874; Miss Emma, born April 14, 1876; Miss Emelia, Feb. 13, 1879, and Lydia, born Oct. 14, 1881.

Mr. Giermann is a member of the A. O. U. W., Charles City Lodge, No. 158. In politics, a Republican. He is one of the enterprising business men of Charles City, where he has been identified since December, 1870. He built his present market-house in 1877, and it is the leading market in the city, and Mr. Giermann tries to please all his customers, and to that end buys the best the market affords. He also carries a fine stock of dried and smoked meats.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Geo. Gilbert

Geo. Gilbert, station agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul Railway, is a native of New York, and was born in Castile, Wyoming County, July 23, 1842; his parents were Seymour and Permelia (Mabie) Gilbert, natives of New York, and members of the Baptist church. He in early life was a hardware merchant and in after years engaged in farming. He moved from Wyoming County, N. Y., to Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., in 1846, where he died. He and wife had two sons and one daughter. Geo. E., subject of this sketch, was the second son; he lived in Winnebago County, Ill., on his father's farm, attending school until twelve when he began to run on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, as newsboy. Subsequently rose to the position of brakeman, then baggageman.

In February, 1874, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty-third Illinois Infantry Volunteers and remained in the service until the close of the war, when he returned to Rockford, Ill., and opened a grocery store. Eighteen months later he sold out and engaged in railroading on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway until September, 1869, when he came to Charles City, and began to work as freight agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, and was warehouseman operator and clerked for E. J. Gilbert, three years, when he was appointed agent at Garner, Hancock County, and remained two years; then took charge of the station at Algona one year, and was appointed agent at Charles City, where he has since remained.

Mr. Gilbert married Miss Ada J. Halsted, at Rockford, Ill., Oct. 22, 1866; she was born in New York, and was a daughter of Egbert and Ester (Kingsley) Halsted. Mrs. Gilbert is a member of the Congregational church. They have had three children, viz.: George H., Archer and Mabel I. Gilbert. Mr. Gilbert is one of the enterprising representative men of Charles City, where he has been identified since 1869. In politics he is a Republican.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Samuel G. Goddard

Samuel G. Goddard, contractor and builder, and agent for the Domestic and Victor sewing machines, is a native of Michigan, and was born in Calhoun County, Oct. 26, 1829, he being the first white child born in this county. His father, Josiah Goddard, was born in Massachusetts, and when twenty-one years of age enlisted as Sergeant Major in the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of Plattsbarg. Alter the close of the war he went to Detroit, Mich., where he married Miss Hannah Luckett; soon after his marriage he removed to Calhoun County, Mich., and was one of the first settlers of this county. He and his wife had a family of sixteen children, eleven sons and five daughters. Samuel C., subject of this sketch was the third son, he worked on his father's farm, attending school winters until fifteen, when he removed to Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., and one year later to Green County, Wis. They remained there and engaged in farming until October, 1848, when they came to Fort Atkinson, Winneshiek County, Ia.

In 1851 Samuel C. started out with fifty cents in his pocket to make his fortune, and located in Bradford, Chickasaw County, Ia. He worked at the carpenter's trade and clerked in a store about a year, when he was elected County Clerk, he being the first to hold that office in the county.

In March, 1854, Mr. Goddard came to Charles City, Floyd County, Ia., and bought the general merchandise stock of Robert L. Freeman, the first store keeper in Charles City. Mr. Goddard built the first frame house in Charles City, the town was then called Freeman, and Mr. Freeman was the first Postmaster and Mr. Goddard the second. Mr. Goddard sold his store to John and William Ferguson in the spring of 1856, then built the Magnolia Hotel, which he conducted two years, when it burned down in the fire of Charles City; he then clerked in Lehmkuhl's store ten years, since then he has worked at his trade, as carpenter and contractor, and engaged in the sale of sewing machines.

Mr. Goddard married Miss Amanda Bigelow, at Waverly, Bremer County, Ia., July 16, 1857. She was born in Wyoming County, N. Y., and was a daughter of Julius and Philena (Dayton) Bigelow, natives of Connecticut; he was a farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Goddard had five children, viz.: Cora, born April 26, 1858, wife of Harry A. Merrill (he is Cashier in the Rockford Bank, at Rockford, Ia.); Angie, born July 29, 1851; May, Sept. 21, 1863; Gladys, Feb. 22, 1865, and Guy A., March 8, 1867, who reside with their parents. Mr. Goddard is a member of the I. O. O. F. lodge. In politics he is a Republican. He is one of the oldest settlers, and is an enterprising representative citizen of Charles City, where he has been identified since March, 1854.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


E. J. Guilbert

E. J. Guilbert, ex-County Treasurer of Floyd County, was born in Rockford, Winnebago County, Ill., June 18, 1848, a son of Milo and Margaret (Palmer) Guilbert; he a native of Vermont, and she of Ohio. They had a family of six sons and four daughters. E. J., subject of this sketch, being the eldest, was but six years of age when he came with his parents to Charles City, Ia., where his father, with Dr. N. H. Palmer, purchased of Joseph Kelly half the town. He built the first frame house here. E. J. attended school and worked on a farm until eighteen, when he was employed as bookkeeper, at Prairie du Chien, Wis., for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway; worked there two years, when he was appointed the first station agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, at Charles City, and retained the position four years. He was then elected Deputy County Treasurer for two years, and was subsequently elected County Treasurer, and held that office four years, when he purchased a farm of 160 acres, in St. Charles Township, where he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits.

Mr. Guilbert married Miss Estella Merrill, at Charles City, May 4, 1870. She was born in Harmony, Me., and was a daughter of J. N. Merrill, an attorney at Rockford, Ia., and Sarah E. (Parsons) Merrill. Mr. and Mrs. Guilbert have three children, viz.: Roy M., born July 27, 1871; Lulie, Aug. 6, 1873; and Margaret, Dec. 8, 1876.

Mr. Guilbert is a member of the Iowa Legion of Honor, and is one of the charter members of Hope Lodge, No.76, and was president for one year. He was elected City Clerk of Charles City, for one year, and has held various local offices of trust. In politics, a Republican, and cast his first vote for Grant for President the second term. Mr. Guilbert is one of the pioneer children of Floyd County, and one of the enterprising, representative men of Floyd County, where he has been identified since fall, 1853. He is of Scotch and Irish descent.

[History of Floyd County, Iowa, Vol. 2, 1882, submitted by Cathy Danielson]


Hermann Mettelstadt

Hermann Mettelstadt, proprietor of St. Charles House, Fall Creek, came to Wisconsin in 1857; resided in Green Lake County, farming with father, for a few years. Went to Charles City, Floyd Co., Iowa, and employed in brewery there five or six years, then farming for two years on own account. Came to Fall Creek in 1877, and built hotel building, and has run the same since. Born in Germany in 1843; came to America in 1856; was married at Charles City, Iowa, September, 1872, to Bertha Kopplein, born in Germany. They have three children — Clara, Frank and Walter. The hotel has accommodations for twenty-four guests and good stabling attached.

[History of Northern Wisconsin (Eau Claire County, Wis.) 1881, page 343; submitted by FoFG mz]


Mrs. LaVerne W. Noyes

Ida T. Smith Noyes, the daughter of Dr. Joel W. Smith and Susan M. Wheat Smith, was born in Delaware county, N. Y., April 16, 1853, and died at her home, 1450 Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, Dec. 5, 1912.

Her ancestors on both sides had lived for many generations past in New England - mostly in Connecticut. Mrs. Noyes' grandparents on both sides moved from Connecticut to Delaware county, New York, where they were pioneer settlers. When Mrs. Noyes was four years old, the family moved to Charles City, Iowa, at that time a hamlet, and this was the family home for more than fifty years. She attended the public schools and later studied at the Iowa State College, graduating with honors with the class of 1874.

Mrs. Noyes was married at her father's home in 1877 to LaVerne W. Noyes, who had been a fellow student at the Iowa State College. From that date her home was in Illinois, but her many Iowa friends kept up their interest in Mrs. Noyes and noted with pride and satisfaction the leading position she attained in her new home. In her adopted state she found ample scope for the development of her unusual talents. She had great artistic ability, and, for some years, devoted the larger part of her time to the study of painting at the Art Institute, later pursuing her studies in the leading studios of Paris.

For some years Mrs. Noyes was president of the North Side Art Club, a position she filled most acceptably. She was also active in the Chicago Woman's Club, Woman's Athletic Club, and had, for some years, been prominent in the society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. In the work of this organization she took great interest and was particularly active in the efforts to enlighten our foreign born citizens regarding American history and government and to instill patriotism into the minds of their children. After serving as State Regent successfully for two terms, she was elected Vice-president General of the National Society, a position to which she was reelected a short time before her death. In view of her great popularity, it was expected by many of her friends that, a little later, she would be made head of the National D. A. R. organization.

She was active in all good causes, and not only made a great many public addresses, but gave generously, both in money and personal effort, to help those in distress and to aid others in their charitable work. Besides her artistic ability she had great facility in the writing of verses. She was particularly successful in producing poems for social events - often written on the spur of the moment. Since her death a little volume has been printed containing many of these poems, and among her friends it is highly prized.

She loved travel. Not only had she visited every part of her own country, but she had made countless trips abroad, one trip encircling the globe. A pictorial record of her travels was obtained by means of her camera, and these thousands of beautiful photographs show how successful had been her artistic training.

The memory of Mrs. Noyes will be long cherished by her hosts of friends to whom she was devoted, and later generations will also learn of her good works through the generosity of her husband, who has, as a memorial to her, given to Chicago University a beautiful building to be used as a gymnasium and social center for the young women of the University.

In accepting the gift, President Judson of the Chicago University said: "The gift of $300,000 to the University of Chicago by Mr. LaVerne W. Noyes, in memory of his wife, is an act unusual in its direct appropriateness. The generous fund is to go to build the 'Ida Noyes Hall,' a gymnasium and social center for the women students. The impress that Mrs. Noyes' life left upon the various branches of women's activities in Chicago is still fresh. The memorial at the great university will preserve its memory in the years to come. It was altogether fitting that the Board of Trustees declared in formal resolution its 'especial gratification that there is to be commemorated in the quadrangles of the university the name of a gracious and gifted woman whose rare qualities are well worthy of admiration and emulation by successive generations of our young women."

[The Blue book of Iowa Women, by Winona Evans Reeves, Publ. 1914, Transcribed by Dana Kraft]


N. Luther Packard

N. Luther Packard, A. B., B. D.

Born at Brockton, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, December 31, 1851. His father died when he was fifteen years of age, after which he was obliged to support the family. Fitted at home and in the preparatory department of U. W., in 1877 entering her ancient classical course, from which he graduated in 1883. He worked his way through college by teaching and farming. Was a member of Calliope.

Attended the Chicago Theological Seminary, 1883- 86. Upon entering that institution, he won the first prize in Hebrew, although all of his knowledge of that tongue had been acquired at home, during vacations, and while working upon a farm.

Mr. Packard has held pastorates at Nashua, Ioula, Buffalo Center, and Riceville. He was State evangelist of Iowa, with residence at Charles City; State superintendent of the Congregational Young People’s Society of Christian Endeavor; and president of the Third District society of the same. He has contributed articles to numerous religions and secular periodicals.

On April 26, 1886, he married Miss Luella Williams, a graduate of Earlham (Ind.) College, and has three children. A biographical sketch of Mr. Packard, with portrait, may be found in Herringshaw’s Encyclopedia of American Biography, p. 711.

[The University of Wisconsin: its history and its alumni (1836–1900) Edited by Reuben Gold Thwaites - pages 732-736 (1900) submitted by FoFG mz]


Mrs. Henry A. Schlick

Mrs. Flora Schlick was born at Charles City in 1868. Her father, Samuel F. Ferguson, was the son of James Ferguson of Scotland, a member of the Ferguson clan. Her mother, Nancy McKinney, born at old Salem, N.Y., one of ten children. The oldest was the mother of John J. Hill, president of the Hill Publishing Co., of New York. Mrs. Schlick was educated at the State University of Iowa and at Iowa College at Ames. She was a successful teacher for four years in the schools of Charles City. On May 20, 1891, at Charles City, she was married to Henry A. Schlick. Three sons have been born to them: Marvin F., Forrest S., and Robert (deceased). She is a member of the First M. E. Church, was superintendent of the Junior League for five years, for several years teacher of a young men's Bible class, and president of the Woman's Home Missionary Society for five years. For six years she was corresponding secretary of the Decorah District. She was the conference delegate to the national convention of the Woman's Home Missionary Society held in Washington, D.C., in 1913. For fourteen years she has been a member of the Cultus Club, and has served in all of its offices. Since 1910 she has been Chairman of the fourth district I. F. W. C. The fourth district contains about thirty club towns, many of which have more than one federated club. From these facts can be judged the success of the work done here under Mrs. Schlick's chairmanship. To her own mind the greatest work she has done has been in her own home, in the rearing of her two sons, young men who would bring pride to the heart of any mother.

[The Blue book of Iowa Women, by Winona Evans Reeves, Publ. 1914, Transcribed by Brenda Shaffer]



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