kansas

Osborne County, Kansas

Biographies

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also look at Bios of Mercantile Interests

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NATHAN N. ALLEN, farmer, P.O. Downs; was born in Bradford County, Pa., July 4, 1842, where he resided with his parents till he was 4 years of age; then they moved to Philadelphia, Pa., where he lived until he was seventeen years of age. He then went to Burlington, Iowa, where he worked as a teamster; then to Atchison County, Mo., where he clerked in a general store for 2 years, when he went to California, where he mined for 4 months, when he enlisted September 11, as private in Company M, First Colored Volunteer Infantry; discharged as private at Fort Leavenworth, October 31, 1864; he then returned to Atchison County, Mo., where he farmed until the spring of 1865, when he moved to Nemaha County, Neb., where he farmed 1 year, and engaged in mercantile business until 1874, when he came to Osborne Country and homesteaded his present farm. He was married February 22, 1866 to Miss Ella Riordian. They have 5 children - Arthur S.., Francis E., Charles A., Agnes E., and Willie. NATHAN N. ALLEN, farmer, P.O. Downs; was born in Bradford County, Pa., July 4, 1842, where he resided with his parents till he was 4 years of age; then they moved to Philadelphia, Pa., where he lived until he was seventeen years of age. He then went to Burlington, Iowa, where he worked as a teamster; then to Atchison County, Mo., where he clerked in a general store for 2 years, when he went to California, where he mined for 4 months, when he enlisted September 11, as private in Company M, First Colored Volunteer Infantry; discharged as private at Fort Leavenworth, October 31, 1864; he then returned to Atchison County, Mo., where he farmed until the spring of 1865, when he moved to Nemaha County, Neb., where he farmed 1 year, and engaged in mercantile business until 1874, when he came to Osborne Country and homesteaded his present farm. He was married February 22, 1866 to Miss Ella Riordian. They have 5 children - Arthur S.., Francis E., Charles A., Agnes E., and Willie.

FRED W. ARNOLD, Fred W. Arnold, editor and postmaster was born at Harder, Minnesota, September 26, 1868, son of Samuel and Carrie (Hayford) Arnold. Samuel Arnold born in Ohio, July 22, 1838, died at Vermillion, Kansas on March 18, 1914. He served in Company F, 6th Minnesota Regiment in the Civil War, and was later a merchant for a number of years. He served as postmaster at Vermillion for about 10 years.His wife, Carrie Hayford, was born in Wisconsin, March 26, 1847 and died July 3, 1933. She was a charter member of the Order of Eastern star Chapter at Vermillion and a charter member and an active worker in the Mutual Improvement Club.> Fred W. Arnold attended public schools at Vermillion and in May, 1890, founded the Vermillion Record. In November, 1895 he purchased the Alton Empire, and in the fall of 1898 disposed of it. In April 1903 Mr. Arnold purchased the Valley Falls New Era at Valley Falls, which in June 1905 he sold. At that time he returned to Vermillion and engaged in the drug business for several years. On November 1, 1914, he purchased the Vermillion Times, of which he is now editor. In October, 1922 he was appointed postmaster and is still holding this position. A Republican, he served as register of deeds of Osborne County in 1898 until 1903 and in 1903 was clerk of the legislative session of that year. His marriage to Carrie V. Gamber was solemnized at Alton, July 4, 1898. Mrs. Arnold was born at Columbia, Pennsylvania, March 20, 1879, and died at Vermillion on October 1, 1907. There are two children, Eugene Guy, born December 19, 1898, who married Goldia McCabe at Corning, Kansas, and Maurice Edgar, born May 1, 1901, who married Blanche Morton at Marysville. Eugene is associate editor of the Vermillion Times, while Maurice is a lintotype operator on Marshall County New. At the present time Mr. Arnold is secretary of Vermillion Lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons. He is a member of the Royal Arch Masons and the Knights Templar at Marysville and the Arab Shrine at Topeka. He is a member of the First Presbyterian Church. Residence: Vermillion. (Illustriana Kansas, by Sara Mullin Baldwin & Robert Morton Baldwin, 1933, pages 43 & 44)

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J.M. BABCOCK, Sheriff, was born at Waukesha, Wis., February 23, 1841; lived and worked on farm in Wisconsin, until the year 1860; when he went to Illinois and taught a school, near Lacon, in winter of 1860-61; enlisted in Company K, 18th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, as Private, at Corbondale (sic), Ill., on the 12th of May, 1861; discharged June 17, 1864, at Springfield, Ill., by reason of expiration of term of service. He was wounded in the left arm at Pittsburg (sic) Landing, April 16, 1862, and wound in the leg at the siege of Fort Donelson; was married to Miss Phoebe Ellerson, at Waukesha, Wis., September 20, 1864. They have 1 child - Eva. He was married a second time to Mrs. Fynett House, a sister of his first wife, December 24, 1868. They have 2 children - Ella and Nora. He moved to Osborne County, Kan., in May 1871, has been engaged in stock raising and farming, making cattle and hogs a specialty; was elected Sheriff of Osborne County, Kan., in the fall of 1881, term of 2 years. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882.

JOHN L. BARNES, County Superintendent, was born in Montgomery County, Pa., October 14, 1824, and with his parents removed to Bradford County, Pa., in 1829, where he resided until 1835; moved to Northumberland County, Pa., and in 1840 moved to Union County, Pa., and from Union County went to Milesburgh, Pa., in 1847, where he resided for two years, when he removed to Lewisburgh in 1849, and to Williamsburgh, Pa., in 1856; was Principal of school at Williamsburgh for 4 years, and in 1860 located in Reading, Pa., as Principal of Ward School for 4 years, and Superintendent of city schools for 6 years and as merchant for 1 year, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he engaged in farming until January, 1879; elected to office of County Superintendent of Schools, which office he holds to date. He was married to Miss Catharine L. Vorse, May 4, 1847. They have 2 children - Frank and Irene. He enlisted at Reading, Pa., in Company C, 42nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as private, June, 1863; discharged as Hospital Steward, September, 1863, at Reading, Pa., for disability. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882.

HALLER H. BATES, farmer, P.O. Osborne, was born at Lewistown, Pa., September 19, 1856, where he followed farming and attending school until 1877, when he graduated at the Lewiston Academy, then in 1877 removed to Decatur, Ill., where he read medicine, and taught school for 2 years; then in 1880 he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he has followed farming. He has 275 acres, has 16 horses and 24 head of cattle. He was married to Miss Laura Hinds, February 26, 1879. They have 1 child - Frank. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882.

SAMUEL S. BELL, farmer, P.O. Osborne, was born at Ballston, Saratoga Co., N.Y., July 17, 1838, where he resided until 1857, when he moved to Waseca County, Minn., where he was a farmer until July 15, 1862, when he enlisted as private in Company B, 5th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and discharged as private in May, 1865, for wounds received in right leg, at the battle of the Wilderness, May 5. After discharge from the army went to Dunn County, Wis., worked in a shingle mill until 1868, when he moved to Wayzata, Minn., where he farmed until 1872, when he went to Russel, Kan., where he engaged as clerk in a hotel until 1874. He then came to Osborne County, Kan., where he resided until 1876, returned to Russell, followed teaming until 1878, then again came to Osborne, where he has been a farmer to date. He was married February 4, 1875, to Miss Anna Beckwith. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882.

D.C. BLEAM, agricultural implement dealer, was born March 30, 1842, in Adams County, Ind. In 1845, moved to Waterloo County, Canada, where he engaged at the age of 16 at carpentering, until 1862, when he returned to Ft. Wayne, Ind., where he enlisted as private in Company D, 5th Indiana Volunteer Cavalry; discharged as private, June 15, 1865, at the close of the war; then returned to Huron County, Canada, where he engaged in carpentering until 1871, when he again came to the United States, located in Waterville, Kan., engaged in mercantile and grain business until January, 1875, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he opened the City Hotel, and also engaged with this brother in the agricultural implement business. He was married November 5, 1867, to Miss Sarah Wiseman. They have 6 children - Mary A., Lucy A., William, John H., Margaret and Viola. He was Justice of the Peace of Tilden Township, Osborne County, for 3 years. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and A.O.U.W. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882.

W.B. BOWEN, liveryman, was born March 23, 1830 in Trumbull County, Ohio, where he resided and worked in the iron works for several years. In 1851, he went to Randolph, N.Y. where he learned the carpenter and joiner's trade, and worked at it until 1855, when he was married and moved to Mercer County, Pa., where he farmed till the fall of 1858; he then moved back to Randolph, N.Y., and engaged in the lumber business. In 1865, he moved to Butler County, Iowa, and farmed. In 1871, he moved to Solomon City, Kan., where he farmed 2 years unsuccessfully. He then went to work on the K.T.R.R. He moved to Bavaria, Kan., January 2, 1875, and July 5, 1875, he moved to Brookville, Kan., In April 1876, he moved to Russell, Kan., being still in the employ of the K.T. Co. In the spring of 1881, he went to Colorado, and engaged in railroading there until November the same year, when he came back to Russell. In the spring of 1882, he came to Osborne City, Kan., and engaged in the livery business. January 2, 1883, he moved his family to Osborne. He was married July 4, 1855, to Miss Amelia Foskit. They have 3 children - Ella A., Wm. B. Jr., and Winniefred A. He has held the following public offices: Road Overseer, 1 year, in New York; Road Supervisor, 1 year in Iowa; Constable 3 years, at Russell; City Marshal, 2 years; School Clerk, 1 year; Chief of Police, 1 year; Deputy Sheriff and Warden of the Fire Department, 1 year, all in Russell. W.B. Bowen is a Mason.

WILLIS SAMUEL BOWEN was born in Iowa on April 14, 1860. He came to Kansas in 1871, and to Osborne County in 1876. When he died on September 27, 1932, he had lived 56 years on the farm southwest of Bloomington but nearer Alton. On May 21, 1881, Mr. Bowen was married to Tressa Clarabel Davis, and they observed their 51st anniversary about 5 weeks before her death on June 27, 1932. Their 6 children were Ethel, Carrie (Mrs. Elmer Bleam), Ernest, Bertha, Edith (Mrs. Harley Newton), and Leslie. Mr. and Mrs. Bowen joined the Kill Creek Presbyterian Church in 1888, were loyal to that group and to their Christian faith, and were in every way exemplary and industrious citizens of the community. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

ROBERT R. BRIGGS, farmer. P.O. Osborne, was born in Perry County, Ohio, February 16, 1824, and until the year 1861 his resident was in the above county, where he was engaged in farming, and in September, 1861, enlisted as a Captain in Company A, 19th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Pickaway, Ohio; resigned on surgeon's certificate of disability in 1861; again enlisted in Company A, 114th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Circleville, Ohio, in May, 1862 and was discharged on surgeon's certificate in September, 1862. Also served in the Ohio Volunteer, in what was the "Morgan raid" thruout Indiana and Ohio, and after his discharge from the army followed farming in Pickaway County, until 1871, when he contracted to build 10 miles of pike, which he completed in September 1874, when he started by wagon for Clarinda, Iowa, where he stayed during the winter of 1884-85, and in March, 1875, came to Osborne County, Kan. He was married April 5, 1848, to Miss Nancy White, who died in 1863. 6 children were born - Thomas, Sarah, Joseph, Albert, Emma and Catharine. He was married the 2nd time to Catherine Gerting, August 10, 1877. They have 2 children - Manly R. and George W. He was Trustee of Winfield Township, Osborne County, 1 year; member of the A.F. and A.M. Farmerd quite extensively this year. He is the owner of 130 acres of wheat (20 bushels to the acre), and 25 acres of corn (20 bushels to the acre.) Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

HARRY BURTON BROWN, Harry Burton Brown, editor and publisher, was born in Natoma, Kansas, September 12, 1888, son of Myron C. and Jennie S. (Gregory) Brown. Myron C. Brown, a farmer and stockman and an early pioneer in Kansas, was born in DuPage County, Illinois, June 26, 1855 and died at Salina, July 26, 1917. He came to Kansas in the seventies and homesteaded in Osborne County. His timber claims are still owned by the family. He was eminently successful in his chosen occupation, and held many city and school positions. Among them he was a member of the board of education, a trustee of the local Methodist Episcopal Church, and a director of the First National Bank of Natoma. He was well fortified in his opinions concerning political and economic policies and was a loyal supporter of the cause of the Republican party, although never a seeker of public office. Jennie S. Gregory was born in Green County, Pennsylvania, June 26, 1861. She came with her parents to Osborne County, Kansas, in 1880, her father, J. M. Gregory, dying in Natoma, in April 1932 at the age of 91 years. She is the only living charter member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, at Natoma and during the World War period was active in various patriotic organizations. Harry Burton Brown was educated first in the public schools of Natoma, and thereafter attended Kansas Weslevan University of Salina and Hays State Normal School at Hays. While at the latter institution he earned a letter in baseball. For four years prior to entering the newspaper business Mr. Brown taught school, including two years at Natoma, in the grade school. Without any specific knowledge of the publishing business Mr. brown purchased the Natoma Independent in 1909. Surrounding himself with an experienced staff he has successfully added or established three other papers. He now owns the Natoma Independent at Natoma; the Luray Herald at Luray; the Waldo Advocate at Waldo; and the Paradise Farmer at Paradise. In addition he is the owner of five farms and several town properties. He is a Republican. On May 13, 1918, he was married to Anna A. Hackerott at Natoma. Mrs. Brown was born on a farm in Osborne County, September 10, 1893 and died at Natoma, on July 10, 1931. She was very active in patriotic work during the World War and was always deeply interested in church and charitable work. There are four children, Robert, born July 1, 1920; Roberta, October 7, 1922; Della Mae, March 8, 1926; and Anna A., July 10, 1931. At the beginning of the World War period Mr. Brown turned his newspaper business over to his foreman, G. G. Gamber, and entered service at Camp Funston. He was later transferred to Camp Dodge, Iowa and assigned to Company B, 339th Machine Gun Battalion, 88th Division, with which he went overseas from Camp Mills, New York. After serving at the front in the southern sector in October 1918, Mr. Brown, with a few others, was ordered to a machine gun school near Paris, and the following winter was sent to the military school at Clamecy. He was next given an opportunity to attend the French university at Montpelier on the Mediterranean, and there he remained three months. In June, 1919, he was returned to the United States, and on the first day of July received his honorable discharge at Camp Devens. He is a charter member of Thomas J. Hogan Post No. 109 of the American Legion, in which he has served as adjutant and historian. He has also been secretary of the Natoma Chamber of Commerce, and has served as city clerk. His religious affiliation is with the local Methodist Episcopal Church, and in that institution has served as Sunday school teacher, superintendent and is a member of the board of trustees. He is past noble grand of Natoma Lodge of the Odd Fellows, a member of the allied organization of the Daughters of Rebekah, the Kansas Press Association and the National Editorial Association. Mr. Brown’s favorite sport is golf, and he has played in various state editorial tournaments. Residence: Natoma. (Illustriana Kansas, by Sara Mullin Baldwin & Robert Morton Baldwin, 1933, Pages 157-159)

WALTER F. BROWN, Walter F. Brown, son of Foster D. Brown and Melissa Caroline Richmond, was born April 13, 1883 in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa. He was married September 12, 1917 at the M. E. parsonage in Garland, Parks County, Wyoming, by the Reverend Mr. Weary, to Blanch Etta Eastman, widow , daughter of James M. Mills and Cora M. Bradley, and she was born January 30, 1888 in Osborne, Kansas. Children: Bonnie Blanche Brown was born September 11, 1918 near Garland, Parks County, Wyoming. Beth Brown was born May 5, 1920 near Garland, Wyoming. Source: "Forney's five family records of genealogy of Benners, Clappers, Ettlemans, Forneys and Studys : with historical sketches by Charles William Forney. Boone, Iowa: Printed for the author by the Standard Print. Co., 1931" submitted by Kim Thorp

WILLIAM LOUIS BRUMBAUGH, William Louis Brumbaugh, hardware merchant, was born in Washington county, Nebraska, March 3, 1874, son of David Oaks and Susan (Anderson) Brumbaugh. The father, a farmer and clergyman was born in Bedford County, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1834 and died in Osborne County, Kansas in February 1897. His ancestry was German. He came to Kansas in 1874 where he obtained a claim of a half section of land and where for some years they lived in a log house. He organized the First Brethren Church in Osborne County, Susan Anderson was born in Bedford County, August 12, 1839 and died in Osborne County, September 30, 1896. She was a devoted home maker and mother of Scott-Irish ancestry. Upon his graduation from public school at Portis in 1890 William Louis Brumbaugh, engaged in farming. Later with a brother, George C. Brumbaugh he conducted a general merchandise store. In 1907 they closed out going to Graham county where they farmed. Since January 1920 he has been a hardware merchant. On September 30, 1894, he was married to Cora Belle Van Fleet, daughter of Hiram and Mary (Little) Van Fleet at Downs. She was born in Smith County, Kansas June 29, 1874 and died at Portis, April 23, 1900. Two children were born to this marriage, Elmer Ross, December 25, 1895, who died December 9, 1897; and Loyal David, July 31, 1897 who married Persis Miller. David is a farmer in Graham County. On November 26, 1904, Mr. Brumbaugh was married to Jeanette Myers. She was born in Putnam County, Missouri, February 12, 1879. There are four children of this marriage, Wilma L., born February 18, 1906 who married Paul A. Rollins; Paul Dwight, October 5, 1909; Ruth Susan, June 6, 1911; and Dean Oscar, June 18, 1912. Mr. Brumbaugh is a Democrat. He is a member of the First Brethren Church of Portis, where he was superintendent of the Sunday school for many years and where he is a member of the church board. He is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Security Benefit Association. For a number of years was a member of the local school board (chairman six years) and served on the first city council after the organization of Portis. Residence: Portis. (Illustriana Kansas, by Sara Mullin Baldwin & Robert Morton Baldwin, 1933, page 165)

FRANCIS MARIAN and MALINDA LAYTON BUCK, were pioneers. Mr. Buck was born Oct 10, 1834 but as a young man lived in Iowa awhile and in 1869 was married in that state to Malinda Layton. They soon moved on to Missouri, and in 1874 found their way to Lawrence township, Osborne County, Kansas where they settled on a homestead. Here they lived for 30 years and encountered all the trying experiences of frontier life, along with the task to rearing 4 children, John W., Joseph, Calvin and Martha "Mattie" (Mrs. Custer Hawley). In 1904 they decided to retire and moved into Osborne, where Mr. Buck passed away on November 5, 1916 Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

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JAMES THOMAS CAHILL saw the light of day in Ohio on August 3, 1849. In that very year his father died, and James lived with his grandparents until young manhood. He then went to Iowa in 1872 and lived there about 5 years. In the fall of 1877 he came to Delhi township in Osborne County, Kansas and filed on a homestead which became his home for 56 years. He knew all the vicissitudes of frontier life, and taught school for 5 years during that period. In October of 1880 Mr. Cahill married Jennie Babcock, who preceded him in death in October 1919. Their children were David L., Mabel (Mrs. Carl Scriven), and James Leslie. The father was a great admirer of the beauties of nature, and was also fond of travel. He passed away February 21, 1933, at the home of his daughter, and was laid to rest in the Delhi cemetery. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

CYRUS CHARLES CLARDY, Cyrus Charles Clardy, son of William Wesley Clardy and Drusilla Caroline Williams, was born January 8, 1885 near Wheatland, Hickory County, Missouri. He was married June 11, 1912 at the Mills home in Portis, Osborne County, Kansas, by the Reverend Isaac Lerew, to Adele May Mills, daughter of James M. Mills and Cora M. Bradley, and she was born August 12, 1884 three miles west of Osborne, Osborne County, Kansas. Children: William James Clardy was born June 26, 1920 near Garland, Park County, Wyoming. Gene Arthur Clardy was born September 15, 1924 in the home of Doctor Mills, at Powell, Park County, Wyoming. Source: "Forney's five family records of genealogy of Benners, Clappers, Ettlemans, Forneys and Studys : with historical sketches by Charles William Forney. Boone, Iowa: Printed for the author by the Standard Print. Co., 1931" submitted by Kim Thorp)

A.B. COATES, furniture dealer, was born December 18, 1836, in Trumbull County, Ohio, where he lived and followed farming until 1851; moved to Grant County, Wis., and engaged in farming until October 5, 1861; enlisted as a private in Company F, 20th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged, July 7, 1863; cause, disability; returned to Grant County, Wis., where he farmed until January, 1865, when he went to Dallas County, Iowa, where he engaged in the furniture business until 1868, when he moved to Northern Iowa, in Cerro Gordo County. Again engaged in the furniture business until the spring of 1872, when he came to Osborne county, Kan., where he followed carpentering until 1877, when he established the present business. He was married November 2, 1860, to Miss Clarinda Chestnut. They have 3 children - Clarence H., Hannah E., and A. Selma. He was elected Trustee of Penn Township, 2 years; Justice of the Peace of Penn Township, 2 years; is a member of the K. of P. and of the G.A.R., Mitchell Post No. 69; also of the A.O.U.W. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

WILLIAM F. COCHRAN,county treasurer, was born in Mercer County, Ill., December 2, 1841; raised on a farm and followed farming until August 14, 1862. He enlisted as private in Company G, 102nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry; was discharged as a corporal June 26, 1865, at the close of the war; was taken prisoner near the line between North and South Carolina, on the march to the sea, confined in Libby Prison until the war was over, when he was discharged at Springfield, Ill. After his discharge from the army returned to Mercer County, Ill., where he engaged in farming until 1871, when he came to Osborne County, homestead a farm, where he resided and farmed until the fall of 1881. He was elected Treasurer of Osborne County; is now living in town. He was married to Miss Mary A. Dunn, April 26, 1866. They have 5 children - Bertha, Ella, Lavern O., Fred and Nettie. He was President of the Agricultural Society, 4 years; Township Trustee of Winfield Township, 1 year; Township Trustee of Lawrence Township, 2 years, County Treasurer elect. He is a member of the G.A.R., also the I.O.O.F. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

W.C. CRADDICK, farmer, P.O. Osborne, was born in Danville, Ind., March 24, 1848; where he resided only 1 year, when his parents moved to Knoxville, Iowa, where he followed farming until 1878, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he has since been engaged as farmer, builder and contractor, having built some of the finest houses in the county of both stone and wood. He was married to Miss Kate Woodruff, June 29, 1876. They have 1 child - Lizzie. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

CHARLES W. CRAMPTON, postmaster, was born in Hartford, Conn., June 10, 1830, and when but 2 years of age his parents moved to Troy, N.Y., and at 21 years of age, he engaged in the hat, cap and fur business until 1870, when he came to Osborne, Kan., and engaged in farming until 1872; then he was elected to the office of County Clerk, which office he was twice re-elected to. Then on retiring from office he served as salesman for the agricultural house of Hays & Wilson until the fall of 1881, and on June 9, 1882, was appointed postmaster of Osborne City. He was married September 11, 1850, to Miss Mary J. Harris. They have 3 children - S. Palmer, Charles H., and Jessie. Mr Crampton was elected Register of Deeds, to fill unexpired term of 1 year of Osborne County. He is a member of the A.F. and A.M.K. of P. and A.O.U.W. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

ISAAC T. CROSS, merchant, was born in West Virginia, July 15, 1841, and with this parents moved to Apponoose County, Iowa, when he was 15 years old, where he lived as a farmer until the spring of 1874, when he came to Osborne County, where he was engaged as a farmer until February, 1881, when he established his present business - general merchandise. He was married May 5, 1871, to Miss Jennie Lemley. They have 2 children - Morris H., and Daisy D. He was Clerk of  Ross Township, Osborne Country for 1 year.

JOSEPH B. CRANEY, merchant, was born in New York City, August 10, 1845, and in 1850, his parents moved to Wisconsin where he lived with them until 1862, when he went into the employ of the Northwestern Railroad Company, filling various positions from lowest to Master Mechanic; was in the service of the railroad until 1871, when he went to Troy, Kan., an engaged in general merchandising until the fall of 1879, when he came to Downs, Kan., where he established his present business. He was married January 7, 1869, to Miss Laura Stout. They have 1 child - Hannibal. Is a member of A.F. & A.M.; also honorary member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. Was Mayor of the city of Downs the first 8 terms after organization of city. Elected State Representative of Osborne County in the fall of 1882, for 2 years.

C.M. CUNNINGHAM, farmer, P.O. Osborne City, was born June 9, 1837, Aurora, Cayuga County, N.Y. Lived with his parents on the farm until 1857, then removed to Seneca County, Ohio, where he engaged in farming until April 19, 1861, when he enlisted in Company B, 7th Ohio Volunteer Infantry as a private, and was discharged as a private September 16, 1862, on surgeon's certificate of disability. He enlisted as a private in Company I, 9th Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, October 1, 1863; promoted to First Sergeant at the organization of the company; promoted to Second Lieutenant February 10, 1864, and to First Lieutenant February 20, 1865. He was discharged as First Lieutenant August 2, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio, at the close of the war. Was wounded at Aversborough, S.C., in the wrist, and at Aiken, S.C., in the elbow; horse was shot and fell on him at Aversborough, S.C., causing hernia. After his discharge from the army, returned to Seneca County, Ohio, as a farmer until August 31, 1869, when he moved to Jackson County, Kansas, where he lived for 1 year. Then in January, 1871, he came to Osborne County, where he has since been engaged as a farmer and stock-raiser. He this year (1882) had 100 acres of wheat, 20 bushels to the acre; 50 acres of corn, 20 bushels to the acre; 20 acres of rye, 21 bushels to the acre; had 800 sheep, fleeces this year average 5.25 pounds; 31 head of cattle. He was married to Miss Helen Jennie Vernon, March 15, 1866. They have 1 child - Vernon E. Mr. Cunningham was appointed to the Governor of the State as Special Commissioner for Organization of County, in June, 1871; in November 1871, was elected Sheriff of the County for 1 year, and in November, 1872 was re-elected for 1 year. He is a member of A.F. and A.M. also G.A.R., Mitchell Post, No. 69. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

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Mr. and Mrs. T.J. DAVIS Mr Davis was Born in Iowa in 1840, moved to Osborne County, Kansas in 1873. He died in June, 1904. Mrs. Davis was born in Iowa in 1843 and came to Kansas in 1873.

W.W. DIMOND, postmaster, was born in Venango County, Pa., September 22, 1839, where he resided until 1871. At 21 years of age commenced work as a blacksmith, which business he followed until 1871, when he came to Kansas and homesteaded a farm in Section 35, Town 6, Range 11, in Ross Township, Osborne County, where he lived and farmed until the fall of 1879, when he moved to Downs, where he has since been postmaster. Married January 3, 1866, to Miss Susan Bixby. Is a member of A.F. & A.M., and has been trustee of Ross Township for the past 2 years. Enlisted in August, 1861, in company G, 83 Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a private. Discharged as a Sergeant March 23, 1863, for gunshot wound - left arm and side - received at the battle of Malvern Hill.

GEORGE E. DOUGHERTY, editor, born in Lancaster County, Pa. March 23, 1862. At the age of 4 years he moved with his parents to Maryland, where he lived for 6 years, and from there to Sterling, Ill., where he lived for 6 years. In 1878, at Sterling, he started the Alpha Journal, a weekly school paper, which he published for a year during 1878-'79. He moved to Mitchell County, Kan., in 1879, where he published theGlenn Elder Keyfor 15 months, during the years 1880-'81. In May, 1881, he came to Downs, Osborne County, Kan., where he purchased the Down's at Bull City, Osborne County, for 13 months, during 1881-'82. He was married September 19, 1882, to Miss Rose Getty.

J.D. DUNKELBERG, farmer, P.O. Osborne City, was born in Lockport, N.Y., July 13, 1857, where he resided with his parents on a farm until fall of 1877, when he moved to Black Hawk County, Iowa. Taught school until spring of 1878, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he has since engaged in farming and teaching school; also buys and sells stock. He has now 25 head of cattle and 100 hogs. He graduated from junior department, Lockport Union School, N.Y., in 1875. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

J.A. FOUTS, clerk, was born in Montgomery County, Ohio, May 7, 1844, and in 1847 moved to Logansport, Ind., where he was a farmer until August 6, 1861, when he enlisted as private in Company E, 29th Indiana Volunteer Infantry at Logansport, Ind., and discharged as Sergeant at Marietta, Ga., December 2, 1865. At the close of the war he returned to Logansport, where he farmed until 1867, when he moved to Fulton County, Ind., and engaged in farming until 1876, when he came to Waterville, Kan., as clerk and book-keeper in dry goods until August, 1878, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., and followed clerking and book-keeping until employed as clerk for the firm of J.R. Borland, where he is now engaged. He was married to Miss Mary E. Ferguson in April, 1869. He was wounded in left leg at Chickamauga, Ga., September 19, 1863. Is a member of I.O.O.F., A.O.U.W. and G.A.R. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

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Mr. and Mrs. W.E. FARNSWORTH Mr. Farnsworth is a typical Kansas Pioneer. His grand-parents were among those who came from Vermont - "To rear a wall of men, On Freedom's southern line." He, then 11 years old, came to Kansas with his parents in 1869. His first home in Kansas was near Eldorado, in Butler County. He came to Bethany Township, Osborne County, in 1885, to the farm where he still resides. Mr. Farnsworth has been a member of the Green Ridge School Board for 23 years. He is Township Trustee of Bethany Township, an office he has held for 7 years. He has also served as Road Overseer for 16 years. Mrs. Farnsworth came to Kansas in 1885. She taught school for 20 years, teaching before and after her marriage. She is a temperance writer of some local note and is a W.C.T.U. and Red Cross worker. They were married March 5, 1887, and have 3 children - Nellie, a teacher in the Malad, Idaho, City Schools; William, who farms the home place, and Donald, who left college to join the colors and is now with the American Expeditionary Forces in France. Portis Kansas.

ALBERT A. FORD Source: William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas" farmer, Section 36, P.O. Osborne, was born in Fulton County, Illinois, April 19, 1836. He lived with his parents on the farm until 1855, when he went to Waterloo, Black Hawk County, Iowa, and engaged as a laborer for one year. He then returned to Fulton County, Illinois, where he farmed for one year, and again went to Waterloo, Iowa, and worked on a farm for one year. Then to Jackson County, Iowa, and worked in a saw-mill for one year, then to Lake Pipin, Minnesota, where he worked at carpentering three months, then went to Jackson County Iowa, on a visit, and from there to Iowa County, Iowa, where he worked on a farm for ten months. He then went to Johnson County, Iowa, where he worked as a laborer until September 23, 1861, when he enlisted in Company A, of the 14th Iowa Volunteer Infantry, as a sergeant. He was discharged as a sergeant February 28, 1863. He re-enlisted as sergeant veteran in Company A, 7th Iowa Cavalry Volunteers, and was discharged March 11, 1865, as sergeant, to accept 2nd lieutenant's commission, in Company I, 3rd United States Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged at Leavenworth, Kansas, as 2nd lieutenant, November 28, 1865. After his discharge from the army, he returned to Iowa City, Iowa, and worked at the carpenter's trade until 1866, when he went to Mitchell County, Iowa, where he worked at his trade until 1868. He then went to Sacramento, California, and worked at carpentering until November, 1870, when he returned east and worked at his trade in Miami County, Kansas, until May 15, 1871, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he worked at his carpentering until 1875. He then engaged in farming, locating on Section 13, Township 7, Range 14, in 1871; and in the fall of 1879 on Section 36, Township 7, Range 14. He has seven cattle and four horses. He was married to Miss Lucinda Cavett, August 11, 1861. They have 7 children - Anna L., Ira J., Frank, Ella, Earl G., Flora and Guy. Mr. Ford is a member of the A.F. &

A.M. JAMES B. GILMORE Another pioneer who claimed Pennsylvania as his native state was James B. Gilmore. He was born there in 1833, and came in the early '70s to take a homestead in Tilden township, 7 miles southwest of Osborne. During the years he moved to another farm and later from there into Osborne. You might say he was not only a Kansas pioneer, but "the father of carpenters" for he and his good wife, Mary R. Gilmore, were the parents of 6 sons who were handy with saw, hammer, and blue prints. They were Charley, Ernest, Evan, James B. Jr., Orrin, Laverne. And they had a sister, Mrs. Ida Eveland. Mrs. Gilmore passed away in 1895 and the father followed in January 1915. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

OMAR GREGORY Who located in Mt. Ayr Township, Osborne County, Kansas, in October, 1873, when Indians and Buffalo still roamed the prairies. Alton, Kansas Source: 1917 Standard Atlas of Osborne County, Kansas. Complied & published by Geo. A. Ogle & Co., Chicago, Illinois.

ZIBA GREGORY Ziba Gregory, one of the 12 children of Omar and Rebecca Gregory. He was born in Iowa on March 11, 1862, so was about 11 years old when the family came to Osborne County. He went to school in the old stone dugout during the period when school terms were 3 months in length. Later on he attended an Academy near Glen Elder, Kansas, and there he met Ida V. Silvey, to whom he was married on September 28, 1855. Sadness came soon, however, for Ida died about a year later, leaving a tiny daughter Winnie, who also died at about 10 months. On November 1, 1887, Ziba married Irene Elliott, and the 7 children born to them were Lloyd, Leslie, Calvin, Roland, Goldie, Burton and Ida. Mr. Gregory is described as a kind husband and father, who loved children. He spent nearly all of his married live in the soddy of the east 80 acres of the homestead, and was a trustee of Mt. Ayr township for 8 years. The days of his life were numbered on February 22, 1933, a few days short of 71 years. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

JAMES D. GREEN, farmer, P.O. Downs, born on the Atlantic Ocean, June 8, 1809, lived in Douglass, Mass., until 13 years of age, when he moved to Oswego County, N.Y. Here he lived until 17 years old, when he went to Chautauqua County, N.Y., where he worked as a carpenter and joiner until he was 25 years old, and then removed to Grant County, Wis., where he farmed for 16 years. In the fall of 1870, he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he homesteaded his present farm, on which he has lived to the present time. He was married, August 14, 1844, to Miss Eunice Babcock. For the last 5 years he has given his attention of the raising of hogs.

CHARLES GUTTERY A 1933 issue of the Osborne Farmer, looking back 50 years into "Ancient History" noted that in 1883 Charles Guttery was "just completing a nice new home on his farm east of Bull City". The man mentioned was another of our pioneers form Pennsylvania, where he was born in 1847, and was also another Civil War veteran with an enviable record of service in Company D, 140th Pa. Infantry, taking part in the battles of Gettsburg, Spottsylivania, and Wilderness, and was at Appomatox when Lee surrender to General Grant. After the war, in 1868, Mr. Guttery married Margaret Ely, and in 1872 they came to Osborne County, Kansas, and took a homestead near Alton. The 2 children of this marriage were Clara Regina (Mrs. Hudson York), and Harry. However, the mother passed away in 1875, and 2 years later Charles married Victoria A. Doak. The 4 sons of this 2nd marriage were Charles, Jr, Perry Orville Grant and John Almarine. one of these, usually called Grant, became from a historical standpoint a most valuable citizen of the county. In 1957, about 2 years before his death, he gave to the Osborne Memorial Library his collection of scrap books, on which days could be spent by an interested reader. One of these contains a full list, arranged by the different cemeteries, of all Civil War veterans buried in Osborne County. Charles Guttery, Sr. died August 14, 1911, and his widow Victoria lingered until in 1938. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

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Osborne County Farmer(Osborne, Kansas) 17 Mar 1904
DR. C.T. HART was born in De Kalb county, Missouri, January 29, 1869. He came to Kansas with his parents when he was eight years of age and they settled in Mitchell county. He graduated from the Beloit high school in 1877 at the age of 18 and engaged first in the confectionery business in Beloit and afterwards farmed a short time near that city. On April 21, 1890, he was married to Miss Zoe Dawson, who lived near Beloit and whom he had knwon since their childhood days. Mr. and Mrs. Hart later went to Kansas City, where he entered the Kansas City Dental college, from which he graduated in 1897.

After completing his education they located in Lawrence, Kansas, for a short time but soon moved to Stockton, Kansas, where they remained in the practice of his profession about two years, moving from Stockton to Osborne in July, 1899.

They had just disposed of their possessions in this city and intended to locate in the west, probably in Colorado. The doctor was in the prime of life. He suffered at times from rheumatism but was strong, active and ambitious. He leaves a loving and devoted wife, a son, father, mother, a brother and a sister. His wife and son are left in comfortable circumstances financially. He owned considerable property and also carried about $5,000 life insurance.

Dr. Hart was a member of Osborne camp of Woodmen, Saqui lodge No. 160, AF&AM, Osborne chapter No 28, R.A.M, Cyrene commandery No 23, K.T. Beloit and Isis shrine, Salina. see Obituary

R.G. HAYS, lawyer, was born in Carmichael's, Greene County, Pa., January 6, 1847. He moved with his parents ot Mt. Vernon, Ohio, in 1849, and to Mendota, Ill., in 1853; then he went to St. Gable's Mission, California, where he attended school until 1860; thence to Gregory mines, Cal., as miner, until 1862, and as a prospector until 1869, when he returned to Knoxville, Iowa, where he read law and was admitted to the bar at Knoxville, Iowa, in 1871. Practiced law for 1 year at Bedford, Iowa, then came to Osborne County, Kan., where he has been to date engaged in the practice of law. Was married to Miss Clare E. Bear, June 30, 1875. Has been County Attorney, Osborne, Country, for 4 years. Is a member of Knights of Pythias and Masonic fraternity. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

HERBERLEIN, FRED V. Farmer, Kill Creek, was born in Prussia, on the Rhine, July 24, 1820, and worked on a farm until he was 23 years of age, when he entered the Prussian army for 2 years. In 1846 he came to the United States and located near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in farming for 12 years. He then sold his farm, and went to Columbia County, Wisconsin, and engaged in the livery business for 7 years, when he sold out and moved to Adams County, Wisconsin and bought a farm and engaged in farming for 7 years. He sold his farm and worked on the railroad for 2 years, and then went to Monroe County, to the Wisconsin pineries where he kept a boarding house for 4 years; when he again sold his business and came to Osborne County, Kansas, where he has since been engaged in farming. He was married to Miss Louisa Rothe, March 10, 1850; they have 6 children - Fredericka, William F., Bertha, Matilda, Earnest and Ella. Source: William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas"

HEREN, CYRUS (Source: The Advocate and news (Topeka, Kan.), January 05, 1898) Judge Heren, of Osborne, Leaves Kansas for a Wider Field. In the departure of Judge Cyrus Heren, of Osborne, Kansas loses one of the ablest jurists in the State. Judge Heren's term as Judge of the 15th Judicial district has just ended and he goes to Chicago to resume the practice of law. He leaves here a host of admirers. Since coming to Kansas he has built up an enviable reputation as a Judge. His eminent fairness and clearness in deciding legal questions has never been doubted-as a prominent attorney truthfully put it, "Judge Heren may not have attained perfection in the performance of his official duties, but he came as near to it as the bar of the State is apt to see for a long time to come." The esteem in which the bar of his district held him is shown by the following letter presented to him by them: "It was our desire to have upon this date greeted you in a body and taken public leave of you, on your retiring from the office of Judge, but considering that the presence of our members, resident in several counties, might be inconvenient at this adjourned term of court, we have decided in this manner to affectionately assure to you that we regret, with a just sensibility, the loss of a magistrate, whose conspicuous and exalted talents, whose enlightened and regular administration of justice made its duties less difficult and laborious, and whose manners rendered them pleasant and respectable. "We desire to bear witness that during the 8 years of your judgeship you have impressed us with the consciousness that your superior legal attainments have been faithfully and eminently devoted to the highest consideration of human society. "Many of us, against partisan prejudice, have learned to respect and admire your exalted sense of justice. Your administration has taught us that partisan politics should have no place in making selections for the judiciary of a free and enlightened people. "We shall cherish a grateful remembrance of your character and work. Our best wishes attend you; and it is with a high sense of honor and clear understanding of its signification that we subscribe ourselves your friends. "Mankato, December 29, 1897." Judge Heren was born February 11, 1855, in Andrew county, Missouri, and he continued to reside in that county until moving to Osborne, Kas., in September, 1883, at which place he has since resided. His boyhood days were for the most part spent upon the farm. His parents with the family having moved to Savannah, the county seat of the county, when he was but 13 years of age, he was educated in the high schools of the town in which he lived and was especially fond of mathematics. He was admitted to practice law when he was but 20 years of age. His father was a lawyer before him, and was Judge of the Circuit court of the district in Missouri in which he resided for several years and thereafter was in the active practice until his death, in 1893. He was the tutor of ex-Governor Altgeld and subsequently his partner before the ex-Governor moved to Illinois. It was in this office that Judge Heren and the ex-Governor became warm and lasting friends. In January, 1877, he entered a partnership in connection with his father and the firm was well known throughout all northwest Missouri. This partnership continued until the young man moved to Kansas, where he continued in the practice of the law. In January, 1885, he formed a partnership with Messrs. Walrond and Mitchell, and the firm was well known throughout the State under the name of Walrond, Mitchell & Heren. This firm continued in the active practice as a firm under their firm name until shortly before the election of Judge Heren to the bench. At that time Mr. Walrond was appointed United States District Attorney for the Indian Territory and he removed to the Territory and the Judge went upon the bench. Mr. Mitchell still remains in the practice at Osborne. Mr. Heren bought stock in the Osborne County Bank. It was afterward nationalized under the name of the First National Bank of Osborne and he afterwards became its president and remained so until his election to the bench in 1889, when he sold his bank stock and severed all his connection with the institution. He was first elected Judge as an independent candidate in opposition to the Republican nominee at a time when the district was supposed to be almost two to one in favor of the Republican party. Very soon after the organization of the Peoples party he became an ardent supporter of its doctrines and in 1893 was nominated by that party as Judge to succeed himself. He was also nominated by the Democratic party, but the Democratic convention nominating him passed resolutions strongly commending President Cleveland and his administration. Judge Heren promptly declined the nomination at the hands of this convention, for nothing would induce him to accept a nomination at the hands of a party making such an endorsement. This action on the part of Judge Heren many of his friends thought would defeat him, but the election resulted in an increased majority for him. He goes to Chicago about the middle of the month, and will there continue the practice of law.

HENRY R. HURLBURT Another native of Iowa who came with his parents as a youth of 16 years to Osborne County in 1879 was Henry R. Hurlburt. In February of 1895 he married Laura Conn and during their period of some 28 years on the claim before Henry's death on Jan. 14, 1923 they became the parents to 2 sons, Jerry Roscoe and Cecil Leon. Mr. Hurlburt was laid to rest in the Bloomington cemetery. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971 JOHN JOY, farmer, P.O. Osborne City, was born in Guernsey County, Ohio October 19, 1811. Lived there until he was 20 years of age, when he bought a farm and lived on it until 183?, when he established mercantile and tobacco business in Mountsville, which business he followed until 1865, when he went to Savannah, Mo., where he engaged in raising stock, cattle and hogs until 1869, when he came to Jackson County, Kan. Here he farmed until 1871, when he came to Osborne County. There were only 2 houses in the town at the time. He then built the 3rd house, and engaged in mercantile business until May 1, 1872. When on his way East to guy goods and effect the sale of Osborne County Bonds (first issue), he met with an accident by the overturning of a stage, from which he has never recovered. He is unable to do any work, but oversees his farm. He was married to Miss Mary Ellis, November 13, 1834. They have 7 children - Harrison W., Elmyria J., Ransom, Joseph, Evelyne, Leonadas, Adele. He enlisted in Gov. Brough's 100-day Squirrel Hunters, repelling the attack of Braxton Bragg, at Cincinnati, Ohio. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

JOHN JOY, farmer, P.O. Osborne City, was born in Guernsey County, Ohio October 19, 1811. Lived there until he was twenty years of age, when he bought a farm and lived on it until 183?, when he established mercantile and tobacco business in Mountsville, which business he followed until 1865, when he went to Savannah, Mo., where he engaged in raising stock, cattle and hogs until 1869, when he came to Jackson County, Kan. Here he farmed until 1871, when he came to Osborne County. There were only two houses in the town at that time. He then built the third house, and engaged in mercantile business until May 1, 1872. When on his way East to buy goods and effect the sale of Osborne County Bonds (first issue), he met with an accident by overturning of a stage, from which he has never recovered. He is unable to do any work, but oversees his farm. He was married to Miss Mary Ellis, November 13, 1834. They have seven children - Harrision W., Elmyria J., Ransom, Joseph, Evelyne, Leonadas, Adele. He enlisted in Gov. Brough's One Hundred-day Squirrel Hunters, repelling the attack of Braxton Bragg, at Cincinnati, Ohio. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 1 - history as of 1882

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JOHN KASER, Farmer, Covert, was born April 16, 1852, in Coshocton, Ohio, in 1857 went to Tama County, Iowa, where he lived on the farm with his parents until 1877, when he came to Osborne County, Kansas, where he has given all his attention to farming and the necessary stock to run the farm. As a crop this year he had 80 acres of wheat, 15 bushels to the acre; 42 acres of corn, 25 bushels to the acre; 24 acres of rye, 25 bushels to the acre. He was married October 28, 1875 to Miss Sussetta Leaver. They have 2 children - Jasper and Lotta B. Source: William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas"

B.F. KELLEY, thresher and farmer, P.O. Osborne, was born March 27, 1835, in Pike County, Ohio, where he resided with his parents until 1844, then moved to Green County, Wis., and in 1857 to Westport, Johnson County, Kan.; engaged as a laborer until 1858, when he removed to Marshall County, Kan., where he gave his attention to farming until September 1, 1862, when he enlisted at Atchison, Kan., as Corporal in Company G, 13th Regiment Kansas Volunteer Infantry. Discharged July 21, 1865, at the expiration of term of service, when he again returned to farming in Marshall County, Kan., and in 1871 came to Osborne County, Kan. Farmed until 1878, when he followed threshing until the present. He is now running a steam thresher. Married Miss Ruth P. Foster, June 24, 1860. They have 2 children - Alice and Guy. Was elected to office of Justice of Peace, Corinth Township, Kan., for 1 year. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

JAMES H. LIPTON, was born November 10, 1827, in Milesburg, Pa., where he was engaged in merchandising, lumbering and hotel-keeping. He came West with his family and located in Abilene, Dickinson County, Kan., in 1875. Purchased a hotel, managed the same until 1878, when he came to Osborne City, Osborne County, Kan., where he established the Lipton House, one of the largest hotels west of the Missouri River, and in its management second to none in the West. He was married to Miss Lucy M. Davidson, February 12, 1853. they have 5 children - William F., aged 28; James M., 26; George M, 19; Lida 17; and Mollie, 13. Lida and Mollie have the reputation of being among the finest singers in the North-west. He was Prothonotary and Clerk of the Courts of Center County, Pa., for 2 terms (6 years). Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

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JAMES MADISON MILLS was born in Illinois in 1854 to Peter and Huldah Mills. The family came to Osborne County in 1872, and as soon as James reached the eligible age he took a homestead on Covert Creek, southwest of Osborne. He worked several years in the flour mill on the river, and by his cheerful, friendly service to the patrons of the mill acquired a wide circle of friends. On Sep 1 1881 he married Cora May Bradley, and the fruit of the marriage proved to be 5 children, Dr. Frank Mills, Mrs. Blanch Brown, Mrs. Adele Clardy, Mrs. Jessie St. Clair, and Harry J. Mills. In 1890 the family moved to Edmonds, Washington, and on Feb 20 of the next year Mrs. Mills passed away, and was laid to rest at Seattle. Mr. Mills and the children returned to Osborne County, and somewhat later he married Ella Bradley, a sister to the first wife. To them came one daughter, Mrs. Faith Laman of Portis. In 1910 they moved to Wyoming where Mr. Mills spent several years improved his Shoshone irrigation project ranch. After a year in California they returned to Portis in 1920. Perhaps the work of putting the home place in shape again put too much strain on the heat of this 66 year old man, for it soon weakened and continued to deteriorate until death came on March 2, 1922. Mr. Mills was a member of the Portis Methodist church, and also a charter member of the Osborne Odd Fellows Lodge. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

M. MOHLER, ex-County Treasurer, was born in Cumberland County, Pa., March 20, 1830, where he resided for 10 years, then moved with his parents to Lewiston, Pa., where at the age of 17 he commenced teaching school, at which occupation he continued until the age of 23, when he attended Mt. Morris Rock River Seminary for 2 years, then attended the North-Western University, Evanston, Ill., until he graduated in 1861, at which time he returned to Lewiston, Pa., where he had charge of Lewiston High School for 2 years. In 1865 he was appointed County Superintendent of Schools of Mifflin County, Pa., by State Superintendent; then in the spring of 1865, was elected County Superintendent for 2 years, and in 1867 was re-elected for same time. During his last term of office, he became owner and prinicipal of Kishacoquillas Seminary until 1871, when in consequence of failing health, he sold out and struck for Kansas and visited in Lawrence until June, 1871, when in company of friends he visited Solomon Valley, and hearing of the Colony from Pennsylvania, having located in Osborne County, where Osborne City now stands, he concluded to visit them. He pre-empted part of Section 8, Town 7, Range 11, and afterward homesteaded part of Section 17, Town 7, Range 11, in 1872, where he resided as farmer until elected to the office of County Treasurer in 1878, when he moved to Osborne city; was re-elected to same office in 1880. Was married to Miss L.C. Hoover, May 15, 1862. They have 4 children - Maggie L., Laura M., Jacob C. and Frank M. Is also a member of the Masonic Order, and member of the State Board of Agriculture, to which he was elected in January, 1877. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

B.M. MUTERSBAUGH, livery, was born April 1, 1864, Mifflintown, Pa. In 1871, his parents moved to Port Royal, Pa., then in 1879 came to Osborne County, Kans. He is now engaged in the livery business, established 1880. Has a large and commodious stable, well stocked, fine carriages, and conducted in a manner that would be credit to places of like business in large cities. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

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OSBORNE, CAPTAIN R.S. (Source: Western Kansas world, (WaKeeney, Kan.) May 24, 1890) A special from Stockton, Kan., of the 19th, to the Topeka Capital says: At a regular meeting of Ash Rock Alliance No. 2103, Rooks county, Kansas, Saturday, May 17, at which members were present from the counties of Osborne, Smith and Phillips, it was unanimously decide to place the name of Captain R.S. Osborne of Osborne county, Kansas, before the alliance and people as a candidate for congress from the 6th congressional district. Captain Osborne has been a successful farmer in Osborne county for nearly 20 years. He is also recognized as one of the finest orators in northwest Kansas. He enlisted during the late war on May 23, 1861, in Company F, 17th regiment, Illinois infantry, and was discharged May 1, 1863, on account of disability. He enlisted and served until the close of the war as captain of Company F, 140th regiment, Illinois infantry. He is an active member of General Bull Post G.A.R. of Alton, Osborne county, Kansas. Captain Osborne is a strong man, and is well know by most of this district.

CHARLES G. PARIS Source: William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas" farmer, P.O. Bloomington, was born March 6, 1829, in Gloucester County, New Jersey, and with his parents went to Warren County, Ohio, when he was 6 years of age. Here he lived until November 1868, on the farm; then moved to Kansas, and settled in Miami County, where he farmed until 1871, when he came to Osborne County, and homesteaded the farm he is now living on. His was then the only family on Kill Creek. He resided on his farm until the fall of 1877, when he was elected County Clerk of Osborne County; then removed to Osborne City, where he held the office of Clerk until January 1882, when he returned to his farm. He was married March 11, 1854, to Miss Sarah J. Harner. they have 9 children - George L., Elmer E., Mary M., Wilie G., Sallie A., Burr C., Anna, Nellie and Maud. Enlisted as Sergeant in Company H, 79th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, August 14, 1862; was discharged as Sergeant March 26, 1863, through loss of sight of his right eye. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. and G.A.R. Was Justice of the Peace of Tilden Township for 2 years, and Trustee of same township for 2 years.

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WILLIAM JOHN ROADHOUSE was born in Canada in 1863, so he was about 11 years old when he came with his parents, William C. and Elizabeth Rush Roadhouse, to Lawrence township in Osborne county in 1874. There he continued to reside the remainder of a useful life. Will Roadhouse was a man of sound judgment, and with all the admirable qualities of honesty, industry, and fairness which arouse the friendship and respect of all acquaintances. He was prominent in all the community church, and political affairs of Lawrence township for about 50 years, being Mayflower U.B. Church trustee, township trustee, and board member of his school district for many years. He and Elizabeth Ann Cooper were married on Christmas Day 1893. Their 5 children during the years were Floyd E., Mildred M. Garrigues, Lorena O. Meadows, Elena I. Storer, and Ralph R. This pioneer father came to the end of his way on Oct 23, 1937. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

THOMAS ROCHFORD, farmer, P.O. Osborne City, was born at Quebec, Canada East, May 20, 1833. At the age of 17 entered as an apprentice at millwright and wagon making, which trade he followed until 1856, when he moved to Austin, Minn., and engaged in farming until 1859, when he removed to Cedar Falls, Iowa. Here he established a wagon and general repair shop, which he carried on until 1863, when he went to Nebraska City, Neb., where he built the City Hotel and did a contracting business until 1871, when he came to Osborne, Kan., where he has been engaged in farming and stock-raising. Has now 42 head of fine cattle ready for market; farms quite extensively; had 75 acres of wheat this year, with an average of 21 bushels to the acre. He was married to Miss Mary Conly, July 24, 1851. They have 7 children - Kate, Thomes, Edward J., John H. Mary F., Rosa E. and Daniel. He has also a grand-child he is raising, Leon Emmett Smith. Mr Rochford was road overseer of Winfield Township 3 years. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

EDWIN P. ROUNDS, Edwin P. Rounds resides about three miles west of Molson (WA), on Tamarack slope. He is an enterprising man who settled here on October 10, 1900, at the time the reservation opened. He has remained here since and has given himself to the good labor of improving his farm and is one of the substantial men of the community. His place is well supplied with water, fences, good outbuildings, and an eight room residence. In addition to this Mr. Rounds owns a good residence in Meyers Falls, Washington, and some other property. Edwin P. Rounds was born in Monona county, Iowa, on October 3, 1868, the son of Jacob H. and Phoebe (Quigley) Rounds. The father was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, in 1823. Our subject's paternal grandfather owned a vessel which was lost at sea, with the entire crew and cargo. The Rounds family in this country is traced back to two brothers, who landed on Plymouth Rock from the Mayflower, in 1620. The mother of our subject was born in Illinois in 1827, and is now making her home with him. To this worthy couple, nine children have been born, seven of whom are living, as follows, Dennis, Andrew J., Jacob H., John, Mrs. Charity Hutchinson, Mrs. Catherine Dunham, and Edwin P., our subject. The family moved to Osborne county, Kansas, in 1870, then to Sherman county, Nebraska, in 1878, and in 1886, they came to the Colville valley, where the father took a homestead near Meyers Falls. On July 26, 1892, Mr. Rounds married Miss Elizabeth J., daughter of Thomas and Mary (Morris) Weed, natives of New York. She was born in Lincoln, Nebraska, and came with her parents to the Colville valley in 1888. Her father was a harness maker and farmer, and is now living on the homestead near Meyers Falls, which he took when he came here, being a well-to-do citizen. Mr. and Mrs. Weed have eight children: Charles, James, Harvey, Mrs. Rounds, Cooper, Stephen, Raymond, and Burnette. On account of the poor health of his wife, and also his father, our subject and his wife together with his parents made an extended tour of the southwestern part of the United States, and Old Mexico, by wagon, visiting the most noted places in this section of the country, and continuing on the road for several years. The wife was greatly improved in health but the father died at Adam, California, and was buried there by the Masons. Then they turned homeward, arriving in Meyers Falls in 1897. As stated above, in 1900, Mr. Rounds took his present place, and has since been known as one of the progressive and good substantial citizens of Okanogan county. Mr. and Mrs. Rounds have adopted one child, Ethel. [Source: "An illustrated History of Stevens, Ferry, Okanogan, and Chelan Counties in the state of Washington" Western Historical Publishing Company, 1904 - Tr. by Helen Coughlin]

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ST CLAIR, EDWIN Edwin St. Clair, son of James A. St. Clair and Harriett O. Lawrence, was born May 11, 1890 on Lawrence Creek, west of Portis, Osborne County, Kansas. He was married Easter Sunday morning, April 7, 1912 at the M. E. parsonage, in Portis, Kansas, by the Reverend Mr. Henslee, to Jessye Gertrude Mills, daughter of James M. Mills and Cora M. Bradley, and she was born February 8, 1891 in Edmonds, Snohomish County, Washington. Children: Lois St Clair was born January 19, 1913 at Portis, Osborne County, Kansas. Elaine St Clair was born April 1, 1914 at Mound City, Linn County, Kansas. Ganelle St Clair was born December 27, 1915 at Portis, Kansas. Dean Edwin St Clair was born October 16, 1917 near Powell, Park County, Wyoming. Josephine Adele St Clair was born August 11, 1919 in Park County, Wyoming. Ruth St Clair was born November 9, 1922 at Grass Creek, Hot Springs County, Wyoming. Rodney Ross St Clair was born August 16, 1928 in a hospital in Wyoming. Source: "Forney's five family records of genealogy of Benners, Clappers, Ettlemans, Forneys and Studys : with historical sketches by Charles William Forney. Boone, Iowa: Printed for the author by the Standard Print. Co., 1931" submitted by Kim Thorp)

ABE SMITH, Register of Deeds, was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, August 28, 1831; raised and worked on a farm until 1851, when he moved to Warren County, Iowa, and engaged as blacksmith until 1855; removed to Dallas County, Iowa, where he remained working at this trade until 1873, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he engaged in blacksmithing and farming until 1876. Married to Miss Martha Webster, November 11, 1852. They have 7 children - Albert, James K., Joseph N., David M., Cora E., Frank E., and Blanche E. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

GEORGE SCHUMACHER farmer and stock-raiser, P.O. Osborne, was born in Baden, Germany, January 5, 1828. At the age of 17 he came to the United States and located in Erie, Pennsylvania, where he carried on a copper shop, and engaged in farming until 1866 when he went to Benton, Iowa, where he engaged in farming until 1877, when he came to Osborne County, Kansas. Here his attention has been turned to stock-raising and farming on a large scale. He has not 38 head of find thoroughbred cattle and 8 head of ordinary stock. He was married to Miss Catherine Feasler, October 1, 1850. They have 10 children - Lewis, Emma, Maria, George, Thomas, Charles and Willie (twins), Samuel, Frank and Kitty. Mr. Shoemaker (sic) is a member of the A.O.U.W. and has been Trustee of Le Roy Township, Benton County, Iowa, for 4 years.

LAWRENCE MONROE SHEARER the owner and editor of the "Olpe Optimist," was born in Osborne county, Kansas, Jan 21, 1878, the first son of Wilson S. and Dora (James) Shearer. His father was born in Miami county, Ohio, of German-French parentage; was educated in the public schools, and attended Miami Academy. After attaining his majority he determined to start in life for himself and came to Kansas, in 1870, when the country was but little settled up. He became a buffalo hunter on the plains in the western part of the state, which occupation was a paying one during the early '70s. Subsequently, he took up government land in Osborne county and he taught school for a few years. He married Dora James, of Mitchell county, in 1876. She was a daughter of George James, one of the the successful pioneer farmers near Beloit, Kan. Two children were born of this union - Osborne Perry and Lawrence Monroe. Mrs. Shearer died in 1881. Lawrence M. Shearer received his elementary education in the public schools of Cawker City and then attended the State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, Kan. At the outbreak of the Spanish-American war he left college and enlisted in Company H, 22nd Kansas infantry, and served seven months. He then spent two years at the Chase School of Art, in New York City. On his return to Kansas he entered the State Normal School, at Emporia, and graduated with the class of 1904. Shortly before his graduation he took the government civil service examination for teacher in the Philippine Islands and was appointed. On June 11, 1904, he sailed for the Philippines and was there three years. He taught for a year and a half in the province of Rizal and a year and a half in Samar Island. Returning to the United States he reentered the normal school, at Emporia, and gratuated in the Latin course in 1908. He decided to remain in his native state and bought the newspaper plant of the "Olpe Optimist," which was owned by H.B. Albertson. Since acquiring the paper, Mr. Shearer has placed it upon a sound financial foundation, has erected a fine new brick building for it, and today the paper is the pride of the town and its owner is regarded as one of the rising young men in the newspaper profession. He is progressive in his ideas, modern in his methods, and run a wide-awake, up-to-date semi-weekly paper. On Oct 6, 1910, Mr. Shearer married Mable Elizabeth French, a school teacher, and a daughter of L.A. and Paulina French. Mr. French is a farmer and lives in Lyon county. Source: Kansas, A Cyclopedia of State History, 1912

ABE SMITH, Register of Deeds, was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, August 28, 1831; raised and worked on a farm until 1851, when he moved to Warren County, Iowa, and engaged as blacksmith until 1855; removed to Dallas County, Iowa, when he remained working at this trade until 1873, when he came to Osborne County, Kan., where he engaged in blacksmithing and farming until 1876. Married to Miss Martha Webster, November 11, 1852. They have seven children - Albert, James K., Joseph N., David M., Cora E., Frank E., and Blanche E. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 1 - history as of 1882

JOHN MINARD SMITH The state of Vermont sounds a long way off, but that was the native state of John Minard Smith. He was born there in 1842, but as a boy went with his parents to Illinois and grew to manhood there. He seems to have been a very capable and likable young man, for he was Postmaster in the town for a period, and also in 1862 married Miss Ellen Gage who is described as a very fine and cultured young lady. For some reason they acquired the Kansas fever, and arrived in Osborne on November 15, 1878, and made it their home the rest of their days. Their very happy marriage was ended by Ellen's death in March 1890. J.M. lived 20 years longer, passing away on December 10, 1910. This pioneer couple were survived by one daughter, Mabel C. (Mrs. Jerome B. Hatfield). Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

OSCAR F. SMITH, Probate Judge of Osborne County, Kan., was born March 23, 1845, at Waukesha, Wis. Then in 1847 he went with his parents to Hartford, Washington Co., Wis., where he followed farming until November 7, 1861, when he enlisted in Company E, 10th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry; was discharged Nov 3, 1864, as private at Milwaukee, Wis., by reason of expiration of term of service; then went to Boone County, Ill., where he engaged in farming until 1870, when he migrated to Jefferson County, Kan., where he again followed farming until 1872, when he again migrated to Osborne County, Kan., and followed the plow until 1880, when he was elected to the office of Probate Judge of Osborne County and was re-elected in 1882 for a term of 2 years. He was married January 7, 1869, to Betsey J. Kimble. They have 2 children - Oscar F. and Flora May. He held the office of Township Trustee and Assessor of Liberty Township for 2 terms; was wounded at the battle of Chickamauga, Ga., September 20, 1863, in the right hand and shoulder, for which he draws a pension of $18 per month. He is a member of the A.O.U.W.; I.O.O.F., and G.A.R., P.M. Mitchell Post No. 69, Department of Kansas; is also a member of the K.B.S. or Kansas Benevolent Society. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

FRANK STAFFORD, County Clerk, Osborne County, Kan., was born April 24, 1845, in Guilford County, N.C.; moved to Indiana in 1852, and in 1863 went to Leavenworth, Kan., where he followed teaming until November 2, 1863, when he enlisted in Company B, 16th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry; discharged in December, 1865, when the war was over. Then in the spring of 1866, he returned to Indiana, where he followed farming until 1867; again came to Kansas, and October 4, 1867. enlisted in Battery B, 4th United States Artillery. Discharged October 4, 1870, at expiration of term of service; then came to Osborne County, Kan., and engaged in farming until the fall of 1881, when he was elected to the office of County Clerk of Osborne County. He was married to Miss Nettie Hart, November 25, 1878. He is a member of the G.A.R. Mitchell Post, No. 69. Elected County Commissioner, of Osborne County for unexpired term. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

MILTON OLIVER STAFFORD was born in Indiana on September 25, 1857. When he was 12 years of age the family moved to Lawrence, Kansas, where his father Milton B. Stafford passed away. The mother, Mrs. Tampa Stafford, brought her children on to Osborne County in 1871 and took a homestead. On December 29, 1886, M.O. married Leni Leoti White, daughter of Andrew J. and Mary White. The years brought them a family of 6 children: Blanche M. (Mrs. Claude Cordill), Milton E., Silas O., Seth, John H. and Wallace W. Mr. Stafford was a successful farmer and an active citizen of the community. He served on the school board several years, 2 terms as trustee of Tilden township, and was the last county assessor of Osborne County. He was a member of the Alton Masonic Lodge No. 207. For him life was over on February 7, 1933, but his good companion was spared until April 16, 1954. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

JOHN CHARLES STARR a prominent and pioneer citizen of Scott, Kan., and was born at Columbus, Ohio, Jul 5, 1848. George Starr, his father, was a native of Bavaria, Germany, where he was born Nov 14, 1820. He came to the United States in 1843, locating near Columbus, Ohio, where he engaged in farming until his removal to Iowa in 1867. In Iowa he gave his attention both to farming and stock raising and remained a resident of the state until 1894. In 1844, at Columbus, Ohio, he was married to Margaretha Nicol, born Oct 19, 1823, a daughter of George Nicol, a native of Germany. Twelve children were the issue of this marriage, as follows: John L. born in 1845, a brave defender of the Union, as a lieutenant of Company K, 54th Ohio infantry, was wounded at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. Jul 3, 1864, and died the following day; J. Michael born in 1847, is now a retired farmer of Keokuk county, Iowa; John Charles, the subject, was next in order of birth; J. George born in 1850, is now a retired farmer at Spencer, Iowa; Margaret born in 1852, is now the wife of Frederick Klett, a farmer of Clay county, Iowa; G. Frederick, born in 1854, is a farmer and stockman in Scott county, Kansas; Mary born in 1856, is now the wife of Henry Killmar, a retired resident of Sigourney, Iowa; Martin L. born in 1858 is not a traveling salesman; Chris L. born in 1860, is a land dealer at Pierre, S.D.; William born in 1862 died in 1863; Anna born in 1864, is the wife of John Randolph, a farmer and stockman of Scott county, Kansas; Lizzie born in 1866, in now the wife of R.L. Richardson, a merchant of Keota, Iowa. The children all having married and settled for themselves, the aged parents in 1894 removed to Scott, Kan., and there lived retired until their respective deaths, the father having passed away on Mar 4, 1903., and the mother of Dec 22, 1910, at the age of seventy-seven. John Charles Starr was educated in the public schools of Ohio and Iowa and at the age of twenty became a teacher, continuing to be thus engaged for several years. He was married Apr 30, 1871, Keokuk county, Iowa, to Miss Minna Mohme of Sigourney, Iowa. Mrs. Starr was born Sep 20, 1850, to parents that were both natives of Germany. In the same year of his marriage Mr. Starr removed to Osborne county, Kansas, and located on government land which he had preempted. He continued his residence there until the fall of 1874, when he returned to Keokuk county, Iowa. There he again taught school and farmed until his removal to Sigourney, Iowa, where he took up the study of law in the office of Mackey, Harned & Fonda. He was admitted to the bar in 1877 and during his residence in Sigourney he served one term as mayor of the city. There he established and became the owner of the "Sigourney Courier," a German publication, which he sold in 1884. In 1885 he and his family came again to Kansas, making the journey in a covered wagon, and located in Scott county, on a homestead and timber claim located in the White Woman valley south of Scott. In 1890 he removed to Scott, where he has since resided. During his residence there he has entered actively into the public life of his community and state and has given public service in different capacities. He has filled the office of justice of the peace, mayor of the city, county attorney, and has served two terms in the lower house of the Kansas state legislature. In 1904 he was a member of the State Text-Book Commission, under Governor Bailey, and in 1908 he served as a member of the State School Land Commission, under Governor Stubbs. Mr. Starr was one of the founders of the "Scott County News," in 1886, and was its editor until the fall of 1888. In 1891 he established the "Scott County Lever," and in the following year bought the "News," combining the two papers under the title of the "News-Lever." In 1909 he sold his newspaper interests and retired from that business. He is now interested with his son in real estate business in Scott and is also interested in gold mining on a small scale at Cripple Creek, Col., and at Goldfield, Nev. Seven children have blessed this union of Mr. and Mrs. Starr, viz: Rosa born in Osborne county, Kansas, Sep 10, 1872, died Oct 12, 1880; Ella J. born May 30, 1974, is single and resides with her parents; Anna born Mar 20, 1876, is also at the parental home; Myrtle, born Dec 23, 1877, is now the wife of Prof. C.S. Risdon, superintendent of the city schools of Independence, Kan.; Carl M. born Oct 27, 1879, graduated from the University of Kansas with the law class of 1900, is now married, was official court stenographer of the 23rd judicial district six years under Judge Charles E. Lobdell, and now practices law at Scott, Kan.; Marguerite born Oct 12, 1882, is now the wife of A.N. Rochester, a banker at Tribune, Kan.; and Carrie B. the youngest daughter, born Jul 30, 1891, graduated in the Scott County High School with the class of 1911 and is now a teacher in Scott county. Early in life Mr. Starr and his wife embraced the Lutheran religious faith, of which church the parents of each were members. Source: Kansas, A Cyclopedia of State History, 1912

AARON STORER The War of 1812 was hardly over when Aaron Storer was born in Maine on April 2, 1815. At age 21 years he went to New Brunswick and there married Anna McCully, who died in 1863 leaving 4 children, one of who was G.N.A. Storer. Then next year Aaron married Charlotte Minnis, and they came to Osborne County. In 1867 however, the family went back to Maine and remained until 1873, then came back to Kansas to stay. Four children came to this second marriage also, one of them being Maria (Mrs. Frank Powers) Mother Charlotte passed away in May 1875. All of her children remained in Osborne County at that time. Aaron Storer died on Feb 19, 1899. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

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L.L. TAYLOR, hotel keeper, was born in Vermont, December 13, 1821.While he was still an infant his parents moved to New York, where he lived with his parents until he was 13 years of age; then he went to Michigan, where he lived for 1 1/2 years, then returned to New York, where he lived for 2 years and then he went to Summit County, Ohio, where he lived for 3 years, when he again returned to Michigan, where he engaged as a cooper until 1852, when he established a grocery and liquor store, which business he followed for 19 years. He then went to Nebraska, where he lived on a farm until 1878, when he came to Downs, Osborne County, where he has since been engaged as hotel keeper. Was married in 1841, to Miss Ann Riley; had 2 children - Clarissa and Carl Eaton. Was married again in 1859, to Miss Lydia J. Webb. They have 3 children - Cora, Nellie and Luella. Was postmaster of Colon, Neb., for 7 years.

WINFIELD S. TILTON did not reach Osborne until 1887 and left in 1896, but he was such a prominent figure in the development of the young town and county that he was long remembered by the active citizens of that period. He was born in Illinois in 1848, and in 1863 enlisted in the Illinois Cavalry, serving the Union cause about 3 years. Later he added to his war record by service in the Kansas Cavalry under Custer and in the 1868 Indian uprising, and subsequently held other posts connected with the War Department in the G.A.R. Ranks. For some while in Osborne he was editor of the Osborne County Farmer, and built up a lasting reputation for his use of vitrolic English and political sparring of those early days. Mr. Tilton was married 3 times, first in 1869 to Anna Wilcox who died in 1872 leaving their 2 children, A.L. Tilton and Mrs. Anna Lee. His second wife, married in 1876, was Jessie McClure and their union was blessed with a family of 10 children. However, Jessie passed away in 1909, and in 1920 Mr. Tilton married Mrs. Alfereta Beyea, who also died in 1928. His own long and busy life ended on January 3, 1933, at Glendale, California. The final rites were held in the famous "Wee Kirk O' the Heather", and he was laid to rest in the beautiful Forest Lawn cemetery. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Sep 16, 1971

DAVID TINDAL, farmer, P.O. Osborne, was born September 23, 1823, in Edzell Village, Scotland; engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes until 1853, when he emigrated to the United States, and landed in New York; thence to Lancaster County, Pa., where he engaged in boot and shoe-making until August 10, 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, 122nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, as a private. Discharged as a private in May, 1863, on expiration of term of service. After his discharge from the army he continued in the shoe business in Lancaster, Pa., until 1871, when he joined the Pennsylvania colony, composed of men from Burke and Lancaster counties, and came to Osborne County, Kan., where he has lived on his farm to the present day. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Wood, December 14, 1849, in Scotland. They have 4 children - William, David, Charles and James. Mr Tindal harvested 35 acres of wheat this year, averaging 25 bushels to the acres, besides other crops of corn, rye, potatoes, etc. He is a member of the K. of P. Good Fellows and Red Men. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

TRUSTIMON B. TOTTEN
The well known resident of Reno county whose name is above was the first postmaster at Huntsville, the postoffice having been established in his dwelling February 15, 1878, and he was again appointed to the same office in April, 1899. He is also one of the leading farmers of Huntsville township and his farm on Section 6, township 23, range 9, is one of the best in its vicinity.
Trustimon B. Totten was born in Oneida county, New York, March 12, 1838, a son of Joseph P. Totten, who was born in that state September 6, 1800. He removed to Indiana in 1842, and died there September 30, 1864. He was the grandson of James Totten, who was born October 11, 1771, and died in Wilmington township, De Kalb county, Indiana, September 27, 1857. The American ancestors of the family of Totten came from Holland. James Totten married Joanna Wing, November 10, 1799, and they reared three sons and three daughters, all of whom except two of the daughters had children and all are dead. Joanna (Wing) Totten died in New York, February 14, 1835, aged nearly 64 years. Joseph Totten married Betsy Barnes, January 21, 1822. She was born 1804 and died June 27, 1880, aged seventy-six years. They had children as follows: Leverett J., born April 2, 1823, who died in Gratiot county, Michigan, leaving five children; Henry J. born December 9, 1824, now living in Toledo, Ohio; Squire Totten, of Natoma, Osborne County, Kansas, who was born May 31, 1827; William B., who was born November 21, 1829, and died at Gatesville, Texas, in December 1890; Helen P., who was born April 4, 1832, and married E.W. Fosdick and died May 15, 1856; Jonathan J., who was born May 8, 1835, and is a lawyer and a farmer who lives near Castle Rock, Colorado; Trustimon B., the immediate subject of this sketch; Pamela J., who married David Beggs and died in 1871 leaving a son four years old; Albert P., who was born in Indiana, September 2, 1844, and died at Evansville, that state, at the age of seventeen years and six months, March 8, 1862, while serving as a private in Company F, Forty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, leaving an enviable record of a good soldier won in action at Fort Donelson and in other memorable engagements.
Trustimon B. Totten was reared to farm work and received a primary education in public schools, which he supplemented by attendance at a select school and at an academy. When he was twenty years old he taught one term of school. After that he was a clerk in a store for a year and then he engaged in the grocery and provision trade at Auburn, Indiana. September 7, 1865, he married Hannah A. Davis, who was born at Black Rock, Erie county, New York, January 21, 1840, a daughter of William and Deborah (White) Dutcher Davis. The father was born April 6, 1801, and the mother August 15, 1804. They were reared in Cherry Valley, Oneida county, New York, and were there married September 25, 1825. They made their wedding tour by a packet on the Erie Canal to Black Rock, now suburban town of Buffalo, where the father engaged in making soft fur hats, being a hatter by trade. They dwelt there until their family of four sons and two daughters reached mature years. One daughter died at the age of six years and ten months. The parents  and children have gone to their final rest, save one, their daughter, Hannah A. Totten. She was a teacher in the district school in northern Indiana. In 1864 she became a teacher in the contraband schools, in which negroes were instructed under the auspices of the Indiana branch of the freedmen's bureau, and was thus employed at Murphysboro. Mr. and Mrs. Totten have had children as follows: Herbert C., born November 12, 1866, who has a wife and one son and lives in Hutchison, Kansas; Hattie D., who married Harry S. Schall and lives in Hutchinson, Kansas; Marion D., who was born February 14, 1869, and has a wife and three children and is a merchant in Huntsville, Kansas; Dora V., who was born June 1, 1870, and died March 5, 1873; Norman R., a teacher and a law student at the State University at Lawrence, Kansas, who was born September 23, 1873; Carrie L., who was born April 24, 1875 and is a member of her parents' household; Jennie who was born April 6, 1877, and died December 2, 1878; and Mervale E., who was born April 23, 1884, and is now assisting his father and attending school at the State Agricultural College, at Manhattan, Kansas.
In September 1861, Mr. Totten enlisted in Company F, Forty-fourth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served four years as a drummer and as a corporal. He veteranized at Chattanooga by re-enlistment. He was in action at Fort Donelson, Shiloh, Chickamauga and Stone River and in other historic fights. His eyes became affected and he was for a considerable time under medical treatment for chronic ophthalmia. He removed from Indiana to Kansas in 1877, arriving on October 5. November 13, following, he moved to his one hundred and sixty acre homestead farm in Huntsville township, and he and his family took up their residence in a house sixteen by twenty-four feet in area. Only twenty-five acres of this land had been improved and he paid a previous settler upon it three hundred dollars for his claim. Since then he has improved the place until it is one of the best farms in the county and has built upon it a good residence and adequate barns and outbuildings. Politically he is a strong Republican, and hew was once the nominee of his party for the office of register of deeds for Reno county. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the local body of which he has long been an official, and hew was instrumental in bringing about the erection of its present fine church edifice. He selected a site for the building ten years before work on it was begun and circulated the first subscription list to raise funds for it and gave his time to it almost entirely until the building was completed and turned over to the trustees in 1894.
Mrs. Totten, who possesses marked literary ability, has for many years been a correspondent for the press. Her work long appeared in the Hutchinson News and is now a feature in the Sterling Bulletin. Her son, Marion D. Totten, is now the Huntsville correspondent of the Hutchinson Daily News. Both Mrs. Totten and her son evince great capacity for local correspondence and their newsy letters to the journals mentioned compare more than favorably with those of most local correspondents. Marion D. Totten was educated in the schools at Huntsville and Hutchinson. He left the farm at the age of seventeen years and for three years attended school and clerked in a store at Hutchinson. The succeeding four years he spent in learning the machinist's trade with the Eagle Manufacturing Company, at Davenport, Iowa. Then, in company with Harry Scholl, he organized the Cedar Transfer Company, which built up a very successful business. He was married in September, 1897, to Miss Mary E. Fleischer, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and they began their domestic life at Htuchinson, in their own home in a house which Mr. Totten still owns. He removed to Huntsville in 1899 and opened a small general store, upon a capital of less than five hundred dollars, and two years later his establishment invoiced twenty-one hundred dollars. Marion D. and Mary E. (Fleischer) Totten have three daughters: Vera A., aged six years; Vita I., aged three years and Lucile C., aged one year. Mr. Totten is a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Woodmen of the World. He affiliates with the Republican party and while a citizen of Hutchinson was active in political work. Mrs. Totten is a member of the Fraternal Aid Association and of other local organizations. He parents were born in Germany and emigrated to Pennsylvania, where they lived out their days, and died leaving two children, herself and a brother Fred Fleischer, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Her father, who was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, was late in life in the real-estate business. For a time Mr. and Mrs. Totten, of this review, lived in Hutchinson, Kansas, where they went to educate their children and where Mr. Totten was a snare drummer in the regimental band of the Twenty-first Kansas Regiment during the service of that organization in the Spanish War.
A Biographical History of Central Kansas, Vol 1, 1902

UNDERWOOD Source: Blue-grass Blade (Lexington KY), Sep 19, 1909 Incidents and Personal Reminiscences Reviewed as Illustrating the Path of Goodness and Truth- By Warren S. Dean
We often find that in the research and study of many things that happened in our personal lives will make the course more clear, and open the way to some of the larger problems humanity has to contend with. For instance, after the writer had gathered a pail of cherries and taken them to the house, and after being sorted over by the wife and made ready to can, we noticed there were quite a number of them thrown out that looked sound and good under an ordinary inspection. Asking the wife in regard to them, she told us they were useless on account of being wormy. But having formed the habit early in life of doing a little investigating for ourselves, we took our knife and opened a few to discover how the worms had done their hidden work. We found first a small speck on the outside, a little discolored, and looking further we found where the worm had eaten its way around the path, so that the flesh of the cherry was more or less blackened in the pathway of the worm. While doing this investigating the wife said: "I told you there were worms in those cherries." We replied that it is a good thing to look for ourselves in this world, and if there were more people who would take as "much interest to investigate those things which pertain to the mind" as they did to the food that went through their stomachs, there would be far more respect shown for truth and honesty. While gathering those cherries, it was quite natural to have a number of them go the way of our mouth, but after the investigation our relish for them somewhat wilted. And we note all through life how many go blundering along taking things for granted, because of a belief, advise or the say of others, but when we investigate and find the truth or the vermin and vice in things that under ordinary inspection we overlook, we generally have that impressed on our minds the rest of our days. Looking back to more youthful days, we note now at mature age how slack we were in those things that pertain to the human mind, or in other words, so busily engaged in making a living that we had no thought to investigate how the miserable worm of superstition had left its vile effects on the minds of others. It was in the fore part of the season of 1879 that we had the pleasure of hearing Prof. Underwood, of Boston, give a Freethought lecture in the opera house at Quincy Ills. His words were not only impressed on our mind that Sunday afternoon, but we thought it strange that a Unitarian minister should come to the platform and invite Prof. Underwood to come to his church and lecture that evening, which he did. But the Sunday following, the clergy of Quincy made an effort to discredit Prof. Underwood, but we were convinced they failed to cover the trail of their worm of "miserable superstition." Mr. Underwood had showed up too plainly their useless work to the cause of humanity. Up to that time, we had the idea that those who "professed religion," or in other words those who "embraced superstition." would be less likely to do a dishonest act than those who made no such profession. It was not long before we had occasion to do a little investigating for ourselves in that line. In the spring of 1879 we settled in the southwestern part of Osborne county, Kan., and took up a homestead, and while there worked around the neighborhood as a handy man, willing to try and make himself useful. After the sod school house was built, it was proposed by some of the sanctified to start a Paradise Sunday School. At the first session they voted for Squire C. for superintendent - a more more noted for his honest commonsense than for piety, and for yours truly for assistant superintendent. It is necessary to state the the superintendents voted for did not put themselves in line to advance the cause of the Paradise of Fools. But it put us in line to find out the true nature of those advocates of sanctified superstition, by doing a little investigating for ourselves, with the result that they not only tried to blacken the character and pathway of those who had found their true nature, but made efforts to blacken the reason and intelligence of all with hidden deceit and hypocrisy. How the protecting wings of religious organizations shielded those pets of superstition, not only giving them help and encouragement in causing trouble and worry for those who investigated, but among their numerous ways they had added to their forces the tools of political ringsters. As we look back over our personal experiences, we realize that we were but a student learning in the school of life, trying in our little way to find the true and right., disdaining rewards from those who conceal the "trail of the vile worms from the sight of honest people for their own selfish interest."
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JOHN W. VAN SCYOC, general merchant, of the firm of Cooper and Van Scyoc, was born in Washington County, Pa., May 28, 1854, and in the fall of 1865, went with his parents to Des Moines County, Iowa, where he lived with this parents until the year of 1871, when he came to Osborne City, Kan., and purchased a farm 1.5 miles north of the city; resided thereon until 1873. In the fall of that year he started on the Range, hunting buffalo, and spent 5 months on the wild prairies. After returning to Osborne in 1882, he entered into co-partnership with George W. Cooper, as general merchant - dry goods, boots, hats, caps, and groceries. Was married September 17, 1878, to Miss S.R. Schweitzer. They have 3 children - Lilly, May and Elsie. He has been a member of the I.O.O.F. for the past 2 years; has been a member of the A.O.U.W. since its organization.

WALROND, HON. Z.T., the first appointed United States attorney for Indian Territory, came from Osborne, Kansas, being at the time of his appointment a member of the state legislature. Having a large acquaintance, attained by virtue of his official term, he decided to remain after his successor was appointed, and his work is among those who have "borne the burden and heat of the day."
The anomalous condition of affairs in Indian Territory prior to the establishment of courts preceded the collection of debts by law. No person residing in the Territory could be sued, and hundreds of debts had accumulated. As soon as it was determined by the court that the statute of limitations did not lie against these debts, lawyers swarmed to Muskogee like flies to a molasses barrel. They occupied every available space in the then small town, but their presence brought a new and brighter life to the village and from the date of the first court opening day a "new" Muskogee has been built up.
Indian Territory, Descriptive, Biographical and Genealogical, including the Landed Estates, County Seats, Etc., with a General History of the Territory by D.C. Gideon, 1901

WINFIELD W. WATSON "From rags to riches" may not be the exact expression needed, but it does give an idea of the career of Winfield W. Watson, one of Osborne's most prominent business men in the early years. He was born in 1884, and as a young boy in Illinois he worked awhile on a farm, driving an ox team and putting in long days. In 1869 her married Clara Butts, daughter of his farmer employer. In 1872 he and his brother William went into the grocery business in another Illinois town. About 1879 Mr. and Mrs. Watson came to Osborne, and the next year established a general store, erecting a large frame building for his stock on the lot later occupied by the Levy clothing store. Somewhat later he organized and became President of the Exchange National Bank, which incidentally was at that time also located on the north side of the street in a building about where the J.B. Byars and J.C. Penney stores were later. About 1889 Mr. Watson moved to Salina, where he again became president of a bank, and also engaged for some time in an extensive business which became the Acme Cement Co. About 1900 he returned to his first love, the grocery business, and organized the Watson Wholesale Grocery Co. Also at various times he had a hand in several other successful business enterprises. In addition he was the first influential booster for Highway ?, which is said to have been the first surfaced highway completely across the United States, and he also assisted in the erection of a handsome modern theatre in Salina. Other honors accorded him were election as President for the Salina Chamber of Commerce, and in 1920 he was chosen as one of the "Big Four" delegates to the Republican National Convention in Chicago. Mrs. Watson passed away in 1925, and in April 1931 Mr. Watson developed an infection of one leg between the ankle and knee which resulted in an amputation. While he spent the last 42 yeas of his life in Salina, W.W. Watson never lost interest in Osborne County, tried to visit here annually while his health permitted, and was always proud o the progress made in a material way. When he died on Dec 4, 1931, it was well said of him that "he was universally respected by our people, and his name will ever be associated with the history of Osborne." Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

ELI S. WILCOXSON When the funeral services for Eli S. Wilcoxson were held at his home on the place he had homesteaded in 1879 there was not room n the house for neighbors and friends who came to signify their love and respect for another old veteran of the G.A.R., who had answered his last summons at the age of 77 years. On Jan 20, 1920 he had been taken to the Old Soldiers Home, but there his health seemed to fail in an unexpected way, and he passed away on May 31, 1921. For the last resting place he was lovingly carried to the Fairview cemetery. After returning from the great war, on Oct 7, 1868 Mr. Wilcoxson had married Susan E. Hampton, of Clay Grove, Iowa in his native area, and they became the parents of Opal Ulmer, Edward G, Chester, Arthur and an infant son name Lucius who lived only briefly. Source: Osborne County Pioneers - Osborne County Farmer, Aug 5, 1971

C.E. WIILIAMS Born in Indiana and has resided in the state of Kansas since 1873. Mr. Williams came to Mt. Ayr Township in 18900 was married 3 years later, and have 12 children, all living. Alton, Kansas. "The Cedars" residence of Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Williams, the first frame residence in the north part of Mt. Ayr Township, 7 miles from Alton on the Missouri Pacific, R.R. Alton, Kansas.

GEORGE W. WILLIAMS was born July 1860, at Newtown, Monmouthshire, England; emigrated with his parents to the United States in 1865, and to Osborne, Kan., in 1875. Went into the music, insurance an sewing machine business in 1881, and on August 7, 1882, he took a partner into the business by name Carr; firm name Williams & Carr. Firm doing a large amount of business until November 21, 1882, when Carr embezzled all of the funds of the firm in the absence of Mr. Williams, left the country, and has never been heard from. George W. Williams, after settling up all business of the firm, accepted a situation from J.K. Martin, manager of the branch office of the American Sewing Machine Company, St. Louis, Mo., as traveling salesman, and is now in the employ of said company. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

JOHN WOLFERT, livery, was born in Sheboygan County, Wis., February 22, 1859, where he lived on and worked a farm until 1877, when he went to Marshall, Iowa, where he worked as teamster until 1878. He then came to Downs, Kan., where he drove a team until 1881, when he established his present business - a livery and feed stable. Was married October 2, 1881, to Miss Laura Lukens. They have 1 child.

JOHN H. WOLTERS, farmer and postmater, Rotterdam, was born in Pella, Marion County, Iowa, September 26, 1856, when he lived with  his parents until he was 12 years of age, when they moved to Kansas and settled on the Saline River in Ottawa County, where they lived on a farm for 2 years, when his father moved to Osborne County and homesteaded his present farm, where he has lived as a farmer to the present time; and since his father's death in March, 1882 he has had the general management of the farm. He also deals in sewing machines - Royal St. John, New Home and the Wanzer. Has for the last 3 years paid considerable attention to blooded stock; has now 2 blooded bulls. His father was born in the Netherlands.

CHARLES R. WOOLLEY, banker, was born in Davenport, Iowa, November 27, 1851; moved with his parents to Pike County, Ill., where he resided until 1856, when he removed to Lincoln, Logan County, Ill., where he engaged in farming until the spring of 1865, when he went to Centralia, Ill., and in the spring of 1870 went to Dutchess County, N.Y., to attend school; attended the new Poltz Academy from 1870 until the fall of 1871, when he moved to Lincoln, Lancaster Co, Neb. Studied law and admitted to practice March 4, 1876, and then in 1876 went to Denver, Col., where he remained until 1877, then returned to Lincoln, Neb.; resided there for 2 years, where he practiced law; then located in Beloit, Kan., engaged as lawyer and loan broker until July, 1881, when he came to Osborne, Kan., and established the banking house of Charles B. Woolley. Was married to Miss M.E. Brown, January 11, 1882. He is a member of the A.F. & A.M.; also Knights of Pythias. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882

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Z.C. YOUNG, Farmer and stock-dealer, Downs, was born in Chautauqua County, New York, May 30, 1828, and lived on a farm until 1852, when he went to California, where he followed mining until the spring of 1854. He returned to New York, where he resided until January 1871. He then started for the West, and located on his present farm. After his return from California to New York, he was engaged as a farmer, stock-dealer and shipper; with the exception of the 3 years of the time, one year of which he was in a flouring mill with his brother, and the last 2 years in milling business on his own book. After his location in Kansas, he followed farming until 1879, and since has looked after his farm as manager, and has given his attention to buying and shipping stock. He was married February 19, 1855, to Miss Sarah L. Smith. They had one child - Smith R. He was married again March 19, 1859 to Miss Lucy Smith. They have one child - Mark. Mr. Young is a member of the A.F.&A.M.; Trustee of Ross Township for one year; Justice of the Peace of the same township 6 years; elected Justice of the Peace in 1881 for one term of two years. Source: William G. Cutler's "History of the State of Kansas"

FRED YOXALL, book and news dealer, was born October 9, 1847, at Crewe England, and at an early age commenced house and sign painting, continuing until 1866; emigrated to the United States and located in Philadelphia, Pa., where he again engaged in house and sign painting for about 12 months, and then removed to Oshkosh, Wis., where he followed the trade of painting until 1871. Finding his health failing, he left his trade and came to Osborne, Kan., where he engaged in the lumber business until 1874, when he was appointed Postmaster of Osborne City, which officd he held until 1880, and then established his present business. He was married April 20, 1873, to Miss Libbie Everett. They have 2 children - Lilly and May. His is a member of Knights of Pythias, and also of the A.O.U.W. Source: William G. Cutler's History of Kansas, Osborne County, Part 3 - history as of 1882




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