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HEROES - NEGROES TO WHOM THE CARNEGIE HERO FUND HAS MADE AWARDS

By Frank Lincoln Mather, 1915
submitted by C. Anthony

John B. Hill, a coachman, on account of injuries received in stopping a runaway team hitched to a landau containing a child and its maid, at Atlanta, Ga., December 1, 1905, received a bronze medal and $500.

George A. Grant, teamster, sustained fatal injures in attempting to stop a runaway team at Groton, Connecticut, January 23, 1906. The award was a silver medal and $25 a month for support of his widow during her life or until she remarries, with $5 a month additional for each of the four children until each reaches the age of sixteen.

Theodore H. Homer, a waiter in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, August 2, 1908, rescued an eight-year-old child from a runaway. He received a bronze medal and $500 for educational purposes as needed.

Albert K. Sweet, machinist, attempted to save four children from drowning at Norwood, Rhode Island, February 17, 1909. He received a bronze medal.

George E. McCune, porter, saved a two-year-old child from being run over by a train at Garden City, Kansas, February 19, 1909. He received a bronze medal and $500 for educational purposes as needed.

Martha Generals, housewife at Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, July 29, 1906, rescued a nine-year-old child from electric shock. The child had grasped an electric light wire and was unable to release his hold. She received a bronze medal, and twenty dollars a month during her life.

Harley Tomlinson, farmer, died assisting in an attempt to save another farmer, Oscar Colson, from drowning in the Yadkin River, Norwood, North Carolina, August 3, 1909. His widow received a bronze medal and $15 a month support during life, or until she remarries, with $2 a month additional for each of the three children until each reaches the age of sixteen.

Frank Forest, farmer, for assisting in the attempt to save Oscar Colson and helping to save Henry C. Myers, was given a bronze medal and $500.

James L. Smith, puddler, at Sistersville, West Virginia, October 28, 1909, rescued a two-year-old child from a burning house. He received a silver medal and $1,000 toward the purchase of a farm.

Boyce Lindsay, a sixteen-year-old boy at Spartanburg, South Carolina, May 28, 1910, saved an eleven-year-old white child from being run over by a train. He received a bronze metal and $2,000 to be used for his education.

John G. Walker, drayman, at Madison, Georgia, June 27, 1909, rescued from a runaway, Oscar W. Butler, mayor and lawyer, Green Thomas, laborer; William G. O'Bear, Quartermaster General State Malitia of Georgia; Legare H. O'Bear, and Julia H. O'Bear. He received a bronze medal and $500 toward buying a home.

Charles A. Smith, laborer, attempted to save Theodore Dilhof, laborer, from suffocation in a sewer at Cincinnati, Ohio, November 26, 1910. He received a bronze medal and $1,000 towards the purchase of a home.

Mack Stallworth, oil tank cleaner at Port Arthur, Texas, June 25, 1910, died, saving Squire Bradford from suffocation. Bradford was overcome in a tank car by gas which had formed in it. Stallworth entered the car through a fifteen-inch opening, seized Bradford, and lifted him up so that two men on the outside of the car could reach him. Stallworth was overcome by gas and suffocated before
he could be rescued. His widow received a bronze medal and thirty dollars a month for life or until she remarries, with five dollars a month additional for her son until he reaches the age of sixteen.

James Pruitt, a farmer at Walhalla, South Carolina, May 20,1911, saved Fritz F. Muller and attempted to save William Riehle from suffocation in a well. Pruitt was awarded a silver medal and $500 toward the purchase of a farm.

James Hunter, a farmer, at Walhalla, South Carolina, May 20, 1911, attempted to save William Riehle from suffocation. Hunter received a bronze medal and $500 toward the purchase of a farm.

Nathan Duncan, a farmer and well digger, at West Point, Texas, August 5, 1907, rescued William C. Anderson, a well digger, from a cave-in in well. Duncan received a gold medal and $2,000 toward the purchase of a farm.

Nathan Record, a farmer, at Letot, Texas, May 24, 1908, helped to save Luther F., Anna, and Nettie L. McClanahan and Dorris A. Stafford from drowning. Record received a bronze medal and $1,000 towards the purchase of a farm.

Lucy G. Edwards, nurse, rescued a seven-year-old child from a rabid dog, Chattanooga, Tenn., May 21,1912. She received a bronze medal.

Elbert Gray, sixteen-year-old school boy, at Canton, Texas, saved a two-year-old child from drowning in a well thirteen inches in diameter and 60 feet deep, which contained 18 inches of water. He received a bronze medal and $2,000 for educational purposes as needed.

Nolden Townsell, aged sixteen, porter, saved a four-year-old child from being run over by an auto truck at Waco, Texas, February 1, 1912. He received a bronze medal and $2,000 for educational purposes as needed.

Arthur Lockett, fireman, saved a three-year-old child from being run over by a train, May 9,1912, at Jefferson, Georgia. He received a silver medal and $1,000 for a worthy purpose as needed.

Lockett was in the cab of a locomotive running 25 miles an hour when his attention was attracted by a scream from the engineer. He saw a child on the track 150 feet ahead of the loeomotive. Although the locomotive was swaying under an emergency application of the brakes, Lockett ran along the running board, jumped to the steam chest, thence to the bumper-timber, and when the pilot was less than 10 feet from the child jumped to the track in front of the locomotive which was then running eight or nine miles an hour. He fell forward as he struck the ground and grabbed the child as he fell. With two strong, quick jerks, he threw himself and the child off the track to safety. The locomotive was stopped when the pilot was 35 feet beyond the point of rescue.

Beecher Roberts, a seventeen-year-old farm hand, helped to rescue Thomas Ashcraft, colored, from a 65-feet-deep cave-in well, Tyler, Texas, April 16,1912. He received a bronze medal and $500 for a worthy purpose as needed.

Roberts reached the well after two white men had been down in the well to remove the sand, which partially covered Ashcraft. He was asked to assist, which he immediately did; descended into the well, removed some sand from round Ashcraft's legs, and then tied the rope to Ashcraft Another rope was lowered to Roberts and both men were drawn up. See also under awards to white persons for saving Negroes, mention of the two white men, Wills and Gregory.





 


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