Page County, Iowa
News


Mrs. G. W. McCoun

The First Gentile Woman in Council Bluffs is Revisiting This Vicinity

Shenandoah, IA, December 1. - Mrs. Vila Neal went to Council Bluffs to meet her mother, Mrs. G.W. McCoun and bring her home with her to make just as long a visit as she can be persuaded to make. Those who have made the acquaintance of Mrs. McCoun hope that she will be contented here for a long time, for she is a woman of charming personality. Although 80 years of age, she retains the youthful vivacity that has made friends for her all through life.

Mrs. McCoun is one of the pioneer women of Iowa, coming with her husband to Council Bluffs in 1857 from their home in Groton, NY. Mr. and Mrs. McCoun came to St. Louis by rail and there the railroad ended and the rest of the trip was made by boat up the Missouri to Council Bluffs where they landed May 3. Council Bluffs was then a bustling town inhabited solely by Mormons and Mrs. McCoun was the first Gentile woman to enter the city. They went to Crescent City where they opened a hotel, the New York House, which they conducted until the war broke out. Mr.McCoun was also postmaster and kept the office in the hotel building. He was quite a large land owner, among his possessions being the ground on which the union depot now stands and which, Mrs. McCoun says, he sold to the railroad company.

Mrs. McCoun tells many interesting stories of those early days. While she and her husband did not mingle socially with the Mormon people, they saw a good deal of them and Mrs. McCoun was particularly interested in the family of one of the most important elders, whose six wives, always lavishly dressed, led a gay social life.

When war was declared Mr. McCoun enlisted in the Twenty Ninth Iowa Infantry and served through the war. In 1869, he and his wife and their nine children moved to Cherokee County where they homesteaded. These were some of the happiest years of Mrs. McCoun's life. Their home was the center of social life of the pioneer community and there were taffy pulls and sleighing parties and quilting parties in which she was the gayest member of the company. Mrs. McCoun and her husband found time for a good deal of church work and their house was the home of the traveling preachers who held services there.

They finally were obliged to move from Cherokee County by three years of crop failure due to the visit of swarms of grasshoppers, and in 1878 they moved to Saline County, Nebraska, where they lived until, their children having all married, they moved back to Iowa, making their home in Kingsley, where Mr. McCoun died in 1908, the first break in the family circle since the death of an infant in 1854. Mrs. McCoun still keeps her home in Kingsley, where she is grandmother to the whole town, and lives alone, doing all her own work and taking care of all her business affairs.

Of the elven children that were born to her nine are living, all married. There are twenty eight grandchildren and ten great grandchildren, so Mrs. McCoun could have quite a family party if she could get them all together.

She is a member of the Methodist Church and regular in her attendance and enjoying church work. She is actively interested in the affairs of her town and enjoys living just as much as she did fifty years ago.

[Council Bluffs, Iowa, Nonpareil, published December 1, 1913; submitted by Ann]


Deputy Sheriff Albert Patton

Posse Searches In Vain For Two Alleged Murderers.

(By The Associated Press) Shenandoah, Iowa. Feb. 14.-Although a posse of several hundred men have searched since Saturday night for Ben and Arthur Hickman, supposed murderers of Sheriff Albert Patton, to arrest them for holding up a crowd of crapshooters, they have completely disappeared. Jack Durn, a cousin of the Hickmans is being watched by deputies.

[Webster City Freeman, pub. February 14, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Trouble Was At Bingham Iowa

Ben and Arthur Hickman Captured at Phelps, Mo., After Exciting Chase by Posse.

Deputy Sheriff Albert Patton, of Page county, was shot to death last Saturday night at Bingham, Iowa by two brothers, Ben and Arthur Hickman, of Coin. The murderers escaped and went to Missouri. Bloodhounds were secured from St. Joseph and put on their trail. However, the brothers were seen at Phelps, where they had breakfasted at the home of a mail carrier. A posse was organized and the murderers were chased to the Missouri river, where they took refuge on an island, but were overpowered and captured.

The trouble originated over a crap game in Shenandoah. The Hickman brothers appeared at the game armed with a gun and made all the participants give up what money they had.

They are alleged to have secured about $400. Deputy Sheriff Albert Patton was notified and he went immediately to Bingham after the Hickmans. When he alighted from the train he was shot to death.

Arthur Hickman has a wife and five children at Coin. He served seven years in the penitentiary for desertion from the army. Both of the Hickmans are said to have been bootleggers.

[Adams County Union-Republic Press, pub. Wednesday February 16, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Nine Men Will Share In $1,000 Hickman Reward.

SHENANDOAH. Iowa Feb 18. - Reward for the arrest of the Hickman brothers, alleged murderers of Deputy Sheriff Albert Patton, will be divided between Temple, Shandy, who captured the men; Charles Smith, restaurant, man who suspected them; Mort Adams, who recognized them. Deputy Sheriff Pitzer and five members of his posse, who took charge of the men, according to reports here. The reward is $1,000

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. February 18, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Hickman Trial For Murder Of Patron Monday.

Names of Four Women Drawn On Jury List For Case Transferred Here From Page County.

Considerable interest in southwestern Iowa today is centered on the trial of Arthur and Ben Hickman, charged with the murder of Bert Patton, a deputy sheriff of Page County early last February which is scheduled to begin here Monday morning in the Cass County court.

More than usual interest is attached for the case because of the likelihood of women sitting for the first time on a murder trial in this county.

Four of the twenty five names drawn for the special venire to hear the trial are: Mary Wasson of Atlantic, Mary E. Anstey of Massena, Elnore Dinsmore of Anita, and Ada Morrison of Grant Township.

On agreement of attorneys for the state and defense the case was transferred from Page county to Cass county. Judge George W. Cullison of Harlan will be on the bench when the case is tried. The attorneys for the state will be George A. Anderson county attorney for Page county, W. K. Mitchell of Council Cliffs, L. H. Mattox of Shenandoah and W. A. Follett of Atlantic. Attorneys Jake Hess of Council Bluffs, Ferguson and Burnes, of Shenandoah, and Swan, Clovis and Swan of Atlantic, will plead for the defense.

The Hickman brothers probably will be brought here from Council Bluffs today according to Sheriff McKee.

The Hickmans are charged with murder in the first degree. Patton was shot just as he had stepped from a train on the Wabash railroad at Bingham in Page county, where he went to arrest the Hickmans on a charge of holding up a dice game at Shenandoah on the night preceding. It is charged that the Hickmans were hiding behind a pile of railroad ties when Patton was shot.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. August 20, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Hickman Trial Gets Under Way This Morning.

The holdup, which is alleged to have led up to the shooting of Deputy Sheriff Patton, took place in the Burlington railroad yards at Shenandoah about 6:30 on a Saturday evening. It was reported to the officer that the Hickmans staged the holdup. Members of the crap shooting party, of which there were a dozen or more, are said to have recognized the Hickmans.

Potion Shot To Death.

Learning that the two who staged the holdup had gone down the Wabash tracks toward Bingham Deputy Patton started in pursuit. He Went to Bingham on a train. As the train pulled into the station at Bingham it passed two men walking along the track. Companions of the officer are said to have shouted "There they are." Patton jumped off the train and in a gun battle which followed was shot dead. In the excitement the two supposed bandits made their escape in the darkness.

The capture of the Hickman boys was effected by Temple Shandy, farmer, on the Monday afternoon following. They were taken while hiding in the timber near Phelps City, Mo. They offered to return to Iowa without extradition.

The change of venue was granted to Cass county by Judge Earl Peters on a showing by the defendants' attorneys that the result had been threats of violence in Shenandoah.

(Continued from Page 1, Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. Monday August 22, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Judge Refuses to Quash Murder Indictment Hickman Trial gets Under Way This Morning.

Questioning, of Prospective Jurors Indicates State to Ask Death Penalty for Slaying of Page County Sheriff.

A motion by the defense to quash the indictment against Hickman brothers on the ground that it is void and invalid because it changes two men with the commission of a crime Which it is physically impossible for more than one person to be guilty of was overruled by Judge Geo. W. Cullison at the opening of district court here this morning.

Other complaints of the defense against the indictment was the claim the removing of a woman on the grand jury voided the body legality; that the verbiage of the indictment is uncertain and indefinite and that the proceedings of the grand jury were not secret.

Arthur and Ben Hickman, brothers are on trial for the killing of Albert Patton, deputy sheriff of Page county, at Bingham, on the evening of February 12 last. They are charged with having killed the officer when the latter attempted to arrest them for an alleged holdup of a gang of crap shooters at Shenandoah earlier in the evening.

The motion by the defense was submitted without arguments by the attorneys. Immediately following the motion to quash, the work of impaneling the jury began.

To Death Penalty

That the state will ask for the death penalty is indicted by questions put to prospective jurors. They were asked whether they were against imposition of such a penalty in case the defendants were found guilty. Those examined said they had no scruples against the death penalty.

The Hickmans entered the court room in the custody of Bailiffs Rattenborg and Slocum. The brothers were handcuffed together. As they took their seats they were joined by Mrs. Arthur Hickman and her five small children. The latter, three boys and two girls, range in age from one to eight years. Sitting beside Mrs. Hickman as the trial opened was her father, Jerrey Haynes of Tarkio, Mo.

Defendants Brought Sunday

Tho Hickman boys wore brought here from the county jail at Council Bluffs yesterday afternoon. As their trial opened they appeared cheerful. Both are prepossessing looking chaps. They came into court freshly shaved and wearing neat blue serge suits.

The Hickmans are being defended by Earl Ferguson of Shenandoah, Jake J. Hess of Council Bluffs and Swan, Clovis & Swan of Atlantic. County Attorney George A. Anderson of Page county is prosecuting. He is assisted by W. E. Mitchell of Council Bluffs and County Attorney Follett of Atlantic.

Many Witnesses.

That the defense will put up a stubborn fight is evidenced by the fact thirty-five witnesses have been called by that side of the case; the state also has a legion of witnesses.

[Atlantic News Telegram, pub. Monday August 22, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Hickman Trial Gets Under Way This Morning.

Questioning, of Prospective Jurors Indicates State to Ask Death Penalty for Slaying of Page County Sheriff.

A motion by the defense to quash the indictment against Hickman brothers on the ground that it void and invalid because it charges two men with the commission of a crime which it is physically impossible for more than one person to be guilty of was overruled by Judge Geo. W. Cullison at the opening of district court here this morning.

Other complaints of the defense against an indictment was the claim that indicting of a woman on the grand jury voided the body's legality; that the verbiage of the indictment is uncertain and indefinite; and that the proceedings of the grand jury were not secret.

Arthur and Ben Hickman, brothers, are on trial for the killing of Albert Patton deputy sheriff of Page county, at Bingham, on the evening of February 12 last. They are charged with having killed the officer when the latter attempted to arrest them for an alleged holdup of a gang of crap shooters at Shenandoah earlier in the evening.

The motion by the defense was submitted without arguments by the attorneys. Immediately following the decision of the court overruling the notion to quash, the work of impaneling the jury began.

To Death Penalty.

That the state will ask for the death penalty as indicted by questions put to prospective jurors. They were asked whether they were against imposition of such a penalty in case the defendants, were found guilty. Those examined said they had no scruples against the death penalty.

The Hickmans entered the court room in the custody of Bailiffs Rattenborg and Slocum. The brothers were handcuffed together. As they took their seats they were joined by Mrs. Arthur Hickman and her five small children. The latter, three boys and two girls, range in age from one to eight years. Sitting beside Mrs. Hickman as the trial opened was her father, Jerrey Haynes of Tarkio, Mo.

Defendants Brought Sunday.

The Hickman boys were brought here from the county jail at Council Bluffs yesterday afternoon. As their trial opened they appeared cheerful. Both are prepossessing looking chaps. They came into court freshly shaved and wearing neat blue serge suits.

The Hickmans are being defended by Earl Ferguson of Shenandoah, Jake J. Hess of Council Bluffs and Swan, Clovis & Swan of Atlantic, County Attorney George A. Anderson of Page county is prosecuting. He is assisted by W. E. Mitchell of Council Bluffs and County Attorney Follett of Atlantic

Many Witnesses.

That the defense will put up a stubborn fight in evidenced by the thirty-five witnesses have been called by that side of the case: The state also has a legion of witnesses.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. August 22, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Nine Farmers On Jury Selected; Women Excused.

Hickman Brothers Identified As Men Who Held up Dice Game- State May Rest Today.

Witnesses for the state in the trial of Arthur and Ben Hickman, on trial here for the shooting of Albert Patton, Page county deputy sheriff, described the holdup of the crap game at Shenandoah which preceded the shooting to death of Patton at Bingham a few hours later. Witnesses recognized the defendants as the pair who staged the holdup. Questions seeking to establish the fact that the shot which killed the officer was fired by one of the brothers, were asked by the prosecution.

The taking of testimony began with the opening of court at nine o'clock. Under pressure of the court the selection of a jury was completed last evening.

Nine Farmers on Jury.

The jury, composed of comparatively young men, is made up of nine farmers, two merchants and one clerk. Four women on the special venire were excused by the court for various reasons. The personnel of the jury is Fred Claussen, Franklin; Louis Holste, Victoria; Harry Marlowe, Massena; Nels Nelson, Brighton; Lloyd Neff, Atlantic; P. C. Pedersen, Benton; Emil Rabe, Noble; Lester Smith, Noble; Fred Wollenhaupt, Massena; R. A. McGrew, Union; F. Nelson, Pymosa; Jesse Knoke, Griswold.

Opening statements were made to the jury by L. H. Mattox of Clarinda for the state and by Jake J. Hess of Council Bluffs for the defense. The latter told the jury that the state would have to prove conclusively which one of the two defendants fired the shot which killed Patton. Otherwise you must find the defendants guilty" declared the attorney. The indictment does not specify which one of the two brothers fired the fatal shot, charging them jointly with the crime.

First Witness.

It was necessary for the court bailiff to warn those in the audience against letting their mirth get the better of them during witnesses, description of the crap game. Laughter greeted the statement of Lacey McKee, one of the dice gamers, that after being robbed of $65 he asked one of the bandits to give him back enough for his supper. The bandit returned a dollar. The witness admitted he won most of the $65 in the game. He recognized the Hickmans as the men who held up the game.

J, F. Bloom, restaurant worker, and Elmer Roerbeck, farmer, recognized the defendants as, the pair who staged the holdup. Roerbeck recognized Arthur Hickman in the court room as one of the pair. He failed to recognize Ben Hickman.

Identify Defendants.

I heard someone say "Let's go and turned around to look down the muzzle of a big gun," said Harley Mace. He said both Hickmans were armed, "Heels to rails" was the command of the Hickmans, said the witness. Mace testified that while the dozen members of the crap shooting party lined up, their pockets were rifled by Arthur. Ben Hickman, he said, covered the victims with his gun.

The first evidence describing the shooting of Patton was given by W. H. Atwood, young man of Shenandoah. He admitted being in the crap game and was one of the victims of the holdup. Later he accompanied the deputy sheriff to Bingham when the latter took up the trail of the Hickmans. Atwood said he recognized the Hickmans along the track as the train pulled into Bingham, He said he pointed them out to Patton and that the latter got off the train in the growing dusk. According to Atwood there was a flash of gun from the direction of a pile of ties. The state maintains this is the shot which killed the officer and that it was fired by the Hickmans. Following the shot, Atwood clambered aboard the train and sought protection in a coach. He says there were several shots fired after he was in coach.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. August 23, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Escape of Ben Hickman.

SHENANDOAH, la., Sept. 28.- The escape of Ben Hickman, convicted murderer, recently from prison at Ft. Madison has developed a new angle in the request for a new trial filed by him and his brother who was convicted for the same murder.

Attorney General Acts.

A motion was recently filed by the Attorney General of Iowa to dismiss the application upon the grounds that Hickman escaped and the court did not have jurisdiction over him. The case will be stricken from the docket until he is captured or surrenders. Reinstatement can be made in that event.

New Angles

The escape of Ben Hickman and the removal of the case from the docket places a new light upon the case of his brother, Arthur, who is serving for his complicity in the crime with Ben.

New trials may result and the issues of each case will be tried upon the merits.
Both tried in Cass county on at change of venue.
Sheriff Says Hickmans Admitted Slaying
"Must Have Killed Someone Firing At Close Range"
Page County Officer Recites Story Told By Defendants Of Their Movements After Leaving Bingham

That the Hickman brothers, Arthur and Ben, on trial in district court here for killing Deputy Sheriff Bert Patton of Page county in a gun battle at Bingham on the night of February 12, admitted they had killed the officer, was the testimony today of Sheriff Harry Borland of Page County and A. L. Burke Burlington railroad detective, armed with a sawed off shotgun, the jail at Rockport Mo., following their capture. The admissions made by the defendants were made during a trip to the county jail at Council Bluffs. Borland was unable to say which of the Hickmans did the talking. He referred to it as their statements.

"Must Have Killed Someone"

According to the sheriff, the Hickmans were asked if they knew they had killed Patton. Their reply, said the witness, was that they knew they must have killed someone, they fired at such short range. The defense fought hard to keep this testimony from the jury, but overruled.

Sheriff Borland also recited the story told him by the Hickmans of their escape from Bingham following the shooting. They, according to the witness, returned to Shenandoah, then went southwest, passing near Farragut and Riverton and crossing the state line into the hills of north-west Missouri. They were taken in the timber near Phelps City, Mo., by Temple Shandy, a young farmer armed with a sawed off shotgun.

Burke testified to being on the train which carried the Hickmans to the Pottawattamie county jail following; their capture. The Hickmans and officer accompanying them were discussing the shooting. The admission of the Hickmans was made in answer to a question whether they had realized they had killed a man, testified Burke.

Claim Of Defense

Cross examination of the state's, witnesses today gave further indication of a theory held by the defense that Patton was in fact killed by a bullet from the gun of one of his companions in the manhunt at Bingham on the evening of February 12 last.

Questioning by Attorney Hess for the defense brought from J. W. Hartman, the statement he saw "Bill" Atwood getting off the train at Bingham and that he carried a gun in his hand. Atwood had previously testified he got off the train just after Patton. Atwood, on cross examination, admitted he was very much excited. He got back on the train immediately following hearing the first shot fired, he said.

Twelve Witnesses Examined.

Introduction of the state's case was resumed when court reopened at 9 o'clock this morning. At noon a dozen of the witnesses had been examined.

[Atlantic News Telegram, Page 1, pub. Wednesday August 24, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Game Of Craps Is Cause Of Killing.

ATLANTIC, Iowa, Aug. 23 Participants In a "friendly" game of craps at Shenandoah on February 12 last, today recounted in county court here the holdup of the game and subsequent killing of Albert Patton, Page county sheriff and identified Arthur and Ben Hickman, on trial for the murder of Patton, as the men who stopped the game at the points of revolvers and relieved the players of their valuables.

The Jury which was completed late last evening, is composed of nine farmers, two merchants and a clerk.

In his opening statement to the jury, attorney Hess, for the defense, declared the state must prove conclusively which of the two Hickmans, if either, fired the shot which killed Patton. In case the state fails in this the jury must find the defendants not guilty, the attorney declared.

[Nevada State Journal, pub. Wednesday Aug. 24, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Verdict In Atlantic Case Expected Soon.

Brothers Are Charged With the Murder of Deputy Sheriff Patton.

ATLANTIC, Ia., Aug. 27-The case of Arthur and Ben Hickman charged with the murder of Deputy Sheriff Bert Patton of Page county went to the jury at 10 o'clock this morning. Judge Collison's instructions to the jury which he began on the opening of court this morning were lengthy, and would admit any of twenty-six verdicts.

The instructions included consideration of the questions of whether the Hickman brothers had a right to defend themselves or whether the shot which killed Patton was or might have been fired by someone other than the defendants.

Patton was killed at Bingham while in pursuit of the Hickman brothers following their alleged hold up of a dice game at Shenandoah, on February 12 last. The state contended that the defendants fired from behind a pile of railroad ties where they were hiding but the defense counsel sought to establish that the bullet which killed Patton was fired by a member of the posse which accompanied the deputy sheriff to Bingham.

[Iowa City Press-Citizen, Saturday August 27, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Hickman Found Guilty.

Atlantic Ia. Aug 27. - A verdict of guilty was returned by the jury trying Ben and Arthur Hickman for the murder of Deputy Sheriff Bert Patton The verdict was returned at 2:30 o'clock after four and a half hours deliberation. Unless an appeal is granted the men will serve life sentences in the Fort Madison penitentiary.

[The Nebraska State Journal, (Lincoln, Nebraska), pub. 28 Aug 1921; submitted by BZ]

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One of the Hickmans Escapes from Pen Was With Other Prisoners Building New Prison.

Escaped Yesterday Afternoon Over Wall.
All Captured But Hickman-Believed to be Ben Hickman.

FT. MADISON, Ia., July 21. - Three men escaped from the state prison here yesterday afternoon, it became known today. Two of the men have been apprehended. The third man, Hickman, serving a life term for a murder committed at Shenandoah, is still at large.

The three men were engaged with a number of others in rebuilding part of the prison destroyed by fire several months ago. They escaped by going over the north wall.

Thrasher and Walter, first names unknown, were captured early today near the country club after having been trailed by prison blood hounds. No trace of Hickman has been found.

Prison authorities are reluctant to discuss the escape.

Sounds Like Ben.

It is believed here that the Hickman referred to in the above bulletin is Ben Hickman. Ben and Arthur Hickman were tried here in August, 1921, term of court, for murdering Deputy Sheriff Albert Patton of Page county, near Shenandoah.

The case against the brothers was tried here on a change of venue. Nothing but circumstantial evidence was introduced against them, but the jury found them guilty and life sentences were given each.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, Atlantic, Iowa, pub. Friday, July. 21, 1922; submitted by BZ]

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Posse Searches In Vain For Two Alleged Murderers.

(By The Associated Press)
Shenandoah, Iowa. Feb. 14.-Although a posse of several hundred men have searched since Saturday night for Ben and Arthur Hickman, supposed murderers of Sheriff Albert Patton, to arrest them for holding up a crowd of crapshooters they have completely disappeared. Jack Durn, a cousin of the Hickman is being watched by deputies.

[Webster City Freeman, pub. February 14, 1921; submitted by BZ]

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Escaped.

Ben Hickman, supposed to be the Hickman who was one of three men to escape from the Ft. Madison penitentiary day before yesterday. The dispatches did not give the first name but Ben is thought to be the most likely one to escape. The other two men were captured but he is still at large. Ben and his brother, Arthur, were sent up for life for the murder of Alfred Patton, Page county deputy sheriff, after they were tried here last August on a change of venue from Page county.

An appeal of the brothers' case by their attorney was taken to the supreme court from the finding of the jury here. The same is still pending on the high court's calendar. What effect the escape will have on the opinion to be handed down can best be imagined.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. July 22, 1922; submitted by BZ]

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Sheriff Thinks Hickman Was At Brother's Home Saturday Night at Coin.

CLARINDA, Ia., Aug. 14. - The sheriff's office thrown into a panic here Saturday night when a telephone call stated that Ben Hickman was seen at the home of his brother at Coin. Sheriff Borland and deputies went to the Hickman home but the trip was in vain. He believes, however, that Ben Hickman was there and he made his escape in to Missouri.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. August 14, 1922; submitted by BZ]

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Hickman's Escape Casts New Light.

Application for New Trial Stricken from the Docket.

SHENANDOAH, Sept. 28.- The escape of Ben Hickman, convicted murderer, recently from prison at Ft. Madison has developed a new angle in the request for a new trial filed by him and his brother who was convicted for the same murder.

Attorney General Acts.

A motion was recently filed by the Attorney General of Iowa to dismiss the application upon the grounds that Hickman escaped and the court did not have jurisdiction over him. The case will be stricken from the docket until he is captured or surrenders. Reinstatement can be made in that event.

New Angles.

The escape of Ben Hickman and the removal of the case from the docket places a new light upon the case of his brother, Arthur, who is serving for his complicity in the crime with Ben.

New trials may result and the issues of each case will be tried upon the merits.

Both tried in Cass county on at change of venue.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, page 6, pub. Thursday Sept 28, 1922; submitted by BZ]

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Saw Art Hickman.

While in Fort Madison, where he took Claude Wilson, local check artist, this week, Sheriff W. A. McKee visited for some time with Arthur Hickman of Coin who was convicted with his brother Ben Hickman here on a charge of murdering Deputy Sheriff Albert Patton following a holdup of a crap game at Shenandoah in 1920. Hickman and his brother were given life imprisonment by Judge Cullison when the case was brought here on a change of venue from the Page county court, Ben Hickman later escaped from the penitentiary and has not been apprehended. Mckee states that Hickman is employed in the machine shop at the prison. He has been working in the shops for four years.

[Atlantic News Telegraph, pub. Saturday June 18, 1927; submitted by BZ]


Twins Healthy at 107

John and Eli Phipps "Just lived Naturally and Kept it Up"

Hennessy, OK, May 9 - Wonders the West might show them gave Eli and John Phipps material for dreams in 1820 the 17-year-old twin boys moved from Virginia to Indiana with their father and mother. But Ell says now that neither he nor John dreamed of living in the lands as Oklahoma or Iowa almost a century later.

The Phipps twins were born in 1803. Next February they will be 108 years old. Eli now lives in Hennessy. He says he never has been ill enough to need a physician. John lives in Shenandoah, IA and, according to Eli, his health is so good he doesn't appreciate it.

In 1853 the mother of the twins died at their home in Indiana at the age of 93. The family moved to Putnam County, Missouri, where Jesse Phipps, the father died of smallpox at 110.

Eli married Rebecca Griffith in Maryville. Mo., and came to Oklahoma sixteen years ago. John moved to Iowa.

Until last fall Eli worked a farm four miles southwest of Hennessy. Now he has moved into town and says he means to rest all the rest of his life.

Transcribed & submitted by Dawn Minard
Kansas City Star, (Date 1910-05-10)


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