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History and Genealogy
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Wayne County, Iowa

 

Wayne County, Iowa Biographies

J. T. Blakely, farmer and stock raiser, section 11, was born and raised on the old homestead and married Dora Wolf in 1896. The homestead contains 240 acres, all under cultivation. He had this season 90 acres in corn, 12 of millet, and 40 in meadow that yielded 168 bushels of timothy seed. In stock he has 40 head of fine cattle and 225 head of hogs; also a match team of horses that are good steppers.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


D. M. Brewer, physician and farmer, section 22, has an 80 acre farm, all under cultivation; 35 acres in corn, and the rest of the farm in meadow and pasture. Dr. Brewer was born in Union twp. In 1872 and was united in marriage to Nellie Havner in 1897. He is a graduate of Rush Medical College, Chicago, and was assistant surgeon for the Mexican Central R.R. Co. for two years.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


The Buoy settlement, George, W. H., W. N. and John Buoy, are industrious farmers. George Buoy has a farm of 80 acres, but had under his control 80 acres belonging to the estate of his mother. He has 35 acres in corn and about 40 in meadow. Mr. Buoy was married in 1894 to Myrtie Hindman. W. H. Buoy's farm contains 100 acres. He has 40 acres in corn, 20 in oats and the rest in meadow and pasture. Was married in 1896 to Grace Westlake. W. N. Buoy is living on the old homestead of Mrs. Mary Buoy, who is on a visit to her daughter in Ohio. He has 40 acres in corn, 20 in oats and the rest of the 160 acres in pasture. He owns 80 acres of land which he rents. Mr. B. was married in 1887 to Jennie Youngblood, daughter of a prominent Illinois man, and has two children. The old homestead is a landmark of the past. John W. Buoy has a farm of 160 acres adjoining the old homestead. He also has 40 acres in corn, 20 in oats and the rest in meadow and pasture. He also has under his control 120 acres belonging to the estate of his mother. At present he has 30 head of cattle and 145 head of hogs. Mr. Buoy was married to Maggie Jeffries in 1891 and has two children.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


F. A. Burton, farmer and stock raiser, is a son of W. B. Burton, deceased, was born in 1870 on the old homestead and in 1894 married Belle Dunn, daughter of Capt. Dunn of Corydon. The farm contains 160 acres, and is well cultivated. He had this season 35 acres in corn, 10 in oats, 40 in meadow, and the rest in pasture; he also has in fair condition 35 head of cattle.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


A. A. Clark & sons, farmers and dealers in shorthorn cattle; 360 acres in section 9. The farm is under the management of Claude Clark who married Maggie M. Hancock in 1896. They have 75 head of shorthorns and 65 head of hogs. Crop of 70 acres corn, 20 of oats, and 90 of meadow that yielded 475 bushels timothy seed.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


W. E. Cutler, farmer and stockraiser, section 22, was born in Illinois in 1860. Mr. Cutler came with his father to Union twp. in 1867, and in 1890 married Alice Clark, daughter of Hon. D. M. Clark. In 1891 he settled on his present place, improving it, and now calls it "Canna Hill." He had 30 acres in corn, 14 in oats, and 50 in meadow from which he realized 200 bushel timothy seed. At present he has 40 head of thoroughbred Canna Hill cattle.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


John H. Davis was born in Appanoose county, Iowa in 1862, and came to Union in 1883, renting and cultivating the Thorp farm, in section 16 since that time. In 1883 he married Hattie Thorp and has five children. His little daughter, Lula, resides in New York. This year Mr. Davis had 30 acres in corn, 17 in oats, and 90 in meadow.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


R. E. Dotts has a 230 acre farm on the edge of Wright twp. The farm has 130 acres in corn.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


E. W. Ewers, son of Smith Ewers, was born in Ohio in 1871 and came to Wright twp. in 1882. He married in 1892 to Mima Showalter. He owns an 80 acre farm in section 16, and this season he had 25 acres in corn, 14 in oats, and 35 in meadow.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Mrs. Eliza Ewing has a 40-acre farm and comfortable home, in Section 10. She is the widow of Samuel Ewing, deceased, and is a native of Pennsylvania. She has resided on the present place 30 years. Her son, A. Ewing, has a farm of 160 acres adjoining the Ewing estate; 35 in corn, 30 in timothy, rest in grass; was born in Illinois and came with his father to Wright twp. in 1865. Was married in 1871 to Maggie Westlake.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


R. M. George owns a 438 farm in section 31. This season has has 115 acres in corn, 20 in oats, 160 in timothy and 160 in pasture. He raises and buys stock and has 30 head of fine cattle. Mr. George is a native of Pennsylvania, and his father moved to Wright twp. in 1857. He has been twice married. In 1872 he was united in marriage to Martha Davis of Wayne county, and in 1875 he was united in marriage to Emma C. Hancock. He has 12 children, all living. Mr. George's son, Wm. H. George, has about 60 acres in corn this year, and he expects a big yield. The farm adjoins Wm. Ruddle's farm.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


J. M. Given has a farm of 80 acres adjoining Confidence on the east, and about 65 acres in grass. He is a carpenter by trade and is building a house for Bert Scott; is a native of Ohio, and left that state 25 years ago. After residing in Confidence several years he married Mattie A. Rimmer.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


T. J. Hancock, farmer, section 30 is a native on Indiana; married in Mahaska county, IA in 1853; has been living on his present farm since 1851; had 90 acres in corn, 100 in grass and the rest in pasture.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Wm. M. Hawkins, farmer, section 2, was born in Union twp in 1857; married Anna R. Fish in 1883; has 200 acres of splendid land and this year had 65 acres in corn, 80 in meadow that yielded 325 bushels of timothy seed; also has 35 head of hogs.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Husted are from Illinois, their native state, moving to and settling on their farm in 1875. They have a farm of 160 acres; this year,with the exception of 35 acres in corn, the farm is in pasture.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


J. Jared, farmer, section 30; was born in Kentucky; emigrated from that state to Warren county, IL, in 1858. There he married Sarah J. Davis and to them 11 children have been born--6 living. Mr. Jared was born in 1828. He has 510 acres in his farm; 200 acres in corn, 30 in oats, 65 in meadow and the rest in pasture.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


J. N. Jeffries, farmer and stock dealer, section 10, is a native of Kentucky. He is farming 440 acres of fine land, deals extensively in stock. This season he has 100 acres in corn, 20 in oats and the rest of his farm is in pasture. He also has a half interest in a farm of 200 acres adjoining Russell, Lucas county, and J. F. Vale is his partner. They are feeding 200 head of cattle on the place. Mr. Jeffries was married in 1877 to Etha Reynolds, daughter of Thomas and Mary Reynolds, deceased.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Isaac Martin owns a farm of 91 acres adjoining the farm of Mr. Thatcher. Mr. Martin has been living on the place 25 years. Mr. Martin is a native of Schuyler county, MO.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Allen G. McClelland

Allen G. McClelland son of J.C. and Elizabeth (Fox) McClelland, was born July 12, 1860 in Mercer County, Missouri. He was married September 07, 1884, to Mary N. Boyd, daughter of Charles and Susan (Atkinson) Boyd. They have twelve children living, one dead: Alva Earl, born June 28, 1774, died December 17, 1888; Enola B, September 15, 1887; John, December 01, 1889; Frances E., December 29, 1891; Charles B., November 16, 1893; Robert B., September 15, 1895; William W., May 29, 1897; Mary M., April 25, 1899; James C., December 22, 1900; Allen G. Jr., November 08, 1902; Madge N. July 12, 1907; Geanell E, April 20, 1909. Mrs. McClelland was born June 06, 1864 at Lineville Iowa. Mr. McClelland moved with his parents to Decatur, Iowa, when only one year old. They lived there two years, then went to Fairfield, Iowa, remaining there until the spring of 1866, when they moved to Adair County, Missouri. He lived at home till about grown, then went into the railroad train service, working for several different companies. He worked at this for thirteen years, then in February 1889, quit railroading, returned to Adair County, and resumed the occupation of farming. He has been there since that time. In 1904 he formed a partnership with Dr. Halladay, in his big farm. They own 480 acres, eight miles northeast of Kirksville. The home is no doubt the best country home in this county, or one of the best in North Missouri. It has twelve rooms besides basement, all of them large. It is thoroughly modern in every way, having its own light, heat and water plants. There are two bathrooms, concrete walks, fountains, etc. He raises Shorthorn and Hereford cattle (running a dairy), and Berkshire hogs.

[The History of Adair County Missouri, by E.M. Violette, 1911, submitted by Desiree Burrell Rodcay]


Thos. A. Murrow has an 80-acre farm north of Mrs. Ewing's place, 25 acres in corn and the rest in pasture. He moved from Lucas county, IA in 1881 and is a native of Indiana.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


J. L. Parsons, farmer and stock raiser, section 18; was born in Jefferson county in 1876, but came to Wayne county when quite young. In 1894 he married Cora E. Pray. He has 320 acres under cultivation. This season he had 40 acres in corn, 100 in meadow that yielded 400 bushels timothy seed, and rest of the land is in pasture. He also has 20 head of cattle, 100 head of hogs and 25 head of horses.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


A. K. Robinson is a native of Kentucky. His farm contains 519 acres, half mile east of Confidence, and he has lived on that place for 43 years. This season he has 80 acres in corn, 40 in oats, 169 in bluegrass, and the rest in timothy which yielded 427 bushels of seed. He is fattening 90 head of cattle and 120 head of hogs. He has a son in the mercantile business at Confidence, who also owns a farm adjoining the town on the east; two sons in business at Promise City and two at Kellerton.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Wm. Ruddle and his two sons, A. E. and J. I., farms adjoin each other and are in section 31. Mr. Ruddle was born in Boone county, Kentucky, and has been living on his present place since 1869. He married Mrs. S. J. Case in 1865, and is the father of five children who are living nearby. There are 200 acres in the farm and about all are under cultivation. He has 60 acres in corn which he thinks will yield 50 bushels to the acre; also has 35 acres in grass. Deals in Hereford cattle.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Q. A. Scott, farmer and stock raiser, section 8, was born in Illinois in 1850, and settled on the present place in 1869; married Lucy Jane Hatfield in 1882. He owns 100 acres of fine land; had 40 acres in corn, 30 in meadow and the rest in pasture.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


J. N. Stark, Section 16, farmer and stock raiser, native of Illinois, has been twice married, the second time, in 1881, to Mattie G. Chamberlain; he is 43 years old, and the father of 8 children. His farm contains 350 acres of fine land, all under cultivation. There are three never-failing springs on the farm and a windmill at each. He had in 80 acres of corn, 15 in oats, 15 in rye and 80 in meadow that yielded 350 bushels; also has 125 head of hogs and 50 of the number ready for market, two fine stallions--one a Cleveland bay, the other a Norman. Mr. Stark settled on his present place in 1879.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Thomas Stark, father of J. N. Stark, was born in 1818, and came to Union township in 1876, and until recently has always enjoyed good health. His farm of 60 acres is in section 15, and is all under cultivation and in excellent condition. He has only 20 acres in corn this season and the rest in pasture.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Charles F. Steiner

CHARLES F STEINER was born at Corydon, Iowa, August 31, 1884, being a son of Clarence and Maggie Steiner. He was married September 07, 1904, to Jessie Fulton, daughter of Abraham and Cordelia Fulton. Mr. Steiner came to Adair County in January 1894. he is now a leading baker of Kirksville, having headquarters on East Harrison Street, just east of the public square. He has been in that business there since 1902. He owns city property and property in Oklahoma. Mr. Steiner is a member of the Methodist church, and belongs to the Odd Fellows, the K. of P. and Yeoman Fraternities. He is a Democrat in politics.

[A History of Adair County Missouri" by E.M. Violette (1911), sub. by Desiree Burrell Rodcay]


J.F. Sullivan, Sr.

The subject of this sketch was born in Wayne county, Iowa, July 17, 1847. His parents were Harvy P. and Eliza (King) Sullivan. They were born in Kentucky and died at Centerville, Iowa, October 2, 1853. At the age of seven years he was removed to Kentucky by his mother's parents and lived on a farm there until he was thirteen years old. He had but very little schooling up to that time and had resolved to secure a better education. He went to Williamsburg, the county seat of Whitley county, Kentucky, and clerked in a grocery store morning and evenings and Saturdays to pay his way in school. He attended school most of the time after he was thirteen years old up to July 1, 1864, when he left Kentucky and went back to Iowa, where he continued going to school for the greater part of two years, until he had a fair common-school education. Then he rented a farm and on the 27th day of February, 1867, he married Miss Eliza R. Duncan, and to her is due an equal share of praise, for her industry and frugality has been one of the main levers to his success. He lived in Iowa as a renter for about five years, then bought a farm in Mercer county, Missouri, where he lived until March 1, 1881. Then he came to Colorado for his health, having been bothered with lung trouble for two years, so that he was able to work on the farm but very little. As soon as he landed in Colorado he went to roughing it, prospecting and camping out up to the latter part of December, 1881, when he landed on Kannah creek, then a sage brush wilderness, and took up his claim, on which he still lives. At this time he had regained his health, so he wrote his wife to sell the Missouri farm and come to Colorado, for he had found all that he had started out to find - health and good climate. She sold the farm and came to this place and they have lived here since. They have reared six children, Mary L. (Sullivan) Morrison, William A., John W., J.F., Jr., Eliza R. and Susan Ada.

[Progressive Men of Western Colorado, Publ 1905. Transcribed by Kim Mohler)]


Andrew J. Surbaugh

Andrew J. Surbaugh is a native of Wayne county, where he was born October 11, 1866, and during all his life has been connected with agricultural interests of his native section. In the November election of 1912 he was chosen to the important position of sheriff of Wayne county and on January 2, 1913, entered upon his new position, for which his many high qualities and his ability well fit him. He was born in Clay township, in which he spent most of his life in the country, but since January makes his home in Corydon. His father, John Surbaugh, was born at Green Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, and died in Clay township in 1877. The mother, Elizabeth (Guinn) Surbaugh, was a native of the same state and she and her husband came to Clay township, Wayne county, in the early days, being among the pioneers of this section. Both were well and prominently known during all their lives for their many high qualities of mind and character and Mr. Surbaugh became one of the substantial men of the locality. The mother passed away in Clay township, May 16, 1910, surviving her husband for about thirty-three years. In their family were twelve children, of whom seven are now living: Mrs. Nettie Caldwell, residing in Lewisburg, Iowa; Mrs. Alice Guinn, a resident of Bentonville, Iowa; Mrs. Mae Reck, born May 10, 1848, residing at Allerton, Iowa; Mrs. Lucy Caldwell, who lives at Lewisburg, Iowa; Mrs. Cynthia McGuire, residing in Humeston; Andrew J., of this review; and John, born February 3, 1872, of Clay township. Lee died in 1877, Mrs. Hattie Caldwell passed away in 1894. Rachel, lola and Grace died in infancy.

Andrew J. Surbaugh was reared under the parental roof and attended the schools in the neighborhood in the acquirement of his education. He early was trained to agricultural pursuits, remaining in this line of occupation continuously. He now owns a farm of one hundred and eighty acres and thereon he has a modern, well furnished home and all such improvements as are deemed essential in the cultivation of an up-to-date farming enterprise. His property is one of the most valuable in this section and bespeaks the energy, industry and progressiveness of its owner. On November 5, 1912, Mr. Surbaugh was elected to the office of sheriff of Wayne county on the democratic ticket, his victory being highly complimentary to him, as it was won in the face of a majority of four hundred which is generally given to the other side. It speaks well for his popularity and the confidence which is given him by the people. He assumed the duties of his office on January 2, 1913, assured of the good wishes of his many friends and acquaintances.

Andrew J. Surbaugh was united in marriage to Miss Elsie Olson on January 6, 1886. Mrs. Surbaugh is a native of Mercer county, Illinois, and grew to womanhood in that state. Her parents were Olof and Christina Olson, both of whom passed away in Illinois. In their family were five daughters: Mrs. Christina Morford, deceased; Mrs. Anna Williner, a resident of Galesburg, Illinois; Mrs. Bertie Loquist, deceased; Mrs. Surbaugh; and Mrs. Susie Grant, of Woodhull, Illinois. The parents were among the early settlers in Illinois, making their home near North Henderson, and there all their children were born and reared.

Mr. and Mrs. Surbaugh are the parents of four children, who were born in Clay township with the exception of the second son: Bay, a barber of Humeston, Iowa; Earl, born in Mercer county. Illinois, who assists the father in the cultivation of the farm; Stella, residing with her parents; and Floyd, also at home. The family are devoted members of the Baptist church, in the work of which organization they take an active interest.

Mr. Surbaugh is a democrat in his political views and has always taken a keen interest in all matters of public importance. He always keeps well informed upon the issues at stake and his advice is often sought in local political circles. Public honors have come to him manifold and he has served as trustee of Clay township, as member of the school board, as assessor and as road supervisor, discharging his duties in connection with the various offices he has held with a fidelity and ability that have received high commendation from his constituents. He is successful in the truest sense of the word, a man unusually broad minded and intelligent, not only attaining individual success but being a helpful and co-operant factor in the general advancement as well.

Past and present of Lucas and Wayne counties, Iowa: a record of ..., Volume 2, By Theodore M. Stuart, 1913, submitted by Kim T.


Baz Thatcher, two miles east of Bethlehem, contains 200 acres. He has 45 acres in corn; 70 acres in timothy that yielded 200 bushels of seed, and 15 acres in mille from which he realized 400 bushels. The rest of his farm is pasture. He has 40 head of cattle. Mr. T. was born in Wright twp. and has lived on his present place 18 years; was married in 1875 to Mary E. McMurray.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


John J. Watson

JOHN J. WATSON resides about two miles south from Curlew where he does general farming and stock raising. He was born in Bloomfield, Iowa, on August 25, 1851, being the son of G. W. and Hannah G. (Waddell) Watson, natives of Vermont and Indiana, respectively. The parents settled in Iowa in 1847 and in Wayne county in that state in 1858. At the beginning of the Civil War, the father enlisted in Company M, Seventh Missouri Cavalry and fought for three years for the union. He was wounded in the right hip at Fort Smith and never recovered the use of his limb, fully. He died in Mount Ayr, in 1891 where the mother now lives. They were the parents of seven children, Lewis, John J., Olivia Walker, Travetta Depew, Arizona Arvado, Emma S. Ellis, and Hallie J., who died in 1881.

From the public school, Mr. Watson received his education and until he was twenty-one, remained with his father. At that age he commenced railroading and followed the same for eleven years. After this, he continued his education on the farm and in 1879, came to Kansas, which was his home for three years. Thence he moved to Nebraska, where he resided six years. After that came the journey across the plains to the Pacific coast with mule teams, five months being consumed on the road. He landed in Seattle on September 14, and there did teaming and draying for a year or so. Later we find him in the coal business in Tacoma and in 1892, he took a logging contract for Allan C. Mason. Following that he came to North Yakima, taking up the coal and wood business, which occupied him until 1897. In that year he came to Eureka, now Republic, being one of the first settlers in that town. He operated an express there until 1901, then took one hundred and sixty acres near Curlew, which he improved and sold April 11, 1903. Mr. Watson then settled on his farm where he now resides, about fifty acres of which he has under cultivation. In addition to general farming, he does stock raising and has quite a band.

On August 29, 1877, Mr. Watson married Miss Sarah Knott, whose parents, James A. and Ellen T. (Shellhouse) Knott, were natives of Pennsylvania and early pioneers to Hancock county, Illinois. The father died in 1875, then the mother came to Iowa and later moved to Missouri, where she died in 1900. Eight children were born in this family, Clara E. Newingham, Mary Hanks, deceased, Bell Fowler, Jane Arnold, Cyrus, Marius, Horace, and James A. To Mr. and Mrs. Walker, four children have been born: Cora B., married to F. R. Burdette, a farmer residing near Curlew; Ethel, married to F. H. Stevenson, in Curlew; Elbie E., and Emory R.

Mr. Watson is a Republican and always takes an active interest in political matters. He is a member of the school board and has been deputy sheriff and United States marshal and was deputy city marshal at Yakima. He has also held various other offices.

Fraternally, Mr. Watson is affiliated with the I. O. O. F., the W. W., the S. of V., and the F. P. P. Mrs. Watson is a member of the Adventist church. Mr. Watson was recently appointed crop reporter for this section of the country, by the Spokane agency. He is a man of good standing and has shown valuable knowledge and interest in his labors in Ferry county.

[Source: “An Illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the state of Washington”; Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904. Tr. by Rhonda Hill]


J. W. White was born in Indiana in 1828, and although now is in his 72nd year, is very healthy and able to attend to his business. He owns an 80 acre farm in section 15, but is now living on the 160 acre farm belonging to his wife.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


Milton Wright, brother of Greenwood Wright, deceased, is a native of Putnam county, IN, and moved to the present farm home in 1865. Since the death of Mr. Wright's wife, which occurred several weeks ago, he has rented the farm and will retire from active life. Mrs. Wright was born in Putnam county, IN. Her remains were interred in the Confidence cemetery. Rev. Sandy Jones preaching the funeral.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


T. R. Wright has a fine farm of 80 acres and has charge of 320 acres belonging to the estate of his mother, all in section 3. Reed, as he is familiarly known, is a son of Greenwood Wright. He has been totally blind since boyhood, but the loss of his eye sight does not interfere with his daily routine of business on the farm. Stock raising he makes a specialty, and has 28 head of cattle that will soon be ready for market. We enjoyed a fine dinner at his house that was prepared by his daughter, Miss May Wright.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


J. F. Yocum is a native of Kentucky and has a fine farm of 240 acres, 50 acres in corn, 25 in oats, and the rest in grass and pasture.

from the Corydon Democrat September 1900 and October 26 1900, Corydon, Utah
Submitted by Sandie Cummins


 

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