Genealogy Trails

RUSSELL COUNTY, KANSAS
BIOGRAPHIES
ACKERMAN, THEODORE
Theodore Ackerman, president of Russell Bank. This bank was opened for business July 10, 1877. The bank building was erected in 1878, at a cost of $3,700 It is built of stone, 22x40 feet, two stories high. Charles P. Copeland is cashier. E. Copeland, of Middletown Springs, Vt., is interested in the same. The bank correspondents are: United States National Bank of New York City, First National Bank of Chicago, Ill.; Bank of Kansas City, Mo.; and First National Bank of Leavenworth, Kan The deposits equal $40,000 to $90,000. Mr. Ackerman first came to Russell, Kan., in 1871, with the Northwestern Colony. He then embarked in merchandising until 1878. He was born in Rodendale, Wis., in 1849. He began life as a clerk for his father, Henry I. Ackerman, in general merchandise, which he continued until coming to Kansas. Was married, in 1877, to Miss Libbie Holly, a native of New York State. They have one daughter - Myrtle Jessie. He was the first County Clerk of Russell County; was also secretary of the Northwestern Colony, and is now president of it. He has held several town offices, etc. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

BANKS, W. E.
W. E. Banks, dealer in a general line of drugs, medicines, books, stationery and druggists' sundries. He opened the business in 1877, and carries a stock of $5,000. He first came to Russell in 1877, and opened the above business. Born in Putnam County, Ind., in 1855, Parents moved to Appanoose County, Iowa, in 1864. He began business in life as clerk in a drug store in 1874. Lived in Iowa until he came to Kansas. Married in 1878, to Miss Emma Crist, of Indiana. They have two sons - Emmett E. and Eugene O. He is the present Mayor of Russell, and a member of Russell Lodge, No. 119, I. O. O. F.; member of the City Council in 1878. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

BEEMER, D. S.
D. S. Beemer, photographer and undertaker. Keeps a general stock of $1,000 in undertakers' goods. He came to Russell October 7, 1877, and engaged in undertaking business in 1878; he also began the real estate business in the spring of 1882. He was born in Luzerne County, Pa., in 1849, living in his native State until he came to Kansas. He spent three years as salesman of farm machinery in Iowa. Returned to Pennsylvania and remained four years. Learned painters' trade, but did not follow it, as it disagreed with him. He was married in 1881, to Miss Edith Tisdale, a native of Canada West. Mr. Beemer is a member of Russell Lodge, No. 177, A., F. & A. M., and A. O. U. W., No. 43. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

BICKERDYKE, MARY A.
Bickerdyke, Mrs. Mary A., philanthropist and army nurse, born near Mount Vernon, Knox county, Ohio, 19th July, 1817. She is the daughter of Hiram and Anna Ball. The mother died when Mary was only seventeen months old. The little one was reared by her grandparents. Her grandsire was a Revolutionary soldier named Rogers and a descendant of the Rogers who landed on Plymouth Rock. While young, she was married to Mr. Bickerdyke, and in a few years was left a widow, with helpless little ones to rear. When the Civil War came, she left home and loved ones to offer her services as nurse to the soldiers, who were dying by scores for lack of food and care. When the supplies to the army were sent from Galesburg to Cairo, Mrs. Bickerdyke accompanied them as delegate. After the battle of Belmont she was assigned as nurse to the field hospital. Fort Donelson brought her in sight of battle for the first time. She obtained supplies sometimes by visiting the North and superintending fairs, by a simple note to a pastor at sermon time, and by her famous "cow and hen" mission, by which she furnished the wounded soldiers with a hundred cows and a thousand hens, to provide fresh dainties for the sufferers. During the winter of 1863-64 she made a short visit home, and returned and took part in the establishment of Adams Block Hospital, Memphis, Tenn. This accommodated about 6,000 men, and from this she became the matron of Gayoso Hospital, in which were more than 700 wounded men brought in from Sherman’s battle of Arkansas Post. She took charge in Memphis, Tenn., of a small-pox hospital and cleansed and renovated it with her own hands, when nine men lay dead with the disease. Through the battles at Vicksburg, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge and Chattanooga Mrs. Bickerdyke nursed friend and foe alike, and when, in 1864, Sherman started on his memorable March to the Sea, always devoted to the Army of the Tennessee, "Mother" Bickerdyke, as the soldiers used to call her, accompanied the 100,000 men who marched away. Resaca, Kingston, New Hope, Cassville, Allatoona, Dallas and Kenesaw Mountain furnished her with 13,000 of those brave men as subjects for her care. When Sherman cut his base of supplies, Mrs. Bickerdyke went to the North and collected immense sanitary stores for the soldiers. When Sherman entered Savannah, she sailed for the South, to take care of the liberated Union prisoners at Wilmington. At Beaufort, Averysboro and Bentonville she pursued her mission, and at the request of General Logan and the 15th Army Corps she marched into Alexandria with the army. At the final review in Washington Mrs. Bickerdyke, mounted upon a saddle-horse, dressed in a simple calico dress and sun-bonnet, accompanied the troops. This dress and bonnet were sold as relics of the war for $100. Since the rebellion Mrs. Bickerdyke has spent her life in procuring homes and pensions for the "boys." She resides with her son, Prof. Bickerdyke, in Russell, Kansas. (American Women Fifteen Hundred Biographies, Volume 1, Publ. 1897. Transcribed by Marla Snow)

BRADBURY, J. M.
J. M. Bradbury, dealer in grain, farm implements, and general merchandise. Began the grain trade in 1873, coming to Bunker Hill in February, 1871. He bought the first grain and erected the first elevator in the village in 1878. The elevator is 24x36 feet, 28 feet high with a capacity of 10,000 bushels. He carries a general stock in merchandise of $8,000. He has officiated as Probate Judge and Clerk of the Court, each one term. Born in Ross County, Ohio in 1841. Was raised and educated in his native state. He began business in life as a clerk then photographing, etc. Enlisted in 1861 in Company A, Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, participated in all battles of his command, discharged on account of heart disease in 1863. He then engaged in photographing two years, married in 1876 to Miss Ella Exline, a native of Ohio, she was raised in Minnesota. He is a member of the Masonic order of Ohio. Mr. Bradbury assisted to organize the town in 1871. Bradbury & Cooper own 800 acres of fine coal land. The coal is of a bituminous quality. The veins of coal are from 16 to 42 inches in thickness. The coal mines are located twelve miles northeast of Wilson in Fairfield and Plymouth townships, in Ellsworth County. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

BRADSHAW, GEORGE T.
George T. Bradshaw, dealer in grain, coal, flour, feed, paints, etc., opened business in 1876. The firm of Knight, Bradshaw & Potter are proprietors of Fairport Flouring Mills, which are located at Fairport, fifteen miles northwest of Russell. These mills are 38x40 feet, three stories high, built of stone in 1879, at a cost of $12,000. The mills are propelled by both steam and water. The capacity is sixty barrels in twenty-four hours. Mr. Bradshaw first came to Russell in April, 1871, with the Northwestern Colony. He was born in Schenectady County, N. Y., in 1836, and reared on a farm. He moved to Waupun, Wis., in January, 1867, where he was principal of South Ward School two years. He then clerked for a grain firm two years. He graduated in the Jonesville Seminary, Saratoga, N.Y. He was a member of freshmen, sophomore and junior classes of Union College, Schenectady, N. Y. He was married in 1863 to Miss D. O. Weld, of Wells, Hamilton Co., N. Y. They have two children, Marion and Charles W. He is a member of A. O. U. W., Pioneer Lodge, No. 43. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

CHADBOURNE, J. S.
J. S. Chadbourne, Clerk of the District Court, first came here in 1872. He engaged in farming a few years, and was telegraph operator for three years. Was elected to his present position in the fall of 1878, and has since held the office by re-election. Is now Deputy County Clerk, and Deputy County Superintendent of Schools. He was born in Harrison, Me., in 1843; lived in his native State until 1856, when he went to Ripon, Wis., and after a number of years learned telegraphy, and became operator there for two years. He then engaged in lumbering until he came to Kansas. He was married, in 1880, to Miss Ella A. Bowen, of Russell, Kan. They have one son - Willie S. Mr. Chadbourne is a member of Russell Lodge, No. 177, A., F. & A. M.; is also a member of the Congregational Church. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

COPELAND, CHARLES P.
Charles P. Copeland, cashier of Russell Bank, and County Treasurer, first came to Kansas in April, 1874. He embarked in mercantile business until 1878, and began banking in 1877. Was elected County Treasurer in 1879; re-elected in 1881. He was born at Middletown Springs, Rutland Co., Vt., in 1854, and was raised on a farm. He graduated from Eastman's Commercial College, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., in 1874. He then came to Kansas. Married in 1876 to Miss Josephine Ackerman, of Rosendale, Wis. They have one son - Cecil Edwin. Mr. Copeland is a member of Russell Lodge, No. 119, I. O. O. F. Has been a member of the City Council three terms, and City Treasurer four years. Ackerman & Copeland own 1,920 acres of land, 600 of which are under cultivation. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

DIXON, JAMES J. A. T. & CO.
James J. A. T. & Dixon Co., dealers in dry goods, groceries, hardware, etc., opened business in February, 1882 and carry a stock of $3,500. Mr. Dixon first came to Bunker Hill October 5, 1872 for his health, and after eighteen months he began agricultural pursuits and became pastor of the Congregational Church, since which time he has followed preaching irregularly. In the fall of 1875 he was elected to represent Russell County in Kansas State Legislature. Re-elected to same position in the fall of 1876. He was appointed to fill vacancy of Probate Judge in 1878, elected to the office the fall following. He has been a member of the County Board for examination of teachers for eight years. Born in Bond County, Ill. in 1828. Raised on a farm. Began studies for college in 1846. Graduated from college at Jacksonville, Ill., in 1852 Studied theology at Lane Seminary, Walnut Hills, Ohio. Was principal of an academy in Livingston County, Ill., eighteen months. He then began preaching the Gospel at Metamora, Ill. Went into service in the spring of 1864 as a private in Company H, One Hundred and Forty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was commissioned Chaplain of his regiment with the rank of Major and served until mustered out, September 1, 1865. He then preached in Northern Illinois until 1871 when he came to Omaha, Neb. and preached two years, thence to Kansas. Began the publication of Bunker Hill Banner in February, 1881. He is a nominee on the Republican ticket to represent Russell County in Kansas Legislature, in the fall 1882. Married in 1854 to Miss Anna L. Holmes of Grant County, Wis. They have two chldren: Lydia F., now married to Wm. Harbaugh of Russell County, and Ernest H. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

EASTLAND, W. G.
W. G. Eastland, of the firm of Eastland & Pierce, attorneys-at-law, came to Russell in the summer of 1872, and engaged in the practice of law. He served as County Attorney two terms, and was Representative to the Kansas Legislature for the years 1879-1880. He is a native of Mississippi; his parents moved from that State to Richland County, Wis., in 1853, where he was raised and educated. He was a member of the Wisconsin State University for a short time. Began the study of law in 1867, entering the law office of Eastland & Eastland, his uncles, and was admitted to the bar of the Circuit Court of Richland County in 1870. Began the practice of law in Russell. He enlisted in the three-months' service in 1864, in Company D, Fortieth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered out at Madison, Wis., in the fall of the same year. He is a member of Russell Lodge, No. 119, I. O. O. F. He was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of Kansas and of the bar of the United States Circuit Court for the District of Kansas. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

FLECK, IRA S.
Ira S. Fleck, dealer in agricultural implements, and farmer is the son of Gabriel and Rebecca Fleck, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. Ira S. was born in Sinking Valley, Blain (sic) Co., Pa., March 24, 1847. While a lad he attended common school, and such advantages as the public schools offered were the only means he ever had of receiving an education. As he became older he would work on the farm in summer and attend school in winter, and this course he pursued until 1866, when his time was divided between farm work and teaching. In March, 1870 he moved to Dixon, Illinois where he continued his business of farming and teaching until the spring of 1873, when he moved to Kansas and located in Russell County, about three miles south of the village of Bunker Hill, where his time was given to farming exclusively. On January 27, 1874 he was married at Dixon, Ill., to Miss Sarah Fleck, a native of Blair County, Pa. One child has been the issue of this marriage: Alice May, born June 8, 1875. Mr. Fleck has held various township offices and in the fall of 1874 was elected Superintendent of Public Instruction of Russell County, which office he held for three successive terms. In the fall of 1880 he was elected to represent Russell County in the General Assembly, and served in the Legislature of 1881. In 1876 Mr. Fleck organized the Republican party of Russell County and put an end to a feud that had long existed in which the only political distinction known was "county-seat" and "anti-county-seat". Mr. Fleck, in addition to looking after the interests of his farm, is also engaged in dealing in agricultural implements, at Bunker Hill. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

GIDDINGS, BANKER & CO.
Giddings, Banker & Co., dealers in general merchandise. They opened trade September 14, 1881, and carry a stock of about $8,000, in a general line of merchandise. The firm is composed of Louis Banker, R. S. Giddings and M. A. Blaine, of Middleburg, Mass. Louis Banker first came to Russell in 1876 and took charge of a general store for G. A. Hart, five years. He then became a partner of the above firm. Born in Belleville, Canada West, in 1858, went to Rosendale and Waupun, Wis., in 1864, with parents and to Cass County, Iowa in 1871, then to Kansas. R. S. Giddings of the above firm first came to Russell in January, 1878 and engaged as clerk for a general merchandise store until he became a partner in the above firm. He was born in Seneca County, N. Y., in 1852. Mr. Giddings lived in his native county until 1876, when he went to Joliet, Ill., and clerked in a dry goods house until 1878 when he came to Russell. This is an enterprising firm and deserves the patronage of the public. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

GROSS, DANIEL
DANIEL Gross first came to Abilene, Kan. in 1874 and clerked some time, finally came to Bunker Hill and became a member of the firm of Eyler & Gross, dealers in general merchandise, opening the business July 21, 1879, and carrying a stock of about $12,000, occupying two rooms, 22x40 and 22x50 feet. Mr. Gross was born in York County, Pa in 1857. Was raised and educated in his native county; married in 1879 to Miss Katie Gardner, a native of Ohio. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

HARSHBARGER, C. M.
C. M. Harshbarger, County Clerk, first came to Russell in the fall of 1870. He engaged in farming which occupation he still follows. He owns one-half section of land, raises stock and cultivates about 110 acres of his farm, was elected County Clerk in 1873, and by re-election has held that office ever since, excepting from 1878 to 1880, (one term.) During the interval he was out of above office he was Township Trustee. He is the first settler in Russell County, and located on the first land by a squatter's right. He has seen many of the variations in pioneer life on the great plains. He was born in Spencer County, Ind., in 1841, moved to Keokuk County, Iowa with parents in 1850, where he lived until he came to Kansas. He was raised on a farm, consequently continues an interest in that substantial occupation. He enlisted in 1861, in Company K, Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and participated in all the battles of his command; mustered out in July, 1865, was married in 1876, to Miss E. J. Haling, a native of Fayette County, Iowa. They have four children; Charles B., Selma C., Clara E. and Grace A. He is a member of Russell Lodge No. 119, I. O. O. F. Deputy Clerk of the District Court for the past two years.

HART, Q. A.
Q. A. Hart, dealer in general merchandise, opened business October 2, 1872. He now has the oldest established store in Russell. He erected the first store building in the village in the summer of 1874, size of which is 22x60 feet at a cost of $1,800, since built an addition 12x40 feet at a cost of $500. He now carries a stock of $10,000. He owns 320 acres of land nearly all cultivated. Has been Township Treasurer and City Councilman four terms. Born April 2, 1825, in Upper Canada. Was raised on a farm, moved to Neenah, Wis., in 1856. Moved to Waupun, Dodge Co. 1865, following farming. Enlisted February 24, 1864, in Company F, Twenty-first, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, participated in fourteen battles, and never received a scratch, was mustered out in July, 1865, when he returned to Wisconsin and farmed until he came to Kansas; married in 1852 to Miss Deborah A. Comer, of Upper Canada. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a member of the G. A. R. of Waupun, Wis. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

HIBBARD, H. C.
H. C. Hibbard, attorney-at-law, and insurance agent, first came to Russell County, Kan. in May, 1871, farmed until 1874, and came to Russell village, where he engaged in the practice of law, was born in Fulton County, Ill. Enlisted in January, 1864, in Company I, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, participated in all the battles of his command, mustered out at Benton Barracks, Mo., June 17, 1865. He came to Kansas in September of the same year, located in Johnson County. He attended the State University at Lawrence in 1870. Previous to the latter dates he also taught school, was married in 1878 to Miss Sonora White of Franklin County, Ind. They have one child, Duane Hibbord (sic), born in 1879. Mr. Hibbard was the first superintendent of schools in Russell County, has served as Deputy Register of Deeds one and one half years. Has served as Police Judge and Deputy County Attorney. He was admitted to bar practice November 16, 1876, in District Court of Russell County. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

KINNEY, HON. ASA
The parents of Mr. Kinney were Abel and Freelove Kinney, of Cortland County, N Y.; their place of nativity being New London, Conn. They were among the early settlers of Cortland County, N. Y., and the father was a man of influence and prominence. His grandparents were of revolutionary stock, having served their country in the struggle for liberty. Asa Kinney was the fourth son of the family, and was born at Homer, Cortland County, N. Y., May 21, 1810. He received a common school education; was also noted as a debater when a young man. He resided in Homer, N. Y., Preston City, Conn., and Cattaraugus County, N. Y. Previous to coming West, he went to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1836, and settled at Oak Creek on the 5th of July of the same year, where he followed farming. Previous to coming West he had been identified with several town offices, and was promoted Lieutenant Colonel of his regiment in New York. He was one of the first Justices of the Peace in Milwaukee County; was a member of the last Territorial Legislature of Wisconsin, and he was elected as a Representative from Milwaukee County to the Constitutional Convention of 1846, and served on the committee on the organization and affairs of counties and towns, and their powers and duties. He was noted for good, solid sense, but not for speech-making. He served in the State Senate in the sessions of 1848 and 1849. In 1852 he went to California and was a member of the Legislature of that State State (sic) Senate in the sessions of 1859 and 1860. He then located at Ripon, where in 1867, he was a member of the City Council, and was two years Street Commissioner. Mr. Kinney settled in Russell, Kan., in 1871, where he has since served as City Clerk, Police Judge, Clerk of the District Court, and has been Justice of the Peace for the last ten years. In 1861 he entered as private in the Ripon Rifles; was mustered into the Fourth Regiment Infantry, and was promoted Quartermaster Sergeant, and in December was discharged on account of ill-health. He was afterward commissioned as First Lieutenant, and Quartermaster in the First Wisconsin Cavalry; joined the regiment at Eastport, Miss., and remained with it until the close of the war. After the war he acted as land and insurance agent for several years. For some time he was a director and agent for the Madison Mutual Insurance Co. Mr. Kinney has been married four times; September 15, 1830, to Miss Diana Spicer, of Preston City, Conn., who died May 2, 1834; January 15, 1835, to Miss Lucretia Grinnell, of Rutledge. N. Y., who died September 21, 1836; March 15, 1837, to Miss Delia A. Rawson, of Oak Creek; November 15, 1878, to Mrs. R. C. Wilson, of Albia, Iowa. Thus it is shown that the life of Mr. Kinney has been one of unusual activity, mixed with a wonderful variety of experiences. He has held a large number of civil offices, served in the war, crossed the plains to the land of gold, and has traveled through the Central States and Mexico. It would be hardly possible to give his varied experiences in life. From the above record the reader can imagine, perhaps, a part of his doings with the outside world. He is a man of pleasing address, fluent in conversation, and intelligent on an immense variety of subjects. At the age of seventy-one he is in the enjoyment of good health, with a fair prospect of several years of usefulness in life to the world. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

McKEEN, D. W.
D. W. McKeen, physician and surgeon, located in Russell, Kan., in December, 1878, where he engaged in the practice of his profession. He was born in Ackworth, N. H., in 1852; began the study of medicine at the age of twenty-one; he was educated at the Kimbal. Union Academy of Meridan, N. H., graduating in June, 1875; began reading medicine the latter year; attended lectures at Long Island College, and at the hospital, Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1878. He graduated from the college of physicians and surgeons at Keokuk, Iowa; began the practice of medicine in Russell; he has been county physician two years. Is a member of the A. O. U. W., and the examining physician for that order. Was married in May, 1882, to Miss Ella B. Loring, a native of Missouri, recently of Wichita, Kan. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

MANN, STILLMAN
Stillman Mann, proprietor of the Russell House. Mr. Mann erected the stone part of his hotel in the summer of 1877; it is 25x48 feet, and three stories high. There is also a wooden addition, 26x68 feet. The hotel cost $7,000. Capacity is about seventy-five guests. He first came to Russell in April, 1871, with the Northwestern Colony from Eastern Wisconsin; at that time there was only a section house in the place. He, in company with H. W. Tusten, built a small shanty, and both families lived in that until other arrangements could be made. Mrs. Mann first began to bake bread and sell it to settlers, and finally, after they got more room, they began to lodge people, and that is the way the Russell House first started. The Northwestern Colony were citizens of Ripon, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac, Wis. The biographies of the most active men in this colony will appear in the history of Russell County. Dr. C. W. Bond came with the colony, but remained only a short time and returned to Wisconsin. The only meat the settlers had for over two years was buffalo, deer, antelope and elk, which roamed over the plains in vast herds, and could be shot down in any direction. Mr. Mann was born in Orange County, Vt., in 1825, where he lived until he was twenty-one years old. He went to Wisconsin in 1848, to Fond du Lac in 1852, where he embarked in the boot and shoe trade until 1857. He then clerked some time, then went to Ripon, Wis., and engaged in the grocery business two years, then to Pittsfield, Mass., and clerked in a boot and shoe house some time, then returned to Fond du Lac, Wis., in 1866, and went into the gents' furnishing and clothing business until he came to Kansas, arriving with nothing but his family and able-bodied. He was married in 1855 to Miss Sarah S. Hubbard, of Pittsfield, Mass. She died in 1865. He was again married in 1866 to Miss Addie L. Dunham, of Washington, Mass. They have two children - Roy E. and Gilbert H. Mr. Mann is an active member of the Congregational Church. He served four years as Justice of the Peace and Notary Public. He has been a member of the city school board two years. He is superintendent of the Sunday-school, and assisted to organize the Congregational Church, of which he is a member, in 1872. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

MOORE & SONS.
Moore & Sons, proprietors of the Golden Rule steam flouring-mills. These mills were erected in 1880, size of which are 32x52 feet and 45 feet high, built of stone, capacity is 100 barrels in twenty-four hours, cost is $22,000. They do an exchange business only in custom work. They employ six men besides their own help. Mr. O. S. Moore first came to Bunker Hill in August, 1878. He was born in Brown County, Ohio in 1848; was raised and educated in Rush County, Ind.; family moving there in 1854. Married in 1879 to Miss Carrie S. Edwards, of Binghamton, N. Y. They have two children: Jessie G. and an infant son not yet named. He is a member of Russell Lodge No. 115, I. O. O. F. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

MOSES, W. H.
W. H. Moses, of the firm Lawson & Moses, dealers in a general line of dry goods, gents' furnishing goods, clothing, boots and shoes, hats and caps, groceries, queensware and crockery. They opened business October 28, 1877. They occupy rooms 26x100 feet and 16x26 feet, and carry an average stock of $15,000. They first opened with a stock of $4,000. Mr. Moses was born in McHenry County, Ill., in 1852. He went to Republican City, Neb., in 1870, and embarked in merchandising, following it three years; he then went into the stock business a few months; he then returned to McHenry County, Ill., to replenish; he clerked there until he came to Kansas. He is a member of the Russell Lodge, No. 175, A., F. & A. M. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

OLIVER, J. W.
J. W. Oliver, dealer in general line of dry goods, notions, clothing, boots and shoes, hats and caps, and groceries. He opened the trade June 6, 1879, under the firm name of Oliver & Michaelis, and changed to the present style in January, 1882. He occupies rooms 22x72 feet, first floor and basement; carries an average stock of $18,000. He came to Russell in May, 1877, and engaged in the hotel business until March, 1879. He was born in Wabash County, Ind., in 1840; lived on a farm until twenty-one years old; he then enlisted in Company H, Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry; participated in all the battles of his command until detailed to division headquarters. He was in Sherman's campaigns in the South; detailed as Second Lieutenant; mustered out in the spring of 1865. He then engaged in merchandising in Clinton, Ill, until he came to Kansas. He was married in June, 1881, to Rebecca Billingsly, of Axtel, Kan. They have one son - Benjamin M. Mr. Oliver is a member of the A. O. U. W., of Russell, Kan. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

PARKER, F. L.
F. L. Parker, dealer in grain, lumber and coal. Mr. W. C. Hobbs opened the business in 1871. The firm was changed to Hobbs & Parker in 1879. They carry a stock of about $10,000 in lumber, building material, etc. Mr. Parker came to Russell in the fall of 1877, and became interested in the above business. He was born in Ann Arbor, Mich., July 27, 1848. Moved to Fond du Lac, Wis., with his parents in 1851, where they resided until the fall of 1855, when they moved to Oshkosh, Wis. At a suitable age he engaged in the hardware business, in which he remained about five years. He then embarked in the manufacture of handles, also the woodwork of carriages and wagons, until he came to Kansas. He was married on March 28, 1871, to Miss Lizzie V. Hobbs. They have two children - William H. and Frederick L. Mr. Parker is a member of Pioneer Lodge, No. 43, A. O. U. W., of Russell. Has been a member of the City Council, etc. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

PERCE, WILLIAM
William Perce, dealer in a general line of groceries, provisions and queensware, opened trade on October 4, 1880. He carries a stock of about $2,500. Came to Russell in 1874 and farmed five years. Was born in Pickaway County, Ohio, in 1817, and raised as a farmer. Moved to Springfield, Ill., in 1849, and engaged in the manufacture of brooms a few years. He was City Marshal of Springfield for one year, and Captain of the Police in 1860-61. Enlisted as First Lieutenant in Company C, Eleventh Missouri Volunteers, in July 1861. Resigned the next May on account of ill-health, and re-enlisted again in 1862, in the Seventieth Illinois Volunteers, a three months' regiment, and was elected Captain of Company B of this regiment. Served four months. Went to farming in 1863, and was appointed United States Deputy Marshal, under John Logan, in 1869, serving two years. Was also an operative of the Secret Service for the Southern District of Illinois. He was married in 1842 to Miss Roxana Vittium, a native of Ohio. They have five children - Mary, now married to Mr. S. Spindle; E. I., married to W. T. Shaw; Wm. A., married; Lewis A., married, and Clarinda A., now Mrs. J. F. Dollison. He has been Justice of the Peace in Russell for many years. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

ROBB, J. W.
J. W. Robb, physician and surgeon, came here in September 1879, where he has since continued the practice of medicine. He was born in Shelby County, Ky., in 1839, and got a common school education in his native place. He then attended the Shelbyville, Ky., Academy, under Prof. J. W. Dodd, graduating in 1858. Began to study medicine in the same year, and after a year or two, attended the University at Louisville, Ky., and graduated from the medical department of that college in 1862. Began the practice of medicine at Shelbyville, Ky., where he continued until 1875. He then took charge of the Masonic Widows' and Orphans' Home, at Louisville, Ky. Having charge three years, he soon after came to Russell, Kan. Was married in 1864 to Miss Sallie E. Robinson, a native of Shelby County, Ky. The Doctor is a member and Master of the Russell Lodge No. 177, A., F. & A. M. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

SMYSER, GEO. W.
GEO. W. Smyser of the firm of J. A. T. Dixon & Co., located on a homestead near Dorrance, in 1871 and farmed three years. He then served as County Treasurer four years, then into general hardware trade at Russell two years, then farmed two years south of the latter village, then went into business at Bunker Hill. Born in York County, Pa., in 1832, where he was raised and educated. Married in 1854 to Mary Hunes of the same place. They have three children: Leila J. Emma E. and Martin B. He is a member of the A. O. U. W and I. O. O. F He enlisted in 1864 in Company C, One Hundred and Sixty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Re-enlisted in 1864 in Company I, Two Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry. Participated in all the battles of his command. Mustered out in Alexandria, Va. in May, 1865. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

SUTTER, EDWARD & EMILE
Edward & Emile Sutter, dealers in musical instruments, watches, clocks and jewelry. They opened business in March of 1879, and carry a general stock of $600. Emile Sutter was born in France, October 1, 1855, learned the trade of watchmaker and jeweler in Locle, Switzerland, came to America in 1879, and located in Russell, Kan. He was married May 20, 1876, to Miss Laura Amanda Marchand, a native of Switzerland. They have three children - Henry E., Lina and Jennie. Edward, his brother, is also a native of France, born February 6, 1858. They went to Locle, Switzerland, at the same time and learned the same trade, but Edward came to America in 1876 and located in Wooster, Ohio, remaining there a year. Then he came to Kirwin, Kan., where he engaged in the jewelry business, and thence he came to Russell. He is unmarried. The brothers are members of the Russell Lodge, A. O. U. W. (from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

TUSTEN, H. W.
H. W. Tusten, farmer, P. O. Russell, came here with the Northwestern Colony, in the spring of 1871. He opened the first general store and continued merchandising for six years. At the same time he opened a farm of 320 acres, and now has 200 acres of it under cultivation. He makes a specialty in the stock business, dealing largely in cattle and horses. He keeps the Membrino stock of horses. He was born in Ontario County, N. Y., in 1833, lived in his native State until 1841, and then came with his parents to Kenosha, Wis., where they lived about seven years. Thence went to Green Lake County, where they farmed for some time. He then went to Minnesota and followed various occupations for six years. He then engaged in lumbering at Fond du Lac, Wis., for four years, and in merchandising for three years. Thence he came to Kansas. He was married in 1867 to Miss Matilda de Neveu, a native of the latter city. They have four children - Herman W., Hattie D., Arthur E. and Emma. He is president of the town site, member of the City Council, etc.(from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

WALKER, JOSEPH H.
Joseph H. Walker, farmer and stock-raiser, P. O. Fairport, Russell County, located in Saline Township, Ellis County, August 5, 1882, on Section 20. He has a homestead and timber claim, and railroad land, consisting of Section 20, 640 acres of land, sixty acres of which he has under plow. He has 360 head of cattle, amongst which can be found some fine Durham stock. He first landed in Kansas in April, 1881, and prospected until he located as above named. He was born in West Townsend, Mass., in 1857, and removed to Cambridge, Mass., in 1865. Lived in his native State until 1881, and attended school until he came to Kansas. His ranch is twenty miles northwest of Russell, and twenty-five miles northeast of Hays City. The Saline River has its course through his ranch. This place is known as Lost Canon Ranch. There are many natural curiosities to be found in this vicinity, amongst which are sharks' teeth and many specimens of fossil shells, etc., which are worthy of the attention of the sojourner.(from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

WEEKS, LILLIE JANE & JESSE McGINNIS
Lillie was a true pioneer, coming to Kansas at age seventeen with her father William in 1877 to set up a home in preparation for the remainder of the family to come the following year. The tasks of daily life for them would be very time consuming, adding to that the building of a house (dugout), digging a well and providing shelter for the livestock. Lillie knew responsibility at an early age. Her husband to be Jess McGinnis (Edmunds wife) to prepare for her arrival. Nancy McGinnis accompanied the weeks family as they made their trip to Kansas in 1878. The parcel of land know as The Cross Plains Cemetery, was originally owned by Edmund McGinnis, Jess's father. It was purchased for the sum of thirty dollars in 1887. Jesse's mother, Nancy was the first person to be buried there. Jesse served in the Civil War was a member of 21st Regiment of Illinois Infantry. He died at age forty-six, leaving Lillie with five children ages 5-14. She applied for a widows pension and received it with back pay in Feb 1896. two years after Jesse died. Lillie and Jesse lived on a farm one and one half miles north of the Weeks home. this is where they raised their five children. Lillie died at age forty seven after enduring the many hardships years of early pioneering. (Submitted by Kyle M. Condon)

WEEKS, WESLEY COLE
Wesley Cole Weeks was born 17 Jun 1857 in Lockport, Will county, Illinois, the oldest of seven children born to William and Mary Weeks.
It was in the year 1878, a year after William and Lillie (Wiliam's oldest daughter) had left for Kansas that William sent for the remainder of his family to come to Kansas and begin their New life on the Weeks Homestead.
At this time Wesley Cole was the oldest, 21 years of age so it became his place to lead the family to their new home in Kansas.
It was in Kansas that Wesley Cole met Polly Jane Mathewson and on 17 Jun. 1899 he and Polly were married and began their own family. Polly had two children from a previous marriage. These children were Jessie and William (Willie) Mathewson. Polly was a Newsom by birth. As time went on, five sons were born to Wesley and Polly.
Wesley was a farmer in the Russell and Barton county, KS area until his death Polly and her family remained in this area until 1920 when again she moved west to Baca County, CO. She also had family in this area. About this time Polly had a case of the German measles and bega to lose her sight. Polly and the boys homesteaded there. Although she was blind she was a strong and courageous woman keeping her family together. Polly and the boys remained on the ranch from 1920 until 1930 when she sold the ranch and moved to the community of Springfield, CO. Polly had a rope run through the house so she could find her way around. She would also get up in the night and do baking or wash dishes. This ofter had other people wondering what was going on, but as Polly was blind, she didn't know if it was day or night. Wesley died in Kansas and is laid to rest in Cross Plains Cemetery. Polly died in Springfield, CO and was brought to Kansas on a train by her sons to be buried next to Wesley. (Submitted by Kyle M. Condon)

YOXALL, ALBERT
Albert Yoxall, farmer. His parents came with the Northwestern Colony from Oshkosh, Wis. to Russell in the spring of 1871. His father opened a lumber-yard in Russell and continued until 1876. Then engaged in farming, locating on Section 32. Has 160 acres of fine land, 140 of which are cultivated. His father, John Yoxall, died in October, 1880. He was a native of England, born in 1815, came to America in 1869, and settled in Oshkosh, Wisconsin where he engaged in lumbering, until he came to Kansas. Albert Yoxall, his son, was born in England, January 1, 1856, married in 1881 to Miss Alice Overholswr (sic), of Lancaster County, Pa. He was engaged as associate cashier of Russell bank three years, and before and after the death of his father he has been engaged as first stated.(from William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas, published in 1883 by A. T. Andreas, Chicago, IL.)

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