Iowa Distinguished Service Cross Recipients

(*Indicates Posthumous Award)
(Names followed by deceased indicate men who have died since awards were made.)

John T. Baker, sergeant, first class, Company F, 7th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near Brieulles, France, October 18 to November 3-4, 1918. On October 18, Sergt. Baker, with a detail of 10 men, carrying wire for wiring in outposts, followed the Infantry through the Bois des Rappes, where he employed his men as infantry to assist in holding the captured position. Later they fired in four outposts in direct view of and under heavy fire from the enemy. On November 3 and 4 they succeeded several times in laying footbridges across the Meuse under heavy fire, allowing the Infantry to cross to the east bank. Residence at enlistment: Bancroft, Iowa.


Walter D. Ballard, private, Company B, 16th Infantry. Displaying exceptional initiative and bravery throughout the operations south of Soissons, France, July 18 to 22, 1918, he, with extraordinary heroism on July 21, 1918, with two companions, captured two machine guns that were causing heavy losses to his company. Residence at enlistment: Redfield, Iowa.


*Fred H. Becker, second lieutenant, Infantry, attached to 5th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vierzy, France, July 18, 1918. Lieut. Becker went forward in advance of his platoon and destroyed a machine-gun nest, thereby preventing the death or injury of many men of his command. His self-sacrificing courage permitted his platoon to advance, but, as he completed the performance of this noble work, he himself was killed. Emergency address: Mrs. J. B. Becker, mother, 228 Newell Street, Waterloo. Iowa. Residence at appointment: 232 Newell Street, Waterloo, Iowa.


*Ernest E. Bickford, corporal, Company H, 16th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Soissons, France, July IS, 1918. Without assistance he attacked an enemy machine gun which was located in a tree and dislodged the gun, but was himself killed while performing this courageous duty. Emergency address: Jesse Bickford, father, North English, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: North English, Iowa.


David X. Binkley, private. Company I, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Hill 212, near Sergy, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, July 28, 1918. He sought and obtained permission to go out in front of our lines and recover his corporal, who was lying severely wounded in the upon. He crossed an open area that was swept for more than 50 yards by enemy machine guns, reached the corporal, and carried him safely back into our lines. Later he was wounded, but refused to go to the aid station until his company had won its objective. Residence at enlistment: 708 Northwestern Avenue, Ames, Iowa.


George R. Boustead, corporal, Company M, 168th Infantry. Corpl. Boustead distinguished himself northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, on July 28, 1918, when, as the lender of a squad of four men, he raided an enemy machine gun nest held by 12 Germans. As a result of this daring work 1 of the en?m? was killed, the other 11 captured, und their 4 machine, guns turned upon the retreating foe. Residence at enlistment: Woodbine, Iowa.


Ernest J. Boysen, second lieutenant, 305th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Champigneulle, France, November 1, 1918. When his platoon was held up by lire from enemy machine guns and snipers, Lieut. Boysen went forward in advance of his platoon in disregard of personal danger, and with a rifle brought down three enemy snipers and drove off the enemy machine gunners, thereby enabling his platoon to resume its advance. Residence at appointment: Harlan, Iowa.


Edwin D. Bramble, private, first class, Headquarters Company, 102d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Marcheville, France, September 26, 1918. He performed valuable service in maintaining communication by voluntarily repairing telephone lines under a violent artillery bombardment. While so engaged he was seriously wounded. Residence at enlistment: Mapleton, Iowa.


*Arthur F. Brandt, corporal. Company E, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action northeast of Verdun, France, October 16, 1918. After his company had been in action three days during the attack on the Cote-de-Chatillon and was to be relieved, Corpl. Brandt volunteered to guide the company to a position of security in the rear which he had selected. While the relief was being made under shell fire, this soldier and four others were severely wounded by a bursting shell. Realizing that this wound would prove fatal, Corpl. Brandt, while being carried on a stretcher, indicated the route to be taken by the company, being wounded in the face and scarcely able to talk. Through his extraordinary fortitude and will power the company was able to reach its position over difficult terrain and under enemy fire. He died of his wounds the next day. Emergency address: Mrs. Ida Brandt, mother, Postville, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: Postville, Iowa.


Guy S. Brewer, major, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Mihiel, France, September 12, 1918. He personally led the assaulting wave of his battalion at St Mihiel, continuing to the enemy's wire, despite the fact, that he was wounded by a shell fragment. While directing his men through the wire entanglements his right arm was shattered by a machine-gun bullet, but he remained on the field for more than an hour directing the disposition of his forces and giving careful directions to the succeeding commander. Residence at appointment: Des Moines, Iowa.


*Charles R. Burks, private, Company I, 165th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Sergy, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, July 30, 1918. During the midday attack on Sergy, after all the runners had been exhausted and many men had been killed or wounded, Pvt. Burks volunteered to take a message to a neighboring unit through violent bombardment and machine-gun fire. He was killed by a machine-gun bullet while on his way with the message. Emergency address: J. H. Burks, father, Malvern, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: Malvern, Iowa.


George A. Bushing, private, Company G, 118th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Brancourt, France, October 8, 1918. He observed a severely wounded soldier about 100 yards from his post on a sunken road heavily shelled by artillery and machine-gun enfilading fire. He voluntarily went out and carried this soldier to a place of safety. Residence at enlistment: Plainfield, Iowa.


Charles J. Casey, captain, 168th Infantry, 42d Division. He displayed notable gallantry on March 9, 1918, in leading a command of untried men in company with French troops in a successful raid on enemy trenches in the salient du Feys, France. By his heroic conduct he inspired both his own men and the men of our ally participating in the operation. Residence at appointment: Red Oak, Iowa.


*Charles W. Chapman, Jr., second lieutenant, 94th Aero Squadron, Air Service. On May 5, 1918, in the region of Autrepierre, while on patrol duty, he courageously attacked a group of four monoplanes and one biplane and succeeded in bringing one down before he himself was shot down in flames. Emergency address: C. W. Chapman, father, 637 West Third Street, Waterloo, Iowa. Residence at appointment: Waterloo, Iowa.


Charles E. Chenoweth, captain, 363d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Forest of Argonne. France, September 29-30, 1918. At the time when troops on the left had retired, Capt. Chenoweth, with his company, covered the left flank of his division and thus prevented an attack by the enemy upon its flank. After being severely wounded, he remained at his post until he had issued the necessary orders for holding the position he had seized. Residence at appointment: Nora Springs, Iowa.


John C. Christopher, first lieutenant, 168th Infantry. He led his platoon against the Prussian Guards on Hill 212, near Sergy, France, on July 28, 1918. So courageous was he and so skillful in directing the attack that 13 of the enemy's best troops were captured at their guns and six machine guns were taken and turned on the foe. Residence at appointment: 308 Eighth Street, Red Oak, Iowa.


Merl E. Clark, sergeant, Company C, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at the Cote-de-Chatillon, east of Grandpré, France, October 16, 1918. After leading his platoon in a resolute assault across open ground swept by machine-gun fire, he saw his left held up by a machine-gun nest. Taking four soldiers, he flanked the enemy position, killed four Germans, and captured two prisoners and two heavy machine guns, his own detachment suffering no casualties. He executed this movement with exceptional skill, daring, and promptness, and in less than 10 minutes cleared the ground for the advance of two companies. Residence at enlistment: 936 Walnut Street. Webster City, Iowa.


Leo George Clarke, second lieutenant, 11th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Remoiville, France, November 5-10, 1918. He set an example of bravery and self-sacrifice to his men during the period November 5-9, 1918. On November 10, while assembling his company, he discovered a wounded man lying in a place exposed to machine-gun lire, and regardless of his own danger carried him to a place of safety. Residence at appointment: Waukon, Iowa.


Robert Colflesh (Army serial No. 2395261), corporal, Company M, 7th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Fossoy, France, July 14, 1918. After his men had been caught in an intense artillery shelling, Corpl. Colflesh, although wounded, refused to seek shelter until all his men had taken cover. While aiding the last man into a trench, he received a second wound. Residence at enlistment: 777 West Fourteenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa.


*Emmett E. Collins, sergeant, Machine Gun Company, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the Ourcq River, France, July 28, 1918. After being wounded, Sergt. Collins voluntarily returned to his company as soon as he had received first aid and fought courageously until he was killed. Emergency address: Mrs. Fanny Collins, mother, 815 East Pennsylvania Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: 815 East Pennsylvania Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa.


Paul Cross, private, Machine Gun Company, 325th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. .Juvin, France, October 12, 1918. After his machine gun squad had been dispersed by a sweeping enemy fire he continued to operate his gun alone until forced to leave it by the overwhelming enemy attack. He then killed two of the enemy with his pistol, but was severely wounded in the encounter. His unusual bravery and daring contributed materially to the success of his regiment in the action. Residence at enlistment: Lacey, Iowa.


Clarence A. Davis, corporal. Company D, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cote-de-Chatillon, France, October 14, 1918. During the attack he made his way forward through intense artillery and machine-gun fire to rescue a wounded comrade. When he had reached a point about 20 yards in front of the enemy trenches he found that the man was dead, and he was himself so seriously wounded that he was compelled to return. Residence at enlistment: Clarence, Iowa.


Fred C. Davis, first lieutenant, 108th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ronsson, France, September 29-30. 1918. He successfully held a trench several hundred yards in advance of the Hindenburg line, under heavy shell and machine-gun fire, with a detachment which he had organized with men from different organizations. The following morning he led his detachment still farther, cleaning up about 500 yards of enemy trenches. Residence at appointment: Madrid, Iowa.


Henry Deeringer, private, Company B, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Estrées, France, October 8, 1918. While working as a stretcher bearer Pvt. Deeringer was himself severely wounded, but he nevertheless succeeded in getting his patient to the dressing station, where he himself received first aid and was tagged for evacuation. Tearing the tag from his coat, he returned to the field and continued to perform his duties until afternoon, when he was hardly able to walk and was again ordered to the rear. Residence at enlistment: Knoxville, Iowa.


Merl Doty, corporal, Company K, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Beaurevoir, France, October 6, 1918. He volunteered and crossed an open space swept by fire from enemy machine gun and snipers to rescue wounded comrades. Residence at enlistment: Route No. 4, Rockwell City, Iowa.


*Charles M. Ford, second lieutenant, Company D, 141st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Etienne, France, October 9, 1918. After all the officers of his company had been killed or wounded, Lieut. Ford took command of the company, and with about 24 men advanced beyond the main line, over extremely difficult ground, capturing 24 enemy machine guns. Lieut. Ford established his men in a good position, practically isolated from the rest of the line, and, manning the captured guns, held the position under heavy machine-gun and shell fire for about 60 hours. Emergency address: Etta M. Ford, sister, 243 Lincoln Avenue, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Residence at appointment: Council Bluffs, Iowa.


Kenneth Gardiner, corporal, Battery A, 10th Field Artillery. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Eugene, France, July 17, 1918. Suffering from shell shock and a wound in the shoulder, he continued to carry messages over shell-swept roads until he was forced to go to the dressing station by his battery commander. Residence at enlistment: 120 West Oak Street, Council Bluffs, Iowa.


Arthur J. Goetsch, sergeant, Company D, 4th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action at Ville-Savoye, France, August 11, 1918. Although his eyes had been burned by gas, he volunteered for duty and assisted in the construction of an artillery bridge across the Vesle River, under constant machine-gun and artillery fire, setting a conspicuous example of personal bravery and devotion to duty. Residence at enlistment: Walnut, Iowa.


John C. Graves, corporal, Company A, 1st Gas Regiment. For extraordinary heroism in action near Nantillois, France, October 5, 1918. After other means of communication had failed, he voluntarily carried messages from the regimental post of command to advance positions through several enemy barrages of gas and high-explosive shells. He continued on duty, even after being wounded, until he was exhausted. Residence at enlistment: 1128 Euclid Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa.


Thomas J. Gray, private, Company M, 168th Infantry. He distinguished himself northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, on July 28, 1918, when, with four other men, he raided an enemy machine-gun nest held by 12 Germans. As a result of their daring and presence of mind, 1 of the enemy was killed, the other 11 captured, and their four machine guns turned upon the retreating foe. Residence at enlistment: Elliott, Iowa.


James Norman Hall, captain, 103d Aero Squadron, Air Service. On March 26, 1918, while leading a patrol of three, he attacked a group of five enemy fighters and three enemy two-seaters, himself destroying one and forcing down two others in a fight lasting more than 20 minutes. Residence at appointment: Colfax, Iowa.


Byron W. Hamilton, sergeant, Company M, 168th Infantry. When leading a rushing attack on machine guns on Hill 212, near Sergy, France, July 28, 1918, he found himself ahead of his line, so wounded as to be nimble to stand on his feet. Attacked by 10 Germans of the Prussian Guards, he rose to his knees and shot 5 of them. The others fled. Residence at enlistment: Pleasant Plains, Iowa.


Harry E. Hample (Army serial No. 2159889), private, first class, Company C. 131st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chipilly Ridge, France, August 10-19, 1918. He volunteered repeatedly to carry messages over ground swept by heavy machine-gun and artillery fire. He displayed marked personal courage, accomplishing every mission he was given. Residence at enlistment: Watkins, Iowa.


Claude V. Hart, sergeant, Company M 168th Infantry. In action near Sergy, France. July 28, 1918, he coolly and with utter disregard of danger led his platoon against enemy machine-gun emplacements. Four of the foe, were captured, together with their two machine guns, which he turned and operated on the retreating Germans until he was severely wounded. Residence at enlistment: 327 East Main Street, Cherokee, Iowa.


Glenn C. Haynes, captain. 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bois de Chatillon, France, October 16, 1918. Capt. Haynes, as battalion commander, distinguished himself by his coolness and leadership in the attack on Bois de Chatillon and Cote-de-Chatillon. When the commanders of his two front-line companies were put out of action after having obtained a footing upon the slopes, Capt. Haynes personally took command of the two companies and in utter disregard for his own safety successfully led them through heavy artillery, machine-gun, and rifle fire to their objective. Residence at appointment: Mount Vernon, Iowa.


Henry Henderson, second lieutenant. 354th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Remonville, France, November 1, 1918. When his company was fired upon by a battery of German 77's not more than 300 yards distant, Lieut. Henderson led his platoon at a run through two machine-gun nests, which were defending that flank of the battery, and succeeded in capturing the entire battery with the aid of the bayonet. Residence at appointment: 402 East Washington Avenue, Council Bluffs, Iowa.


Earl A. Hoffman, private, Company C, 341st Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Bols de Bantheville, France, October 24, 1918. Severely wounded while dressing the wounds of 23 of his platoon, he continued his work until he fainted from pain and was evacuated. Residence at enlistment: 707 East Chestnut Street, Denison, Iowa.


Chester R Howard, deceased, first lieutenant, 104th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Belleau Woods, France, July 20, 1918. Lieut. Howard was wounded early in the action, but set a splendid example of personal bravery by retaining command of his company and leading it through a violent artillery and machine-gun barrage until he fell exhausted after advancing 200 meters. Emergency address: Mrs. ?. ?. Howard, mother, 606 Sixth Avenue, Mount Vernon, Iowa. Residence at appointment; 606 Sixth Avenue, Mount Vernon, Iowa.


*William P. Hyman, second lieutenant, 166th Infantry. After the capture of Seringes et Nesles, France, on July 29, 1918, by the organization of which he was a part, and while holding a portion of the town with his platoon, he found that one of his men was missing. Being told that the man was wounded and lay beyond a hedge at the edge of the village, he unselfishly attempted to locate the wounded man, was caught in direct machine-gun fire, and killed. Emergency address: L. F. Hyman, father, Iowa Falls, Iowa. Residence at appointment: Iowa Falls, Iowa.


John J. Ingalls (Army serial No. 95497), corporal, 80th Company, 6th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. Wounded in the assault on machine-gun positions in the Bois de Belleau, France, on June 6, 1918, he refused to be evacuated, but assisted in the evacuation of the wounded, thereby displaying great qualities of self-sacrifice and devotion to duty. Residence at enlistment: Olin, Iowa.


Rufus B. Jackson, second lieutenant, 370th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Farm la Folie, France, September 28, 1918. Having been ordered to use his Stokes mortars in wiping out machine-gun nests which had been resisting the advance of his company, Lieut. Jackson made a personal reconnaissance by crawling to the enemy's lines to locate the nests. Accomplishing his purpose, he returned and directed the fire, silencing the guns. Residence at appointment: 912 East Thirteenth Street, Des Moines, Iowa.


William H. Jutras, first lieutenant. 103d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Riavllle, France, September 26, 1918. When the platoon on the right flank of his company was threatened by an enfilading movement of the enemy machine guns, he carried a message to the commander of that platoon through deadly machine-gun and minenwerfer bombardment. It then being necessary to establish liaison with the company on the right, in order to save his platoon from annihilation, and knowing that he faced almost certain death, this gallant officer unhesitatingly volunteered for this mission and crossed a terrain swept by converging machine-gun fire. Mortally wounded, he delivered his message in time to save his platoon. Emergency address: Mrs. Matthe Jutras, mother, 185 Beech Street, Manchester, N. H. Residence at appointment, Waterloo, Iowa.


Elmer J. Kilcher, private, first class, Company D, 130th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Fresnes-en-Woevre, France, November 10, 1918. Pvt. Kilcher voluntarily returned through the enemy's barrage after a raid to rescue another soldier who had been wounded, and was himself wounded as a result of his self-sacrificing effort. Residence at enlistment: Waucoma, Iowa.


William H. Kofmehl, second lieutenant, Company Ç, 15th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action north of Verdun, France, October 21, 1918. After his platoon had suffered heavy casualties in the Bois des Rappes from machine-gun fire he located the enemy guns, and, rallying a handful of his men, charged the enem? positions, capturing 37 prisoners. After getting his own machine guns in position Lieut. Kofmehl, seeing that one of his gunners had been wounded, operated the gun himself, setting an excellent example to his men. Residence at appointment: Farley, Iowa.


Carl Lee, private, Company D, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Molain, France, October 17, 1918. Having become separated from their company in a smoke barrage, Pvt. Lee and Corpl. Henry W. Cardwell found themselves face to face with a party of the enemy. Pvt. Lee brought his automatic rifle to his shoulder and attempted to fire, but the gun was jammed and would not shoot. Seeing themselves covered by the gun, and not knowing its condition, the Germans threw up their hands, and while Pvt. Lee kept the rifle at his shoulder, Corpl. Cardwell rounded up the Germans and disarmed them. Their ruse resulted in the capture of 12 of the enemy, comprising three machine-gun crews. Residence at enlistment: Osage, Iowa.


James B. Lepley, sergeant, Company M, 168th Infantry. Near Souain, to the northeast of Chalons-sur-Marne, France, on the night of July 14-15, 1918, he left his trench and returned to the woods, through a smothering fire of gas, high explosive, and shrapnel, to search for two men from his platoon who were missing. He found them lost in the woods and guided them back to the platoon. On July 28, 1918, near Sergy, France, he led his platoon forward in the face of a heavy machine-gun fire and captured 6 machine guns and 13 prisoners from the Prussian Guards. Residence at enlistment: Red Oak, Iowa.


Charles A. McCarthy, private, Company B, 2d Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Flêville, France, October 5, 1918. With the assistance of one other soldier Pvt. McCarthy entered a wood where three machine guns were holding up our attack, and under unusually heavy artillery and machine-gun fire knocked one of the guns out and rushed the second single-handed. With assistance of the other soldier he then succeeded in capturing about 20 prisoners who were in or near the machine-gun nest Residence at enlistment: Blairsburg, Iowa.


Hanford MacNider, captain, 9th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Medeah Farm, France, October 3-9, 1918. He voluntarily joined an attacking battalion on October 3, and accompanied it to its final objectives. During the second "attack on the same day he acted as a runner through heavy artillery and machine-gun fire. He visited the lines both night and day, where the fighting was most severe. When higher authority could not be reached, he assumed responsibilities and gave the necessary orders to stabilize serious situations. When new and untried troops took up the attack, he joined their forward elements, determined the enemy points of resistance by personal reconnaissance, uncovered enemy machine-gun nests, and supervised their destruction.

Capt. MacNider is also awarded an oak-leaf cluster, to be worn with distinguished-service cross, for the following act of extraordinary heroism in action near Remenauvllle, France, September 12, 1918: On duty as regimental adjutant, while carrying instructions to the assaulting lines, he found the line unable to advance and being disorganized by a heavy machine-gun fire. Running forward in the face of the fire, this officer captured a German machine gun, drove off the crew, reorganized the line on that flank, and thereby enabled the advance to continue. Residence at appointment: 232 Second Street, Mason City, Iowa.


James Manning, corporal, Company C, 4th Engineers. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Thibaut, France, August 8, 1918. He was one of our men who volunteered and swam the Vesle River for the purpose of doing work on the opposite bank necessary in the construction of a footbridge. With another soldier be succeeded in felling a large tree in the face of heavy machine-gun fire and 1-pounder fire after the remainder of the platoon had withdrawn. Residence at enlistment: General Delivery, Des Moines, Iowa.


Andrew R. Melrose (Army serial No. 1210143). corporal, Company D, 107th Infantry, 27th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vendhuile, France, September 28, 1918. Leaving the protection of a trench, he crawled out under heavy machine-gun and snipers' fire and rescued a British officer who had fallen in an exposed position. His example was an inspiration to the men serving with him. Residence at enlistment: Marcus, Iowa.


*Lotus N. Mobley (Army serial No. 240329), sergeant, Company L, 102d Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Trugny, France, July 23, 1918. Sergt. Mobley displayed exceptional courage in dashing into field under heavy shell and machine-gun fire and carrying to safety a wounded man. Emergency address: Carl D. Mobley, father, 1132 South Olive Street, I.os Angeles, Calif. Residence at enlistment: Cedar Rapids, Iowa.


Vern Amos Morgan, first lieutenant, 355th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Beaufort, France, November 4, 1918. Although he was wounded early in the engagement by shrapnel, Lieut. Morgan, after receiving first-aid treatment, immediately returned to his company and led it throughout the day. After taking the town of Beaufort he pushed on with his command to its objective through heavy artillery and machine-gun fire, 40 per cent of his company becoming casualties. Residence at appointment: 424 Harrison Street, Council Bluffs, Iowa.


Adolph N. Nelson, private. Company H, 131st Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Chipilly Ridge, France, August 9, 1918. Although severely wounded, he, on his own initiative, went out in advance of his lines, armed with an automatic rifle, and mopped up n machine-gun nest in which there were three guns. He killed four of the enemy crew, and brought the other two Germans back as prisoners. He set an example of heroism and devotion to duty, performing this service under heavy artillery and machine- gun fire. Residence at enlistment: Soldier, Iowa.


Bernard Nelson, sergeant, Company D, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Landres-et-St. Georges, France, October 14, 1918. During the attack on Hill 288, when the assault wave was held up by machine-gun fire, Sergt Nelson volunteered and led two squads to silence these guns. He cut his way through strong barbed-wire entanglements, advanced up a very steep slope in the face of direct machine-gun fire, entered the trench, and killed or wounded the entire crews of the two guns, making it possible for the battalion to advance. Residence at enlistment: Centervllle, Iowa.


*Oscar B. Nelson, first lieutenant, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at La Tuilerie Farm, France, October 10, 1918. Lieut. Nelson alone attacked two enemy machine guns, killing 2 of the enemy and capturing 19.

Lieut Nelson is awarded a bronze oak leaf for the following act of extraordinary heroism in action at La Tuilerie Farm, France, October 16, 1918: Accompanied by six soldiers, this officer advanced 600 yards beyond his own lines through heavy fire from enemy artillery, machine guns, and rifles, and captured two more machine guns, killing, capturing, or dispersing their crews. Still later in the day he led his company in an attack on Chatillon Hill and took his objective, but in so doing received wounds which caused his death. His coolness, courage, and utter disregard for his own safety were a source of great inspiration to his men. Emergency address: Jacob Nelson, father, 1706 West Sec-ond Street, Ottumwa, Iowa. Residence at appointment: 1706 West Second Street, Ottumwa, Iowa.


Severt J. Nelson (Army serial No. 2384980), sergeant, Company M, 60th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cunel, France, October 12, 1918. Leading his platoon in the face of murderous machine-gun fire from his front and flanks, Sergt. Nelson reached his objective after taking four enemy machine-gun nests and killing and capturing many prisoners. He then continued ahead of his men, and alone cleaned out some houses in the woods, which were occupied by the enemy. Emergency address: Andrew M. Nelson, brother, Ellsworth, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: Ellsworth, Iowa.


Liberty Pease, private, Company E, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Forest De Fere, near Nesles, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, July 26 to August 2, 1918, during the advance of his regiment in the Forest De Fere, by his voluntary, unauthorized, and untiring efforts in carrying wounded, both by day and by night, under the most severe and dangerous circumstances, and especially when the town of Sergy was under bombardment, July 31, 1918. Residence at enlistment: R. F. D. No. 2, Farragut, Iowa.


Helmer Peterson, private, Company E, 9th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Tuilerie Farm, France, November 4, 1918. He displayed exceptional bravery in carrying important messages to the rear through heavy enemy artillery and machine-gun barrages, keeping his commanding officer informed as to the situation at all times. Tireless in his efforts, he was instrumental in the success of the operation. Residence at enlistment: Route No. 7, Decorah, Iowa.


*Sylvester Phillips, private, Battery E, 10th Field Artillery. For extraordinary heroism in action near Greves Farm, France, July 14, 1918. He was acting as telephone operator at a gun in a detached position when all the crew became casualties. With another soldier he courageously continued to fire the piece under the heaviest bombardment until it was struck by a shell and he was killed. Emergency address: Mrs. Mary Phillips, mother, 1117 Walker Street, Des Moines, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: 1117 Walker Street, Des Moines, Iowa.


Earl W. Porter, second lieutenant, Air Service, observer, 7th Aviation Instruction Center. For extraordinary heroism in action near Lassigny, France, August 9, 1018. He, with First Lieut. Charles Rnummid Wake, pilot, while on a reconnaissance expedition at a low altitude and beyond the enemy lines, was attacked by five German battle planes. Although wounded at the beginning of the combat, he shot down one of the enemy machines, and by cool and courageous operation of his gun, while his pilot skillfully maneuvered the plane, fought off the others and made possible a safe return to friendly territory. Residence at appointment: 1008 Poplar Street, Atlanta, Iowa.


*Charles D. Priest, first lieutenant, 358th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Les Huit Chemins, France, September 29, 1918. He disregarded personal danger by going 600 yards beyond the front lines, and with the aid of a soldier carried back a wounded man to shelter. Emergency address: Mrs. Wilma Priest, wife, 830 LaSalle Street, Chicago, ILL. Residence at appointment: Collins, Iowa.


Winfred E. Robb, first lieutenant, chaplain, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism throughout the advance across the River Ourcq, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, July 26 to August 2, 1918. During the pursuit of the enemy by the 168th Infantry across the River Ourcq, he distinguished himself by his bravery under fire. During all of this time, and particularly during the operations near Sergy, he showed the greatest coolness under severe artillery fire in attending and carrying the wounded and dying, and in every way ministering to the needs of the men of his regiment. Residence at appointment: Des Moines, Iowa.


Lloyd D. Ross, major, 168th Infantry. He displayed notable gallantry on March 9, 1918, in leading a command of untried men in company with French troops in a successful raid on enemy trenches in the salient du Keys, France. By his heroic conduct he inspired both his own men and the men of our ally participating in the operation.

An oak-leaf cluster is awarded Maj. Ross for the following acts of distinguished service: The courage, resolution, and resource of Maj. Ross as battalion commander made possible the successful capture of Hills 288, 242, and Cote-de-Chatillon, France, October 14, 15, and 16, 1918, which was accomplished only after the most desperate fighting through wire und trenches against a resolute and determined defense involving frequent and bitter counterattacks. His brilliant and determined leadership was an example and inspiration to the entire command. Residence at appointment: 605 Hammond Street, Red Oak, Iowa.


Edgar J. Rule, sergeant, Headquarters Detachment, 10th Field Artillery. For extraordinary heroism in action near Courbon, France, July 14-15, 1918. Sergt. Rule, who was in charge of a telephone detail, fearlessly repaired lines under heavy fire of gas and high-explosive shells until the lines were cut beyond repair, when he volunteered and carried messages through the bombardment. Residence at enlistment: 1416 Marshall Street, Boone, Iowa.


Clarence C. Schide, second lieutenant, 114th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bois d'Ormont, France, October 12, 1918. Although severely wounded, Lieut. Schide continued to lead his platoon over open ground and subjected to heavy artillery and machine-gun fire until he received a second wound, which necessitated his removal from the field in a critical condition. Residence at appointment: Mason City, Iowa.


Russell A. Schmidt, captain, 108th Field Signal Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action near Cumieres, France, October 8, 1918. With a detail of five men, Capt. Schmidt was engaged in attempting to lay a telephone line across the Meuse River, when they were discovered and attacked by a superior force of the enemy. Even after being wounded three times, Capt. Schmidt continued the unequal struggle, killing one and wounding three of the enemy, until all his ammunition was exhausted and all of his men severely wounded. Believing himself to be mortally wounded, he advanced into the enemy's lines and gave himself up, in order to save the lives of his men. He was recaptured by our forces later in the day. Residence at appointment: 132 South Seventh Street, Council Bluffs, Iowa.


Raymond J. Schulze, private, first class, Section No. 583, Ambulance Service. For extraordinary heroism In action near Orvillers-Sorel (Oise), France, August 16, 1918. When many French and American drivers had been killed or wounded during an intense bombardment on a dressing station, he immediately went to their assistance, but received wounds himself which will make him a cripple for life. Residence at enlistment: 320 Fifth Avenue, West Cedar Rapids, Iowa.


Henry G. Schwer, private, Company B, 119th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bellicourt, France, September 29-30, 1918. During an attack by his regiment he was wounded, but continued his work as stretcher bearer throughout the night, refusing to be evacuated while able to render assistance to his comrades. Residence at enlistment: Fairfax, Iowa.


Fred L. Sexton, private, 82d Company, 6th Regiment, United States Marine Corps. For extraordinary heroism in action near Bayonville, France, November 1, 1918. Exposing himself to enemy fire, Pvt. Sexton, with another soldier, courageously advanced ahead of their platoon and captured 5 machine guns and 14 prisoners. Residence at enlistment: Osage, Iowa.


Laurens C. Shull, deceased, second lieutenant, 26th Infantry. Near Soissons, France, July 19, 1918, he led his platoon with brilliant courage in two attacks and was badly wounded in the third, when, with equal vigor, he advanced against a machine-gun nest. Emergency address: D. C. Shull, father, 1112 Pierce Street, Sioux City, Iowa. Residence at appointment: 1112 Pierce Street, Sioux City, Iowa.


*Eben A. Smith (Army serial No. 547459), sergeant, Company I, 30th Infantry. 3d Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Crezancy, France, July 16, 1918. Although knocked down by the explosion of a shell, Sergt. Smith immediately got up and rendered valuable assistance to his platoon leader in conducting the movement of the platoon through the most intense shell fire. He was subsequently killed in action. Emergency address: Mrs. Kate Bronson, mother, 618 Columbia Street, Waterloo, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: 618 Columbia Street, Waterloo, Iowa.


Raymond R. Smith, corporal. Company C, 11th Machine Gun Battalion. For extraordinary heroism in action northeast of Cunel, France, October 12, 1918. During a heavy bombardment after a shell had struck his machine gun, knocking it and his squad completely out of action, Corpl. Smith assembled three men from another squad and obtaining another gun again took up position on the line and remained throughout the action, as the front was at that time thinly held and in constant danger of counterattack. The prompt initiative and splendid courage on the part of this soldier not only inspired and encouraged his men, but aided materially in the success of the action. Residence at enlistment: 227 Harrison Avenue, Burlington, Iowa.


John H. Snyder, first lieutenant, Air Service, observer, 91st Aero Squadron. For extraordinary heroism in action September 12, 1918. While on a special mission to determine the probable enemy concentration in the back areas he, with his pilot, in spite of almost impossible flying conditions, flew 60 kilometers over the enemy lines at a very low altitude. The unfavorable weather alone would have warranted them in turning back, but they continued on regardless of very active and accurate machine-gun and antiaircraft fire. They returned to our lines only when their mission was successfully completed. Residence at appointment: 411 North Federal Avenue, Mason City, Iowa.


*Matthew Spautz, sergeant, Company A, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the River Ourcq, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France. During the advance of July 30, 1918, while in command of his platoon, Sergt. Spautz showed extraordinary heroism, leading his men on in the advance, having three times been knocked down by enemy shells. After having been wounded by machine-gun fire, he still continued to advance. He was finally killed while doing his utmost to advance. Emergency address: Michael Spautz, father, Davis Avenue, Dubuque, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: Dubuque, Iowa.


Marion F. Study (Army serial No. 2154036), private, first class, Company L, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Molain, France, October 17, 1918. With another soldier he volunteered to go out across an open space swept by heavy machine-gun fire, about 150 yards to the front. to rescue two wounded soldiers, which he helped to bring back to the line. Residence at enlistment: Route No. 1, Thurman, Iowa.


*Ira V. Swanger, corporal, Company F, 130th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action at Marcheville, France, November 10, 1918. After showing exceptional bravery and judgment in leading his squad against enemy machine-gun positions, he was mortally wounded. Realizing that he had no chance of recovery, he refused to permit stretcher bearers to take him to the rear, urging them to care for others whose condition was less serious. Emergency address: Mrs. Anna Rishel, mother, Persia, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: Persia, Iowa.


Adolph Swanson, private, Company I, 357th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Les Huit Chemins, France, September 29, 1918. He volunteered and accompanied Lieut Charles D. Priest in going 600 yards beyond the front line and assisted him in carrying to safety a wounded man. Residence at enlistment: R. F. D. No. 5, Box No. 85, Red Oak, Iowa.


Otis E. Turner, private, Company M, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 18, 1918. When his platoon was held up by an enemy machine-gun post, Pvt. Turner, with another soldier, took their automatic rifle, rushed 50 yards through intense fire, skillfully placed the rifle in position, and opened an effective fire. Residence at enlistment: Belville Island, Iowa.


James M. Walker, private, first class, Company K, 328th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Norroy, France, September 15, 1918. When his platoon had successfully reached its objective, he was dispatched with a message to battalion headquarters, the journey -being under intense fire for the whole distance. He not only delivered the message, but while returning assisted many other carriers by directing them to their proper destinations. Residence at enlistment: Tipton, Iowa.


*Earl W. Wall, second lieutenant, 132d Infantry. 33d Division. For extraordinary heroism in action in the Bois de Malaumont, France, October 8, 1918. As battalion scout officer Lieut. Wall led a patrol into the wood for the purpose of securing information of enemy units, in preparation for an attack. Severe machine-gun fire was encountered and this officer was wounded, but, with two soldiers, he continued on until he was wounded the second time, securing the desired information. Emergency address: J. J. Wall, father, Albion, Iowa. Residence at appointment: Albion, Iowa.


Arthur L. Walters (Army serial No. 204377), sergeant, Company B, 2d Ammunition Train. For extraordinary heroism in action near Beaumont, France, November 9, 1918. Sergt. Walters was in charge of a convoy of ammunition trucks which was halted in the town. An enemy shell struck the train and set one of the trucks on fire. Although knocked down by the explosion, Sergt. Walters quickly recovered himself and moved his convoy to safety, after which he returned and, jumping to the wheel of the blazing truck, drove to a place where it no longer endangered the lives of others and extinguished the fire, saving both trucks and ammunition. Residence at enlistment: Wadena, Iowa.


Kenneth Watts (Army serial No. 2857069). private, Company B, 360th Infantry, 90th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action at Andevanne, France, November 2, 1918. Sent with another runner from battalion headquarters to deliver a message to a front-line company, he made his way through the enemy fire, and when his comrade was wounded, delivered the message, then he rescued his wounded companion, carrying him under heavy fire to a dressing station. He then returned to duty. Residence at enlistment: Barnes City, Iowa.


*Hugh Weatherman (Army serial No. 124281), private, Battery C, 5th Field Artillery. For extraordinary heroism in action at Mandres, France, March 1, 1918. During a heavy enemy bombardment of gas and high-explosive shells, Pvt. Weatherman left shelter for the purpose of putting gas masks on his horses, and while so doing was mortally wounded by a shell fragment. Realizing the character of his wound, he refused medical attention, urging the Medical Corps men to assist other wounded men who could be saved. Emergency address: Winfield Weatherman, father, Beaman, Iowa. Residence at enlistment: Beaman, Iowa.


Nichlous Weber, private, Company K, 325th Infantry. For extraordinary beroism in action near St. Juvln, France, October 16, 1918. After three stretcher-bearers had been shot down while trying to bring in a wounded soldier, he advanced in the face of the terrific machine-gun and artillery fire and rescued the wounded man. He then returned to the field and successfully brought the three stretcher-bearers to our lines. Residence at enlistment: R. F. D. No. 5, Waterloo, Iowa.


Floyd H. Wells (Army serial No. 2158832), corporal, Company M, 326th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near St. Juvin, France, October 16, 1918. With another soldier Corpl. Wells advanced several hundred yards ahead of the front line, under heavy artillery and machine-gun fire, and rescued a wounded comrade. Residence at enlistment: Chester, Iowa.


Henry A. West (Army serial No. 2154039), private, first class, Company L, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Molain, France, October 17, 1918. With another soldier he volunteered to go out across an open space, swept by heavy machine-gun fire, for 150 yards, to rescue two wounded soldiers. The mission was accomplished successfully. Residence at enlistment: 1405 West Walnut Street, Des Moines, Iowa.


Richard J. White, first lieutenant, 113th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Ravine de Molleville, north of Samogneux, France, October 15, 1918. He was a member of a small party which was suddenly fired upon by three German machine guns, one soldier being killed and an officer severely wounded. Himself unharmed, Lieut. White returned with another soldier and, in the face of machine-gun fire, approached within 50 yards of the machine-gun nests and carried the wounded officer to shelter. Residence at appointment: 1115 West Jefferson Street, Creston, Iowa.


Robert E. Wickliffe, private, Company A, 4th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Grand Ballois Farm, France, July 14-15. 1918. After being severely wounded he remained at his post, performing his duties as a relay runner until relieved. Residence at enlistment: General Delivery, Spencer, Iowa.


Alt C. Wilken, private, Company M, 168th Infantry. He aided materially in the advance against the Prussian Guards near Sergy, France, July 28, 1918. Despite three wounds he continued firing with his automatic rifle until his right hand was shattered. Residence at enlistment: 1009 Walnut Street, Atlantic, Iowa.


Harold Wilkinson, private, Company B, 16th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action south of Soissons, France, July 20, 1018. When the enemy was forming for a counterattack he carried messages three times through their heavy barrage, and although in an exhausted condition from that work, he remained with his company throughout the entire operations. Residence at enlistment: Williams, Iowa.


Frank L. Williams, first lieutenant, Medical Corps, attached to 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action in Champagne, east of Rheims, France, July 15, 1918, and near the River Ourcq, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, July 30, 1918. He voluntarily left a dugout on the Champagne front, and for more than two hours, all the time under shell fire, administered to the needs of wounded men who were lying in the open. During the advance across the River Ourcq he voluntarily remained in exposed positions under heavy shell fire, caring for and dressing the wounded, until he was severely injured. Residence at appointment: 2005 University Avenue, Des Moines, Iowa.


Earle W. Wilson (Army serical No. 102466), sergeant, Company M, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action, near Sergy, France, July 28, 1918. Showing great personal bravery and comtempt of danger at all times during the attack on Hill 212, he maneuvered his platoon so skillfully as to capture a machine-gun position with four of its occupants, after which he operated the two enemy guns thus taken against the retreating Germans. Residence at enlistment: Red Oak, Iowa.


John H. Wintrode, sergeant, Company A, 168th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near the River Ourcq, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, France, July 30, 1918. He took command of his company when all his officers were killed or wounded and handled it with extreme courage, coolness, and skill under an Intense artillery bombardment and machine-gun fire during an exceptionally difficult attack. Residence at enlistment: Winterset, Iowa.


Otto T. Wischmeier, private, Company L, 117th Infantry. For extraordinary heroism in action near Busigny, France, October 9, 1918. Voluntarily accompanying a party sent out to attack machine-gun posts, Pvt. Wischmeier, armed only with a rifle and bayonet, entered an enemy dugout alone and captured a number of Germans. Residence at enlistment: Route No. 2, West Burlington, Iowa.


Herman Woll (Army serial No. 2254426), private, 357th Ambulance Company, 315th Sanitary Train, 90th Division. For extraordinary heroism in action near Vilcey-sur-Trey, Frunce. September 12, 1918. With another soldier, Pvt. Woll left the shelter of a wood and went forward to rescue a soldier who had fallen wounded on a hill under constant machine-gun and shell fire. While they were carrying him back on a litter he was again wounded and the litter was struck twice by machine-gun bullets, but they succeeded in carrying him back to safety, thereby saving his life. Residence at enlistment: 821 East Des Moines Street, Estherville, town

[The Distinguished Service Cross, By United States Adjutant-General's Office Iowa,
Issued by the War Department, April 6, 1917 thru November 11, 1919]


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