LAUREL VALLEY PLANTATION

Photos by Debbie Terry

The Structures

 Quarters Section



Shotgun Quarters



Double Creole Quarters

Boom Crane used for unloading Sugar

HISTORY

The land that Laurel Plantation still exists upon originally belonged to Etienne  Boudreaux. It was given to him in  a land grant in 1783.  It is one of the largest surviving sugar plantations still standing in the south today. The village included over 105 structures of which over 60 buildings of which includes a schoolhouse, sugar mills, store, and blacksmith shop among other numerous slave homes and outhouses remain today. The main plantation house was burned down by Union soldiers.  The old sugar mill is a shell slowly crumbling.

 By 1832 the land was purchased by Joseph W. Tucker who bought nearby land and used his slaves to maintain his fields.  By 1850 Joseph Tucker had 162 slaves  on Laurel Valley Plantation. After his death on July 9, 1852 from Cholera, his son's, Joseph Pennington, and William Pleasant tried to maintain the property. Joseph Pennington took over the management in 1869.

Children of Joseph W Tucker and Marcelline:

Joseph Pennington--Oct 10, 1835 died Nov 11, 1899

Henrietta -- August 6, 1840 died Oct 13, 1899

Laura Emily-- Dec 17, 1851

Mary Louise-- Jan 7, 1844 died Apr 28, 1973

William Pleasant-- born Feb 28, 1846 died July 9, 1909

Charleton Beatty  --Dec 31, 1847 died Nov 30, 1876

 

 The widow of Joseph, Marcelline Emma Gaude Tucker remarried a cousin of her former husband Caleb Jackson Tucker and had a daughter named Louise born in the year 1858. Marcelline died March 8, 1859.

The Village would soon change hands again in 1870's, having been sold to Zuberbier & Behan of Lafourche Parish, they too would soon sell the Plantation Village. On January 12, 1893 Laurel Valley Plantation Village was again sold at a public auction. It was  bought by J W Lepine and Frank Barker. The plantation by this time was a total of 3, 023 acres. In the year 1903 Frank Barker died leaving the sole owner as Lepine. After the death of J W Lepine, his son J Wilson Lepine, Jr took over the management of the plantation. The depression became the downfall of the sugar plantations, and it was not until 1950 that the plantation was put back in full order.

Article in 1892:: Laurel Valley is in a high-class condition, with a prospect of a splendid crop the present season, and will continue under the management of that able and enlightened planter, Mr. Richard Burton. Unless unforeseen accidents occur, Laurel Valley will give a good account of herself at the end of the present agricultural year.

 

In 1915 Mr. J. W. Lepine owned and operated Laurel Valley and invented a tractor that enabled him to plant faster than by using mules.

 

source: Louisiana and the Sugar Planter

"The elaborately wainscoted central hall runs 84 feet and is 12 feet wide. The ceilings are 14 feet high. The front porch is characterized by ornamental Victorian carpentry. The building, as it now exists, represents two major periods of construction: the first under Burch A. Wormald who in 1884 employed Andrew Downey, a New Orleans carpenter, to build a residence; and a second during the Barker-Lepine years, primarily from 1903 to 1912. Members of the Lepine family have lived here since 1893".source: Library of Congress

Known slaves of Laurel Valley
{resources freedmen records}

Names of applicants: David Singleton, Freedman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 0. No. of acres wanted: 20. Location: Johnson or Tucker Plantations, Parish Lafourche. Means: 1 Horse, a share worth $200 in a crop of cane, corn, potatoes, hogs, etc. Remarks: Has a son in U.S. Army.

Names of applicants: Isaac Goodrich, Freedman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 0. No. of acres wanted: 30. Location: Johnson or Tucker Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: Share worth $200 in a crop of cane & cotton, besides corn, potatoes, hogs &c. Remarks: Has a son in U.S. Army.

Names of applicants: Abraham Taylor, Freedman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 2. No. of acres wanted: 30. Location: Johnson or Tucker Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: Share worth $200 in a crop of cane & cotton, besides corn, potatoes, hogs &c.

Names of applicants: Abraham Beasle, Freedman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 1. No. of acres wanted: 20. Location: R. Tucker Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: $100 in cash. Remarks: Has been 2 years in U.S. Army.

Names of applicants: Josiah Powell, Freedman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 1. No. of acres wanted: 20. Location: R. Tucker Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: One mule and share of cotton crop worth $200, corn, potatoes, hogs &c.

Names of applicants: William Lucas, Freedman (see no. 46). Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 0. No. of acres wanted: 40. Location: R. Tucker or Johnson Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: $70 due him for labor, 2 acres corn, potatoes, hogs &c.

Names of applicants: Henry Beander, Freedman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 2. No. of acres wanted: 40. Location: Tucker or Johnson Plantations, Parish Lafourche. Means: One horse, $70 in cash, a share worth $200 in a crop of cotton & cane besides corn, potatoes, hogs &c.

Names of applicants: Charles Hatton, Danl. Robinson and 8 others, Freedmen. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 22nd, 1865. No. of men: 10. No. of women: 10. No of children: 25. No. of acres wanted: 250. Location: R. Tucker of Johnson Plantations, Parish Lafourche. Means: Nine horses, one mule, a crop of cane and cotton estimated worth $4,000. Individual crops of corn, potatoes &c., hogs, fowls, etc

Names of applicants: Jack Jesiman. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 12th, 1865. No. of men: 1. No. of women: 1. No. of children: 1. No. of acres wanted: 40. Location: Robert Tucker Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: One mule, one horse and $200. Remarks: Has lived on the place many years.

Names of applicants: Peter Mathews and 9 others, Freedmen. Date: Thibodeaux, La., Sept. 18th, 1865. No. of men: 9. No. of women: 9. No. of children: 23. No. of acres wanted: 360. Location: Geo. Tucker Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: 6 mules, one horse, a crop of cane worth $4,000, 70 acres of corn, 25 cotton, 20 potatoes. Remarks: cultivated a part of the place this year

Names of applicants: William Lucus and 5 other Freedmen (see no 64). Date: New Orleans, Sept. 9th/65. No. of men: 6. No. of women and children: 20. No. of acres wanted: 200. Location: Laurel Valley Plantation, Parish Lafourche. Means: (blank).

 

Cemetery on Laurel Valley Land Coming Soon

Old Fountain Missionary Baptist Church Coming Soon

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Photos Copyright 2009 Debbie S Terry
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