KANSAS

BIOGRAPHIES OF MEMBERS OF THE LEGISLATURE OF 1861

SENATE

BANCROFT, EDWARD PAYSON

Edward Payson Bancroft, born March 1, 1829, in Union, N. Y., died December 25, 1904, at Chelsea, Mich.; was a member of the first state senate, 1861. He removed with his family from New York to Michigan, where he studied medicine at the Michigan State University. He came to Kansas in February, 1857, and settled in Emporia, engaging in the real-estate business. He was nominated secretary of state at the Free-state convention held at Topeka, April 28-29, 1858, and was also appointed one of the agents to select lands granted the state by the general government. He was a member of the railroad convention of 1860, from which he, with others withdrew on account of the apportionment and representation. At the beginning of the civil war he enlisted in the Eighth Kansas, and was mustered in as quartermaster October 22, 1861, and promoted to major of the Ninth Kansas April 1, 1862, resigning February 19, 1863. Governor Robinson appointed him a colonel on his staff May 2, 1861. In August, 1863, he returned from the South a very sick man. He had been at the siege of Vicksburg, and stopped at Lawrence, where he was joined by his wife and brother, A. R. Bancroft, and caught in the Quantrill raid; they were at the Eldridge House, and Major Bancroft was carried out of the burning building in an armchair. He returned to Emporia. He was a regent of the State Normal School 1871-’73, and was appointed on the board of centennial managers March 2, 1876. Major Bancroft sold bonds of the Normal School and kept the money; he was arrested, and found guilty September 14, 1878, and sentenced to five years in the Penitentiary and costs. This sentence was commuted by Governor St. John to two years and seven months. In 1881 Mr. Bancroft went to Chihuahua, Mex., where he engaged in the real-estate business. Later he returned to Michigan and made his home in Detroit. He was married to Mary B. Millspaugh, of Ontario county, New York, in 1853. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 238)

BROADHEAD, JOHN FLETCHER

John Fletcher Broadhead was born at Hudson, N. Y., September 15, 1830. He was educated in the common schools, and later read law, and was admitted to practice September 15, 1857. The following spring he came to Kansas, locating at Mound City, where he engaged in his profession. He was elected a senator to the first state legislature, and served until his enlistment in the army; he was mustered in as captain of company D, Third Kansas infantry, July 25, 1861, which became company E on its consolidation with the Tenth Kansas, and was with his company until his regiment was mustered out, August 18, 1864. Upon his return to Mound City he was elected to the house of representatives of 1865, and returned to the senate of 1869-’70. March 9, 1871, he was appointed judge of the Sixth district, vice D. P. Lowe, who had been elected to Congress, and held the office until November 17 of that year. He moved to Independence in 1875, where he died November 15, 1881. His first wife was Ellen A. Warner of Jamestown, N. Y., whom he married July 15, 1857, and who died July 11, 1861. December 11, 1863, he married Nettie W. Warner, a sister of his first wife.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 238)

BURNETT, JONATHAN COLMAN

Jonathan Colman Burnett was born in Morristown, Vt., March 19, 1825, and died in Wichita, July 2, 1899. He received an academic education and afterward studied law, and was at one time register of probate of Lamoille county, Vermont. He came to Kansas in 1857, and arriving in Leavenworth he, with seven other young men from Vermont, formed the “Vermont colony,” and located in Bourbon county, near Fort Scott. Judge Burnett was a member of the first town site company of Mapleton, in May, 1857, and in 1859 he was a delegate to the Wyandotte constitutional convention. He was a member of the last territorial legislature, which was in session when Kansas was made a state, and likewise a senator to the first state senate. He was appointed register of the Fort Scott land-office by President Lincoln, and took over the office in April, 1861, serving until March, 1865. During his incumbency this office was moved to Humboldt. September, 1861, it was raided by guerrillas, whereupon, on October 3, it was moved to Mapleton, the then county-seat of Bourbon county. The spring of the following year, May 15, 1862, the office was returned to Humboldt where it remained until December, 1870. After resigning from the land-office Judge Burnett moved his family to Lawrence, where he was for some time a director and land commissioner of the L. L. & G. railroad. He afterward engaged in farming and stock raising, and later moved to Russell county. Judge Burnett was twice married: October 18, 1849, to Laura L. Wheelock, of Hinesburg, Vt., who died October 4, 1850; and December 27, 1852, to Anna Mary Fisk, of Morrisville, Vt., who survives him. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 238)

CONNELL, JESSE

Jesse Connell was born in Kentucky about 1819. He settled in Leavenworth in 1855 and was a member of the senate of the first state legislature, 1861. He was also a member of the Lecompton constitutional convention in 1857. He was a man of high character. He died in the early ‘70’s. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 238)

DENMAN, HAMPTON B.

Hampton B. Denman was born in Ohio, about 1829. He came to Kansas in March, 1857, and died in Washington, D. C., in 1096. In a Democratic convention in 1859 to nominate candidates for state offices under the Wyandotte constitution, he received 27 votes for governor, and Samuel Medary, the nominee, received 43. At the same election, December 6, 1859, he was elected to the first state senate. In 1863 he was appointed a commissioner to select certain lands due the state, and in 1866 Indian superintendent of the Northern agency. He was mayor of Leavenworth for the years 1858, 1859, and 1862. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, pages 238-239)

DUTTON, HARTWIN RUSH

Hartwin Rush Dutton was born in Allegany county, New York, July 20, 1824. He was a civil engineer by profession, and early in the ‘50’s located in Iowa, remaining there until 1857, when he migrated to Brown county, Kansas. He laid out the town of Hiawatha, and was president of the town company. In 1859 he was elected to the last territorial legislature, and was state senator in 1861, the first state legislature. March 26, 1861, he was appointed by Governor Robinson state treasurer, vice William Tholen, who entered the army; at the next election, November, 1861, he was elected to serve out the term. Shortly before his term of office expired he left Kansas, going to Chicago, where he went into the insurance business. He died at Zanesville, Ohio, November 12, 1883. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 239)

ELDER, PETER PERCIVAL

Peter Percival Elder, of Franklin county, was born September 20, 1823, in Somerset county, Maine. He received his education at Farmington Academy and the Maine Wesleyan University. He read law for a short time, but finally settled on a farm in his native county. In the spring of 1857 he arrived in Franklin county, locating on a claim near Ohio City, where his family joined him two years later. He helped organize Franklin county. He was a delegate to the Osawatomie convention of 1859 that organized the Republican party in Kansas, and a member of the territorial council 1860 and 1861, and of the state senate of 1867 and 1868; was a member of the house of representatives in 1875, 1876, 1877, 1883 and 1891, and speaker of that body in 1877 and in 1891. He resigned from the senate of 1861 to become agent for the Osage and Seneca Indians, which office he held until 1865, when he resigned. During his incumbency he recruited and put into active service a regiment of Osage Indians and was largely instrumental in keeping many of the tribes loyal. He resides in Ottawa. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 239)

FARNSWORTH, HIRAM W.

Hiram W. Farnsworth was born at Brattleboro, Vt., October 13, 1816, where he received his early education. He entered Williams College in 1836, graduating with the class of 1840, after which he went to Alabama, where he taught school. In 1842 he returned to New England and became principal of the Female Academy of New London, Conn.; this position he held until 1855. The next year he came west, arriving in Lawrence May 9, 1856, and settling in Topeka a few days later. He was elected to the first state senate, resigning in June, 1861, to accept the appointment of agent for the Kansas Indians, which he held until October 1866. He was then appointed one of three special commissioners to inspect all Kansas Indian tribes, taking deputations to Washington to effect treaties preparatory to their removal from the state; this work being concluded in May, 1867. In March, 1869, he was appointed postmaster of Topeka, holding the office four years. He served as clerk of the Topeka board of education from 1876 until his death. He married, in Boston, Mass., March 17, 1842, Della T. Lerow, who died June 5, 1850; and December 3, 1855, he married Harriet A. Stoddard, of New London, Conn. Mr. Farnsworth died at Topeka, July 26, 1899. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 239)

GUNN, OTIS BERTHOUDE

Otis Berthoude Gunn was born October 27, 1828, at Montague, Mass. He was the son of Otis and Lucy Fisk Gunn. He had a thorough New England common-school education, and began work as a rodman on the construction of the Hoosac Tunnel railroad. He was engineer in charge of the railroad between Rochester and Niagara Falls. He taught school for two years near Harrisburg, Pa. In 1853 he was division engineer in the construction of the Toledo, Wabash & Western, and followed railroad construction westward until he located in Kansas in 1857, settling at Wyandotte. In 1859 he was elected to the first state senate, which met in 1861. In 1861 he was appointed major of the Fourth Kansas regiment, later the Tenth Kansas infantry, but in May, 1862, resigned to resume railroad work, being connected at various times with the Kansas City & Cameron, Leavenworth, Pawnee & Western, Central Branch Union Pacific, and the Missouri, Kansas & Texas. Of this last-named road he built 600 miles. He built the bridge across the Missouri river at Atchison, and in 1876 superintended the construction of the present union depot in Kansas City. He was a great engineer. In 1896 he wrote a financial article entitled “Bullion versus Coin,” which the Republican national committee circulated broadcast over the country. He died in Kansas City February 18, 1901, and was buried in Oak Grove, Lawrence.  His widow resides in Kansas City, Mo. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 239)

HOFFMAN, SAMUEL E.

Samuel E. Hoffman was born in Pennsylvania about 1835. He came to Kansas from Iowa, locating in Neosho Falls, Woodson county, in 1858, being the first lawyer in the county. He was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention in 1859, and was elected to the first state senate. He was also one of the agents appointed to select lands granted to the state by the general government, 1861-’62. He is now a resident of St. Louis, Mo., and engaged in banking.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 239)

HOUSTON, SAMUEL DEXTER

Samuel Dexter Houston was born at Columbus, Ohio, June 11, 1818. He was the son of Caleb Houston and Elizabeth Purdy. His parents moved to Illinois in 1830. He was educated in the common schools. In 1843 he married Mary Jane Rankin, daughter of a noted Presbyterian divine and anti-slavery leader. She died in 1850, leaving two daughters. In 1852 Mr. Houston married Tabetha Kimball by whom he had four sons and four daughters. He cultivated a farm in Iowa for a few years. In December 1853 anticipating the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska bill, he migrated to Kansas and settled upon the Blue river, near Manhattan. In 184 he plowed thirty-five acres and raised a small crop of corn and some vegetables. In October of that year he staked off a town where Manhattan now is. In 1855 he accepted a nomination from the Free-state party as a candidate for the first territorial legislature. He was elected, but when all the other Free-soil members were ousted Mr. Houston resigned, leaving no Free-soil members of that body. (That was the session which met at Pawnee and adjourned to Shawnee Mission.) In 1857 he was elected to the state senate under the Topeka constitution. July 5, 1859, he was a member of the Wyandotte constitutional convention, being now one of the four or five surviving members of that body. December 6, 1859, under this constitution, he was elected to the state senate which met in April, 1861. In 1861 President Lincoln appointed him receiver of the land-office at Junction City, which position he held for about ten years. He is still living (April, 1908), in his ninetieth year, with his son-in-law, Luke F. Parsons, at Salina. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 240)

HUBBARD, JOSIAH M.

Josiah M. Hubbard, was born in Connecticut July 16, 1832. He was educated in the public schools and in 1856 came to Kansas, a member of the famous Beecher Rifle Company. He was president of the first town company of Wabaunsee, where he settled, and was a member of the first state senate. When the civil war came on he enlisted in the Eleventh regiment of Kansas volunteers and was mustered in September 15, 1862, as first lieutenant of company K, serving until the company was discharged, September 13, 1865. He left Kansas immediately thereafter, returning to Connecticut, where he has since resided and where he has held various public offices, being a trustee of the State Agricultural College for many years; he was also a member of the state legislature of 1886, serving as chairman of the committee on agriculture and a member of the committee on judiciary. He is now member and secretary of the State Board of Mediation and Arbitration. Mr. Hubbard has been twice married, first to Miss H. E. Fairchild, July 6, 1863, who died in 1867. His second wife died in California in 1899, after prolonged ill health. He resides at Middletown, Conn. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 240)

LAPPIN, SAMUEL

Samuel Lappin was born in Ohio about 1881, and died at La Centre, Wash., August 4, 1892. He came to Kansas from Louisiana at an early date, locating in Nemaha county, where he served as register of deeds from 1855 to 1861. He was one of the incorporators of Seneca, in 1857 and long a resident. He represented Nemaha county in the senate of 1861-’62, and in the house in 1869. November 26, 1862, he was commissioned as assistant quartermaster by the President, ranking as captain, and was mustered out September 20, 1865. He was elected state treasurer, and served from January to December, 1875, when he was asked to resign. December 21 suit was begun against him, charging him with forgery, counterfeiting and embezzlement, and he was arrested January 13, 1876, at Chicago. He escaped from jail in the following July, going to South America, where he wandered some years, returning to the states in 1880. He was finally recognized in Washington territory, and, October 23, 1884, was bought back to Kansas to stand trial. The claims of the state having been satisfied in full by the sale of Lappin’s property, the case was dismissed December 24, 1885. He again took up his residence in Seneca, and later through the aid of friends, started a store in Lenora.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 240)

LOCKHART, JOHN

John Lockhart, of Johnson county, was born in Scotland about 1834 and was brought to America in 1836. He taught school in Wilmington, Ill. In 1855 he came to Kansas, settling in Johnson county. In 1856 he was elected to represent that county in the legislature under the Topeka constitution, the body dispersed by General Sumner July 4, 1856. He was elected October 5, 1857, to the regular territorial legislature, and in 1858 to the territorial legislature of 1859. In 1859 Mr. Lockhart was elected by a large vote to represent Johnson county in the state senate under the Wyandotte constitution, serving in the session of 1861, but resigning bfor ethe session of 1862, to enter the army. He was commissioned a captain of the Union Guards at Uniontown, August 19, 1861; was commissioned a captain in the United States service March 18, 1862; and was captain of company I, Fifth Kansas volunteer cavalry. His father resided at McCamish, Johnson county. He died at Helena, Ark., September 12, 1862, and his remains were brought to Leavenworth. A negro cook in the camp of the Fifth Kansas was claimed by a Missourian, and the negro promptly surrendered. It is told of Lockhart that a few days after, while scouting he found the negro in chains. He released the negro and placed the chains on the master.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, pages 211-212)

LYNDE, EDWARD

Edward Lynde was born in Saybrook, Conn., October 16, 1820, and died at Paola, Kan., March 27, 1897. In 1827 his family migrated to Ohio, settling in Stark county, where he received his education. In May, 1856, he came to Kansas, locating on a claim near Grasshopper Falls. He was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention, and was elected to the territorial legislatures of 1859 and 1860, and to the state senate of 1861, serving as president pro tem, of that body. He was commissioned colonel of the Ninth Kansas volunteers March 24, 1862, and mustered out November 25, 1865, at De Vall’s Bluff, Ark. He returned to Kansas much broken in health, and in 1868 moved to Kansas City, Mo., where he had an appointment in the internal-revenue service. In 1886 he returned to Kansas, locating on a farm in Miami county; but a few years previous to his death he took up his residence in Paola. He was married October 19, 1843, to Margaretta Shaw at Marlboro, Ohio. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 240)

McDOWELL, JOHN H.

John H. McDowell was born in Virginia about 1825, and settled in Leavenworth in 1858. He was elected state senator December 6, 1859. He was a railroad contractor; was one of the purchasers of Leavenworth, Pawnee & Western, and sold it to a St. Louis syndicate at a handsome profit. He was a shrewd business man. He returned to Ohio and died there. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 240)

MARTIN, JOHN A.

John A. Martin was born March 10, 1839, at Brownsville, Pa. He received a common-school and printing-office education. In October, 1857, he came to Kansas, locating at Atchison. In February, 1858, he purchased the Squatter Sovereign, and changed its name to Freedom's Champion. In 1858 he was nominated for the territorial legislature, but declined because he was not of legal age. He was a delegate to the Osawatomie convention in 1859, which organized the Republican Party in Kansas. July 5, 1859, he was elected secretary of the Wyandotte constitutional convention; he was secretary of the railroad convention which met at Topeka in October, 1860; and was elected to the state senate of 1861. October, 1861, he was mustered in as lieutenant-colonel of the Eighth Kansas regiment, and a year later was promoted colonel, and was mustered out November, 1864, with the brevet of brigadier-general. he was provost-marshal of Leavenworth in March, 1862, and of Nashville, Tenn., from December, 1862 to June, 1863; colonel Third brigade, First division, Twentieth army corps, September-October, 1863: colonel First brigade, Third division. Fourth corps, September-November 1864. He was one of the incorporators of the State Historical Society, and its president in 1878. June 1, 1871, he married Miss Ida Challis. Colonel Martin served as mayor of Atchison in 1865, and from 1878 to 1880 was a member of the board of managers of the National Soldiers' Home. In 1884, and again in 1886, he was elected governor of Kansas. He died October 2, 1889. See the eulogium by Benj. F. Simpson in the Kansas Historical Society's fourth volume of Cellections.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 241)

MILLER, JOSIAH

Josiah Miller was born in Chester District, S. C., November 12, 1828. He was the son of Robert H. Miller and Susannah Allilley. The family were Scotch Presbyterians and pronounced opponents of slavery. They were badly mistreated. Josiah Miller was educated at the University of Indiana, graduating in the class of 1851, and later from the law school at Poughkeepsie, N. Y. January 3, 1854, he was married to Agnes B. Carlisle, of Bloomington, Ind. In August, 1854, he came to Kansas, and arranged to establish the Kansas Free State newspaper at Lawrence, and January 5, 1855, started the paper, the firm being Miller & Elliott. May 21, 1856, the paper was destroyed at the sacking of Lawrence. He was captured by pro-slavery forces, held as a prisoner of war, and tried for treason against South Carolina. On his release he canvassed several of the Northern states for Fremont. In 1857 he was elected probate judge of Douglas county, and in 1859 to the first state senate. He was postmaster at Lawrence in 1863, and resigned to become paymaster in the army. He served again in the legislature of 1867. It is claimed for him that he was the author of the motto upon the state seal, "Ad astra per aspera." He was a wide-awake business man and accomplished much. He died at Lawrence, July 7, 1870, after having a leg amputated on account of some disease of the member.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 241)

MORROW, ROBERT

Robert Morrow was born at Sparta, Sussex county, New Jersey, September 20, 1825. He married Martha Cory April 13, 1850. He settled at Appleton, Wis., in 1850, and engaged in merchandising for five years. He was county treasurer of Outagamie county for two years. He settled in Lawrence in 1855 and engaged in the hotel business, and was burned out by Quantrill in 1863. He was a member of the territorial legislature of 1859, and in 1859 was elected to the first state senate. He has served as a member of the city council of Lawrence and as treasurer of Douglas county. He and his wife engaged in the hotel business in Lawrence, Emporia, Atchison and Indianapolis, Ind., at the latter celebrating their golden wedding. They reside to-day in Lawrence.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, pages 241-242)

OSBORN, THOMAS A.

Thomas A. Osborn, the sixth state governor of Kansas, was born at Meadville, Pa., October 26, 1836 and died at his birthplace February 4, 1898. He served an apprenticeship in the printing business and paid his way through Allegheny College by typesetting. In 1857 he came to Kansas and begun work on the Herald of Freedom. He read law, and was admitted to the bar in 1858. In 1859 at the age of twenty-three, he was elected state senator and in 1862 when the lieutenant-governor resigned, he was elected president of the senate, defeating John J. Ingalls on the fourteenth ballot. In 1862 he was elected lieutenant-governor and in 1864 President Lincoln appointed him United States marshal. In 1870 he  married Miss Julia Delahay, of Leavenworth. In 1872 he was elected governor and reelected in 1874. In 1877 he was appointed minister to Chili and in 1881 appointed to Brazillian mission. In 1885 he resigned as minister to Brazil and settled in Topeka. He was for many years a director of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad company. Edward Delahay Osborn, an attorney in Topeka, is his only heir.  (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, Page 242)

PHILLIPS, JAMES A.

James A. Phillips was born in North Carolina in 1835, moved to Indiana in 1852, and came to Kansas in the spring of 1857, settling at Paola. He studied law with Benjamin F. Simpson, and was admitted to the Miami county bar in 1860. December 6, 1859, he was elected a member of the first state senate of 1861. At the beginning of the civil war, July 16, 1861, he was commissioned first lieutenant and adjutant of the Fourth Kansas infantry, and upon the consolidation of that regiment was transferred to the field and staff as adjutant of the Tenth Kansas infantry. July 10, 1862, he was promoted major of the First Indian home guards. In 1866 he moved to Burlingame. He served as county attorney of Osage county. He never married, and died at Burlingame in 1872. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, Page 242)

ROOT, JOSEPH POMEROY

Joseph Pomeroy Root, lieutenant-governor and president of the senate.  

Joseph Pomeroy Root, of Wyandotte, then a part of Leavenworth county, was born at Greenwich, Mass., April 23, 1826, and died at Kansas City, Kan., July 20, 1885. He was a member of the Connecticut-Kansas colony, better known as the Beecher Bible and Rifle Company, which settled at Wabaunsee. He organized free-state forces and in every way identified himself with the early history of the territory. As chairman of the free-state executive committee he located the road from Topeka to Nebraska City, thereby securing a safer route of travel for free-state immigrants. He was sent east as agent to obtain arms and other assistance and was very successful. On his return he located at Wyandotte and was there elected a member of the council. He was lieutenant-governor of the state in 1861; served in the Second Kansas as surgeon, and was medical director of the Army of the Frontier. At the close of the war he returned to Wyandotte and the practice of his profession, but was appointed minister to Chili in 1870. At the close of his term of office he returned again to Wyandotte, and continued there until his death, July 20, 1885. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, Pages 207 & 242)

SEAVER, REV. H. N.

Rev. H. N. Seaver was a native of New England, having been born in Augusta, Maine, in June, 1810. He removed to the state of New York, where he was for many year's a minister in the Methodist church, being located at Elmira as presiding elder for some time. He came to Kansas in 1856, in company with General Bayless and several others, and was one of the original proprietors and locators of the town site of Highland, Doniphan county, where he lived until his death in July 1879. He was a member of the senate of the first state legislature, 1861. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 242)

SLEEPER, HIRAM S.

Hiram S. Sleeper, senator from Breckinridge (now Lyon) county, in the state senate of 1861, was born in New York state about 1833, and came to Kansas from Illinois. He was a surveyor by profession, was a member of the town site company of Italia and laid out the town in 1855 (the name was changed later to Florence), and in 1857 a new town site was laid off and named Neosho Rapids. Mr. Sleeper was commissioned an additional paymaster of volunteers by the President February 19, 1863, and resigned November 15, 1865, to April 13, 1869. He was a member of the state central committee of 1868. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 241)

SPRIGGS, WILLIAM

William Spriggs was born in Floyd county, Kentucky, October 11, 1825. His father was John Spriggs. His grandfather, John Spriggs came to America about 1770 and was killed in battle in the Revolutionary war. John Spriggs the second was born on the eastern shore of Maryland. Moving to Kentucky he met and married Sarah Burchett. Early in life the parents of William Spriggs removed to Jennings county, Indiana. William worked on a farm in summer and attended school in winter. He studied and taught school until 1850, when he was admitted to the bar. In 1857 he came to Kansas, settling in Anderson county. He married Margaret Ray August 2, 1847. October 4, 1858, he was elected a member of the territorial legislature of 1859. He was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention. December 6, 1859, he was elected a member of the first state senate, 1861 and 1862. In 1862 he was elected state treasurer by a vote of 9025 to 6294 for D. L. Lakin; and again in 1864, by a vote of 12,051 to 8526 for J. R. McClure. In 1867 he was appointed judge of the district court, serving but one year. Mr. Spriggs is still living, on a farm near Garnett. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, page 241)

WOOD, SAMUEL NEWITT

Samuel Newitt Wood was born at Mount Gilead, Ohio, December 30, 1825, the fifth child in the family. He was the son of David Wood and Esther Mosher, who settled in central Ohio in 1817. The family were all Friends, and as early as 1840 were active in the anti-slavery cause. He married Margaret W. Lyon, whom he first met in 1849, as he was helping ten run-away slaves. June 6, 1854, he started for Kansas, settling in Douglas county. In 1856 he was a delegate from Kansas to the convention at Pittsburg, Pa., which organized the Republican party, and he campaigned Ohio that year for Fremont. In 1858 he was elected a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention. The next year he moved to Chase county and started the Cottonwood Falls Press; and December 6, 1859, was elected to the first state senate, which met in 1861. He participated in the battle of Wilson Creek, Mo., as captain of a company of Kansas rangers, and was commissioned captain of the Morris county rangers, cavalry, organized at Council Grove, May 20, 1863. He served also as second lieutenant and recruiting officer of the Ninth and Fifteenth Kansas cavalry regiments. He had previously recruited a battalion in Missouri, and was elected major. The battalion having joined in the formation of the Sixth regiment Missouri volunteer cavalry, he was promoted colonel February 14, 1862, serving until August 12, 1862. He also served in the legislatures of 1862, 1864, 1866, 1867, 1876 and was speaker of the house in 1877. About 1885 Colonel Wood moved to Stevens county, and for several years was engaged in a violent county-seat fight, resulting in his assassination by James Brennan in the court-house at Hugoton June 23, 1891. Mrs. Wood resides at Strong City, Kansas. (Transactions of the Kansas State Historical Society, 1907-1908, edited by Geo. W. Martin, Secretary, Vol. X, 1908, Page 242)


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