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Desha
It is stated in the Kentucky Reporter of the 14th ult., that the trial of Desha, the son of the Governor for the murder of Francis Baker has closed and that the Jury has brought in a verdict of Guilty. A full report of the trial is to be published by James G. Dana and James Cowan, Esqrs. – York Gazette. [Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) February 23, 1825; Submitted by Nancy Piper]

Desha’s Trial
This all exciting trial terminated on Monday the 31st ult., by a verdict from the jury of Guilty.  Judge Shannon, who presided, had granted a new trial on motion, on the grounds that there were persons who had access to the jury after their retirement, improperly; that threats had been made of personal violence against the jurors, unless they condemned the prisoner. (Those threats were made by one or two anonymous letters thrust under the door of their room; and by persons outside the house.) Also on the ground that the sheriff remained a part of the time with the jury, in their retirement, improperly, and on the general and most important ground, that the verdict was not warranted by the evidence of the case. These are such grounds as no Judge could disregard, with the least respect to justice or precedent; and in granting a new trial, Judge Shannon has shown his firmness and uprightness. We believe the general opinion is unfavorable to the prisoner in this case.  But however strong may be the evidence against him, he is entitled to a fair trial.  His friends cannot ask more, nor could his enemies grant less. – Kentucky Gazette.   [Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 9 1825 Submitted by Nancy Piper]

Trial of Desha
We have received from Lexington, Kentucky, an extra Gazette containing Judge Shannon’s opinion on the subject of granting a new trial in the case of the Commonwealth vs. Desha, indicted for the murder of Baker.  It contains ten columns of closely printed matter, in which the Judge undertakes to show from the evidence, that Desha could not have been the murderer of Baker – nay, he strongly intimates his suspicions, that the witnesses on the part of the prosecution who first discovered the dead body, were themselves the perpetrators of this sanguinary deed.  In the whole of this long comment but one column is given to a consideration of the reasons for a new trial, which were, improper deportment on the part of the sheriff and jury – the rest is occupied by a consideration of the evidence presented on the trial.  Of this extensive matter, the following is a comprehensive analysis.  On the 2d of November, Baker breakfasted at a tavern kept by a Mr. Duggett, and rode off in a state of intoxication.  Desha had arrived at the tavern the preceding evening about sunset and on the next day they departed together, both on horseback. Soon afterwards, the mare on which Baker rode (testified so by two of the witnesses, but disbelieved by the Judge) with a saddle and bridle on came to Ball’s, a place four miles distant from the other and was caught by a man by the name of Milton Ball, supposing some rider had been thrown from his horse.  He testifies that he shortly afterwards met Desha’s horse destitute of a rider also, with a saddle on but no bridle, and shortly after, met Desha himself with a pair of saddle bags on his arm, who mounted the mare, took the deponent up behind him and returned to the house of the deponent’s father.  Desha departed, taking with him both the horse and the mare to the house of his father.  This took place according to this testimony on the 2d of November.  On the 8th of that month, the body of the deceased was found between Ball’s and Doggett’s by Milton Ball, about fifty yards from and in sight of the public road, lying by the side of a log, and the side next to the road, with the throat cut from ear to ear, and with other marks of violence, exhibiting every symptom of a recent murder.  The features were natural – there was no swelling of the body, and no offensive evidence of putrescence. This is the ground on which the Jude doubts that the murder was committed at the time that Desha was seen with the mare: the body must have lain in that exposed state for seven days. Desha states that he purchased the mare and saddle bags of the deceased, for which he gave him his note, and returned riding her and leading his horse – that his horse pulled away from him, and in so doing, tore a rag from his finger which had been cut the day before – that he dismounted to obtain the rag, and to adjust it to his finger, and while he was doing this, the mare also escaped.  He states that he followed them on until he was overtaken by Ball in the manner as described by the witness.  In this way he accounts for the blood upon the bridle. – Balt. Amer.   [Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 30, 1825 Submitted by Nancy Piper]
 

Baker - Howard Feud
Five more murders have resulted from the Baker-Howard feud in Kentucky.  Saturday, George Baker was shot and killed by members of the Howard faction, while on his way to town.  Sunday, Alex Baker and his brothers went to Howard’s home, called the old man out and shot him to death, and then finished their work of revenge by killing his wife and two children, after which they fled to the mountains. [Moro Leader (Moro, OR) – Wednesday, April 20, 1898 - Submitted by Jim Dezotell; January 2014]


Desha
It is stated in the Kentucky Reporter of the 14th ult., that the trial of Desha, the son of the Governor for the murder of Francis Baker has closed and that the Jury has brought in a verdict of Guilty. A full report of the trial is to be published by James G. Dana and James Cowan, Esqrs. – York Gazette. [Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) February 23, 1825; Submitted by Nancy Piper]

Desha’s Trial
This all exciting trial terminated on Monday the 31st ult., by a verdict from the jury of Guilty.  Judge Shannon, who presided, had granted a new trial on motion, on the grounds that there were persons who had access to the jury after their retirement, improperly; that threats had been made of personal violence against the jurors, unless they condemned the prisoner. (Those threats were made by one or two anonymous letters thrust under the door of their room; and by persons outside the house.) Also on the ground that the sheriff remained a part of the time with the jury, in their retirement, improperly, and on the general and most important ground, that the verdict was not warranted by the evidence of the case. These are such grounds as no Judge could disregard, with the least respect to justice or precedent; and in granting a new trial, Judge Shannon has shown his firmness and uprightness. We believe the general opinion is unfavorable to the prisoner in this case.  But however strong may be the evidence against him, he is entitled to a fair trial.  His friends cannot ask more, nor could his enemies grant less. – Kentucky Gazette.   [Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 9 1825 Submitted by Nancy Piper]

Trial of Desha
We have received from Lexington, Kentucky, an extra Gazette containing Judge Shannon’s opinion on the subject of granting a new trial in the case of the Commonwealth vs. Desha, indicted for the murder of Baker.  It contains ten columns of closely printed matter, in which the Judge undertakes to show from the evidence, that Desha could not have been the murderer of Baker – nay, he strongly intimates his suspicions, that the witnesses on the part of the prosecution who first discovered the dead body, were themselves the perpetrators of this sanguinary deed.  In the whole of this long comment but one column is given to a consideration of the reasons for a new trial, which were, improper deportment on the part of the sheriff and jury – the rest is occupied by a consideration of the evidence presented on the trial.  Of this extensive matter, the following is a comprehensive analysis.  On the 2d of November, Baker breakfasted at a tavern kept by a Mr. Duggett, and rode off in a state of intoxication.  Desha had arrived at the tavern the preceding evening about sunset and on the next day they departed together, both on horseback. Soon afterwards, the mare on which Baker rode (testified so by two of the witnesses, but disbelieved by the Judge) with a saddle and bridle on came to Ball’s, a place four miles distant from the other and was caught by a man by the name of Milton Ball, supposing some rider had been thrown from his horse.  He testifies that he shortly afterwards met Desha’s horse destitute of a rider also, with a saddle on but no bridle, and shortly after, met Desha himself with a pair of saddle bags on his arm, who mounted the mare, took the deponent up behind him and returned to the house of the deponent’s father.  Desha departed, taking with him both the horse and the mare to the house of his father.  This took place according to this testimony on the 2d of November.  On the 8th of that month, the body of the deceased was found between Ball’s and Doggett’s by Milton Ball, about fifty yards from and in sight of the public road, lying by the side of a log, and the side next to the road, with the throat cut from ear to ear, and with other marks of violence, exhibiting every symptom of a recent murder.  The features were natural – there was no swelling of the body, and no offensive evidence of putrescence. This is the ground on which the Jude doubts that the murder was committed at the time that Desha was seen with the mare: the body must have lain in that exposed state for seven days. Desha states that he purchased the mare and saddle bags of the deceased, for which he gave him his note, and returned riding her and leading his horse – that his horse pulled away from him, and in so doing, tore a rag from his finger which had been cut the day before – that he dismounted to obtain the rag, and to adjust it to his finger, and while he was doing this, the mare also escaped.  He states that he followed them on until he was overtaken by Ball in the manner as described by the witness.  In this way he accounts for the blood upon the bridle. – Balt. Amer.   [Republican Compiler (Gettysburg, Pennsylvania) March 30, 1825 Submitted by Nancy Piper]


Baker - Howard Feud
Five more murders have resulted from the Baker-Howard feud in Kentucky.  Saturday, George Baker was shot and killed by members of the Howard faction, while on his way to town.  Sunday, Alex Baker and his brothers went to Howard’s home, called the old man out and shot him to death, and then finished their work of revenge by killing his wife and two children, after which they fled to the mountains. [Moro Leader (Moro, OR) – Wednesday, April 20, 1898 - Submitted by Jim Dezotell; January 2014]



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