Butler County Genealogy Trails

 

Kentucky

A History of the State

by: J. H. Battle, W. H. Perrin & G. C. Kniffin (Copyright 1885)

Submitted by Cathy Schultz

 

WILLIAM G. ABBOTT was born in Butler County, Ky., April 30,1835.  At the age of eleven years, he began to earn his own living, which he did by fishing and selling fish in Rochester, Butler County; this he continued for several years; then hired to a farmer to drive plow for 10 cents per day, which he continued for three seasons, and was always happy on Saturday night with six dimes in his pockets; at the age of fourteen, being from home, he received notice of the death of his step-father. He mounted a wild mule and started home; the mule threw him and cut his head badly, but, undaunted, be continued his journey, after having his wound sewed up by a farmer on the way.  After the death of his  step-father, young Abbott constituted himself the guardian and supporter of his mother and her children, Josephine, Sarah, Jane and George Washington.  He remained with them until he was twenty-one years of age.  In the meantime, he had settled in Ohio County on some military
land, known as the Fitz-Hugh survey. After three years he sold his improvement, and bought 200 acres in Butler County, where he settled and remained one year, then left his mother on the farm, where she lived until she again married, twelve years later. During this period, Mr. Abbott worked at stone-cutting at Paradise for a while, then worked for W. D. Coleman for eighteen months, for $18 per month; bought a ferry on Green River, which he operated for two years; sold the ferry and went into a general merchandising business in Paradise, Ky., where he built a fine residence, but lost considerable money on account of the failure of the iron works and discontinuance of coal mining.  March 24,1861, he married Annie A Nourse, of Butler County; they are the parents of nine children, of whom there are living: Cordelia, Christian S., Olive, Inez, Ettie, Nola and Murnie M.  In 1862, Mr. Abbott was commissioned a lieutenant in the Home Guards in Muhlenburgh County, and in 1863 joined the Federal army. He enlisted in Company H, Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteers; fought under Gen. Sherman in the Georgia campaigns, and from Atlanta to Richmond; was discharged in July, 1865, when he returned to Kentucky, and engaged in farming until 1883; served as a peace officer in his native State nine years, and in 1883, was elected magistrate, which office he now holds. He owns 400 acres of good land, well improved; also owns the best hotel property in Rochester, besides small stock in the Rochester Roller mills, and in the Rochester Academy. Mr. Abbott is thorough in business, and has acquired his property by his own industry and perseverance. In politics he is a Republican; his religious views are based on charity to mankind, and fulfillment of personal obligations.

REDDICK ARENDELL, farmer, was born in Rochester, Butler County, March 15, 1835, and brought up there until the age of five years, when his parents removed to Muhlenburgh County, where he resided until 1854, when he removed to Kansas, but returned to his native State in the fall of 1856, and settled on Hickory Camp Creek, five miles southeast of Rochester. His parents were Reuben and Lavinia (Dewese) Arendell, who removed, the former from North Carolina, and the latter from South Carolina, to Kentucky with subject's grandfather, John Arendell, who had fifteen sons and one daughter. Reuben Arendell was the fourteenth son, and fifty years ago owned lands in Butler County, extending four miles along the Green River, including the present site of Rochester. Mr. Arendell did not enjoy the facilities for mental training in his early life that children at the present day have, but acquired a taste for reading, and seeks to give his children the advantages of instruction in school and at home. His business, since 1856, has been mainly farming and lumbering. In 1854 he was united in matrimony to Elizabeth, daughter of W. Arendell, also a second cousin. She was born August 24, 1833, and is the mother of nine children, six of whom are now living: Theodosia Earnest, Henry McDonald (married to Joanna Cook), Lavinia (wife of T. E. Pendley), Cleopatra Theresa, Josephine Lillian, Eliza Celeste. Mr. Arendell's farm consists of 135 acres of timber and plow land, comfortable homestead, etc. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a stanch Democrat in politics.

SAMUEL H. AUSTIN was born in Butler County, Ky., July 22, 1845, and is a son of Samuel and Nancy (James) Austin, the former of whom was a native of Maryland, and the latter of Butler County, Ky.  They were of Irish and Scotch descent, respectively.  When but a lad, some fourteen years old, in 1815, Samuel Austin came with his parents from Maryland to Ohio County, Ky., then almost an unbroken wilderness.  There he received the major part of his education at the primitive log schoolhouses of the Kentucky frontier.  In early life he learned the tailor's trade, which he followed at Hartford some ten or twelve years.  In 1833, he removed to Morgantown, Butler Co., Ky, where he was soon after married.  Here he first engaged in general merchandise and continued the same for several years; after which he bought wild land on the north side of Green River, six miles below Morgantown, and subsequently improved a farm, upon which he remained about eighteen years.  In 1856, he sold this place and bought another in the little bend of the Green River, same county, where he remaimed some twenty-three years, when he again sold out and returned to Ohio County, remaining only about two years.  After this he made his home among his children until his death, December 3, 1884, in his eighty-fourth year.  He was the first county judge of Butler County, which office he held for eight years.  He was also among the first magistrates of Butler County, which office he also held in Ohio County.  He and wife were for many years devoted members of the United Baptist Church.  He was also a member of the Masonic fraternity from early life.  Two of his brothers were veterans of the war of 1812.  Samuel H. Austin, the subject of this sketch, was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty years old, after which he farmed his father-in-law's farm for several years.  He then bought a partially improved farm on Indian Camp Creek, Butler Co., Ky., upon which he has ever since resided.  He was married February 14, 1867, to Helen N. Porter, also a native of Butler County, Ky.; born March 1, 1850.  Three sons and five daughters have blessed their union, all of whom are yet living.  Their names are as follows: Thomas P., Elisha F., Lela B., Lether R., Nancy E., Flora A., Ella V. and William O.  Mr. Austin and wife are and have been devoted members of the church.
 

JOHN W. BAILEY, Butler County, was born May 4, 1811, in Granville County, N.C., where he grew to manhood, and in 1842, removed to Butler County, Ky., where he has since resided.  His father, Israel Bailey, a native of Granville County, died in 1853, at the age of eight-five years.  He was the son of Jeremiah Bailey of North Carolina, who died in 1811.  Israel married Mary, daughter of Ned Harris, of Granville County (died about 1857, aged sixty-six years).  Their children are Samuel, Israel, Allen, Anderson, Matilda (Davis), Solomon, John W. Mahala (Dilon), Joseph, Priscilla (Bailey) and Henderson.  September 8, 1829, J. W. Bailey married Lucy, daughter of John and Tabitha (Harris) Snead, of Wake County, N.C. (born February 4, 1809, died March 13, 1835).  To them were born Sarah A. T. (Bailey), Henry A. (deceased), Mary S., Elizabeth A., Doc. Samuel J., Israel, Perlina, and Emily C. (Barclay).  Mr. Bailey is a farmer, and has 277 acres of land in a good state of cultivation.  He is a Missionary Baptist, and in politics affiliates with the Democratic party.
 

JOHN BAKER, Butler County, was born April 12, 1833, in Smith County, Tenn., where he grew to manhood.  In 1861 he removed to the southern part of this county, where he has since resided.  His father John Baker, Sr., was a native of Tennessee, and died in 1833, of cholera, on the Mississippi River; his father was George Baker.  John Baker, Sr., married Sarah Enoch, of Smith County, Tenn.; their union was blessed with the following children, Mary M. (Neel), Louisa (Bell), and John (subject).  The last having been left an orphan in early childhood, he was brought up by his maternal grandmother, and received but limited advantages for an education; until twenty-two years old he attended a five months' school.  He has continued to improve his mind by constant reading, until at present he is a man of considerable information.  He has been twice married; first September 15, 1856, to Minerva J., daughter of Philip and Phoebe (Dice) Fisher, of Wilson County, Tenn., and second on October 4, 1866, to Mrs. Mary A. Philips, widow of Stephen R. Philips, and daughter of Josiah and Eliza (Hams) Wood, of Smith County, Tenn.  His first wife died June 26, 1866, without issue; his present wife has one son, Ezra F. Baker.  Mrs. Baker's children by her first husband are Elizabeth (Helm), Ida F. (Gray), Elmira L. (Mayhugh), and James P.  Mr. Baker is a practical farmer, and owns 252 acres of well improved and productive land.  He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and a Prohibitionist in politics.

WILEY R. BEESLEY, Butler County, was born in Warren County, Ky., April 11, 1807, where he remained until he was twelve years old, when he removed with his mother, Elizabeth Beesley, and his grandfather, William Beesley, to Butler County, Ky.  The family settled on the Indian Camp Creek.  Here Wiley R. Beesley received a common school education and grew to manhood. After attaining his majority, he bought a partially improved farm on the north fork of the Indian Camp Creek, where he remained until the fall of 1872.  He then sold out and bought the farm of 160 acres (a part of which he has since sold) on the waters of Welch's Creek, where he still resides. He held the office of constable for four years, and afterward that of magistrate for three terms of four years each.  William Beesley, the grandfather of our subject, was a veteran of the Revolution; served under Gen. Greene, during that struggle, and was in the battle of Roodsley's Mill, where Gen. Gates was defeated by the British.  Wiley R. Beesley was first married November 8, 1832, to Perlina Smith, a native of Butler County, Ky; to this union were born three children, only one of whom (Anthaline Daughety) is now living.  Perlina Beesley departed this life April 10, 1849, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.  Mr. Beesley was next married April 18, 1853, to Lucinda Haning, a native of Switzerland County, Ind., born July 6, 1833.  She is a daughter of John and Sallie (Coy) Haning.  Eleven children have blessed their union, nine of whom - seven sons and two daughters - are living, viz.: William D., Elizabeth Taylor, Robert D., John W., Florence T., Ira R., Irving R., Singleton R. and Peter Cooper.  Mr. Beesley and wife, have been for many years members of the United Baptist Church, in which he has officiated as deacon.  In politics he is a Democrat.


LEANDER BELCHER, Butler County, was born July 4, 1852, in Logan County, this State, and in childhood removed with his parents to Butler County, where he was brought up and now resides.  He is the son of Thomas Belcher, a native of Tennessee, born in 1803, and removed from Smith County in 1847 to Logan County, Ky.  In 1854, he came to Butler County, where he died in November, 1862.  His father was Richard Belcher.  Thomas (subject's father) married Mary Gill, of Tennessee (born in 1809, and died in 1868), and their children were Rebecca J. (Orange), born June 15, 1826, Louisa (Tyree), born April 24, 1828, Mary (Melton), born July 6, 1830, Sutton E., born August 19, 1832, Susan (McCoy), born July 3, 1834, John W., born January 11, 1837, James T., born February 17, 1838, Elizabeth M., born December 29, 1839, Richard F., born August 10, 1841, Prudence (Chandler), born September 29, 1844, Zachariah Taylor, born January 29, 1848, and Leander, born July 4, 1852.  June 25, 1884, Leander married Barthenia, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Childers) Brown, born April 25, 1852.  Mr. Belcher has for the past four years been engaged in merchandizing at Townsville, and has met with encouraging success.  He is a member of the Baptist Church, and in politics is identified with the Republican party.

JAMES A. BELLAR, Butler County, was born September 20, 1850, in the southern part of the county, while his parents were here on a visit.  He was reared in Smith County, Tenn., until 1863, and in that year removed with his parents to the region where he was born and where he has since resided.  His father, George W. Bellar, a Tennessean, died in 1881, at the age of fifty-two years.  He was the son of Samuel Bellar, of Tennessee, and was married to Lucinda M. Lack, daughter of Obadiah and Elizabeth (Conger) Lack.  They had eight children, viz.: William L., James A., Nancy E. (Proctor), Obadiah, Mary F. (Hutchinson), John P. (deceased), Isaac and George W.  James A. Bellar was married October 21, 1873, to Helena S., daughter of Allen and Sarah (Stewart) Cornell of Macon County, Tenn.  The fruits of this union are four children, three of whom, Fannie, Bennie and Ophelia, are living - Jennie is deceased.  Mr. Bellar is a farmer and deputy county clerk.  He is a member of the United Baptist Church, of which he is clerk.

 

JAMES R. BERRY was born in Butler County, Ky. near Berry's Lick, April 25, 1818, and is one of ten children born to Francis M. and Rebecca (Reed) Berry, both of whom were natives of Virginia, and of Irish descent.  When only a small boy, Francis M. Berry removed with his parents from Virginia to the upper part of Kentucky, from thence in the latter part of the last century, the family removed to what is now Butler County, Ky., but was then a part of Logan County, and settled on Big Muddy Creek, near Berry's Lick. Here Francis M. received his early education; was married and engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in December, 1881, in his ninety-first year; he was a veteran of the war of 1812, served under Gen. Harrison in the Canadian campaign, and also against the Indians in the Northwest territory; he and his wife were devoted members of the old school Presbyterian Church for more than sixty years.  James R. Berry received such an education as the schools of the country afforded in his youth. At that time three horse-mills supplied the entire country with bread stuff. James R. was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty-four years old; he then bought seventy-five acres of wild land near Berry's Lick, erected a log cabin, and subsequently improved a farm, upon which he resided until the breaking out of the war, in 1861, when he sold out, and bought a farm one mile below Aberdeen on the Green River, which he afterward lost on account of a defective title.  In February, 1883, he came to the farm where he now lives, three miles below Aberdeen on the Green River.  He was married August 5, 1842, to Catherine Bennett, also a native of Butler County; born January 18, 1819, a daughter of Elisha and Elizabeth (Hancock) Bennett, both of whom were natives of Virginia.  Three sons and three daughters blessed their union, of whom the three sons are living, as follows: John W., Elisha F. and James D.  Mr. Berry and wife have been for many years members of the church, first of the old school but now of the Cumberland Presbyterian.  Mr. B. is a Republican.
 

JASPER C. BERRY was born in Butler County, Ky., near Berry's Lick, September 2, 1837, and is a son of Francis M. and Rebecca (Reed) Berry, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume.  Jasper C. received a common school education in youth, and was employed on his father's farm until he attained his majority, after which he and his brother farmed the home place on shares for some five years.  He then removed to a farm on the Green River, about five miles below Morgantown, where he remained one year, after which he was employed as a laborer on a farm two years.  In March, 1864, he enlisted in Company G, Twelfth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry (Federal service), and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until it was mustered out at Louisville in September, 1865.  He participated in all the battles of the Georgia and Atlanta campaigns and the Saltville and Salisbury raids, as well as many other lesser engagements.  After his return from the army, he was employed on the farm for several years.  In 1867, he bought 200 acres of wild land some three miles below Aberdeen on the Green River, where he has since improved the farm upon which he now resides.  He was for a time superintendent of the county poor.  He was married August 2, 1866, to Mary E. Porter, also a native of Butler County; born March 22, 1847.  Five children have blessed their union, two of whom are living: John F. and Edney C.  Mr. Berry and wife are church members; he of the Cumberland Presbyterian, and she of the Baptist.  They were formerly members of the Grange.  In politics, Mr. Berry is a Republican.


JOSEPH BLUNK, Butler County, was born November 2, 1833, in Harrison County, Ind., where he grew to manhood, and, in 1875, removed to Meade County, Ky.; in 1876, to Hancock County; in 1880, to Daviess County, and in 1883 he located in Butler County, where he now resides.  His father, Andrew Jackson Blunk, a native of Jefferson County, Ky., died in 1877, at the age of seventy years.  He was the son of Andrew Blunk, who was born in Virginia, and was a soldier in the war of 1812.  Andrew J. married Mary, daughter of Henson and Jane Johnson of Harrison County, Ind. (died in 1873, aged seventy years).  Their offspring were John, Henson (died in the Mexican war), Joseph, Jane (Farnsley), Andrew, Levi, Amos and William.  Joseph Blunk procured a common English education in youth.  He was married August 15, 1850, to Adaline, daughter of Thomas and Susan (Gwartney) Wright, of Harrison County, Ind. (born April 16, 1834), and to them have been born William T., Mary E. (widow of Charley Fransell), Levi H, Andrew J., Susan E. (Renfrow), John S, Minnie M. and Virginia B.  Mr. Blunk is a farmer owning 259 acres of land in a good state of cultivation.

LEWIS F. BOLTON, Butler County, was born September 23, 1837, in Whitley County, Ky., and in 1841 removed with his parents to Butler County, locating on Big Reedy Creek, on the place where he now resides. Sympathizing with the South, and believing in the right of secession, he took up arms to maintain his views, enlisting, in 1861, in the Ninth Kentucky (Confederate) Infantry, in which he served until the final settlement of the conflict; he returned home and since has been an honored and law-abiding citizen.  His father, Haile Bolton, a native of Grayson County, Tenn., was born February 21, 1813; at the age of twelve he removed with his parents to Campbell County, that State, where he grew to manhood and is now enjoying a good old age.  He is the son of John Bolton, a native of Halifax County, Va., and a soldier in the war of 1812, who died in Campbell County, Tenn., in 1855, at the age of sixty-eight years.  Haile Bolton (subject's father) married Dina Woosley, a daughter of Samuel and Phoebe (Bailey) Woosley of Whitley County, Ky., born in 1816 and died December 28, 1883.  This union was blessed with the birth of ten children, seven of whom are living, as follows viz.: Lewis F., Josiah, Martha J. (Hunt), Elizabeth (Jones), George W., Samuel M., and Beverley L.  The following are dead: James, John R. and Julia A.  Mr. Bolton was brought up on a farm with limited facilities for an education, but by close application and constant reading his mind is well-stored with useful knowledge.  He was placed in nomination by his friends for representative to the legislature, and though carrying the full strength of his party, he was defeated by a strictly party vote.  He was married, December 13, 1866, to Mary V. Thacker, daughter of Dillingham and Prudence A. (Kelley) Thacker, of Warren County, Ky., born December 10, 1847.  To them have been born seven children: Aurora A. (deceased), Anna M., Belle, John C., Adaline, Roscoe H. and Josiah L.  Mr. Bolton is a farmer and owns 101 acres of productive land, which is in a good state of cultivation.  He is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Christian Church; politically he is a Democrat.

JAMES J. BORAH was born December 18, 1847, near Borah's Ferry, Butler County, where he spent his youth.  He is the second of eight children, six of whom are living.  His parents were Willis and Margaret (Austin) Borah, both of whom are deceased.  His grandfather was George Borah, a native of Pennsylvania, one of the first settlers of Butler County.  He was an extensive land owner in this county, and established and gave his name to the ferry across the Green River, known as Borah's Ferry.  Our subject was married November 21, 1877, to Caroline E. Annis, the fifth child of John Annis, a native of England.  She was born near Morgantown, Butler County, February 20, 1863.  The result of this union is two children: Donnie May and Dixie.  Mr. Borah has a farm of 150 acres, with a beautiful house, lately built.  He is a Democrat in politics.

G. WASHINGTON BROWN is one of the eminently successful farmers of Butler County, and was born in Ohio County, Ky., March 14, forty-four years ago. He was brought up in the same locality and educated in the public schools. His father, Thomas E. Brown, was born in Virginia, January 13, 1808, and died March 18, 1872; he was by occupation a prominent farmer and merchant and settled in Ohio County, when a child.  G. W. Brown's mother was born February 10, 1809, and died November 6, 1858.  Our subject moved to Butler County in 1860, and purchased his farm near Mining City, where he now owns 300 acres of good land.  He enlisted in Company H, 12th Kentucky Cavalry (Capt. Payne), and served nearly three years, and was in the campaigns of Tennessee and Georgia.  November 29, 1866, Mr. Brown was united in marriage with Rebecca F., second daughter of J. W. and Mary McKinney.  She was born in Butler County, February 5, 1850.  Seven children have blessed this union:  William Ellsworth, Minerva Ann, John Thomas, Oscar Vineyard, Elmer Hamilton, James Pendleton, Mona Alcyon.  Mrs. Brown's father, J. A McKinney, was born in Virginia in 1819, and came to Kentucky with his parents in infancy, and has since been a resident of Butler County; in 1846 he married Mary A. London, by whom he has seven children: Nancy E. Layne, William Martin, Rebecca, Brice V., John L., Laura L., wife of G. G. Pendley; and James.  They have eighteen grandchildren and have never had but one death among them, and have not employed a doctor but twice in twenty years.  Mr. McKinney owns 250 acres of good land, well supplied with both graded and common stock.  His farm is about half bottom and half timber land.  A portion of the bottom land, being well set with cane, affords excellent winter pasturage.  Mr. McKinney and Mr. Brown are both Democrats, and their families are members of the Baptist Church; both are of strong temperance principles.
 

JOHN H. BURRISS, Butler County, was born January 7, 1822, on the place where be now resides,. He is a son of John and Betsey (Sutton) Burriss, the former a native of North Carolina, who removed to Tennessee, when a young man, bringing his earthly all on a packhorse. He was in many Indian skirmishes; was in the battle of Nickajack; was also a soldier in the war of 1812; was married to Betsey Sutton, a daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Know) Sutton, o£ this county, by whom he had ten children, as follows: William, Nancy (Oden), Sally (Potts), Pully (Hutchison), Ann, Elizabeth, Jane, John H., James and Melinda (Ennis). Mr. Burriss lives with three sisters on the homestead; he is a carpenter and farmer, and owns 130 acres of land. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

IREDELL BYERS, Butler County, was born in Grayson County, Ky., September 19, 1829, and is the eldest of nine children born to John and Jennie (Elder) Byers, both of whom were natives of Grayson County, and of Irish and German descent, respectively.  John Byers was educated and married in his
native county, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in September, 1875, in his sixty-seventh year. He and wife were, from early life, devoted members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; he was a soldier in the service of the State during the late civil war, and participated in
several battles. Iredell Byers received such an; education as the schools of Kentucky afforded in his youth; he has since, however, by his own exertions, acquired a good practical business education. He was employed on his father's farm until he was twenty-two years of age, the last year, however, being
for himself. He then bought wild land in Grayson County, where he improved a farm, and remained for four years, after which he sold out and again bought wild land in the same county, and improved another farm, on which he resided for some twenty-five years.  From September, 1862, until the close of the late civil war, he served as first lieutenant in the Home Guard or State service, and saw some very active and hard service. In the spring of 1881, he sold his farm in Grayson County, and bought a partially improved farm in Butler County, Ky., where he still resides.  The farm is now well improved. Mr. Byers was married March 6, 1851; to Mary Hayse, also a native of Grayson County, Ky., born April 13. 1830. She is a daughter of Caleb and Margaret (Putt) Hayse. Seven children have been the fruit of this union, five of whom—two sons and three daughters—are living, as follows; Angeline Squier (deceased),
Beesley, Sarah E. (deceased), Perry C., Martha J. (Legrande), Austin G. and Phoebe C.  Mr. Byers and wife, and most of the
children are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in which he has been a ruling elder for the past thirty years.  He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he is a Republican.

SAMUEL J. CALDWELL, Butler County, was born March 12, 1840, in this county, and is the son of James and Martha (Ried) Caldwell, The former was a native of this county; was born March 10, 1810; he was a wealthy farmer, and died in 1845. His father was George W. Caldwell, a native of Virginia, and who in early youth came to Logan County, now Butler, where he died about 1837. He was the son of Oliver Caldwell, who came from Scotland, and lived and died in Virginia. The father of subject, James Caldwell, married Martha Ried, a daughter of Cunningham and Peggy (Ewing) Ried, of Butler County. To them were born George W., William C, Samuel J., Daniel C. and Mary M (Mansfield). Samuel J. was brought up on a farm, and received but a limited education. He was married January 15, 1863, to Margaret R, daughter of William and Margaret (Wright) Caldwell. She was born September 30, 1839; and died December 3, 1872. This union was blessed with the birth of the following children: James W., Margaret L. and Lillie B. A coincidence in the history of this branch of the Caldwell family is the fact that subject, his wife, both their parents and their children were born and reared in the same house, and the homestead of the grandfather still remains in possession of the family. Mr. Caldwell is a man temperate in all his habits, industrious and economical. He owns 1,061 acres of improved land. His dwelling is one of the finest and best in the county, and his barns and other buildings are excellent; he has six barns, one of which is 161x50 feet, and twenty feet high to the eaves. He has also fifty acres in fruit, 200 pear trees and other varieties of fine fruit. He owns nearly 100 horses and mules, and 50 head of cattle. He deals in tobacco, and frequently has on hand at one time 400,000 pounds of the leaf. He is a member of the Masonic order, and in politics a Democrat.

WILLIAM B. CARDWELL was born in Butler County, Ky., July 20, 1841, and is a son of Robert and Nancy J. (Moore) Cardwell, both of whom were natives of Virginia, and of Irish and English descent respectively. When a young man, in about 1830, Robert Cardwell removed from Virginia to Butler County, Ky., then almost an unbroken wilderness. Here he was married, and engaged in agricultural pursuits all his life. He first rented a farm in the little bend of the Green River, below Morgantown, where he resided for several years, when he removed to a farm on Renfrew Creek, above Morgantown, where he remained some three or four years. He then bought a farm three miles and a half from Morgantown, where he resided until 1867, when he sold out and bought a farm north of the river on Welch's Creek, where he remained until his death, which occurred on the night of the 25th of April, 1877, in his 64th year. On that night his dwelling, with its entire contents, was destroyed by fire, in which he and his youngest daughter and youngest child were so severely burned that they died the following day. Mrs. Cardwell departed this life on the 15th of April, preceding the fire. Mr. Cardwell and wife were devoted church members, he of the Methodist Episcopal Church North, and she of the Cumberland Presbyterian; he was also member of the I. O. G. T., and an earnest advocate of the temperance cause. William B. Cardwell received only a limited common school education but has since acquired a good business education. He was employed on his father's farm until he was eighteen years of age, after which he was employed as a laborer for a few months. He then rented lands in Ohio County where he was employed until September. 1861, when he enlisted in Company C, Eleventh Kentucky Volunteer Infantry (Federal service), and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until the expiration of his term of service, being mustered out at Bowling Green, in December, 1864. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Stone River, Lookout Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain, the siege of Atlanta, siege of Knoxville, and many lesser engagements. After his return from the army he farmed on shares for several years. He then bought a partially improved farm of 102 acres, three miles east of Aberdeen, upon which he still resides. Since that time he has dealt quite extensively in real estate, and now owns well improved farms amounting to 217 acres. In February, 1884, he engaged in general merchandising at Aberdeen in connection with farming. He was married April 5, 1860, to Angeline Flener, also a native of Butler County, Ky.; born June 12, 1841. Twelve children have blessed their union, ten of whom, five sons and five daughters are living, viz.; William H., Paradine A., Luvenia A., Sarah A, F., Azro A., Alverado, Mary A., Siotha J., Leroy L., Robert L. Mr. Cardwell and wife are church members; he of the Methodist Episcopal and she of the United Baptist. He is also an earnest advocate of the temperance cause. In politics he is a stanch Republican.

HON. THOMAS C. CARSON is the son of William and Nancy (Porter) Carson; the former, a native of Campbell County, Va., was born in 1798 and removed to the southern part of Butler County, then Logan County, Ky., early in the century. His occupation was surveying and he was the first county surveyor of Butler after, its organization in 1810. He also assisted in the division of the county. Subject's mother was born in 1800. There were eight children in the family, of whom two are now living. The eldest was Lena, the wife of W. T. Martin, now deceased; Sally, wife of James Butler both deceased; Jackson, deceased: Oliver Cromwell, now residing in Bowling Green; Hon. T. C. Carson, the subject of this sketch; William P., deceased; Nancy, deceased; John M. William Carson followed farming and surveying until his death, which occurred in 1852, and was a gentleman of considerable wealth and influence in the county. Judge Thomas C. Carson was born in Butler County, April 2, 1823. He received a good common school education, and was brought up on the farm. In 1810 he was elected county judge, which position he has held four years. In 1881, Judge Carson and others organized the Butler County Bank (with an authorized capital of $100,000) of which he was elected president and. J. P. More, cashier. This is one of the most substantial institutions in the State, and since its organization has steadily increased its business. The judge has been twice married; first to Sarah E. daughter of William N. Wilson of Butler County, by whom be had five children: John M. Carson, married to Luli, daughter of the Hon. B. S. D. Guffy; Nancy P.; Alvina, the wife of E. T. Harreld, both deceased; Emma, deceased wife of J. E. Whitaker; and Mollie, deceased wife of J. E. Harreld. Mrs. Nancy Carson departed this life in 1873. The judge married as his second wife Martha Hughes of Tennessee, by whom there was born to him one son, Justus O. Mr. Carson owns a line farm in the Big Bend of the. Green River, also large interests in Morgantown, including real estate, stocks, etc. He and his family are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity, No. 272, and the Keystone Chapter, Hartford, Ky.

WILLIAM RUMSEY CHAPMAN, Butler County, was born December 6,1841, near Beaver Dam, Ohio County, where he grew to manhood, and in 1861 enlisted in Company C, Ninth Kentucky (Confederate) Infantry. He served during the war, and participated in the battles of Shiloh, Vicksburg, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga (in the last-named battle was wounded), Missionary Ridge, and was with Johnston in the campaign between Dalton and Atlanta. After the fall of Atlanta his regiment was mounted and attached to Gen. Wheeler's cavalry, and with them fought Gen. Sherman alt the way to Savannah. In the siege of the latter place he was the only member of Company C, Ninth Kentucky, participating in its defense, balance of company having been detailed on a scout and out off from the command. He was then detailed as provost guard, and surrendered at Charlotte, N. C.; took the oath of allegiance to the United States in Nashville, and in the following May returned home in 1869 he located in the southeast part of Butler County, where he has since resided. He received a good English education in his youth. He married, January 16, 1868, Mattie A.., daughter of Jacob W. and Emoline (McCoy) Mason, of this county, and born May 3, 1848. They have two children: Elfie R. and Olive M. In 1876 Mr. Chapman was appointed magistrate and member of the court of claims, which position he held by appointment and election for six years. He is a farmer, and has been brought up to the business of tilling the soil. He owns 250 acres of well improved land on Richland Creek. In politics he is a Democrat. He is a member of the Baptist Church. His father, Solomon Chapman, was born November 12, 1800, in Todd County; removed with his parents in childhood to Ohio County, where he died April 3, 1869. He was the son of Willis Chapman, a native of Sumter District, S. C, and who died in Missouri in 1858 at the age of eighty-eight years. Solomon Chapman married on the 8th of January, 1824, Sarah, daughter of Robert and Charlotte (Barnes) Render, of Ohio County, born March 11,1807, and died May 12, 1860. They had the following children: Artemiea (Taylor), now dead; Isaphenia E. (Wise); Willis N.,  deceased; Robert R., deceased; Elizabeth E. (Williams); Ellis M.; Marianna, deceased; subject; Cyrus F., deceased, and Sarah J., deceased.

PRESLEY M. CLARK, Butler County, was born March 6, 1829, in Vanderburgh County, Ind. He is a son of Isaac Clark, a native of Virginia, who at an early day located in Butler County, Ky, where he married Elizabeth Morris. .To this marriage was born one son, Presley M., and one daughter,-Elizabeth, who died in 1872.  Isaac Clark removed to Indiana about 1828, and remained there some years. After the death of his wife, Elizabeth, he returned to Kentucky, where he took a second wife, Eliza James, of Butler County; she" departed this life in 1865, surviving her. husband twenty-two years, he having died in 1843. During his lifetime he followed the trade of a bootmaker. Presley M., at the age of twenty-one years, began to learn the tanner's trade, which he followed two years. In 1850 he married Elizabeth, a daughter of James B. Reade, of Butler Co., Ky., and to them were born seven children: William W., Naomi, Mary F., James I., Iva, Jane and Edward. Mrs. Elizabeth (Reade) Clark died in 1873, after which in lo75 Mr. Clark married Mrs. Sarah F. Brisendine, of Butler County. She was a widow, and the mother of three children: Annie, James and Calvin. To her marriage with Mr. Clark were born four children: Robert L., Blanche, Doyle and Claybourne.  After his marriage in 1850 Mr. Clark bought 125 acres of land in Butler County, and has followed farming very successfully; so much so that in addition to the support of a large family he has amassed a good share of this world's goods and owns a farm of 176 acres of land, which he has  brought to a high state of cultivation, and improved with good dwelling, barns, fences, etc. The farm produces abundant crops of grain and tobacco, and is admirably adapted to grasses, which, with the water privileges, renders it valuable as a stock farm. Mr. Clark is a Democrat without political aspirations; the improvement of his land and the education of his children engage his attention. He, Mrs. Clark and three children are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which Mr. Clark is elder. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a Master Mason in Acacia Lodge, No. 212. He is strictly temperate, and lends his influence to the temperance cause.

FLEMING J. CLARK was born in Butler County, Ky., January 15, 1836, and is a son of Isaac and Eliza (James) Clark, the former of whom was a native of Virginia, and the latter a native of Ohio County, Ky; they were of English and Scotch descent respectively. When only a lad, Isaac Clark came with his parents to Butler County, where his early education was received and where he was married. The family settled on the Green River, about six miles below Cromwell.  In early life Isaac learned the shoe-making trade, which he continued to follow, in connection with farming, until his death, which occurred in the fall of 1842. He and wife were members of the Baptist church. Fleming J. Clark received a fair common school education in youth. His father died when he was only six years old, but he remained at home with his mother and step-father until he attained his majority, after which he was employed as a laborer on a farm for nearly a year. He then bought a partially improved farm in Ohio County, where he remained about eighteen months, when he sold out, and rented for one year in Ohio County.  After that he bought wild land on Sixe's Creek, in Butler County, and subsequently improved a farm, upon which he resided until 1871; he then bought a partially improved farm of 220 acres (a part of which he has since sold), upon which he now resides; the farm is in a fair state of cultivation. August, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Twelfth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry (Federal service), and served with that regiment in all its marches and engagements until May, 1863, when he was sent to the hospital at Louisville, where he remained until the following October, when he was transferred to the Invalid Corps, with which he served until the close of the war, being mustered out at Chicago, July 1, 1865. He was married November 11,. 1857, to Elizabeth Warren, a native of Garrard County, Ky.; born March 28, 1837. Three sons and five daughters have blessed their union, all of whom are living as follows: Fines W., Rosana, Nancy E., John R., Bruneta, Amanda, Ada and Thomas P. Mr. Clark and wife are members of the Christian Church, in which he has been a ruling elder for several years. In politics he was formerly a Republican, but is at present acting with the National Greenback party.

HENRY COHRON, Butler County was born August 31, 1833, in the southern part of this county, (where he grew to manhood and where he still resides. He is a son of John Cohron and Catherine Cohron, nee Johnson; the former was a native of Campbell
County, Va., and came with his parents to Logan County, Ky., September 15, 1797, where he lived many years, and died in 1877, at the age of eighty-five years; the latter was a native of Edmonson County, and died in 1876, aged eighty-five years. They had ten children, viz.: James, Polly (Ewing), Susan (Graham), Bettie (Howard), John, Adaline (Stringfield), Maria (Hill). William, Benjamin and Henry. Mr. Cohron was brought up on a farm, and had no educational advantages beyond the neighborhood schools. He was married January 27, 1859, to Mary A., daughter of Thomas and Thory (Richardson) Martin of this county, but born in Wilson County, Tenn. October 31, 1838.  This union has been without issue but they have adopted a son, Edward C. In 1865 Mr. Cohron enlisted in Company M, Seventeenth Kentucky (Federal) Cavalry, in which he served until the close of the war.  He is a farmer, and in politics a zealous Republican. The family are members of the Methodist Church.

JOHN N. CONWAY, Butler County, was born January 6, 1841, on Big Reedy Creek, in this county, where he grew to manhood and has always resided. In 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Eleventh Kentucky (Federal) Infantry, and was slightly wounded at the battle of Murfreesboro. He served three years and was honorably discharged. His father, William Conway, a native of Barren County, Kentucky, was born October 18, 1807, and is still living. He is the son of Thomas Conway, a native of Virginia, a Baptist minister, who was accidentally killed in the construction of the canal at Louisville, Ky., in 1829; his father was Thomas Conway, of Virginia, a celebrated Indian fighter. William (subject's father) married Mary, daughter of Rev. Isaac Embry. of this county, who was born in May, 1819. From this union sprang Melvina (Miller), John N., James M. (deceased), Nancy (Miller), Martha (Willis), William T. and Jane (Wilson). In youth John N. received a limited education but by studious habits has acquiried a fair business education. September 17, 1861, he was married to Miss Annie, daughter of J. A. and Nancy Jones of Butler County (born July 23, 1847). To them have been born John W., Thomas h. C, Joseph W., William F., Otis A. B., Drusilla B. (deceased), Theodore H., Lula J. and Catherine A. Mr. Conway served one term as magistrate, and member of court of claims of Butler County.  He is a farmer and owns 568 acres of well improved and productive land. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and for the past twelve years has been an elder in the Christian Church.

JOHN M. COOK, Butler County, was born in Ohio County, Ky., April 22, 1832, and is the third in a family of seven children born to James and Jane (Raines) Cook, both of whom were natives of Tennessee. James Cook was educated and married in his native State, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits all his life. He and his wife separated in Tennessee, and about 1830 or 1831, Mrs. Cook removed to Ohio County, with her family, and remained there for several years when subject was born to her and William Arnold. He retained the name of Cook from his mother. She then came to Butler County, and settled on Indian Camp Creek. For the last five or six years of her life she made her home among her children. Her death occurred in the fall of 1868. She was a member of no church but was nevertheless a devout Christian. John M. Cook received only a limited common school education in youth. As soon as he was able to work, the care and support of his mother and several younger brothers and sisters devolved mainly upon him. He left home and commenced life's battle for himself at the age of seventeen, being first employed as a laborer on a farm, which he continued until 1854. He then farmed on rented lands for some eight years. In 1862, he bought a partially improved farm of 100 acres on the Indian Camp Creek, Butler County, Ky., where he improved a farm and remained about six years. In 1868, he traded this place for another partially improved farm of 116 acres in the same neighborhood, where he has since improved the farm upon which he now resides, and to which he has added sixty acres. He was first married, in 1854, to Eliza J. Haney, a native of Butler County, Ky.  To this union were born two daughters, both of whom are living, viz.: Sarah J. Evans and Martha A. Daughety. Mrs. Eliza J. Cook departed this life in April, 1858, and Mr. Cook next married, April 24, 1859, Perlina J. Daughety, also a native of Butler County, Ky., born July 24, 1842, a daughter of William and Abigail (White) Daughety, both of whom were natives of Kentucky. Seven children were born to this union, six of whom, all sons, are living: John W. (deceased), Monroe, McClellan, William A., Stephen T., Robert L., and Joseph M.  Mr. Cook and wife have been for many years members of the United Baptist Church, In politics he is a Democrat.  He was formerly a member of the Grange.

 


 

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